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More disturbing news about coach Alberto Salazar of the Nike Oregon Project and what about Nike’s founder and billionaire Phil Knight

There has been much talk about Alberto Salazar and the Nike Oregon Project lately but let's not forget about mister NIKE Phil Knight.  

Just this week teenage super star Mary Cain said her career was ruined by Salazar and Nike. She was mentally abused by coach Salazar when she was part of the Nike Oregon Project. Nike knew what was going on.  

Let’s not forget who Nike is. Phil Knight built Nike into the giant company it is today. He was running things day to day at Nike when the Oregon Project was started in 2001. I am sure he pushed coach Salazar to do whatever it took for their athletes to win races.

Phil Knight ran over a lot of people and companies as he built Nike. Today he is worth over 31 billion dollars and growing. Nike stock is trading near an all time high. I am sure their $250 racing shoes must be helping. A shoe that many feel should be ban. I am sure they did not have it tested or looked at by the world’s governing body (IAAF) before they released it. They just put it on the market. That’s the Phil Knight way. That’s the Salazar way.

I am not a fan of either men. Nor am I a fan of Nike. They tired to destroy my magazine Runner’s World in the early 80’s because I would not rate their shoe number one. This is another story I have told before.  

That’s in the past and I have moved on. But things that have been going on more recently can’t be overlooked.

Nike’s power is overwhelming. They think they can do whatever they want. They are still even supporting Salazar, a long-time friend of Phil Knight. Yet Salazar has been banned for four years for doping violations. Should have been a lifetime ban.

How can we continue to turn our back on this? We can’t. We can’t just continue to buy their shoes, making Phil Knight and family even richer.

In response to Mary Cain’s allegations of forced weight loss and public shaming by former coach Alberto Salazar at a now-disbanded Nike-supported running program, Nike has started an investigation into the matter.

When asked for comment regarding Cain’s allegations Friday, a Nike spokesman issued the following statement: “These are deeply troubling allegations which have not been raised by Mary or her parents before. Mary was seeking to rejoin the Oregon Project and Alberto’s team as recently as April of this year and had not raised these concerns as part of that process. We take the allegations extremely seriously and will launch an immediate investigation to hear from former Oregon Project athletes. At Nike, we seek to always put the athlete at the center of everything we do, and these allegations are completely inconsistent with our values.”

Cain’s also claimed that Nike needs to change because it “controls all the top coaches, athletes, races and even the governing body,” and there is a need for more women to be in charge.Nike response seems rather vague to me.  What do you think we should do? Thanks Mary Cain for sharing your story. That was very brave. 

(11/08/2019) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson (Founder Runner’s World and My Best Runs)
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Nike has shut down the Oregon Project after Alberto Salazar was banned for four years for doping violations

Nike has shut down its elite Oregon Project (OP) long-distance running operation less than two weeks after head coach Alberto Salazar was banned for four years, a company spokesperson told CNN.

Salazar was banned for "multiple anti-doping rule violations" following a four-year investigation by the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

Nike says it took the decision to wind down the OP as the situation has become an "unfair burden" on its athletes.

"Nike has always tried to put the athlete and their needs at the front of all of our decisions," a spokesperson told CNN.

"While the panel found there was no orchestrated doping, no finding that performance-enhancing drugs have ever been used on Oregon Project athletes and went out of its way to note Alberto's desire to follow all rules, ultimately Alberto can no longer coach while the appeal is pending.

"This situation including uninformed innuendo and unsubstantiated assertions has become an unfair burden for current OP athletes. That is exactly counter to the purpose of the team.

"We have therefore made the decision to wind down the Oregon Project to allow the athletes to focus on their training and competition needs. We will help all of our athletes in this transition as they choose the coaching set up that is right for them."

The Nike Oregon Project is a prolific training group that has produced some of the world's best athletes, including Mo Farah, who Salazar coached to four Olympic gold medals between 2011 and 2017.

Salazar, 61, and Jeffrey Brown, a consultant doctor for the NOP, were ruled to have trafficked testosterone, tampered with the doping control process and administered a banned intravenous infusion.

Nike told CNN it "will continue to support Alberto in his appeal," which has been taken to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland.

”Maybe this confirms that NIKE really did know what was going on and in fact might have been the moving force pushing Salazar to do some things he otherwise would not have done,” wonders Bob Anderson.  “However NIKE is too big of a powerhouse for us to ever know the real story.  Why would they close this program and leave many elite runners out in the cold?”  

(10/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Just don’t understand why Nike would close down this program unless there is a back story they want to “hide”? 10/11 11:35 am


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54-year-old James Kalani from Los Gatos California ran and logged the most miles for Run The World Challenge 6 which started July 3 and finished September 10

Run The World Challenge 6 just ended Tuesday September 10.  The ten week challenge attracted many runners and miles were logged in 14 countries. 

The idea of the challenge, which was started by lifetime runner Bob Anderson, is to run or walk and then log all your miles on the My Best Runs website. Many participants also posted a photo and comments every day like James Kalani and several others in the Run The World Feed. A total of 11,660 miles were logged during the ten weeks by the team.  That is 166 miles daily.  

James Kalani finished first with 1329 miles run and logged over the periiod which started July 3, 2019.  35-year-old Eliud Esinyen from Kenya was second with 1181 miles.  74-year-old Frank Bozanich finished 4th with 773 miles and Rosaline Nyawira from Kenya was first woman with 744 miles. 

James started running at birth.  "My mother says. I have always run. But due to  chronic bronchitis and asthma, as well as numerous allergies, I was limited to how long I could run as a juvenile," James says. 

In high school, he would run a sub five minute mile every few days, but couldn't be on the track team because he could not practice daily.

"I started jogging as an adult. When I went back to college as an adult for 15 years, running was a stress relief and a necessity. I would ramp up running from 10 to 20 miles in just a couple of months and would be marathon ready in a few months," James continued.

He ran sub-3 hour marathons at one point.

He has always taken breaks from serious running.

"I do what time, attitude, and my mind and body dictate. I tend to be hard on my body while running.  I think I have overcome a lot of those pitfalls however.  I know I can't compete and be happy all the time."

"Running makes me happy and to compete takes some joy out of it.  I guess that makes me a bit of a soul runner. I just love to run and it's cheaper than therapy."

He set a goal to average 20 miles per day for this challenge.  He did not make 20 but was not far from it.  So how did he average over 130 miles per week?

"Since I work early morning, I am home in the early afternoons. I regulated my diet (that is a huge part).  I literally snack a lot. Making sure I am over 5000 calories per day. I started yoga and meditation as a run ritual before and after as well as foam rolling and icing.

"Then I rest for awhile and then I do a shot of Irish whiskey daily to get my blood sugar back up so I could continue to move after a run.

"I used this challenge to push myself to find my threshold in running, something that competitive running can't do for me.

"I now love variations of runs - hills, mountains, trails, and streets. Believe it or not, streets gives me a great chance to not become mesmerized during your run. It makes you keep your head on a swivel...

"Since I have never strayed from athletic activities or running, getting to my peak only takes months. It's all about how much you want something and learning how to listen to your body.

So how did your body hold up?  "Mid-challenge, I started to have knee issues related to my IT Band... foam rolling, icing, rest, and changing running style got me through it. I am a firm believer in holistic medicine and this time I tried various things...

"CBD oil GREATLY helped with post-run swelling," he says.

You were running on an average of three hours everyday for 70 days.  How did you handle your diet?

"I never stopped snacking. I eat one piece of fruit daily at work, a lot of grains, pasta (pasta 4-5 days per week), spinach... high carbs, relatively low proteins. Not a lot of meat and beans take the place of extra protein. I have found that eating colorful food (not much processed) makes a big difference too. 

"Lots of nuts like sunflower, cashews, and almonds. Cheese is also my endurance choice."

So what do you think about this challenge?

"I love this challenge. This challege over the past year filled a hole or "need" in my life. The older I get, the more I like to test what I am capable of. Posting keeps my mind active on the goal. It's fun to turn on the run gps app, start running, snap a few pictures, and remember the run in detail.. doing that helps me recap runs and select the ones I loved to do again with small changes.

"I changed routes so many times living back in Los Gatos because I had been away from here for 23 years.  I was like a kid in a candy store.. I was fueled by memories and locations of my youth. I ran 54 miles from San Francisco (Oyster Point) back to Los Gatos.. It is fun to look back on that... my first 50-miler...as well as my first 40 to Gilroy."

So what are your plans?

"I am getting back to races.  I am taking on running for charity again, but with a twist. I have been trying to run with an altitude trainer mask so I can breathe through a mask. The better shape I get in I can also regulate my body temperature under a lycra body suit. Yes, a costume. I am using volunteer running to earn funds for childrens and veterans charities. I am also going to go back to training other runners."

On that note, what advice do you have for others?

"Run with a purpose.. run for fun, and run for the sheer joy of it. Regulate your diet.. take in lots of it.. but stay away from big meals. Stay hydrated. Work on breathing. Elevation variations are VERY important for strength and endurance. Mind the cross training (I run with a 20 pound vest a couple days a week). Calisthenics are your friend. Just keep moving, but know when to stretch, ice, and rest. Yoga and meditation helped me immensely.. make it a serious part of your daily routine (maintain flexibility). Never run on the same side of the road...it can lead to knee problems," says James.

James Kalani is one amazing runner.

"Our next ten week RTW challenge starts September 11 and we hope to better the miles we just covered," says Bob Anderson.  There is no entry fee and there is no cost to have a My Best Runs account where the miles (k's) are logged.

(09/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Run The World Global Challenge 7

Run The World Global Challenge 7

Run The World Global Challenge is a world wide celebration of running. Here is he link for the official results of Run The World 52-Week Challenge. Congrats to all our participants. RTW Challenge #7 is a 10 week program starting September 11, 2019 and ending 11:59pm Tuesday November 19, 2019 (California USA time). There is no entry fee. You log...

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The weather was perfect for this year’s San Francisco Marathon and Half Marathons

There is a new men’s champion at the San Francisco Marathon for the first time since 2016.

After Jorge Maravilla won the race in each of the last two years, Gregory Billington captured the 42nd edition of the event Sunday with a time of two hours, 25 minutes and 25 seconds. He averaged a blistering pace of five minutes and 33 seconds per mile, which put him ahead of Maravilla’s second-place time of two hours, 29 minutes and 28 seconds.

On the women’s side, Nina Zarina jumped out to an early lead and won without much drama with a time of two hours, 47 minutes and one second.

She completed the course well ahead of second-place finisher Eleanor Meyer (two hours, 52 minutes and 16 seconds) and the rest of the field. Zarina added another accomplishment to her 2019 resume after being named the female global champion at the Wings for Life World Run in Switzerland in May.

It appeared in the first portion of the race as if Maravilla would join her in the winner’s circle when he paced the field through the first 5.5 miles.

However, Billington pulled even by the halfway mark before turning on the jets and building a comfortable lead:

There would be no doubt from there, as the American maintained and added to his lead through the back half of the course and prevented Maravilla from three-peating in the Bay Area.

Billington, Zarina and the rest of the runners started at 5:30 a.m. PT at Mission Street and The Embarcadero on a 26.2-mile course, which is a Boston Marathon and Olympic time trials qualifying race.

The finish line was at Folsom Street and the Embarcadero but only after runners went past a number of San Francisco landmarks and neighborhoods. Runners went past the famous piers and Fisherman’s Wharf, through the Presidio, through Golden Gate Park, across the Golden Gate Bridge and past Oracle Park, where the San Francisco Giants play.

They dealt with a total elevation gain of about 1,175 feet in a city that is known for its hills, further testing their endurance and strength on a grueling course.

Ultra superstar Michael Wardian won the 52.4 mile Ultra (that’s two SF marathons).  Pictured with MBR  Director Bob Anderson who clocked 1:46:42 at age 71 for the second Half race good enough for first 65 plus. 

(07/28/2019) ⚡AMP
Bob Anderson, Michael Wardian
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San Francisco Marathon Weekend

San Francisco Marathon Weekend

The 42nd running of The San Francisco Marathon (Full Marathon, 1st Half Marathon, 2nd Half Marathon, 5K and Ultra marathon) will fill San Francisco’s streets. The course is both challenging and rewarding. You’ll enjoy waterfront miles along the Embarcadero, Fisherman’s Wharf, and Crissy Field; feel your heart pound as you race across the Golden Gate Bridge; speed past landmarks like...

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Indian’s Dharam Singh claims to be 121-years-old and is still running races

Dharam Singh says he was born October 6th, 1897 and has run more marathons than he can remember.  But is he 121? He does not have a birth  certificate but does have three forms of government issued ID. 

According to Robert Young of the Gerontology Research Group, only about 1,000 people have been verified as living past 110.  Of these people, only about 10 percent are male.  The number of people over 120 is even a much smaller number.  

However, Dharam Singh says himself he has no doubt that he was born in 1897.  (Click on the link to view the video and see what you think.) 

"When I was young, I used to run from my village to the neighboring village, which was about 600 to 700 meters away. I would run several laps. I did not know how to run then, the technique of it, but I did it on instinct," he says.

Today he gets up at 4 am and runs four kilometers daily.

To date, Gujjar has taken part in more than three dozen races in different parts of India. 

Singh has lost count of the number of marathons that he has run. However, he recollects running marathons in these cuties of India.  Allahabad, Nainital, Uttarakhand and Chandigarh, and claims to have run in 50 others. He says he ran his first marathon in 1970.

Running races over 90 is quite a feat by itself.  But running races over the age of 110?.  Well, that’s considered to be impossible.

Of course, that was until Dharam Singh made it into that age bracket.

It’s a bit hard to believe when so many people barely make it to 100 years old how he has managed to keep running?

Regardless of how old people believe Mr. Singh really is, it doesn’t discredit the root of his message. “Stay active, take care of your body, keep exploring, and if you’re given the chance to live out on the edges of your comfort zone, do it! These are simple concepts. Yet, they’ve gotten me pretty far,” he says.  

But if you’re at all concerned about the veracity of his age, don’t worry; there are still plenty of wise, powerful elders running around inspiring us.

Often, the best life advice comes from those who have lived so long and whose lives have just begun. There’s always simplicity to their advice.

In 2017, National Geographic did a special episode in their Explorer series investigating his life and success as a runner in such an advanced age.

When asked about his continued fitness, he says it is all about having a controlled diet. He has led a strict healthy lifestyle since childhood and gives credit to his balanced diet of self-prepared chutneys along with mineral water and lemon juice for his longevity. "I eat a strict and balanced diet and have no illness. I stopped eating ghee and other fatty items almost 40 years ago, neither do I drink or smoke," he said. He has been a strict vegetarian since birth.

Singh claims of being 121 years old has generated much controversy. While Gudha refers to his passport, voter ID Card and PAN card [a tax identification in India]—all stating 1897 as his year of birth, and all three government of India-issued valid identity documents—asserting he is 121 years old, he does not have a birth certificate to prove this age.

“Some have said he is not even 80 years old.  We may never know but it is inspiring to imagine that he could be over 110,” says lifetime runner and MBR Director Bob Anderson (71). 

