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Articles tagged #Abbott World Marathon Majors
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Jordan Hasay will headline the women’s race in the 2019 Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Jordan Hasay has announced that she will target the American women’s marathon record this fall in Chicago.

Rupp’s Nike Oregon Project teammate, Jordan Hasay, offers incredible inspiration when it comes to successful comebacks. After a storybook 2017 season that saw her run the American debut marathon record, 2:23:00, for a third-place finish in Boston and then post the second-fastest time ever run by an American woman in Chicago (2:20:57), she shut down her 2018 season due to two stress fractures in her foot.

She announced her comeback with confidence this spring in Boston, acquiring another podium finish and posting a swift time, 2:25:20. Hasay hopes to take down Deena Kastor’s long-standing American record of 2:19:36. “I am honored to return to the streets of Chicago,” said Hasay. “I love the fast course and exciting atmosphere, which I believe can lead to an attempt at the American record. I look forward to being at my best again and giving it all I have in October.” 

In its 42nd year on Sunday, October 13, the Bank of America Chicago Marathon welcomes thousands of runners from more than 100 countries and all 50 states, including a world-class elite field, top regional and Masters runners, race veterans, debut marathoners and charity runners.

The race’s iconic course takes runners through 29 vibrant neighborhoods on an architectural and cultural tour of Chicago. Annually, an estimated 1.7 million spectators line the streets cheering on more than 40,000 runners from the start line to the final stretch down Columbus Drive.

As a result of the race’s national and international draw, the Chicago Marathon assists in raising millions of dollars for a variety of charitable causes while generating $338 million in annual economic impact to its host city. The 2019 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, a member of the Abbott World Marathon Majors, will start and finish in Grant Park beginning at 7:30 a.m. on Sunday, October 13.

(05/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Reigning London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot is focusing on defending her title at 2019 London Marathon

Reigning London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot is not focusing on breaking the world record when she returns to the 2019 London course on April 28.

Cheruiyot, popularly known as ‘Pocket Rocket’, will be lining up in the streets of London for a third consecutive year but this time round she will be defending the title she clinched in 2018.

The Olympic Champion clocked 2:18:31 beating the three-time London Marathon champion and her close ally Mary Keitany en route to clinching the title and the duo are set to face off again in this year’s event.

The 35-year-old however says that focus is on retaining the crown but not setting a record and would not be focussing on her competitors.

“I will be running against anybody. I will be competing as Vivian and so I don’t know what my competitors are planning, maybe they want to break the world record but for me I hope to run good race,” Cheruiyot, known for her trade mark infectious smile told Citizen Digital.

Having beaten Keitany to the title last year, Cheruiyot said they might be rivals on the road but enjoys a warm relationship with the New York Marathon champion.

“In athletics we are also friends, only that if I win then that is my time and if Mary wins it’s her time because this is sports,” explained Cheruiyot.

This year’s race is set to be as competitive as ever with the winners of the last four Abbott World Marathon Majors set to line up in London on Sunday.

The duo is set to face off against Chicago Marathon champion Brigid Kosgei and the Berlin Marathon champion Gladys Cherono.

Also, in the mix is another Kenyan, Linet Masai, who will be making her debut.

Cherono, Kosgei and Keitany top the current Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York.

Meanwhile, three-time Olympic champion who finished second in London and won Chicago in 2017, Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba, has pulled out of the Sunday’s race as she is expecting her second- born child thus leaving her compatriots Tadelech Bekele, who finished third in London last year and the 21-year- old Roza Dereje, second in Chicago, and winner of the Dubai Marathon in 2018 to lead the assault for Ethiopia.

(04/22/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gilbert Kiprotich
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Lawrence Cherono wins the 2019 Boston Marathon Elite Men's race by two seconds

It was a sprint to the finish at this year's Boston Marathon.  A three-person race down the stretch on Boylston Street turned into a two-man, all-out sprint and Cherone of Kenya emerged in front of Lelisa Desisa.  Cheroono's time was 2:07:57, best time since 2011, while Desisa clocked a 2:07:59.  Kenneth Kipkemoi faded in the final 300 yards and placed thired in 2:08:06. 