(07/27/2019) ⚡AMP
by Samantha Burns
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oollee says ditch plastic wáter bottles will be the oficial wáter sponsor for the Golden Gate Double 8K and Golden Gate 10k/5k August 4

Everyone has a right to clean water, no matter what you look like, how much money you make, or which political party you favor. In America, that right is enshrined in law.

oollee water purifier equips homes and businesses with a high-tech reverse osmosis device. Ditch Plastic Bottles Today!

oollee Water Provider will be the official water supplier for the fifth annual Golden Gate Double 8K, UjENA 5k and Golden Gate 10k events being held August 4 in Crissy Field across from Sports Basement in San Francisco.

oollee Water Provider located in Menlo Park, California says "Drink your water clean, fresh and free of harmful additives and impurities using oollee services.  Limitless clean water in your home every single day."

"We are excited to welcome oollee as our official water provider," says race director Bob Anderson.  oollee will also be awarding the male and female 10K winner one of their water purifier system valued at $2199 each. 

The Golden Gate 10K, UjENA 5K and DOUBLE 8K (5K+3K) courses offer unparalleled views of the Golden Gate Bridge for more than 80% of the course! The course will begin on historic Crissy Field near the Presidio in San Francisco.  Runners will enjoy the gorgeous vistas of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

These races sponsored by Sports Basement are competitive and fun events.  A special Golden Gate finishing medal will be awarded to all 10K and 5K finishers. The featured event is the Golden Gate Double 8K.  Participants will race a 5K at 8am, take a break and then race 3K at 9:15am.  Times are added together for scoring. 

"Double Racing was started in 2010 and nearly 100 events have been staged already," says creator Bob Anderson. 

"If you have not done a Double, you need to experience it," says Lisa Wall social media director for My Best Runs.  "I have run several and I really like the unique aspect of the event."

The event is almost sold out and most likely will be within the next few days. 

(07/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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Golden Gate 10k UjENA 5k DOUBLE 8K

Golden Gate 10k UjENA 5k DOUBLE 8K

Our course offers unparalleled views of the Golden Gate Bridge for more than 80% of the course! The course will begin at historic Crissy Field near the Presidio of San Francisco. Runners will enjoy the gorgeous vistas of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. We are offering three races: Golden Gate 10K, UjENA 5K and Golden Gate Double 8K. The...

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70-year-old Frank Meza who was disqualified after clocking 2:53:10 at the Los Angeles marathon has been found dead

Firefighters found a body this morning in the L.A. River bed after they responded to a report of a possible jumper, said the L.A. Fire Department.  The incident was reported shortly before 10 am.  

The county coroner said the body was that of Frank Meza, 70, of South Pasadena. The cause of death has not been determined.  ABC 7  says that Meza was the retired doctor and marathon runner who was recently disqualified by the L.A. Marathon.

The Los Angeles Times had reported earlier that “it wasn’t until Frank Meza checked the internet that he realized so many people were talking about him. Hundreds of strangers from across the country had posted on message boards, branding Meza a liar and a cheat.

“All kinds of allegations were being thrown at me,” he said.  “It was pretty traumatic.”

To that point, the retired physician had forged a different sort of reputation. Soft-spoken and gray-haired, he had mentored Latino students while working to provide healthcare for low-income patients throughout Southern California.

Meza was also a devout runner who, late in life, began entering marathons. The problems began there.

Though he ran mainly around California, eschewing bigger races across the country, his unusually fast times for a 70-year-old caught the attention of the long-distance community.

Runners grew skeptical when he was twice disqualified for irregular splits, the times recorded at various points along the course. An impressive finish at the recent Los Angeles Marathon prompted officials to look closer as doubts erupted into online vitriol and a series of articles on a website called MarathonInvestigation.com.

Derek Murphy, an amateur sleuth who operates the site from Ohio, looked back at numerous races, compiling an array of data, photographs and video that he considered incriminating.

“At this point,” Murphy says, “I have no doubt.”

My Best Runs did not post his time because his splits did not add up.  “For sure Frank did cheat and did not run a 2:53:10 marathon at age 70,” says MBR Director Bob Anderson. “We are sad how this story has played out before he could prove to the world he could run that fast.”

(07/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Los Angeles Marathon

Los Angeles Marathon

The LA Marathon is an annual running event held each spring in Los Angeles, Calif. The 26.219 mile (42.195 km) footrace, inspired by the success of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games, has been contested every year since 1986. While there are no qualifying standards to participate in theSkechers PerformnceLA Marathon, runners wishing to receive an official time must successfully complete...

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The Run The World Global 52-week Challenge has finished. The team logged 122,123 miles or 335.5 daily. Michael Wardian was first American and Kenyan's Eliud Esinyen ran the most miles averaging 15.7 miles daily logging 5,738

Run The World Global Challenge is a world-wide celebration of running.  The program was started by Bob Anderson one year ago, July 4, 2018.  Since that time 281 runners around the world ran or walked and then logged 122,123 miles.  This equals 335.5 miles daily or 2,348 miles weekly for 52 weeks which equals 4.9 times around the world. 

"One of the key reasons we started this program," says creator Bob Anderson, My Best Runs and Runner's World magazine founder, "was to motivate people, bring together runners from all over and to run miles all over the world." 

That all happen. Runners from 20 countries participated, miles were run in 75 countries and it certainly motivated many runners to run more miles than they were running before. 

53-year-old James Kalani had not run much over the last few years and then he entered the RTW Challenge.  After getting in good shape over several months, he started pushing it for Challenge #5 which started March 31. Over the last 94 days he ran and logged 1536 miles.  That's 114 miles weekly.  It was not just covering miles, many were quality. On June 16 he ran 30.6 miles at an average pace of 6:41 per mile.

Before the RTW Challenge creator Bob Anderson was running on average 20 miles weekly.  "I got so motivated by this challenge," says Bob.  "I looked forward to running not just one time daily but often I would run two or three times.  I took a photo everyday and posted it in our Runner's Feed.  I also read every post and commented on each for the whole year.  I have been running since 1962 and have run nearly 1,000 races.  I am an addicted runner but I needed something new and this was it."

In the end Bob averaged 5 miles daily or 35 miles weekly for a total of 1830 miles for the year.  With the added miles he also improved his racing performance.  He ran 7:54 pace for 10k and placed third 70 plus at the London 10,000 in May.  A race with nearly 20,000 runners.

The RTW Challenge team did some amazing things during the year.  69-year-old Brent Weigner lives in Cheyenne Wyoming but many of his 2036 miles were run outside of the United States.  In fact Brent ran miles in 30 different countries. 

The most miles were run and logged in the United States.  The top five countries were: United States (64,899 miles), Kenya (24,066 miles), Palau (8,242 miles), India (7,423 miles) and South Africa (6,765).  The amazing story here is that the little country of Palau has less that 22,000 inhabitants and placed third.  Their team leader Aaron Salvador logged 1,584 miles himself and encouraged his team to run and log. 

The team leader for South Africa, Liz Dumon, is the key reason why her country placed fourth.  She herself ran and logged 1000 miles.  Liz encouraged people to sign up.  In fact our youngest members were twins she recruited along with mom and grandma. The 7-year-old twins Jonathan (logged 118 miles) and his sister Michelle (logged 100 miles) had loads of fun and posted regularly in the Runners Feed.  Their dogs joined in on the fun too. (Third photo of twins with Grandma)

Their 56-year-old grandma (Johanna Fourie) logged 672 miles and placed 10th for females.  Right behind her was mom (Erika Fourie) with 625 miles. 

Who said age is just a number? The top three overall females were 65 plus.  Placing first was 68-year-old Kat Powell (USA).  She logged 1271 miles.  Not far back was 69-year-old Linda Robinson (USA) with 1145 miles followed by 65-year-old Carmella DiPippa (PW) with 1040 miles.  Sixth female was 71-year-old Karen Galati (USA) who logged 835 miles.

On the men's side there were so many stars.  35-year-old Kenyan Eliud Esinyen averaged 15.7 miles daily or 110 miles weekly (second photo).  Many times he ran three times daily.  On April 21 he ran a marathon on a tough course at high altitude clocking 2:22:46 which is 5:27/mile pace.  On January 27 he ran a 10k clocking 31:05.  Eliud ran and logged the most with 5,738 miles. 

Kenya's team leader Willie Korir (27) placed second overall with 5195 miles.  He also posted images regularly in the Runners Feed along with comments.  He also wrote several stories for My Best Runs Running News Daily column including finding inside information about the king of the marathon, Eluid Kipchoge.

The first American and third overall was 45-year-old Michael Wardian with 3618 miles (frist photo). This ultra star pulled off many amazing feats during the year.  Most recently on June 29 he ran 89.9 miles around Washington DC.  On May 4th he ran 62.14 miles at 7:14/mile average pace in Sacramento.  He ran the Big Sur Marathon in 2:35:18 making the podium.  He had run the Boston Marathon earlier a little faster clocking 2:33:23.

In March he travelled to Israel and posted the fastest known time on the 631-mile Natoinal Israel Trail.  He covered this distance in 10 days, 16 hours and 36 minutes.  Earlier he not only ran seven marathons on seven continents in seven days (winning them all) he tacked on three more marathons when he got home.  That's ten marathons in ten days.  He is the complete runner with a wide range.  On Feb 10th he ran a 5k in 17:01. 

"Michael is one amazing versatile runner and we were happy when he decided to join our team," says Bob Anderson.

Second American and fifth overall was 75-year-old Frank Bozanich who logged 3523 miles. Frank has run many ultra races over the years and have won many.  Lots of these miles were not real fast compared to what he has done before.  But on July 30th last year he ran 20 miles in Reno in two hours and 43 minutes.  That is an 8:09/mile pace. 

Finishing in seventh place was 72-year-old Paul Shimon who logged 2835.  Like so many of our team, Paul had to deal with a lot of bad weather in Kansas during the winter.  But he layered up and got in the miles.

Michael T Anderson (61)  placed eighth overall logging 2,798 with lots of fast times along the way.   He has run over 130,000 miles in his lifetime so far.  On June 8th he ran 19:13 for 5k in Atlanta where he lives.  On April 28 he clocked 39:25 for 10k.

"The fastest runner on our team was Joel Maina Mwangi," says Bob Anderson.  This 34-year-old Kenyan placed 13th overall with 1,953 miles logged.  On March 10 he ran a 30:14 10k in Torino Italy.   He ran six half marathons under 1:05.  His fastest was run in Aosta, Italy where he clocked 1:02:50 on September 30. 

"There are as many amazing stories," says Bob Anderson. "I am glad our event is helping motivate runners all over the world.  I am looking forward for year two." 

What's next?  Run The World Global Challenge #6 will be a 10-week program.  There is no entry fee.  You just need to have a free My Best Runs (the sponsor of this program) account and sign up for Run The World. 

(07/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Global Challenge 7

Run The World Global Challenge 7

Run The World Global Challenge is a world wide celebration of running. Here is he link for the official results of Run The World 52-Week Challenge. Congrats to all our participants. RTW Challenge #7 is a 10 week program starting September 11, 2019 and ending 11:59pm Tuesday November 19, 2019 (California USA time). There is no entry fee. You log...

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Happy Global Running Day! Be sure to run, walk or jog at least one mile today!

Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you.

Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk, or call your friends for a pick-up game in the park. The important thing is that you have fun being active—and you inspire others to join you.

Global Running Day is a day that celebrates the sport of running. It is held annually on the first Wednesday of June. 

Participants of all ages and abilities pledge to take part in some type of running activity by submitting their names through the Global Running Day website. 

Global Running Day was formerly known as National Running Day and began in the United States. The first event was in 2009.

The inaugural Global Running Day was held on June 1, 2016. More than 2.5 million people from 177 countries pledged to run more than 9.2 million miles. 

New York City Mayor, Bill de Blasio, declared June 1, 2016 to be Global Running Day in the City of New York. 2014 Boston Marathon winner Meb Keflezighi led a group run from the Boston Run Base, and the Atlanta Track Club organized a “run around the clock” event, where at least one person from the Atlanta metro area would be running every hour of Global Running Day.

More than 100 organizations support Global Running Day and the Million Kid Run.

As part of Global Running Day, the Million Kid Run aims to get young people excited about fitness. By moving and having fun, kids discover that living an active lifestyle can be fun and easy.

The 2018 Global Running Day inspired Bob Anderson to start the Run The World Challenge.  It launched July 4, 2018.  Since then 289 people all over the world have run and logged over 110,000 miles.  This program encourages people to run and or walk everyday.

”If you are a runner already,” says My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson, “be sure to run at least a mile today.  For everyone else, there is no better time than today to get started.”  71-year-old Bob Anderson is a lifetime runner who ran his first mile Feb 16, 1962.  He is on track to hit 1820 miles over the last 12 months ending July 3.  

“I just love to run and programs like Global Running Day and Run The World challenge motivate me to do more,” says Bob Anderson.  “So get in your mile today.  Run, walk, jog it all counts.” 

(06/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Global Running Day

Global Running Day

What is Global Running Day? Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you. Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk,...

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Running is What We Do is a unique new video series from My Best Runs publisher and lifetime runner Bob Anderson

As Global Running Day is approaching June 5 Bob Anderson, publisher and founder of My Best Runs has announced a new unique series of videos.  "The series called Running Is What We Do will be unique videos showing the world how important running is to us," says Bob Anderson.

The first in the series of short videos (2 to 8 minutes) was filmed in England at the Vitality London 10000.  Mo Farah won for the seventh time and Steph Twell won the woman's race.

"Of course it is always important to know who wins big races like this," says Bob.  "But there is so much more to know about this race.  Over 19,000 participants ran through central London Monday May 27.  The staging area was in Green Park, next to Buckingham Palace and we were right there."

Behind the scenes footage shows runners in the Park as they are getting ready to take off on their 10k journey through the city and after they finished.

The Vitality London 10000 was selected by My Best Runs as one of the Best 100 races in the World the last three years.  "In fact I think this might be the world's best 10K road race," says Bob after running it. 

"It has been on my bucket list for a couple of years and in March I decided to enter and travel from California to see if I could make the top three in the 70 plus division, since my training had been going well. 

"I had not run a race in England since 1966 and with over 415,000 people wanting to run the London Marathon (same group who puts on this race) I felt the race would be the perfect event to cover for our first video in our new series."

Part of racing is to make it to the podium in your age group, a goal that might have more meaning than the finishing medal. This was one of Bob's goals. He wanted to finish in the top three 70 plus. And he wanted to produce the first Running Is What We Do video.  Making it to the top three was more of a personal goal but it also added another story to cover.

Bob did reach his goal clocking 49:22 or 7:55/mile.  He had hoped to run a little faster but he started at the back of wave two being stuck in a toilet line.  By the time he got out he had three minutes to make it to the start. 

"I have been running races since 1962 and I even through there were tons of toilets, I made a quick wrong decision that cost me 25 minutes," says Bob.  "But at age 71 it seems like I need to go three or four times before racing.  It would have cost me more time if I had not made that stop.  I think as runners we all know what I am talking about."

He was stuck behind the pack and ran his first mile in 8:03.  And ran just under 25 minutes for 5k.  His last mile was 7:33.  So maybe he lost at least a minute.

Before and after the race he shot all the footage on his iPone 10 for this video.  He was able to cover the scene close-up and personal. His wife Catherine captured the race in over 1600 photos and several photos were used in the video.

"At the finish line I met Barrie Nicholls," says Bob.  "We talked about running and he told me he is an actor and I jumped on the opportunity for him to say a few words for our first video.

"I loved this race and I hope to return," says Bob.  "However for a race this size (over 19,000 runners) there is one thing they should change. They need more age-groups.  Making it to the podium is a big deal and for me right now at 71, 70 plus age-group is okay.  But for those 76, 88 or even 95 this age-group is too big. 

"We are all aging and we need all the encouragement we can get.  I am not even sure if they give out age-group awards or not (I have to check) but it is nice to make that top three."

The Running Is What We Do videos by My Best Runs will be showing all sides of the sport of running around the world.  "This series is not just about world-class races and elite runners but about all aspects of the sport we love, running."

If you have video footage you would like to share contact My Best Runs.

(05/29/2019) ⚡AMP
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London 10,000: Britons Mo Farah and Steph Twell win men's and women's titles

Sir Mo Farah and Steph Twell retained their British 10K road race titles at the Vitality London 10,000 this morning as thousands turned out to run through the sun-bathed streets of the British capital.

For Farah it was his seventh win in seven races on the famous central London course, while Twell took two seconds from her personal best to win the women’s crown for a second time just 24 hours after setting a world mile record for running hand-in-hand.

In the end Farah’s win was easy enough but the four-times Olympic champion was pushed hard by Rio Olympian Andy Butchart and former British Mile champion Nick Goolab before prevailing in 28:15.

“I really enjoyed it today,” said Farah, who was racing for the first time since finishing fifth in the Virgin Money London Marathon last month. “I love coming to London and particularly running on this course. It’s fantastic to win for a seventh time.

“The London Marathon is behind me now. I was a bit disappointed not to run quicker there but I have recovered well and was confident today.”

Goolab led the trio through halfway in 14:08 before he dropped back, but Butchart hung on until the last two kilometres, when Farah finally kicked away and put more than 100m between the pair.

“I knew Andy and Nick are both running well and I would have to keep my eyes on them,” said Farah. “We got rid of Nick, but Andy kept pushing and pushing and pushing.

“I thought, ‘When am I going to get rid of you?’ He did very well, but I was confident I could do it in the end. This is my race.”

Butchart may have failed to add to his victories here in 2016 and 2017, but the Scot was pleased enough to finish runner-up just 13 seconds behind, matching his personal best from 2016.

“I knew I would have to do the hard work,” said Butchart, who led for most of the first 5K. “But Mo was just chilling really. It’s really hard to lead a 10K and get away from someone like him.

“I wanted a good run and got that. It was only in the last 2K that he pulled away and I’m pleased to equal by PB. It shows I’m ready to run fast in the track.”

As for Twell, she set off at a pelt in the women’s race, running with a small group of male club runners as she established an unassailable lead that grew with every step.

On Sunday she and husband Joe Morwood had smashed the Guinness World Record for the fastest road mile holding hands, but that effort did little to dent her 10K title defence.

Twell passed halfway in 15:33 and eventually won by nearly 40 seconds from Stockport’s Jess Piasecki with Verity Ockenden of Swansea taking third.

“This is a great course and a great event,” said the two-time Olympian who stopped the clock at 31:55. “A personal best and a world record in one weekend can’t be bad.

“My legs were fine after yesterday, but I think I felt it in my arms a bit. The bigger races always bring out the best in me, and this is one of the biggest and the best.

“Today was London in its full glory and the crowds were fantastic. I’m just delighted.”

The unheralded Piasecki was also pleased as she clinched the runner-up spot in her best time of 32:33, while Ockenden also took some well-known scalps from a race loaded with internationals as she pinched the last podium place in 32:39, a PB for her by nearly two minutes.

“I saw Steph go off and I knew that was too fast for me,” said Piasecki. “But I ran quite within myself until the last kilometre. That was tough but it was worth it to finish second.”

As an aside,  My Best Runs publisher and founder Bob Anderson placed third in the 70 plus division clocking 49:22.  “What a great event,” says Bob.  “This is for sure a Bucket List race.  It may only be 10k but it is worth traveling too.  Congrats to Mo and Steph, the winners today.”  (Third photo) Bob with Barrie Nicholls (65-year-old runner/actor from London) at the finish line. 

(05/27/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vitality London 10,000

Vitality London 10,000

The Vitality London 10,000 takes you past many landmark sites, including the London Eye, Buckingham Palace and the Bank of England – so you even get to do a bit of sightseeing along the way! You will run alongside elite runners and have coverage from the BBC, making this 10km one of the highest in profile of its kind. ...

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Maybe including pickles and pickle juice in your daily diet will help you as a runner?

While pickles are incredibly polarizing, those who like them really love them. And whether your favorite is a deli-counter dill or a few slices on a sandwich, it's hard to deny that pickles are surging in popularity right now. And for good reason—they're a healthy snack.

Lots of runners are eating pickles and drinking the juice regularly too.  Both Michael Anderson and Bob Anderson from My Best Runs have included pickles in their regular daily diet.  "Pickle juice gives me extra oomph," says Michael Anderson who has been running for over 40 years.  "The juice is perfect to add to a water bottle for runs over one hour.  Also it really helps me with recovery helping with cramping and hydration."  Michael is currently running about 40 miles per week. 

"Michael turned me on to the benefits of drinking pickle juice and eating pickles.  I have always loved pickles but now I include both in my daily diet,” says My Best Runs director and lifetime runner Bob Andeson. 

"For sure it helps with recovery but also it is helping me get closer to my ideal racing weight.  It might be partially mental but it seems to work.  I just feel heathlier including pickles/juice in my daily diet."  71 year-old Bob Anderson is currently training on average 35 miles weekly and racing at sub 8 minute/mile pace. 

So what about this juice? Here's everything you need to know about the brine and all the reasons why you should be drinking it.

1. It can relieve muscle cramping.

Pickle juice has been proven to ease muscle aches and pains. Drinking the stuff after workouts became so popular at one time that Gatorade nearly launched its own version of the briny stuff.

2. Taking pickle-back shots is crazy fun.

If you've never had one of these, you aren't living. Outside of dancing on a table, it's quite possibly the silliest thing you'll ever do at a bar but it's one of those kitschy, "Southern" gimmicks that you have to try at least once. Who knows, maybe you'll learn to love them and get all your friends on board, too.

3. It keeps you hydrated for longer.

Sipping plain water is great, but a drink that contains both sodium and potassium is ideal because it will help you get hydrated faster and remain that way. They're both electrolytes that you lose when you sweat and pickle juice contains them both.

4. It's very budget-friendly.

Pickle juice can replace expensive, sugary sports drinks. And sometimes it's even free if you keep a jar of pickles in the fridge. You can even make your own by pickling cucumbers in vinegar, garlic, and salt.

5. It's more readily available than ever.

If your main argument against drinking pickle juice is that you'd have to do so out of the jar, then you have no more excuses. The briny stuff is now available in canned form for your convenience.

6. It's vitamin- and antioxidant-rich.

Pickle juice contains a decent amount of antioxidants and vitamins C and E, which help boost your immune system function, among other health-boosting roles in your body.

7. It can help you lose weight.

According to a study from Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, consuming vinegar—the main ingredient in pickle juice—every day can promote healthy weight loss.

8. It keeps your blood sugar regulated.

So instead of dumping that leftover liquid from your pickle jar down the drain, consider saving it for future use.

You might even find yourself enjoying the salty flavor. Things can taste differently after you exercise than they do normally. So even if pickle juice doesn’t sound amazing right now, maybe it will hit the spot after your next workout.

Even if you don’t ever love the taste, you may end up deciding that drinking pickle juice is worth it for the health benefits.

(05/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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A Long Run the movie tells one man's story, but it's every runner's journey. Bob Anderson's life connects us to many icons...by the end, you're left with a runner's high without the sweat says Dan Brown

Over 100,000 people have already watched A Long Run the movie with good reviews. Now you can watch the full length movie...compliments of MyBestRuns.com with speical arrangments with it's production company Around Town Productions.   

Actor Sean Astin who narrated the film wrote, "I loved A Long Run.  Thank you so much for letting me be a part of your wonderful journey Bob."  Boston Marathon director Dave McGillivray wrote," In watching A Long Run, you readily see the impact and influence Bob has had on our sport over the years.  This story is inspiring, motivational, educational and simply makes you want to go out the door and do a run..and a real 'long run' at that."

Joe Henderson writer and former Runner's World editor wrote, "I’ve always known Bob Anderson as a man of Big Ideas, one with a knack for making these dreams come true. He conceived a little magazine called Distance Running News, which grew into the biggest one, Runner’s World.

"He created a book division that published some of the sport’s best-selling titles...This all happened before Bob turned 30, but his idea-generating didn’t stop then. At more than twice that age, he dreamed up Double Racing and then to celebrate his 50th anniversary as a runner, Bob plotted a tough year-long course: 50 races, averaging better than seven minutes per mile overall, concluding the week he would turn 65."

A Long Run tells one man's story, but it's every runner's journey. Bob Anderson's amazing life connects us to icons like Bill Rodgers, Billy Mills and Paula Radcliffe but also to the low-budget thrill of a community 5k. The gorgeous cinematography captures The Avenue of the Giants, the beauty of Central Park in New York City, the San Francisco landscapes, resort cities like Cancun and Cabo, the lush island of Kauai and the vistas of Fort Bragg.

And the smoothly intertwined stories - his 50-race challenge, the magazine, the running boom - are handled with Olympic-caliber pacing. By the end, you're left with a runner's high, without all the sweat.

This is an inspirational life long journey that takes you across the United States, into Mexico and introduces you to some amazing runners.

A Long Run features Bob Anderson who started Runner's World magazine when he was 17 with $100. He grew the magazine to nearly a half million circulation with monthly readership of nearly 2.5 million before selling it to Rodale Press in 1984. How did he do it and why did he sell the magazine he loved?

50 years after he started running, he started his 50 race challenge... one year - 50 races - 350 miles.

His goal - Average under a 7 min/mile average pace at 64-years-old. That's fast for any age!

In the running formula known as age-grading, Anderson’s mile pace is the equivalent of a 30-year-old running an average pace of 5:24 for 50 races covering 350 miles.

“I wanted to do something special, something that would be very positive for running,” Anderson said. “But I also wanted to do something that would not be easy.”

Did he reach his goal? How did he cope with injuries? Weather? Hills? How did he recover each week?

Bob Anderson first run took place Feb. 16, 1962. His first race was May 7 that year, when he covered 600 yards at Broadmoor Junior High in 1 minute, 39 seconds.  By 1963 at age 15 he placed first at the Junior Olympics in Missouri clocking 2:08.5 for 880 yards.  

By 17, Anderson wanted to tackle a marathon. He wanted to run the Boston Marathon. But neither he nor his high school coach (coach McGuire) knew how to prepare. So Anderson did the 1965 equivalent of a Google search: He sent letters around the country asking for advice.  

Coaches and top athletes replied not just with training tips, but also with addresses of other people Anderson should try. Soon he had a network of running experts at his disposal.

Recognizing the value of this collected wisdom, he turned to teammate David Zimmerman while on a bus trip to a cross-country meet for their Shawnee Mission West team. “I’m going to start a magazine,” Anderson declared.

With $100 from baby-sitting and lawn-mowing jobs, the 17-year-old launched Distance Running News. The magazine debuted in January 1966 with a 28-page issue that Anderson collated, stapled and folded himself.

The publication created a stir among a previously unknown army of foot soldiers. Thirsty runners plunked down the $1 subscription price (for two issues) — and often enclosed an additional $5 just to make sure the magazine stayed afloat.

“Until then, I wasn’t even aware that there was a running community,” said SF Bay Area runner Rich Stiller, who had been running with Anderson since the early 1970s. “I always think that Runner’s World was part of the jet-propulsion that really made the running boom take off and made people realize, ‘Oh, gee, I’m not doing this alone.’ ”

The magazine grew so quickly that Anderson dropped out of Kansas State University. He recruited a SF Bay Area writer and runner named Joe Henderson to be his editor, and moved the magazine headquarters to Northern California.

Anderson’s 50-for-50 goal was in jeopardy after he stumbled out of the gate or, more specifically, down a trail in Mountain View.

While on a training run in December, Anderson awoke to find his head streaming with blood and two people standing above him looking alarmed.

“There were no marks at all on my hands, which means I must not have even realized I was going down,” he said.

The fall required over 60 stitches and plastic surgery. But determined not to cancel the first race in his 50-race quest, Anderson limped to the starting line in San Francisco on New Year’s Day with a ruddy forehead and an eggplant of a bruise on his left knee. He finished that first race and then 49 more that year.  

When Bob was publishing Runner's World he got so consumed managing a staff of 350 and was not able to train enough to run the Boston Marathon.  However he did run ten marathons between 1968 to 1984 but none with enough training.  He would not run Boston until 2013 when at age 65 he clocked 3:32:17.

A Long Run the movie covers a lot of ground.  The year long event finished over six years ago but the story is fresh and a movie all runners and even non-runners will enjoy.  You will want to watch it over and over again.

Some of the runners besides Bob Anderson featured in the film include: Bill Rodgers, Paula Radcliffe, Joe Henderson, George Hirsch, Rich Benyo, Amol Sexena, JoAnn Dahlkoetter, Rich Stiller, Hans Schmid, JT Service, Pina Family, Wall Family, Billy Mills, Gerry Lindgren, Dave Zimmerman, Dean Karnazes, Monica Jo Nicholson, Coach Lloyd McGuire, Katie McGuire, Mary Etta Blanchard, John Young, Roger Wright and more...

It was produced by Around Town Productions and directed by Michael Anderson (third photo at one of the showings in a theater in Monterey). 

To watch the movie click on the link or go to: www.alongrun.com

(05/13/2019) ⚡AMP
by Dan Brown
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17 time NCAA champion distance runner Edward Cheserek will make his Carlsbad 5000 debut

The most decorated runner in NCAA history and one of the hottest superstars in athletics, Edward Cheserek will make his Carlsbad 5000 debut at the 34th running of ‘World’s Fastest 5K’ on Sunday, April 7, 2019.

“I’m excited to be part of Carlsbad 5000,” said Cheserek, who ran the second-fastest indoor mile in history last year, finishing in 3:49.44. “It’s an iconic event that I’ve always wanted to race.”

At the age of 25, Cheserek has established himself as an international star in the running world that only shines brighter as his career progresses. In high school he attended Saint Benedict’s Preparatory School in New Jersey, where he twice won the Foot Locker National High School Cross Country Championships.

He was a 17-time collegiate national champion at the University of Oregon when he graduated in 2017.

“Carlsbad 5000 is one of the most historic races on the road running circuit. To attract a talent such as Edward Cheserek is testament to the event and its reputation,” said Matthew Turnbull, longtime elite athlete recruiter for the event.

“Ed is one of the most exciting athletes in the world and to have him racing in Carlsbad next week is a great statement, he has the personality and ability to go all the way. This race has nurtured many World and Olympic Champions, Ed certainly fits that mold and we’re excited to see him here and to watch him perform on the global level chasing medals for years to come.”

Since 1986, thousands of runners and walkers have converged on the seaside village of Carlsbad in early Spring to enjoy the scenic course or to set world records at the Carlsbad 5000. The annual road race attracts amateur, competitive, and professional runners from around the world.