Scott Fauble, in seventh, and Jared Ward, in eighth, were the top American finishers, crossing in 2:09.10 and 2:09.25, respectively.

Going into Boston Lawrence was the winner of six marathons and was the fastest man in the 2019 Boston Marathon field, Cherono brought both speed and strength to his Boston debut. His personal best was earned with a course record win at the 2018 Amsterdam Marathon (2:04:06). He also won the 2017 Amsterdam Marathon, the 2016 and 2017 Honolulu Marathon, the 2016 Prague Marathon and the 2015 Zurich Marathon. In his first Abbott World Marathon Majors event, he finished seventh at the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2:09:25.

Cherono’s coach is 2007 Boston Marathon runner-up James Kwambai. He says winning the Amsterdam Marathon in a course record time has been a career highlight.

Last year Geoffrey Kirui was intent on defending his Boston crown, but after pulling away from the front pack and leading many of the closing miles, he was caught by Yuki Kawauchi and had to settle for second in 2018.

This year at 20 miles Geoffrey was leading clocking 1:38:37 but in the end he faded to fifth about a minute behind the winner.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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John Hancock 2019 Boston Marathon US Elite Open Team

Featured video: 2019 Boston Marathon John Hancock U.S. Elite Open Team for Monday April 15.

Abdi Abdirahman, a four-time Olympian, placed sixth at the 2017 Boston Marathon. He is a multiple national champion in the 10,000m, 10K, 10-mile and half marathon. 

Shadrack Biwott finished third this year in Boston. Last year, he was second American and fourth overall. Biwott placed fifth at the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon in a personal best time of 2:12:01.

Aaron Braun, 13th at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, is a versatile road runner. Braun is a national champion in the 12K and was top American at the 2015 Houston Marathon.

Sarah Crouch has finished top-ten three times at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, including this year where she was top American and ninth overall. She is a past champion of the Tallahassee Marathon and finished 11th at the 2016 Boston Marathon.

Jeffrey Eggleston has raced on three IAAF World Championships Marathon teams, placing as high as 13th in 2018. He has won the Pittsburgh, Woodlands, Lima and San Diego Marathons and has been runner-up in Brisbane, Pittsburgh and at Twin Cities.

Scott Fauble was the second American and seventh overall at the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon. Fauble placed fourth in the 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Trials and represented the United States at the 2017 IAAF World Cross Country Championships.  

Lindsay Flanagan, the 2015 Pan American silver medalist in the marathon, finished 11th at the 2017 Boston Marathon and set her personal best of 2:29:25 at the Frankfurt Marathon this year.  

Sara Hall is the tenth fastest U.S. women’s marathoner of all time having set her 2:26:20 mark at the 2018 Ottawa Marathon. Hall has earned national titles in the marathon, 20K, 10-mile, mile and cross country. She is married to Ryan Hall, who is a John Hancock Elite Athlete Ambassador and holds the American course record of 2:04:58 at the Boston Marathon. 

Jordan Hasay set an American debut record of 2:23:00 with her third-place finish in Boston in 2017. She then ran the second fastest marathon of all time by a U.S. woman at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, where she placed third in 2:20:57. Hasay is an 18-time All American and a national champion at 15K and 20K.  

Elkanah Kibet, a member of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, has had two top-ten finishes at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon. At the 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon, Kibet finished top American and 16th overall. He was 8th in Boston in 2018.

Desiree Linden, a two-time Olympian, returns to Boston as defending champion. A top-five finisher in eight Abbott World Marathon Majors, additional accomplishments include placing seventh at the 2016 Olympic Games Marathon, tenth at the 2009 IAAF World Championships Marathon, second at the 2012 and 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and second in the 10,000m at the 2015 Pan American Games. In addition to her 2018 win in Boston, she placed second in 2011.