The men’s event record and world 5K best is Kipketer’s 13:00, which he ran in 2000 & 2001. The modern, IAAF recognized 5k World Record was set in Monaco this February by Switzerland’s Julien Wanders with a time of 13:29.

My Best Runs director and Runner's World founder and publisher for 18 years, Bob Anderson will be running the Carlsbad 5000 for the 26th time.  Over the years his best time was 17:09 while in the 50-54 age group.  He hopes to be in the top three or even win the 70-74 age group this year.  

(03/28/2019) ⚡AMP
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Carlsbad 5000

Carlsbad 5000

The Carlsbad 5000 features a fast and fun seaside course where 16 world records have been set. Both rookie runners and serious speedsters alike enjoy running or walking in one of seven people's races. The day before is the Junior Carlsbad which is just for kids 12 and under. There are events for every age and ability, from the diaper...

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The Run The World Challenge will motivate you to run more miles...RTW4 starts March 1 with an exciting new format

The Run The World Global Challenge (RTW) is a world-wide celebration of running.  Lifetime runner, Runner's World magazine and My Best Runs founder, Bob Anderson (71) created the event to help further spread the word about the benefits of running. The first RTW Challenge started July 4.  

On March 1 the RTW4 Challenge will start with some changes to make the event even more fun and challenging. 

"Since I started running in 1962 I have been telling people about the sport I love," says Bob Anderson  "I am proud to say I have reached a lot of people but the task is never done.  Run The World is my current project and the feedback from around the world has been very positive."  

Lize Dumon from South Africa posted this on the Run The World Feed January 5. "Possibly my last run for RTW3.  Might do a small one to bring me close enough to 200 miles. Been a priviledge to be a part of all three Run The World Challenges.  I have made loads of friends and learned a lot."  Lize is putting together two South African 14 people teams for RTW4.

Already 260 Run The World runners have run and logged 85,876 miles (as of Feb 5, 2019) since July 4th in 56 different countries. In the little country of Palau alone, teams there have already run and logged 5,648 miles (photo 2 of some of the Palau RTW1 team headed up by Aaron Salvador).  Aaron is putting together two teams of 14 for RTW4.

"Run The World Challenge is a great motivator," says Bob.  "I was running 20 miles a week before Run The World. I now have been averaging 32 miles weekly and I am much better shape because of it.  There are many such stories among the 260 runners who have already participated."  

The first team that started July 4 finished in 36 days 23 hours and 13 minutes (the current world record). Two other teams starting August 29 and October 29 also completed the goal of circling the world.

How does it work? Participants run or walk and then log in those miles (k’s) on their free My Best Runs (MBR) account. The goal is for the team (now group of teams) to log enough miles (k's) to circle the world within 30 days.

The process of running/walking and then logging in miles (k's), making a comment (optional) and posting a photo (optional) is the basic program.  A team member logs into their My Best Runs account to log in the miles they run or walk.

One major change is RTW4 will end 30 days after starting.  "It is hoped one of our three groups of teams will reach our goal within this time frame but if not the group of teams that have logged the most miles win.  All teams within the three groups will also be competing against each other," says Bob.  

All runners will be part of a 14 person team.  The teams have many interesting themes like: Team one will be for runners 70 plus. Team 9 is for those men and women who have or are in the Military. Team 10 and 11 are for Elite Runners.  Team 21 is for India's citizens.  Team 23 are for runners living in Canada. Team 34 are for those runners who have completed at least one 100 mile race.  Team 37 are for runners who have lost 50 or more pounds and are currently running. Team 42 are for runners who have run at least 50 races in one year. (Click the link for the full list of the 42 team.)  

Runers will pick the team of their choice as long as it is not full.  There are 14 different teams (with a maximum of 14 runners per team) making up a group.  

One unique aspect of RTW4 is that one person can be on one team, two or three teams.  BUT the teams have to be in different groups.

When you run, let say five miles, these same miles only need to be entered once and they will be credited for all your teams. 

Registration is now open. "It was hard to pick just one team per group," says Michael Anderson who has done all RTW Challenges. "I could have signed up for several different teams but I decided on Team 30 having fnished at least one Boston Marathon, Team 25 West USA because I live in Bend, Oregon and Team 4 age 40-49.  Can't wait to do this again.  It has really motivated me to run a lot more. Bring it on."

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Global Challenge 7

Run The World Global Challenge 7

Run The World Global Challenge is a world wide celebration of running. Here is he link for the official results of Run The World 52-Week Challenge. Congrats to all our participants. RTW Challenge #7 is a 10 week program starting September 11, 2019 and ending 11:59pm Tuesday November 19, 2019 (California USA time). There is no entry fee. You log...

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My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson is the featured runner on Amby Burfoot's Lifetime Running website today

Bob Anderson is the featured profile today on Lifetime Running. 

As the founding publisher-owner of Runner's World magazine ("Making Tracks Since 1966"), Bob Anderson played a pivotal role in the American running boom. Less well known: He has been, and at age 71 remains, a passionate runner and racer. In recent years, Anderson has thrown his creative energy behind a Double Racing concept ("Running with a halftime break") and a free Running News Daily column which Bob edits.

Here are some excerpts from my interview: 

When did you start running and WHY?

I started running on Feb 16, 1962.  My older brother went out for cross country because my dad ran some in the Navy and I wanted to give it a try. Could not run without stopping after a mile that first day.

Your best races and running achievements?

One of the features on our Ujena Fit Club website is that it age grade all races. Five of my top races that I am most proud of would include when I ran a 1:25:24 half marathon at age 64. A 59:17 10 miler at age 53. A 17:09 5k at Carlsbad at age 49. A 3:32:17 marathon at Boston age 65. And a 2:08.5 880 at age 15.

But my greatest running achievement has to be when I ran 50 races in 2012 at age 64. My 50-race challenge was not just about finishing a race each weekend but it was also about achieving an average performance which would be at least 80% age graded. I raced 350.8 miles and averaged 6:59 per mile.

3 key tips for successful lifetime running?

1--Run or walk each day outside covering at least one mile.2--Don’t worry about speed unless you want too. Make this your choice.3--Run at least a few races each year. 

Favorite quote?

Steve Prefontaine: “To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.” 

What are the biggest lessons (life lessons and running lessons) you have learned from running?

Running is magical and makes everything possible. My day is not complete without a run. Running is just part of my DNA. If I had not found running, I can not imagine what kind of life I would have had. 

Age is only a number and even through the number is getting larger, I just don’t let a number tell me what I can or cannot do. We only live once, so why not enjoy it to the fullest?

Running helps add meaning to every day.  

After posting this on FB Gary Rush wrote:

If not for Bob Anderson and his magazine, and the stories and photos and dreams it inspired in my life- I likely would have not been a runner since age 14 or a marathoner since age 15...

Editor's Notes:

First Photo: with Linda Sereno at the San Juan Christmas 2018 Double Road Race (Dec 16, 2018).  Linda was awarded the Best Double Racer for 2018 the night before along with Dwayne Spencer.  Second Photo: finishing the 10k leg of a Double Road Race in Bali Indonesia with Ken Whyte from Ausutralia.

The next Double Racing event will be the Palo Alto Double 8K (5K+break=3k) on March 10, 2019. 

(01/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Amby Burfoot
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Palo Alto 10K, 5K, Double 8K

Palo Alto 10K, 5K, Double 8K

The Palo Alto 10K, 5K and Double 8K (5k+break+3k) will be held in the Palo Alto Bayland Open Space on the west shore of San Francisco Bay. The Double 8K Run/Walk is a two-stage run (5K+Halftime+3K). The races will be run on a flat, fast course. The 5K and 10k courses are mostly on paved and hard-pack trials. The 3K...

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Top two American’s in the Run The World Challenge which just finished are both over 70

The third Run The World Challenge sponsored by My Best Runs (MBR) has finished.  The team of 105 active runners, who ran and logged miles in 23 different countries, finished last night (January 5) in 68 days 17 hours and 18 minutes.  

The event created by MBR Founder Bob Anderson is all about running and then logging in those miles, posting photos and comments in our runner’s feed to help motivate the team and inspire others.  The team has to run/walk and then log in 24,901 miles (40,074k) to complete the challenge.  

“This is the distance around the world,” says 71-year-old Bob Anderson who himself ran and logged 297 miles. 

“Our team from around the world and ranging in ages from six to 74 did an amazing job,” says Bob.  The team logged an average of 362 miles per day and the team had to stay focused for over two months. “With our busy lives that is not easy,” says Lisa Wall a team member. 

34-year-old Eliud Lokol Esinyen from Kenya and running most of his miles in Eldoret logged the most miles with 1,298.59.  He averaged 18.9 miles daily, many days he worked out three times.  Finishing in second was 27-year-old Boaz Kipyego also from Kenya.  However he spent about five weeks in Minnesota USA running and racing.  He ran and logged in 1,129.41 miles.

First American was 74-year-old Frank Bozanich from Reno Nevada.  The previous five time national champion at 50 miles and 100k ran and logged in 1,036.19, good enough for third place.  “This is his third time around the world with us,” says Bob.  “Many people say that age is only a number and certainly age is not stopping Frank.  He told me he is running a lot slower these days because he has put a lot of miles on his body, however.  Well done Frank, on an age-graded basis this has to be the best performance,” says Bob.

There were five male runners 70 plus in the top 31 places.  In fact 72-year-old Paul Shimon placed sixth overall running most of his 893.06 miles in Winfield Kansas.  Like many of the team he had to deal with a lot of issues including the cold, snow and darkness.  

Super star Michael Wardian (photo top left) placed 8th overall and ran some of the best times including clocking 2:34:54 at the New York City Marathon.  He also ran a tough 50-miler in Israel.  He posted 651 miles  for his third trip around the world with us.  In a few weeks he is going after his world record he set in 2017 at the World Marathon Challenge.  That’s running seven marathons in seven days on seven continents.  

On the women side, ultra super star 48-year-old Gloria Nasr ran and logged 422.54 miles to place first female.  Gloria lives in Paris, France.  Some of her miles were also ran in Peru when she travelled there to run an Ultra (photo upper right). She has also run the six stage race through the desert of Morocco in the past.

In second place was Kenya’s Rosaline Nyawira who currently is living, training and racing in South Africa.  She ran and logged 394.01 miles.  

Third and first America woman was 71-year-old Karen Galati who logged in 223.88 miles.  She ran most of her miles in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.  As she wrote on her profile “Better late than never to this addicting sport.”

Miles run and logged in the top five countries were USA, Kenya, Palau, South Africa and India.  The small country of Palau was in second place the first few weeks.  The Run The World Challenge group there lead by Aaron Salvador have so much spirit.  Most weekends they get together and run ten to fifteen miles.  “You can always count on us to post photos and comments too,” says Aaron. 

Our group from South Africa lead by Lize Dumon has just as much spirit.  During the challenge Lize completed her first marathon and just got over 200 for the team.  The Fourie family in South Africa has to get the top spirit award.  The two kids (Michelle age 6 and Jonathan age 7), the mom (Erika) and grandma (Johanna) posted nearly every day and collectively logged in 455 miles.  Even the dad joined in many days.  

“This was not our best RTW performance but this one has to be our toughest with many challenges,” says Bob.  “Many of our team had to deal with early cold and snow in the United States and Canada.  Our runners in Palau had to deal with heavy rain and wind. In South Africa it was over 100 degrees many days.  In California our runners had to deal with unhealthy air quality for two weeks because of the smoke from the wild fires.  A majority of our team had to deal with shorter days and run in the dark. And on top of everything there were three major holidays during Challenge3.

”I am very proud of our whole team. It is hard to stay focused on something like this for over two months but we did it.  We made it around the world.  For many of us for the third time.  There are so many more stories I want to share’” says Bob.  “Well done team.  Let’s do it again.” 

Details for the next Run The World Challenge will be announced soon. 

(01/06/2019) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson Team Caption
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Merry Christmas to all our My Best Runs followers from Bob Anderson and staff

We have been up here in Bend Oregon visiting my son and his family since Friday. My son Michael Anderson is our MBR results editor and post results as soon as they become available.  Sometimes it is as soon as the first runners are crossing the finish line. 

Michael (top photo) have carved out many running courses around his house.  We have already run 22.2 miles since Friday and will at least get in six  miles today.  

Last Christmas Michael lived in Eugene and we ran the Pre Trail Christmas morning.  

We have been running on Christmas Day forever.  When Michael lived in the Bay Area I would run with my daughter Lisa and her family and then run with Michael in the afternoon.  

Lisa (second photo) and family lives in San Jose, California.  She is our social media and newsletter editor.  We celebrated Xmas with them before heading up to Oregon.

Both of my kids have run marathons, my wife has run a half marathon and many other races but after operations on both feet can’t run now (Catherine works out at the gym these days) and all my four grandkids run even including my two year old, Bear. Owen age 12 have already run a 5:52 mile.  My son-in-law Justin has run a 1:27 half marathon.

We are a running family and have been forever.  There is no better day than Christmas Day to get outside and get in a few miles.  (Updated: Mike and I got in 7.1 miles through two inches of snow today.)

Two other members of our full time crew are Jaime and Manuel. They work at our La Piedad office.

Our webmaster Waitman Gobble keeps us all working and always is coming up with new features. 

Gary Allen (Marathon Man Gary Allen) and Larry Allen (Larry Allen on Running) have signed on to do regular writing for us sharing their many years of running wisdom and knowledge with us.  I am sure they will be getting out and getting in a few miles today.

Willie Korir is located in Nairobi, Kenya and has been sharing insights into what makes many runners in Kenya superstars.  He has also run and logged 2851 miles for our three Run The World Challenges since July 4. 

Our third Run The World team is not too far off of running and logging enough miles to circle the planet for the third time.  I am so proud of our team. 

Merry Christmas and Happy New Years to everyone.    Be sure to get out today and let’s all make 2019 a super year.  I know this is our plan here at My Best Runs.

(12/25/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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The marathon that 70-year-old Gene Dykes ran 2:54:23 was not sanctioned by the USATF and his world record will not be accepted

70-year-old Gene Dykes clocked 2:54:23 at the Jackson Marathon but it is not going to be accepted as an official world Record because the race was not sanctioned by the USATF.  Gene posted this on Facebook.

“Before running the Jacksonville Marathon, I reached out to the race director for assurance that it was a suitable venue for setting a world record, and I received the response that "you should have a good shot at the record".  

“I assumed that he was correct, but I was remiss in not doing my own homework.  It appears that, although the Jacksonville Marathon (course) is certified by the USATF, the race was not sanctioned by the USATF, and both must be valid for recognition of records by USATF/IAAF.”

Many races do not pay the fee to be sanctioned by the USATF because they do not see the benefit.  The larger races with elite runners have to be sanctioned and they do pay the fee.  

A race of 30,000 plus runners pay $15,300 to the USATF.  A smaller race of 3000 pay $1460.

These fees have nothing to do with the course being certified.  Most races know the importance of having their course certified.  It appears in this case, Jacksonville paid to have their course certified but not the sanctioned fee. 

This would have gone completely unnoticed and maybe the race Director did not realize Gene Dykes was going to break Ed Whitlock world record.

But Gene did and now it is not going to be accepted as an official record because this fee was not paid. Maybe in a case like this the fee could not be paid after the fact? 

“Gene Dykes deserves the record,” says Bob Anderson “and there should be something that can be done to make this right.  If it is just about money, we can pay that.”

Obtaining a USATF sanction involves filling out a sanction agreement to form a relationship between the sanctioned event and USATF. Basically, it means that an event has agreed to follow applicable USATF rules and will be afforded the benefits like insurance and other things as outlined on their site.

Gene continued on FB.  “Thank you all so much for the nice things posted about my race.  I am still proud of what I've accomplished - it just looks like it's not going to be "official".  That said, I still have four more years to do it right, and, who knows, that might happen sooner than you think!”

”Let’s not give up on what you already did Gene. You ran 26.2 miles in 2:54:23 and it should be accepted as the official world record,” says MBR Bob Anderson. “This time is too amazing to ignore.”

(12/22/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Best Racing Moment of 2018 and My Best Runs 2019 World Best 100 Races were announced today

My Best Runs "Best Racing Moment in 2018" and the My Best Runs "2019 World Best 100 Races" were announced today in Mountain View, California at the My Best Runs (MBR) headquarters.

First on the agenda was the announcement of the 2018 Best Racing Moment. MBR founder Bob Anderson stated, "Eluid Kipchoge was all smiles as he crossed the finish line at the Berlin Marathon September 29." 

"He had just smashed the world marathon record clocking 2:01:39.  Eliud ran the last 17k without pacers, pushing himself, taking off one minute and 18 seconds off of Dennis Kimetto's record."

"The world has rarely seen one event so dominated by one man, Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge," says Bob who also was the founder of Runner's World magazine (1966) and publisher for 18 years.

Eliud has won many awards this year including World Athletes of the Year at the IAAF Awards.

Next up on the agenda was the annoucement of the 4th Annual My Best Runs 2019 World Best 100 Races. 

"There are so many good races in the world.  This list could easily be much bigger.  However, as we have done now for four years, we have narrowed it down to the top 100," stated Bob. 

The featured race at 44 of the best 100 are marathons.  There are 20 half marathons and 14 10ks.  There is the Western States 100 miler and the Comrades Ultra marathon in South Africa.

The shortest race is the New Balance 5th Avenue Mile in New York City.  The longest is the 156 mile Marathon Des Sables coming up March 5 in Morocco. 

Most offer prize money totally million of US dollars.  The Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon coming up January 26 is offering $1,316,000.  This marathon which was first held in 2000 top four men at the 2018 race all ran under between 2:04:00 and 2:04:06.  Four women ran between 2:19:17 and 2:19:53.

"It is good to see over $21 million (from races MBR are featuring) in prize money being offered runners," says Bob.  "Running is what these runners do and the money is well deserved and important for our sport."

Of course the Berlin Marathon is one of our top 100 but so is the Valencia Half Marathon (Spain) where Abraham Kiptum broke the world half marathon record in the 2018 race by clocking 58:18. 

The Birell 10k Race in Prague, CZE also made the list again for the 4th year. 18-year-old Phonex Kipruto from Kenya clocked 26:46 while Caroline Kipkirui clocked 30:19.  "This is one fast evening race and obviously belongs on our top 100 list," stated Bob.

The list has races from 23 different countries. 

"You can not go wrong in running any of these races," says Bob Anderson. "Your biggest challenge in many of these races will be to be able to be on the starting line. But if you can get in, you will have a blast."

(12/19/2018) ⚡AMP
by My Best Runs
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New ownership has been announced for the Carlsbad 5000 being held April 7th

San Diego-based Groundwork Endurance, LLC announced this week that it has acquired the iconic Carlsbad 5000 road race from IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company. Under the leadership of local runners, including U.S Olympian Meb Keflezighi, Groundwork Endurance will welcome participants from around the world to Carlsbad, California April 6- 7, 2019 for the 34th annual Carlsbad 5000.

“I am delighted to join the local ownership team in building upon the legacy of the Carlsbad 5000. There is no better place than the San Diego coast to celebrate the sport that has meant so much to me,” said Meb, the only runner in history to win the NYC Marathon, Boston Marathon and an Olympic Marathon medal.

“I raced the Carlsbad 5000 twice during my professional career and both experiences were unforgettable. Having the opportunity to now help shape the direction of this amazing event for future generations is truly an honor. My wife and I are excited to watch as our three daughters run in their first Junior Carlsbad and we can’t wait to get more kids throughout the area to join in on the fun.” Known as the “World’s Fastest 5k”, the annual road race attracts amateur, competitive, and professional runners from around the world.

Since the inaugural edition in 1986, the Carlsbad 5000 has seen 16 World records and eight U.S. records, as well as numerous national and age group marks. The event is the home of the current female and male World 5K road records: 14:46, Meseret Defar (ETH), 2006 and 13:00, Sammy Kipketer (KEN), 2000.

“First and foremost, we want to thank the incredible running community that has made this race so special for more than 30 years,” said Ashley Gibson, the founder of Groundwork Endurance who spearheaded the effort to return race ownership to its local roots.

“The Carlsbad 5000 is not only a showcase of world- class talent but a celebration of family, friends, and community. Our team has a great appreciation for the unrivaled history of this race and we are committed to producing a fantastic event in 2019. April can’t get here soon enough!” Race weekend promises a fast oceanfront course, healthy competition, and energetic atmosphere for participants of all ages and paces. The event features multiple age-group races throughout the morning leading up to the legendary pro women's and men's races.

The popular Junior Carlsbad, which celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2019, also features multiple races designed for children ages 12 and under. Kids distances range from a one-miler to the always entertaining 50-yard Toddler Trot and 25-yard Diaper Dash.

“The Carlsbad 5000 is truly one of the world’s great events and holds a special place in the hearts of the runners and longtime event staff alike,” said Dan Cruz, the race’s longtime Head of Communications.

“Few events can match the Carlsbad 5000’s tradition, spectator friendly course, electric race day atmosphere and I couldn’t be more pleased to continue working with the new ownership team.”

My Best Runs Director Bob Anderson has run the Carlsbad 5000 for 25 consecutive years.  

(12/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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We all thrive on solo runs but the camaraderie of a group or team run is special - Larry Allen on Running File 1

Funny thing about running. A lot of it is solitary and we all thrive on being alone so its fine, at least part of the time. Meanwhile there isn’t much better than the camaraderie of a group or team run.

Conversations wax and wane and the personal bonds formed and memories made are often inseparable and indelible. The miles disappear, the pace quickens and the distance covered grows, it’s somehow invariably easier to be inspired to do more as part of a group.

It seems like we runners need a little of both; the quiet of running alone, lost in thought but with a good dose of runs on a team or with a friend or friends. Both have a place and are magical in their own special way.

Bob Anderson’s MyBestRuns hosts a periodic online event, repeated through the year, called Run the World Global Challenge and it fosters what we do alone and the joy in being connected while doing it.

Each event involves a hundred runners or so from all over the planet having signed up and committed to a cyber team effort to accumulate the running and walking mileage necessary to circumnavigate the 24,901 miles around the planet earth over a couple of months.

Participants post a daily (or in the case of some serious athletes, multiple times daily) run or walk, with a picture and little diary entry. I think most of the miles by all involved are solitary but all as part of the team effort to accomplish a goal bigger than any one of us.

It’s a unique, fascinating and inspirational use of social media. It has motivated me personally to do more, to be earnest in my efforts to rehabilitate my body following some personal health issues. There is a commitment, low key personal accountability, a real sense of achievement and camaraderie as words of encouragement and quiet competition creep in as we each do our part to collectively make it around the world.

The often lovely posts feature photographs of places run and selfies taken that somehow serve to enlighten and makes the world a smaller and more peaceful place, slightly reminiscent of the way world travel does.

I’m midway through my third trip around the world since July. I’ve contributed a total of about 500 miles, about the distance from my adopted home in New York City to my native eastern Maine.

This third team has already made it 8,850 miles in the first 25 days of running and walking (and posting). We’ve done enough to make it roughly from California to Europe and at our current average of about 350 miles per day we will have made it around again on about January 8th of the new year.

If so it will have taken us a total of 71 days, a good 9 days faster than Jules Verne imagined and fantasized about back in 1873. Go team!

(Editor’s note: Larry Allen is a 50 year runner and artist (self portrait) who currently is dealing with a health issue.  

His wisdom and knowledge of our sport is impressive and this is why we asked him to regularly share his thoughts here - Larry Allen on Running. You can also follow Larry on our RTW Challenge feed.)

(11/22/2018) ⚡AMP
by Larry Allen
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Runing is very important to me, it fits right in with eating, brushing my teeth and sleeping - Larry Allen On Running Intro

I am Larry Allen. I am 64-year-old, a 50 year runner and doing the Run The World Challenge for the third time.  

In 1965 I was living in Maine, Great Cranberry Island.  A small, isolated, offshore island adjacent to a national park with only 80 residents.  I started running there and achieved some success and in 2016 I was inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame.  

Running is very important to me. Without intending to overstate it, running fits right in with eating, brushing my teeth and sleeping. Obsessed is another word although I think over the years the obsession has been moderated to a healthier place.

My mental health depends on it to an extent. My creativity, well being, problem solving, peacefulness and certainly my ability to stay centered and in balance with life itself have always been better when I’m running. 

"He is a New York City artist, who retired as the director of publishing for the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan, “painted” in many different styles and left a truly remarkable body of work," a friend wrote. 

I keep busy as an artist and as a part-time manager of the business affairs of my still very active wife Kristen Blodgette. She’s a professional musician, Musical Director, Conductor and Musical Supervisor, principally having been associated with Andrew Lloyd Webber for his Broadway and worldwide productions for over 30 years.  

We live in New York City and in Fairfield County Connecticut.  "Larry has run some impressive times over a wide range: 440 (51.7), 4:34 mile, 15:58 5k, 33:26 10k and a 2:46:20 marathon.  He has directed many races, coached and written a lot about the sport. 

When Larry turned 60 he wanted to run one more marathon," wrote Bob Anderson.  I had a good year, a steady 60 miles per week. I was going to run Philly in November but about three weeks prior I tore a calf muscle severely and that was that. When I started running again about six weeks later I felt a profound fatigue and weakness that I didn’t recognize.

I assumed it was age but it was unsettling and very difficult.  An old running friend and ER nurse saw the significant dip in my ability on a social media running tracking app and called me. She essentially did triage over the phone from 500 miles away and asked (told) me to immediately go the nearest walk-in clinic and to tell them she had sent me. After an EKG the doctor came into the exam room and said 'I don’t want to alarm you but you are in complete heart block and and we’ve called an ambulance.'  I didn’t quite understand what heart block was but learned later that it was electrical in nature and not blocked arteries.

After emergency surgery suddenly I had a pacemaker.  My cardiologist is Dr Paul Thompson, who in addition of being an esteemed physician is also an accomplished runner (15th at the 1976 Boston Marathon).  

Dr. Thompson isn’t sure whether my heart block was as a result of damage done by a lot running for many years or a genetic predisposition or both but ironically he feels the strength of my heart and general health of the rest of my entire cardiovascular system as a result of years of running probably allowed me to survive the condition. 

My goal today is to find the right clothes for a cold windy day and to run four miles in the woods. My goal for this week is to do it again on Friday and hopefully Sunday too. In between my goal is to briskly walk five or six miles on rest days and at a tempo that lets me recover enough to run the next day.

My goal this winter is to stay off the treadmill as much as I can and to get outside six days per week, to cover about 30 miles weekly and to enjoy every single mile. My goal for next spring is to be running the majority if not all of my miles. My goal for next summer and fall is to have it all be easier than it was this year. My goal for the year after that is to do another lap....and the same for every year. 

(Editor's note: Larry's wisdom and knowledge of running is impressive and we are happy to announce that Larry will be contributing to My Best Runs on a regular basis - Larry Allen on Running.  He also posts most days in the RTW Feed about his road to recovery.)

(11/19/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Even super heroes like Yuki Kawauchi need to let their body recover, less marathons for this Boston Champion

Yuki Kawauchi announced on Facebook today that, "I have decided to stop running marathons in America and Europe until next spring."

This comes after running some tough marathons including the Venice Marathon where he had to run through ankle deep water.  Yuki continues, "I feel severe (tired) going to work (after a marathon) without recovery time (massage, hot spring, rest, etc.) after a long fight and jet lag." 

He has to go into work soon after he arrives back in Japan and usually works until 9:15pm.  He posted, "It was no problem when I was younger."

In the last year he mentioned the following races: January marathon in US was very cold like -17C (5F).  In March he vomited after he finished because of the hot conditions in Taiwan.   The conditions in Boston where he won were terrible (cold, wet and windy).  In May he ran a 71K race in Japan on a very tough course.  June was a hot marathon in Sweden. He ran in strong wind in two races in Japan and Italy. 

He concluded, "I need to recover to be in perfect condition by next spring."  Gary Fanelli, former elite runner, reaction was similar of many, "Yes Yuki, you definitely need recovery...so please give that to yourself...and rest until you do feel 100%...which means, how you felt before you started a marathon."

Bob Anderson says,"Yuki is a hero for many of us.  He has run in extreme conditions and have run well most of the time.  But now he needs recovery time.  Even super heroes need to let their body recover.  Yuki has made a wise decision."

(11/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Gene Dykes is currently the world's top 70 Plus runner - My Best Runs Exclusive Profile Part One

Gene Dykes is the world's best runner in the world currently seventy plus. "One of my 'secret' training methods for marathons is to run a lot of ultras," Gene told My Best Runs in this exclusive profile.

"I’ll begin training for Boston in January, and to kick it off I’ll run a 50-miler in January and both a 100-miler and a 200-miler in February. During March I’ll convert that training base into marathon speed." 

Sounds wild and unconventional but it has been working for 70-year-old Gene Dykes from Philadelphia..."It was thought by many of us that Canada's Ed Whitlock's records were way beyond reach," says lifelong runner and Runner's World and My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson. 

"At age 73 Ed became the first 70 plus runner in the world to run the marathon under three hours."  In 2004 73-year-old Ed Whitlock clocked an amazing 2:54:48 at the Scotiabank Tornonto Waterfront Marathon. 

No one ever had run a marathon that fast 70 plus. The late Ed Whitlock was in a league of his own until now.  At the same marathon this year on October 21, 70-year-old Gene Dykes clocked 2:55:18. 

My Best Runs wanted to find out more about this new super star, a runner who has set PR's at all distances (other than the 5k) over the last year from 1500m to 200 miles. How did Gene discover running? 

"It’s probably more accurate to say that I discovered running twice," said Gene. "The first time, when I was about fourteen, it just kind of popped into my head to run three miles to the house of a girl I was interested in.  After about a mile and a half, I had to walk for a bit.  I was really disgusted with myself, and I swore I would never again resort to walking on a run. 

"I actually kept this promise, until I started doing trail races, of course, where there are lots of good reasons to walk now and then." 

After this he ran track in high school for a couple of years. "In my senior year I thought I was pretty good when I dominated the 2-mile run in my county.  That notion was quickly dispelled when I ran track in college and I was totally blown away by the competition.  For the next four decades, I would stay in jogging shape much of the time, but it never occurred to me to race because it had been firmly impressed upon me that I wasn’t a very good runner," Gene remembers. 