Timothy Ritchie, the 2017 U.S. National Marathon champion, ran for the U.S. at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships where he placed 23th. Ritchie is the head men’s cross country coach at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Dathan Ritzenhein is the fourth fastest U.S. marathoner of all time with a 2:07:47 personal best. Career highlights for the three-time Olympian include finishing ninth at the 2008 Olympic Marathon, winning the bronze medal at the 2009 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and finishing 13th at the 2012 Olympic Games 10,000m. 

Sarah Sellers ran through freezing rain and torrential wind this year to finish second behind Des Linden. In her 2017 marathon debut, Sellers won the Huntsville Marathon. In New York this year she finished 18th.

Brian Shrader is a versatile runner on the track and roads. He made his half marathon debut in Boston this year at the B.A.A. Half Marathon, running 1:05:26. He also made his marathon debut in 2018, running 2:13:31 at the USA Championships in Sacramento.  

Becky Wade, a champion of the California International Marathon, finished 11th at the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon and tenth at the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon. 

Jared Ward placed third at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and followed with a sixth-place finish at the Olympic Marathon in Rio de Janeiro, less than a minute and a half out of medal contention. In 2017 Ward was tenth at the Boston Marathon and this year, he finished top American and sixth overall at the TCS New York City Marathon. 

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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IAAF Announces New Qualifying System for Tokyo 2020

Today the IAAF Council met in Doha and announced the qualification system for track & field at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. The big change from previous years is that the IAAF will be using its new World Ranking System as part of the qualifying criteria.

As in the past, athletes can still qualify by hitting an entry standard. But those standards are much stiffer across the board as compared to 2016. In the men’s distance events, for example, the times dropped from 3:36.20 to 3:35.00 in the 1500, from 8:30:00 to 8:22:00 in the steeplechase, from 13:25.00 to 13:13.50 in the 5000, from 28:00.00 to 27:28:00 in the 10,000, and from 2:19:00 to 2:11:30 in the marathon for 2020.

For the women, the 1500 standard has gone from 4:07.00 to 4:04.20, the steeplechase standard has gone from 9:45:00 to 9:30:00, the 5000 standard has gone from 15:24.00 to 15:10.00, the 10,000 standard has gone from 32:15 to 31:25, and the marathon standard has gone from 2:45:00 to 2:29:30.

The reason for these tougher standards is the IAAF’s desire to make use of its World Ranking System which in theory encourages athletes to compete head to head in important meets, which is something we’re behind. Essentially, the World Ranking System will take the place of the world descending order list that was used to fill fields in the past at the Olympics and World Championships.

The IAAF will accept all athletes who achieve the entry standard and fill the rest of the field based on where an athlete ranks in the World Ranking System as of July 1, 2020; if the athlete does not accept the place, the IAAF will continue down the rankings until the field is full in each event.

The qualification window for each event is as follows:

For the marathon and 50k race walk, the qualification period runs from January 1, 2019, to May 31, 2020

For the 10,000, 20k race walk, and combined events, the qualification period runs from January 1, 2019, to June 29, 2020.

For all other events, the qualification period runs from May 1, 2019, to June 29, 2020.

In addition, the top 10 finishers in the marathon at the 2019 World Championships will be considered to have achieved the standard, as will top-5 finishers at IAAF Gold Label Marathons and top-10 finishers at Abbott World Marathon Majors held during the qualification period.

(03/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organizedthe Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, from July 24 to August 9, 2020. The Games in 1964 radically transformed the country. According to the organizersof the event in 2020, the Games of the XXXII Olympiad of the modern era will be “the most innovative ever organized,...

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Mary Keitany, Vivian Cheruiyot And Tirunesh Dibaba will battle at the London Marathon

The defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot and the current TCS New York City Marathon champion Mary Keitany return to the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2019.