He rediscovered running in 2004 at the age of 56 after a six year layoff because of a torn hamstring... "A golfing acquaintance told me he had a running group and that I should join him sometime.  A classic case of falling in with a bad crowd.  They encouraged me to run some races with them, and discovering that I wasn’t half bad, my running career was born," Gene told us. 

So how important is running to Gene?  "It started out as an activity I looked forward to on weekends, and it slowly took over as my main hobby.  Probably starting around 2011 when I ran my first adventure race and started training for Comrades (56-mile race in South Africa) it became way more than just a hobby.  While it will never quite reach the point of being 'all-consuming.' I suppose you would be forgiven for thinking that, considering that I’ll have done 38 races in 34 weekends this year." 

The obvious next question was, tell us about your training.  "For about nine years I just stumbled my way through training.  I did lots of long, slow runs with occasional track workouts.  I gradually improved, and I was having a lot of fun, but I was worried that my best days were behind me when I fell miserably short of a new marathon PR at the 2013 Toronto Marathon. 

"Swallowing my pride and opening my wallet, I hired a coach.  What a life changing decision that was!  In just five months I went from a half decent runner with modest goals to a runner capable of competing at the highest levels. Training now consists of fewer miles, but harder workouts and fewer rest days," says Gene. 

He has set PR's in the last 12 months from 200 miles down to the 1500m.  He clocked 98 hours, 10 minutes 22 seconds for 200 miles, 23:41:22 for 100 miles, 1:26:34 for the half marathon and 5:17 for 1500m. 

In 2018 he won ten USATF national championships. His 2:57:43 clocked at this year's Rotterdam Marathon was a world single age record until he bettered it in Toronto.  

Gene says, "I’m particularly fond of having won championships at both track 1500 meters and trail 100 mile this year.”  In part two Gene talks about his diet, going after more records, dealing with injuries and a lot more.  Coming tomorrow October 29 on My Best Runs.          

(10/28/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Count down to the third Run The World Global Run Challenge

The little country of Palau had a lot to celebrate after finishing 5th in the Run The World Global Run Challenge 2 that concluded October 12.  

Palau's team leader Aaron Salvador posted in the RTW Feed, "This is now the fruit of our labors, those sweats, early morning runs, long runs and running under the rain/heat of the sun are all worth it." 

He himself ran and logged 378 miles during the 44 day event.  Miles ran and logged in Palau totalled 1,187.  Team members only ran more miles in the countries of United States, Kenya, India and South Africa. 

Palau is located in the western Pacific Ocean.  There are mountain and sandy beaches on its east coast and grassy fields surrounded by palm trees in the north.  Current population is just under 22,000.  Aaron and team will be competing again in the up-coming RTW Challenge 3 starting October 29. 

"Our team from around the world is being put together now," says Bob Anderson Team Caption.  "We have runners of all abilities on our team.  Current and past elite runners make up our team as well as runners who have just started running.  All ages run and walk with us from age 11 to age 74." 

34-year-old team member Carmen Gair from South Africa wrote, "RTW Challenge 2 motivated me to log more mileage than I have ever done before in a similar time frame. I can’t wait to see what Challenge 3 brings. Absolutely love being part of this wonderful running community."  

62-year-old Kiranpal Singh Dhody from India will be participating for the third times says, "I love running for fitness...I try to push myself to get good timings in competitions and get podium finishes. The RTW Challenge helps me push myself."  

RTW Challenge 3 starts October 29.  It is easy to participate.  Just run, race or walk and then log these miles (k's) into your My Best Runs account.  

South Africa team leader Lize Dumon posted,  "I haven't realized how precious this RTW community has become to me. It is like an extended running family...It has become a place where I learn so much about running from reading everybody's posts and a place of immense encouragement... bring on Challenge 3."  

This event was created by 70-year-old Bob Anderson who founded Runner's World when he was 17 and published it for 18 years.  "I hope you will join our team," says Bob.  "Sign up by October 29 or join us along the way."      

(10/22/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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The RTW team logged 24,901 miles and 52.4 of these miles were run inside an NFL stadium

Did you Know? Run The World Challenge 2 team members Becca Pizzi and Michael Wardian both ran the marathon (first woman and first man) that was run inside the Gillette Stadium in Boston September 29. 

This 114 lap race was the first-ever marathon held entirely inside and on the field of an NFL football stadium. 

Dave McGillivray (also a RTWC 2 team member) was the race director. "Dave's marathons are my absolute favorite and his DMSE support team is second to none," says Becca. 

A ton of funds were raised for the New England Patriots Foundation helping the homeless...Both Becca and Michael have signed up for the RTW Challenge 3 team.  

Run The World is an event created by lifetime runner 70-year-old Bob Anderson.  He ran 260 miles for challenge 2 and even through he did not complete anything close to what Becca and Michael did, he still doubled his normal weekly mileage.  Many team members were also motivated to run more hitting milestones of 50, 100, 200 or more miles before we finished. 

"The finish line of the RTW Challenge is when our team have logged 24,901 miles," says Bob Anderson.  It took 44 days 18 hours and 29 minutes to complete the task this time.  

Runners age 11-74 ran miles in 24 different countries. In the little country of Palau 1,187 miles were logged. 74-year-old Frank Bozanich ran and logged 801 miles in the 44 days. There are so many amazing stories. 

What has become really popular and a good motivator is the Run The World Feed.  Many team members post notes and photos daily for other members to leave comments. 

"I read every post and look at every photo and comment on each one," says Bob. "I started this with Challenge 1 and found this was a good motivator." 

Lize Dumon in South Africa wrote, "The RTW community is very precious to me. It is like an extended running family, a safe place to share everything running." 

RTW Challenge 3 starts October 29. The Challenge will help get you in better shape so you can reach your goals. This can be a tough time of the year to get out the door.  We will help each other.  Sign up today and join our team.     

(10/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Run The World Challenge 2 team has finished and here are the awards

"We have finished," says Lize Dumon (photo) a RTW Challenge 2 team member from South Africa, "Great achievement! But this morning, going out for my run just felt that little bit harder. I haven't realized how precious this RTW community has become to me. It is like an extended running family, a safe place to share everything running without rolling eyes and sighs from non-runners. It has become a place where I learn so much about running from reading everybody's posts and a place of immense encouragement! I don't want to leave this place... bring it on Challenge 3!" 

Run The World Global Run Challenge is a global event celebrating running, motivating the team, inspiring others and completing the goal.  The 131 member RTW Challenge 2 team ran and logged miles in 24 countries reaching a total of 24,901 miles in 44 days 18 hours 29 minutes.  

"This event is a real motivator. Many of our members (including me) ran many more miles than usual," says Run The World Challenge Team Caption, Bob Anderson. 34-year-old team member Carmen Gair from South Africa posted, "Thank you...for this amazing challenge...thank you...for motivating me to run more than double my usual mileage in this amount of time."

She ran and logged 151 miles in 44 days.  Team members added this challenge to their existing goals and used the Challenge to further motivate them.  

"Here are the special awards for our RTW Challenge 2 team," says Bob Anderson who reached 260.66 miles himself.

For Outstanding achievement: Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 801 miles...

Most Inspiring: Lize Dumon set her goal to reach 200 miles and she did that. She also motivated other team members in South Africa that she recruited to reach their goal as well...

Most Motivating: Aaron L. Salvador from the little country of Palau logged 377.99 miles, recruited others and posted a note and photo everyday...For

Best Performance: Willie Korir (second photo) from Kenya logged the most miles (993.88) which is an average of 22.5 miles per day. This is being shared with Joel Maina Mwangi also from Kenya who not only logged in 610.44 miles but he raced four half marathons during the Challenge period clocking 1:02:52, 1:03:19, 1:02:50 and 1:02:54...

Five Most Inspiring stories: based on their story posted on My Best Runs: (this award goes to the five who received the most views on My Best Runs) Joyce Lee (1178 views), Michael Wardian (851 views), Gloria Nasr (616 views), Joel Maina Mqangi (492 views), Pete Magill (400 views)...

Best Youngest performance: Zander Brister age 11 logged 16.32 miles. He ran one mile in Hollister clocking 6:19 and he also averaged 7:42/mile pace at the Pacific Grove Double Road Race 15k...

Best Oldest performance: Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 801 miles. Shared with 71-year-old Paul Shimon who logged 655.37 miles...

Top Fifteen Spirit awards: (Based on posts on the RTW Feed) Aaron L Salvador, Michael Anderson, Brent Weigner, Danilo Purlia, Larry Allen, Asya Cabral, Lize Dumon, Roger Wright, Geoffrey Smith, Carmen Gair, Annie Conneau, Joseph Brazil, Vince Martignetti, Marnie Margolis, Willie Korir... 

Best Single Run: Michael Wardian when he ran 184.5 miles in 36 hours 48 minutes 14 seconds on the C&O Canal Trail...

Notable Mentions: Boaz Kipyego logged 788.61 miles and came to the United States and placed fourth at the Twin City Marathon. Rosaline Nyawira was first female logging 454.37 miles. Brent Weigner (69) has been running races every weekend including running a marathon in another country Sri Lanka. He logged 258 miles. James Kalani has gotten back into running (this challenge motivating him) and has already run 4 miles at 5:33 pace. He logged 252 miles.

Ultra marathon star Gloria Nasr from France logged 237 miles. Rosaura Tennant ran both the Berlin and Chicago marathon during this Challenge. Becca Pizzi was first woman in the marathon run inside a NFL stadium in Boston...

"Everyone is a winner on our team," says Bob Anderson.  "I can't wait to do this again."  RTW Challenge 3 start Oct 29. 

(10/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Meb Keflezighi is Considering Coming Out of Retirement for 2020 Olympic

America’s Meb Keflezighi is considering coming out of retirement to try to make his fifth U.S. Olympic team at the age of 44 years old at the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials.

As the most decorated U.S. marathoner in history, Keflezighi won a silver medal in the 2004 Olympic marathon. He also won the 2009 New York City Marathon, the 2012 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and the 2014 Boston Marathon. Keflezighi, currently 43, made his first U.S. Olympic team on the track in 2000 and then competed in the marathon at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Summer Games.

He announced his retirement from competitive running after racing the 2017 New York City Marathon, which was his 26th career marathon. “I still believe I can run 2:12 or 2:13, and maybe even faster on a great day,” Keflezighi added.

“The question that I have to ask myself is whether or not I want to do the work to get in 2:14 shape. I really don’t know.” The 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials will be held on Feb. 29, 2020 in Atlanta.  

“Meb should do this,” says Bob Anderson.  “US marathoning needs this even if it just inspire others but I think you could pull off at least a top three if he puts in the training.”

(10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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My Best Runs helped tell the world about the photo finish at the 2018 Illinois Marathon

The top two finishers at last year's Illinois Marathon were both clocked at 2:21:03.  The finish line judges gave the win to 22-year-old Tesfaalem Mehari and 39-year-old Wilson Chemweno second. 

My Best Runs helped tell the world about this exciting finish.  My Best Runs published the leader board results just as soon as they were official. 

Race director Jan Seeley had decided to have the Illinois Marathon featured and followed by My Best Runs (MBR) months before.  

"We only feature the best, most interesting and unique races," says MRB founder Bob Anderson, "the Illinois marathon is the type of race we want to share with our over 600,000 unique annual visitors." 

MBR is supported by races.  "Jan recently signed up for another year and we appreciate her support along with our many other race directors," says Manuel Juarez, MBR sales manager.  

MBR was started by lifetime runner Bob Anderson, the founder and publisher of Runner's World Magazine (from 1966 to 1984).  Bob, now 70, is still running 35 miles weekly and racing at sub 8 pace.  

"My Best Runs is for runners who love races," says Bob Anderson. "We are helping race directors publicize their race, and our website helps visitors find races from around the world without having to spend hours searching the Internet.  It is now in one place. This is much more than just a race listing," says Lisa Wall, MBR social media director. 

MBR features Photos, Videos, Course Maps, registration link, Leader Board Results, prize money, race write ups, background info, current race stats and promote discount codes if you do this. "Our editorial team will put this all together for you and post your results as soon as they are official, keeping your race updated every step of the way," says Michael Anderson, media director. 

As news becomes available, your race will also be featured in our column Running News Daily and in our weekly newsletter.  "We want to tell more people around the world about your race," says Bob.  Contact Manuel Juarez for more details at 650-209-7820 or write manuel@mybestruns.com 

"We appreciate your support. This is a win-win situation and we can have your race up within 24 hours at a reasonable cost," says Jamie Sanchez, MBR content manager.

(10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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I needed some motivation and the Run The World Challenge 2 is just the ticket

I have been running since 1962 and I needed some motivation.  I am participating in the Run The World Challenge 2 event that started August 29.  I did the first one that started July 4 and I ran an average of 5.1 miles per day for 37 days.  Before this I was doing about three miles per day.  That got me in better shape for Challenge 2.  On day 2 of Run The World Challenge 2 I just ran more miles in one day than I have in probably two years.  I just completed 13.21 miles broken up into three parts.  I did an easy two mile warm-up and then stopped for a light lunch (bowl of tomato soup and a roll).  After about a half hour break I ran 7.39 miles at 8:52/mile pace running the last mile just under 8 minutes.  I then drank a bottle of water and changed my shirt.  After about twenty minutes I ran 3.82 miles at 9:14/mile pace.  I started off really slow and picked it up.  Why am I tell you all of this? Because today I would have most likely have run only two to three miles easy but since I am doing the Run The World Challenge 2 I did this instead.  I did it for me and our team. The mission behind the Challenge is to celebrate running, inspire others, complete the challenge of logging enough miles to circle the globe and to motivate team members.  I can say without hesitation that I was motivated today solely because of the Run The World Challenge.  But you draw your own conclusion.  I am the team caption.  I am the guy who came up with the idea.  I have run over 1000 races and have probably run over 75,000 miles.  I founded and published Runner's World magazine for 18 years.  I have been around running for a long time.   If you are looking for something to help motivate you, this would be a good event to get involved with. There are single virtual events but nothing like what we are doing.  This is a team event.  It takes a big team (no bigger than 175).  The team also needs to run and log miles in at least ten different countries and have runners in all age groups from 17 and under to 70 plus.  I am 70-years-old and the Run The World Challenge 2 has me so motivated.  I run for me but it feels good to also be doing it for the team as well.  (Photo one of Bob Anderson fav places to run is in Paris.  This photo taken two years ago.)   (08/30/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Running is more than simply a daily habit for 57-year-old Pete Magill

Pete Magill (bib 105) has always loved to run. "It was my favorite part of sports, whether I was playing kickball, football, or actually running a race," says Pete.  When he went to high school, it was no surprise that he decided to go out for cross country. "I caught the bug. I was a runner. And once a runner, always a runner," he says.  Running is important for Pete in its own unique way. "It’s obviously a huge part of my life. Not only do I run every day (sometimes twice a day) when I’m in a competition mode, but it’s a big part of how I make my living. I write about running, both in magazines and books. And I coach runners, ranging in age and distance from high school sprinters to senior marathoners," Pete says.  Running isn’t simply a daily habit for Pete like taking out the trash or paying bills either. "It’s its own thing. It’s the time of day when I set the rest of life aside and simply enjoy being alive," explains Pete.  When he was in his 30's he was living an out-of-control life.  "It was running that rescued me, that centered me, and that has allowed me to live a productive and sane life in my 40s and 50s."  He has written four running books. "I strive to give the reader accurate, up-to-date, and useful information. And I try to debunk all the false information that gets in the way of smart, informed training and racing."  He made his living as a screenwriter for much of his 30s, and he learned to make every line count.  "I try to bring that to my running books. Every line should tell the reader something. Every paragraph should present some fresh idea with research or personal experience to back it up."  His new book, SpeedRunner, is about the components of basic speed, strength, and agility.  It explains how runners generate all three and the best way to train in order to improve them.  "My next book is titled, Fast 5K: 25 Keys to Your Best Race, and it tells the reader everything I know about training and racing for the 5K."  He thinks all runners should create a smart training plan, and then follow it.  "That’s easier said than done. For starters, simply redoing a training program you’ve done before isn’t a “smart plan.” Every time we start training, we begin from a different point. We’re older. Or our fitness isn’t the same. Or we simply trained incorrectly in the past and need to steer a different course this time around."  I asked Pete why he entered the Run The World Challenge.  "I think that Bob Anderson has once again hatched an idea that only improves the world of running—the runner’s world, if you will. The key to any good idea is that it be easy to understand, so that participants can clearly see what their contribution will be. A goal of compiling enough miles to run around the world? Yep, that fits the bill! And having runners from all age groups and requiring that miles from some team members be logged in different countries? Again, this is a truly great idea for helping to solidify the community of runner.  Count me in,” says Pete.Here are of few of Pete’s career highlights: 2016 Inductee: USATF (USA Track & Field) Masters Hall of Fame.  Fastest-ever American age 50+ at 5K (15:01) and 10K (31:11); 2nd fastest for Half Marathon (1:10:19); 14:45 5K at age 49 a world record.  His list of achievements is massive.  His knowledge of running, his passion for the sport and his achievements sets him apart but yet 57-year-old Pete Magill is always there ready to share all his secrets to help others achieve their goals.       (08/28/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Run The World Challenge 2! Participants must log their first mile before they are on the team, limited to 175.

"I think the Run The World Challenge is really cool because I get to connect with people who are doing the same thing for different reasons, and people from around the world,” say Henry Ward who is doing the challenge for the second time.  

The Run The World Global Run Challenge is all about running.  It is a celebration of running.  The challenge is a good motivator and many have said they have run more miles (k's) because of the challenge. 

The challenge inspires others to start or re-start their running.  The challenge is about setting a goal and completing it.  “Our first team started on July 4 and 36 days 23 hours 13 minutes later our team of 175 (which is now the max size of a team) finished running and logging 24,901 miles (40,074K),” says team Caption, 70-year-old Bob Anderson who logged 189 miles.  

“Our team ran miles in 30 different countries.  The youngest on our team was 11 and the oldest 82 and I am proud of all of them.”  Participants logged in as many as 797.37 miles down to 2.49 miles.

Run The World Challenge 2 starts Wednesday August 29.  You can sign up at any time but once 175 people log at least a mile, our team is full.  “Signing up is just the first step of the process,” says Bob Anderson.  

“You are not on the team until you log your first mile.” For this challenge, we will be doing a celebration lap in Pacific Grove on September 30 at the Pacific Grove 10k and Double Road Race event.  

“We encourage everyone to join us and come run one of our races too,” says Bob.  Get signed up and logged your first mile starting Wednesday August 29 to make the team.  The maximum size team is 175.  

“We are running and logging enough miles to circle the globe,” says Michael Wardian who is doing the challenge for the second time.  That is 24,901 miles.  All ages and abilities are invited. Every mile count.  

(Photo) Team members Bob Anderson, Lisa Wall and Owen Wall.  

(08/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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What does a two time Boston Marathon winner and the Boston Marathon Race Director have in common? They are both doing the Run The World Challenge again

Geoff Smith won the Boston Marathon twice.  He was leading the 1983 New York City Marathon at 26 miles until Rod Dixon caught him and Geoff finished just seconds behind. After taking a break from running due to some injuries, Geoff has now run every day recently passing 700.  While doing the first Run The World Challenge he nearly doubled his regular mileage. That team logged in 24,901 miles in 36 days 23 Hours 13 Minutes.  That’s enough miles to circle the globe.  “We are putting together our second team now and we hope to finish in 30 days,” Bob Anderson Run The World team Caption says.  Miles on the first team were run in 30 countries.  Youngest on the team was age 11 and the oldest was 82.  Team members logged in as many as 798 miles to as few as 3.  “I increased my average weekly miles from 20 to 35,” says 70-year-old Bob Anderson.  “The Run The World Challenge just gives more purpose to run a few more miles everyday,” he says.   There are a few more spots available.  You can continue with your regular routine and just take another minute or so to log in your miles on your My Best Runs account.    “I am looking forward to doing this challenge again,” says Geoff Smith.  Runners of all ages and abilities and throughout the world have already signed up.  How about you?  Use this link to sign up: https://mybestruns.com/goal.php  Join Geoff, Dave, Bob, Lize, Aaron, Owen, Lisa, Becca... (08/24/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Run The World Global Run Challenge 1 July 4 Start Special Awards Announced

The Run The World Global Run Challenge 1 presented by My Best Runs started July 4, 2018.  The goal was to run and log 24,901 Miles in the shortest posible time.  "The mission was to celebrate running, motivate our team, inspire others and complete the challenge," says team caption Bob Anderson

The team of 175 active runners finished in 36 Days 23 Hours and 13 Minutes on Thursday night August 9th at 11:13pm (PDT).  "It was an amazing event and I can not wait until the next one starting August 29," says Geoff Smith (team member and two time Boston Marathon winner). 

"Everyone on our team was a winner and deserve an award," says Bob Anderson.  "Here are our special awards just announced today.  Congrats to these winners and our entire team." 

Outstanding achievement - Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 475 miles. 

Most Inspiring - Aaron L. Salvador from the little country of Palau logged 296.4 miles and posted a comment and photo everyday. Shared with Geoff Smith who also posted a comment and photo everyday logged 240.5 miles (which is almost double what he was doing prior to the Challenge)  

Most Motivating - Grace Padilla (US) logged 327.11 miles posted a comment and creative photo everyday. Grace who is 47 placed 11th overall and was first female.  

Best Performance - Willie Korir from Kenya not only did he log the most miles (797.37) he also ran one of his workouts at 4:37/mile pace for 9.13 miles.  

Five Most Inspiring stories - based on their story posted on My Best Runs: (this award goes to the five who received the most views on My Best Runs) Michael Wardian (1,677 views), Benn Griffin (1,461 views), Swetha Amit (1,431 views), Roy Pirrung (1,241 views) and Kiranpal Singh Dhody (1,088 views)  

Most Inspiring Photo - Grace Padilla´s July 5th photo training on the track in Mammoth Lakes, California (featured photo).  

Best Youngest performance - Owen Wall age 11 who logged 34.2 miles including running 8.1 miles in one day at 9:59 pace during his longest ever run. Shared with Elliot Daniels age 14 who ran and logged 184.45 miles and ran 5:47/mile pace for six miles in the Wharf to Wharf race in Santa Cruz, California.  

Best Oldest performance - Libby James age 82 who logged 81.81 miles (rounds up to 82). Shared with 74-year-old Frank Bozanich who ran and logged in 475 miles. 

Top Fifteen Spirit awards (based on coment and photo posted regularly that appeared on the Run The World Feed): Aaron L Salvador, Grace Padilla, Shawn Whalen, Michael Anderson, Brent Weigner, Danilo Purlia, Larry Allen, Rosaura Tennant, Asya Cabral, Kati Toivanen, Lize Dumon, Roger Wright, Abbey Cannon, Geoffrey Smith, and Pulkit Singh.  

Best Single Run - Michael Wardian when we ran 100.5 miles in 30 hours 23 minutes to place 11th on July 21 at Hardrock 100.  

Notable Mentions - Dave Mcgillivray logged 164.52 miles (Boston Marathon Director), Becca Pizzi logged 226.17 miles (Holds the record for running seven Marathons. Seven days on seven Continents), Liz Dumon had never run 150 Miles in 30 days before this challenge, Boaz Kipqego from Kenya logged 588.52 miles and placed second, JR Mintz (age 52) logged the most miles by an American with 480.86 miles, Paul Shimon (age 71) logged 390.71 miles placed 6th overall and was third American, Harpal Singh Gill was first runner from India logging 331.66 miles placing 10th overall, Sam Tada was first runner from Japan logging 237.30 miles placing 29th overall. Malin Andersson co-owner of World´s Marathons logged in 77.67 miles and Will Adams who logged 51.58 miles mostly all plogging (picking up trash while running).  

Our next Run The World Global Run Challenge starts August 29.  There is a $25 entry fee to help cover expenses unless you can not afford it and then it will be waived.  

(08/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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My Best Runs and World’s Marathons join forces to help Runners around the globe

My Best Runs located in Mountain View, California and World’s Marathons located in Stockholm, Sweden have formed a partnership.

This is exciting news for both race organizers and runners.  World’s Marathons partners will now be offered the opportunity to utilize the resources of My Best Runs to gain additional exposure for their race events.

“Runners get a new channel to discover amazing races and book their entry online through My Best Runs,” says Malin Andersson co-founder of World’s Marathons.  

“This is especially helpful when entering an international race or a race that sells out quickly,” says My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson.  

Thanks to the partnering of these two high profile running sites, who already have a tremendous hold on the marathon and running industry, My Best Runs will further enhance World’s Marathons Marketplace by offering the tools to register at a click of a button.  

The partnership creates an audience in over 150 countries worldwide. Currently, 80% of the registrations through World’s Marathons are made by international runners.

“The additional marketing is a huge asset to an event organizer’s exposure, participation rate, and bottom line,” says Malin.  This will be a big benefit for race organizer looking to increase the popularity of your race, target people outside of your niche market, and create buzz that reaches the world at an amazing pace.

Bob Anderson and Malin Andersson (photo) got together in Paris in late May for a run, to meet up with Edouard Cassignol from the Paris Marathon and to finalize plans.  Those plans are being rolled out now.  “Races like the Stockholm Marathon are already on board,” says Bob Anderson.

(08/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Run The World Global Run Challenge Team Just finished logging in 24,901 Miles in just under 37 Days

The first ever Run The World team have run and logged enough miles to circle the Global.  A team of 175 strong from around the world came together and not only covered 24,901 miles but they took the time to logged this many miles in 36 Days 23 Hours 13 Minutes.  

The team ran miles in 30 different countries.  The youngest person on the team was Owen Wall, age 11 and the oldest was Libby James, age 82.  Willie Korir from Kenya logged the most miles with 797.37.  

Grace Padilla from the US posted the most for females with 327.11 miles.  The purpose of the Run The World Challenge was to celebrate running, motivate the team, inspire others and complete the goal.  

“Our Mission was accomplished,” says Run The World team leader Bob Anderson.  The next start date is August 29 and it is hoped this record will be broken.  

(08/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: If it doesn't challenge you, it doesn't change you says Ravindra G Rajput

RUN THE WORLD: Ravindra G Raput started running January 31, 2016.  He weighed close to 200 pounds (90kgs) and felt tired quiet often.  "My doctor suggested walking and jogging and I took his advice," says Ravindra.  In addition to running he also took up cycling.  He lost 14 kg (30 pounds).  "I observed that I felt fresh, energetic, active.  The spark of fitness got enlightened in me and there was no looking back after that," he says.  40-year-old Ravindra lives and works in Pune, India.  He has participated in over 100 marathons since Feb of 2016 and as his passion drew he wanted to encourage others.  "I realized that fitness is not just for an individual but for the whole society and community to take up fitness activities." he says.  It began in his home and he encouraged his wife and 14-year-old daughter to take up running and cycling.  "Next were my colleagues and slowly we had a team participating in various marathons and cycling events," Ravindra says.  "Today my family and I continue our work of spreading awareness around health, fitness and healthy living. I'm linked to multiple campaigns such as Cycle2Work which encourages people to cycle to work on a daily basis and reduce the overall carbon foot print,” he says.    "Thanks Bob Anderson and My Best Runs for organizing such an unique event for the world," he says.  "Run The World gives us precious qualities like hard work, dedication, passion, will power, tenacity and Bob Anderson has given us continued motivation," says Ravindra.     (08/08/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Julie likes to run along the Seine River in Paris when the city sleeps

RUN THE WORLD:  33-year-old Julie Delle Donne Voisse works at the reception of a Nice Parisian hôtel.  She started running before her 30th birthday.  "I wanted to prove to myself that I could do something "athletic", even though I have never been a fit girl," says Julie.  "I started with a 10-15 minute run."   After a few weeks she could easily run up to a hour.  Running is very important to Julie.  "Taking time for myself, is good for body and mind," she says. "It’s free and accessible anywhere, just need shoes and a few free minutes. I tried other activity but I never had this freedom." Julie is married and has a seven year old boy.  Across the street from the hotel where she works is the Seine river.  "I like running in Paris, along the Seine early morning when the city sleeps, or late evening in public gardens to admire the city," she says. Besides training, Julie also likes to run races and looks forward to collect the medal and hang it on her board! Why did she enter this challenge?  " Running is an individual sport but we share so much between runners. This challenge is a good motivation around the borders."  Julie has posted 16.16 miles so far for the Run The World Global Run Challenge. "I met Julie on our trip to Paris in May," says Bob Anderson.  "I was impressed by the passion she has for running.  I told her about our challenge and she signed up right away." (08/07/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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The Run The World Challenge is not over until it is over, until we login 24,901 miles says team leader Bob Anderson

The Run The World Challenge is one of the longest running events on the planet.  “Our team will log in enough miles to circle the world, that is 24,901 miles,” says team leader Bob Anderson.  

A team can not be no larger than 200 active runners.  “Our team needed members to run miles in at least 20 different countries (we have logged in miles in 29 countries). We also had to at least have one runner in each age group (14 and under, 15-19, 20-29, 30-39,40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 and 80 plus).  We met all these Run The World Challenge standards,” says Bob.  

The goal was to do this in 30 days.  “What we did not know is that with a team this size, things happen, injuries, work and family situations, life challenges, or just running out of time to log.  So after 30 days our team has logged in 19,600 miles,” Bob says.  

This team is 78.7% of the way around the globe. “Our team of 163 active runners are amazing.” Willie Korir from Kenya is the leader and has been running two to four times per day to login his 630 miles.  

That is 21 miles per day.  Jen Baylis from the US has logged in 465.34 miles with Grace Padilla right behind her with 464 miles.  25 members of the team has logged in 200 miles or more.  45 have logged 150 miles or more and 85 a hundred or more.  

“One of our team members, Michael Wardian (photo) logged in 100.5 miles in one day.  No, we are not finished. We are not finished until we reach 24,901 miles,” says Bob.  Maybe during the next challenge a team will reach 24,901 miles in 30 days.  The next Run The World Challenge starts August 29.  

“In the meantime we are continuing until we reach our goal. We are hoping to reach it within 40 days or in ten more days,” says Bob Anderson.  