They join their compatriots Gladys Cherono (2018 BMW Berlin Marathon champion) and Brigid Kosgei (2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon champion) meaning the winners of the last four Abbott World Marathon Majors will be on the Start Line in London on Sunday 28 April.

Cheruiyot, who is also the reigning Olympic 5000m champion and the runner-up behind Keitany at last November’s TCS New York City Marathon, said: “It was a great moment for me winning last year’s Virgin Money London Marathon and I am very much looking forward to returning in April.

“The line-up for this year’s race is, once again, incredibly strong so I know I will need to be at my very best to repeat last year’s victory but it is a challenge that I’m really looking forward to. I will be ready.”

Also confirmed to run are the Ethiopian trio of Tirunesh Dibaba,  the three-time Olympic champion on the track and third fastest woman of all time, who finished second in London and won Chicago in 2017, Tadelech Bekele, who finished third in London last year, and 21-year-old Roza Dereje, second in Chicago and winner of the Dubai Marathon in 2018.

Cherono, Kosgei and Keitany top the current Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York. Dereje and Cheruiyot are on 16 points apiece following their second places in Chicago and New York respectively. The Series XII title could be decided in London.

The Abbott World Marathon Majors series adds up points for the best finishes in the world’s six best marathons. Series XII started at the 2018 BMW Berlin Marathon and will finish at the same race in 2019, taking in the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, 2018 TCS New York City Marathon, 2019 Tokyo Marathon, 2019 Boston Marathon and the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

Hugh Brasher, Event Director, said: “This is a truly amazing women’s field which features the five best women marathon runners in the world last year. The stage is set for a fascinating race on Sunday 28 April.

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Will The Singapore Marathon Be The Next Abbottt World Marathon Majors?

Singapore, no matter how you put it, no matter when you run—day or night, January or July—is hot and humid. And that is of course not ideal to aim for a marathon PB or break a world record, right?

Maybe so, but the island city-state may soon become an Abbott World Marathon Majors (AbbottWMM) course alongside Boston, Chicago, New York, Tokyo, Berlin and London. In coordination with the Chinese private conglomerate Wanda Group last year, the AbbottWMM agreed to a 10-year strategic partnership to potentially develop three new events to add to the series. As part of this agreement, they were tasked with identifying current races that met the requirements of potential inclusion in the series.

“The World Marathon Majors is a very European and U.S.-centric organization. In order to expand and truly create the global series that they want, they need to expand in areas where they do not yet have a presence, such as Asia,” said Ironman Managing Director for Asia Geoff Meyer.

So why the Singapore Marathon? For starters, it’s one of the most well-organized urban destinations and is extremely clean and safe. The international hub is also easy to reach from anywhere in the world (albeit a long flight from the U.S. and Europe) and has a great public transportation system so travelers can effortlessly navigate its neighborhoods.

“What the World Marathon Majors wants is a truly global city, with all the amenities: hotels, an international airport and all the other modern city infrastructures,” says Meyer.

There is still much to be considered before dubbing Singapore the next AbbottWMM city in 2020. “Singapore is a great international destination with a passion for sports and it has seen a huge increase in the popularity of running over the last few years,” says Tim Hadzima, Executive Director for the AbbottWMM. “But there are still areas that need to be improved for the Singapore Marathon to reach our requirements.”

Aside from the expected long-term procedure, as well as the strict set of criteria to be met for any new marathon, what really seems to be the main issue right now is the lack of local government support. 

“Singapore works very much on this ideology: Singapore for Singaporeans. All of New York City, or London for that matter, basically shuts down for the marathon. There are pros and cons for the local people on a race day like this,” says Meyer. “But Singapore works on a different level. Every single complaint, or inconvenience to a Singaporean resident, is taken very seriously.”

“We’re not going to be a Berlin or London that is basically about world records—and I don’t think we want to be—it’s too hot, too humid from that perspective,” Meyer continues. “We’ve increased the prize money from $160K up to nearly $500K this year. So we’re serious about bringing the world’s best.”