(08/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: I get energy spreading through my entire body when I run says Malin Andersson

RUN THE WORLD: Malin Andersson has been running with her parents since she could walk.  "My brother and I biked next to my parents while they ran, then we started running with them and later they were biking next to us while we were running," says 31-year-old Malin who lives outside of Stockholm, Sweden.  She is co-owner of an important running website. "World's Marathons is an international marketplace for running events.  We help bring more international runners to running events," she says.  "We are driven by a team of dedicated tech and business talents based out of Sweden with offices in Lisbon and Jamaica."  She says she runs today just for herself to take good care of herself.  "I get energy spreading through my entire body when I run.  I love running mostly without feeling any pressure of having to perform," she says.  "At this point, I am not clocking myself since I am high performing in my business projects.  I enjoy running and love being out on the trails in the Swedish woods. The Swedish woods is one of my favorite place to run."  “Malin and I met in Paris in May,” says Bob Anderson.  “We decided to work together on several running related projects (My Best Runs and World’s Marathons).”  They did not talk about the Run The World Challenge because it had not been "born" yet.  "I think it is amazing how Bob Anderson have made Run The World Global Run Challenge happen in such a short time and being able to set this up with all these enthusiastic passionate people joining," Malin says.  (Photo taken during a meeting in Paris May 2018. Malin, Jean-Loup Fenaux (founder of Ahotu - an important running website) and Bob Anderson.  Earlier Malin and Bob met up with Paris Running Tours and ran from Notre Dame to the Eiffel Tower. (07/31/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Our goal was to log enough miles to circle the globe in 30 days, that's 24,901 miles

Day 27 of of Run The World Global Run Challenge is coming to an end soon.  Our Mission is to celebrate running, motivate our team, inspire others and reach our goal.  As of right now our team has logged in 17,432 miles.  Our team ranging in age from 11 to 82 have run miles in 29 different countries.  26-year-old Willie Korir from Kenya has logged in the most miles with 553.18. The top American is 74-year-old Frank Bozanich who has logged 407 miles.  Jen Bayliss (US) is the top female with 265.24 miles.  Grace Padilla (also 47) is close behind with 238.99 miles.  74 of our team has hit the magic number, which is to log in 100 or more miles in 30 days and we have ten more who can reach that goal too.  The 5 mile a day average (which is 150 miles in 30 days) already has 34 in that group and another ten can achieve that mark as well.  There are a lot of stats to look at and we will share more later.  I am so proud of what our team has achieved.  There are so many wonderful inspiring stories to tell.  Our Run The World feed and our My Best Runs profile tell just some of the stories.  Many more to tell.  The big question is, are we going to make our goal?  We still could, but 30 days is up at the end of day Thursday.  In any case, we are going to reach our goal.  It could take us 40 days but we are going to do it.  Once we hit our goal we will record the days, hours and minutes (based on PDT) that it took us.  This will be the standard that we will go after on our next Run The World Challenge starting August 29.  In fact it would be fun to have two teams to challenge each other.  In any case, we are going to run a celebration lap (about 400m) this Sunday at our Golden Gate Double 8K and Ujena 5k/3k event.  It will be right before our awards.  We still need 7,477 miles to reach our goal.  Sounds like a big number by end of day Thursday or even by Sunday but I am hopeful.  Thanks for your support.  Bob Anderson, Run The World Challenge Team Leader.  (07/30/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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The Run The World Global Run Challenge team is one third of the way around the world

The Run The World Global Run Challenge team has logged in 8,138 miles so far which is almost a third of the way around the world in the first 14 days.  

These miles have been run in 21 countries.  The top ten counties based on miles logged are: 1. USA 2. Kenya 3. India 4. South Africa 5. Great Britain 6. Canada 7. Palau 8. Mexico 9. Japan 10. Costa Rica.

“We wanted this to be a Global event and that is what it has become,” says Bob Anderson who created the event.  70-year-old Bob Anderson has logged in 76 miles himself since the start date of July 4.  

“Our Mission is to celebrate running, motivate our team, inspire others and complete our goal of logging 24,901 miles, the distance around the world in as few days as possible with a team no bigger than 200,” says Bob.  

(Photo: Grace Padilla training at Mammoth Lakes, California last week and logging her miles in for the RUN THE WORLD Challenge.)  

(07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Mary Menton has been running for over 25 years and loves it as much now as ever

RUN THE WORLD:  Mary Menton has been running for over 25 years.  She works full time as a family Advisor Dignity memorial.  "I protect families on the worst day of their life before someone passes," Mary says.  "I have been doing this for 3 and half years and I love it as much as running."   She gets up around 5 am to run before work and if needed does a second workout in the evening.   "Running to so important to me and it always will be.  It provides peace, its like a drug.  It not only is a physical addiction for me but it is mental as well.  I need to be exercising and running.  Its a feeling and enjoyment people who don't run can't understand what it is like to be a runner," says Mary.  She was one of the top 10 Americans at the Boulder Boulder 10k and she qualified for the Marathon Olympics Trials three times.  "As a Master the work is more difficult," she says, "because we are older the injuries are much higher.  I am dealing with an injury now.  As a master it is much more relaxing and I am not so hard on myself."  She discovered running as a young girl while, "watching my older sister and a AAU sprinter.  My mom would pack PJ’s because track meets were all day. So my little sister and I would be let loose running around the stadium.  I was in awe of the runners."   Mary has three girls.  "Sara is working for the Court of Appeals in Denver. She is a lawyer.  My daughter Megan is a RN living in Denver.  My 3rd daughter Ryan will be a Senior at Trinity Catholic."  What does she think of this challenge?  "The Run The World challenge is another one of Bob Anderson's fantastic ideas.  His passion for the sport is infectious. He is not only an advocate of running but a motivator to everyone. Having the Run The World challenge spreads the importance of running and keeps people together for a common interest."  Mary's current goal is to start running regularly again and get back to 50 miles a week.  (07/12/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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The RUN THE WORLD Global Run Challenge 1 has Started, the team is 175 strong from 15 countries

The time has come for our 175 strong RUN THE WORLD Global team to start logging miles.  The goal is to login 24,901 miles or 40,072k within 30 days.  “We have put together a strong team,” says Bob Anderson, team leader.  “Our runners come with lots of experience to runners who are just getting started.  We have ultra marathoners capable of running 100 miles in a day, world class runners, past Olympians,  middle distance runners, trail runners, 80 plus runners, kid Runners, coaches, Race directors, recreational runners, marathoners, and more,” says Bob.  Some of the team will be logging in five miles a week while others will be logging in over 130 miles weekly.  “It is the type of team we were looking for.  Once the word got out there, we reached 200 easily.”  We established guidelines we needed to follow.  1. A team can not have more than 200 active runners.  2. There has to be at least one member in each age group, 19 and under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70 plus.  3. At least 25% of the team must be either male or female (mixed team). 4. There needs to be Runners from at least 10 countries.  The runner can either have a passport from that country or live in that country.  5. The first 200 who log miles are on the team after the start date.  Each member have to set a weekly goal, post a short bio and agree to try to reach their goal and log the miles.   6. Miles can either be running, run/walk or walking miles.  Only “real miles” can be posted.  “Our team meets all these guidelines.  I am so proud of all our team members,” says Bob.  What is the mission? First it is a celebration of running.  Second, to inspire others to include running into their daily life.  (This is why we are publishing inspiration stories about our members).  Third, to motivate (Team members set a weekly goal which they want to reach or more.) Four, to bond (bringing Runners from around the world closer together.  “We are Runners” Five, to educate and inform (our My Best Runs website offers advice and reports on the best, most interesting and unique races in the world). “Our team is excited to finally get this under way.”   (07/03/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Swetha Amit says that when the endorphins kicked in after her first half she was hooked

RUN THE WORLD: 36-year-old Swetha Amit started running December of 2010 in her hometown of Mumbai, India.  She was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and as a result lost a lot of blood, strength and self confidence. 

"Since I couldn’t lift weights in the gym as I used too, I took up running to build back my strength and restore my sense of worth," she says.  Six months later she ran her first half marathon in Mumbai. 

"The sheer feeling of crossing the finish line and with the endorphins kicking in got me hooked. Running has been a part of my life ever since and will continue to be as long as I am alive."

So far she has run one full marathon, 26 half marathons, three Double Races, two 15k's and several 10K's.  She has had eight podium finishes.  "I have gained a wonderful community called the Mumbai Road Runners which is the largest running group in India.  

I have met a lot of inspiring people and learnt a lot from them. I have also run some incredible events in California in the last year which has changed my perception about running." 

She came to California about a year ago with her husband and daughter.  "We met up a year ago on the Stanford campus," says Bob Anderson.  Her husband would be studyng at Stanford over the next year. Swetha would enroll in some creative writing classes. 

"A Facebook friend Ram, founder of Mumbai Road Runner. told me she was coming. I was impressed by her right from the start. Obviously running was a major part of her life along with her family.  We connected right away as us runners do," says Bob.  Swetha says of her stay, 

"We landed here in Stanford, California in June 2017. Coming away from my comfort zone and home in India was initially intimidating. However, I decided to embrace the opportunities."   And she did. 

She has run 27 races and is doing a couple more before leaving in August.  "My stay in the Bay area has been a memorable experience." 

Asked about our Run The World Challenge, "I think it’s a fantastic idea. I have always marveled at the fact that running somehow manages to connect people from across the globe. We run in different parts of the world yet there is this common thread that ultimately brings us together.  We inspire, get inspired from people of varied backgrounds, age groups and their ability to battle against the odds. I feel elated to be a part of this phenomenal challenge." 

(06/22/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Boston Marathon Director Dave McGillivray has run over 150,000 Miles

RUN THE WORLD: "You can count on 35 miles a week from me," wrote Dave McGillivray, director of the Boston Marathon since 1988. Dave is much more than a first class race director.  He was and still is an accomplished runner.  He has done some amazing things with more to come.  On his birthdate he runs his age in miles.  (Photo: finishing 60 miles on his 60th birthdate.)  In 1978 he ran across America, a distance of 3,452 miles in 80 days.  That is a daily average of 43 miles or 302 miles weekly.  Most recently in 2018 he ran seven marathons in seven days on seven continents at age 63.  He has run the Boston Marathon 46 times and he does this after completing his duties directing the marathon. In May 2004, McGillivray ran across the country again, this time with nine other veteran marathoners, in relay style, from San Francisco to Boston as part of TREK USA, an event which he founded and raised over $300,000 for five children’s charities.  In his lifetime so far he has run more than 150,000 miles.  "Dave and I first met back in the 70's during one of his cross country adventures,” says Bob Anderson.  "Dave stopped by our Runner's World offices and we had time to meet and chat before he headed back out to run more miles."  There is one thing he would like to figure out.  He needs more hours in a day.   "There just is not enough time in a day.  I wish there would be a way to add a couple more hours each day," Dave told me.  “If we could take a pill to add another couple of hours daily I know I would do that too.  I am very excited to have Dave on our team and I know we can count on his miles," says Bob.   (06/21/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Libby James is the fastest 80 plus woman in the world

RUN THE WORLD: "I’d be happy to add a few miles to your round the world challenge.  Put me down for an average of 20 miles per week," wrote 81-year-old Libby James.  She has been running since the early 70's and racing since 1976. She holds American and world records in distances from 5k to half-marathon. She says it pays to get old and keep running.  Most recently competing in the 80- to 84 age group, she holds the USATF Women’s Masters records for 5k and 15k races, with times of 25:11 and 1:25:06.  She runs Bolder Boulder 10K every year. Libby has a new book called Still Running.  It is about her experiences with the sport. Libby writes because people fascinate her. Being a writer gives her a legitimate reason to be nosey—to find out all she can about people and what makes them tick. For more than 30 years she’s been a freelance feature writer.  "We are excited to have Libby on our Run The World team," says Bob Anderson.  "We met in Colorado (where she lives) a few years ago and I was impressed with her dirve and obvious love for running."  Corey Radman asked Libby recently if she had a formula for success.  "There’s no secret formula. I don’t eat weird. I eat fairly healthy. I think one of the secrets is consistency, particularly as you get older. If you lay off for four or five days, it’s harder to get started again. So, I’ve taken to not running very far, but doing it pretty regularly. Almost every day, usually four miles," Libby answered. (06/21/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Ultra Marathoner Giant Roy Pirrung has won 85 National Titles

RUN THE WORLD: 69-year-old Roy Pirrung is looking forward to the Run The World challenge and is looking at posting 75 miles weekly. Ultra Running Magazine wrote this: 

In 1980, at the age of 32, Roy Pirrung was 60 pounds overweight, smoked 2 packs of cigarettes a day, and was a self-described binge drinker. He decided to take up running to help change his lifestyle.

Within a year he was 60 pounds lighter, tobacco and alcohol free, and ran his first marathon, in 3:16. Only two years after that his marathon time was down to 2:38.

It would seem he was born to run. In 1985 he ran his first ultra, the Ice Age 50 Mile trail race in Wisconsin, finishing 5th in one of the most competitive trail ultras in the country.

Only four months later he won the Fond du Lac 24-Hour race with just under 138 miles, and found himself ranked #1 American at that event for the year. Yes, he was born to run.

Ultra racing success continued at a brisk pace for Pirrung. In 1987 he became a national champion for the first time, winning the USA 100 Mile Championship in New York City.

A year later he garnered his second national title and his first national record, winning the inaugural USA 24-Hour Championship in Atlanta with a new American Road Record of 145 miles, 1464 yards. Roy Pirrung’s ultra career continued at a world-class level for over two decades, and continues today at a similar level in the Masters age-group categories.

He has raced in almost every state in the USA, and in 26 different countries on five continents. He has run in almost two dozen USA 24-Hour National Championships, has won two of them, and has placed in the top five in 17 of them.

In addition to his three open National Championship gold medals and his three open American Records, he has won over 80 Masters age-group National Championship Titles and has broken over 50 Masters age-group National Records. He is an American Ultrarunning Association Hall of Fame member with over 50 American records and 86 national titles.

Lifetime miles over 100,000. Lifetime races over 1,000.  "We are super excited to have Roy on our team," says Bob Anderson.  Carey Stoneking one of his Facebook friends posted, "OK Roy...But don't over-do it.  They only want to go around the world...Once." 

(06/21/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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If you love running and would like to show the world, this 24,901 mile challenge circling the world is for you

This challenge is about five things. First to celebrate running. Second to motivate people to reach their goals. Third to inspire people to run regularly. Four to show the world how much we love running.  Five to see if our group can log enough miles to circle the world.  

"Our group will start logging miles July 4th and hopefully within 30 days reach our goal of circling the world, 24,901 miles (40,074K)," says Bob Anderson.

"As of June 18 we are 68 runners strong and we think we can average 2,471 miles per week. More runners are needed for us to reach our goal within 30 days."  

On August 5th the team will run a victory lap (800m) in San Franicco and receive a medal and shirt to celebrate reaching the goal. Runners from 12 different countries and from across the US have already signed.

"We know many team members will not be able to join us in San Francisco," says Bob Anderson. "The Victory Medal and shirt can be mailed out.  The key thing is to get signed up."

If you love running and want to tell the world that running is an important part of your life, this would be a good challenge to join. If you can make a commitment of posting miles this challenge is for you.

There is no entry fee and only if you want a shirt and medal is there any fee. Click on the title to sign up and get more information. Lifetime runner Bob Anderson has put this together.

(06/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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