Only time will tell if we’ll soon be adding Singapore to our list of majors to compete at, but with so much in the air currently, we’re not holding our breath for a decision just yet. Would you race in Singapore in December with temperatures around 85-90 degrees F and 100 percent humidity to get a seventh AbbottWMM medal?

(02/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot will defend her London Marathon title in April

Vivian Cheruiyot believes she will need to produce her "very best" to defend her London Marathon title in April as she heads a star-studded lineup, which includes winners of the last four majors.

Cheruiyot will be joined by fellow Kenyans Gladys Cherono, Brigid Kosgei and Mary Keitany, who top the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York respectively.

Cheruiyot clocked two hours, 18 minutes and 31 seconds to seal her London triumph last year ahead of three-time winner and race favourite Keitany, who finished fifth.

"It was a great moment for me winning last year's Virgin Money London Marathon and I am very much looking forward to returning in April," Cheruiyot said in a statement.

"The line-up for this year's race is, once again, incredibly strong so I know I will need to be at my very best to repeat last year's victory but it is a challenge that I'm really looking forward to. I will be ready."

(01/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Significant changes and new regulations for 2019 IAAF Label road races to improve the quality of events

Significant changes have been made to the regulations for IAAF Label road races starting in 2019 to improve the quality of events for the athletes who take part and the fans that follow them. An IAAF Label denotes high standards in event organization, full application of the IAAF competition rules, complete support from authorities for the event, a commitment by the organizer to the advancement of the sport, and concrete steps in the global fight against doping. Several changes have been made to the IAAF Label regulations for 2019, including the introduction of a 'Platinum Label', the use of IAAF World Rankings to determine an athlete's Label status, and allowing 5km races to apply for Labels. “This is a milestone for the IAAF and the global road racing community," said IAAF President Sebastian Coe. "It’s a stepping stone towards 2020, when we will have an even more coherent structure of races, with better defined tiers to guide fans and athletes, and with integrity measures that are proportionate to the level of the competition. In 2019 we will be reducing the pool of athletes who hold the coveted 'Gold Label Status' to ensure the highest-earning pros are subject to out-of-competition drug-testing . “I’d like to thank the AIU and Abbott World Marathon Majors for their guidance in this area, and stress that these changes are being introduced in cooperation with race and athlete representatives, who have been very supportive all the way. A more robust regulatory framework for athlete representatives is also in the making.” The 2019 regulations will apply to any road races seeking Label status for 2020. (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world. Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September. Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record. For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January. The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday. I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck. In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions.  The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13. The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched. Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Past champions Abel Kirui and Dickson Chumba join the elite field at this year's Chigago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that several international running stars are joining the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon elite athlete competition. Past champions Abel Kirui (KEN) and Dickson Chumba (KEN) are confirmed, and 2017 runner-up Brigid Kosgei (KEN) and two-time podium finisher Birhane Dibaba (ETH) stand out among the women. They will join previously announced global sensations Galen Rupp (US), Mo Farah (GBR), Yuki Kawauchi (JPN) and Suguru Osako (JPN). This year’s elite field includes 11 men who have run 2:07 or faster and nine women (including three Americans) who have run 2:25 or faster. Moreover, it features five of the top eight men who placed on top of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XI leaderboard and two of the top seven women. “We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Bank of America Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski. “This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international and American athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago.” Dickson Chumba set his personal best, 2:04:32, in Chicago in 2014 when he finished third on a historic day that witnessed three of the top five times ever run in Chicago (Chumba is the fifth fastest runner in Chicago’s history). He came back to win in 2015 and while he tried to defend his title in 2016, he came up three seconds short, finishing second to Abel Kirui. Since he embarked on his marathon career in 2010, he has finished 17 marathons and he boasts an impressive record: five wins, five runner-ups and four third place finishes. He lines up this fall after opening his 2018 season with his second win at the Tokyo Marathon. His time, 2:05:30, was the second fastest winning time in Tokyo’s history.  (08/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Kati Toivanen is an accomplished artist and a devoted marathoner

RUN THE WORLD: Kati Toivanen started running in 1981, when she arrived in America as an exchange student from Finland.  "I was hosted by a wonderful, loving family in Williston, Vermont," Kati says. "In an effort to connect with other students at the high school, I joined the cross-country team. I was not very good, but worked hard and improved."  That started her life-long fondness of running.  She returned to the the US to attend college and graduate school, eventually building an art career and a family.  "I never raced again until my son's elementary school had a fund raising 5K in 2013. That, and my elliptical breaking, got me started on a path to losing 30 pounds and lacing up for regular running again," she says.   Running has now become an important part of her daily routine. "I like it for its physical and emotional benefits, but increasingly for the social connections."  She belongs to the very active running community in Kansas City.  "Runs fly by as we chat away. I have also gotten faster by hanging onto folks who are just little faster than me," says Kati.  In 2016 she ran her second full marathon.  "The 2016 Helsinki City Marathon was really exciting. The course went around the city where I spent much of my youth," she remembers.  But her most cherished running event was running the 2018 Boston Marathon.  "I typically excel in the face of adversity, so while this year's race conditions were not exactly enjoyable, they played to my strengths: mental toughness, perseverance, stubbornness, and my ability to choose denial at will. I got a small PR and a big BQ for 2019. I plan to run Boston as long as I can hit the qualifying time."  On her bucket list is to run all the Abbott World Marathon Majors.  She will be running the Chicago and New York marathon this fall.  I asked her about her goals? "I am still reaching PRs in my mid-50s before the reality of my age inevitably catches up to me. After that I plan to focus on age-graded results."  Why did you sign up for the Run The World Global Run Challenge I asked.  "I enjoy challenges and structures as well as any project that brings people from many cultures together in a positive way. This is definitely a fun tribe to join as it combines my passions for global citizenship and running," says Kati.  She has now lived half of her life in the states and have a dual citizenship.  She has a 15-year-old son.  Kati is a professor of art at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where she also served for seven years as an associate dean in the College of Arts & Sciences. Kati Toivanen is an active artist.  One of her sixteen solo art exhibitions was favorably reviewed in Art in America.  Her works have been published and exhibited nationally and abroad.     (07/26/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Olympian Amy Cragg Joins 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon American Women’s Elite Field

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that two of the fastest women in U.S. history, Amy Cragg and Laura Thweatt, will join previously announced American Jordan Hasay to compete for the top spot on the podium at the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon. Cragg, a two-time Olympian, and Thweatt, the 2015 U.S. Cross Country champion and 2018 Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K champion, make the 2018 Chicago Marathon the deepest American women’s field in Chicago’s storied history. Hasay currently ranks second on the list of all-time American marathoners with her 2:20:57 run at last year’s Chicago Marathon. Her time was also the fastest American time ever run on U.S. soil. Cragg moved up to the fifth spot in U.S. history earlier this year with her 2:21:42 performance in Tokyo, and Thweatt claimed the ninth spot in London last year after she finished in 2:25:38. The last time three American women finished in the top five in Chicago was 1994, and the last time U.S. women claimed the top two spots was 1992. Chicago’s history could be rewritten with Hasay, Cragg and Thweatt headlining this year’s American field. “There is an American tradition in Chicago of historic performances, competition and developing top talent,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “Amy and Laura are world-class athletes, and they are fighters. We expect to see them battling up front, and we are thrilled to welcome them to our elite field.” Cragg, a member of Nike’s Bowerman Track Club since 2015, joins this year’s elite field after opening her 2018 season by smashing her personal best to finish third at the Tokyo Marathon in 2:21:42. She competed in Chicago for the first time in 2014, finishing fourth in 2:27:03. Since then, she has experienced global success, winning the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon trials, finishing ninth at the 2016 Rio Olympics, and ending a 34-year medal drought for the U.S. after taking home a bronze medal at the 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon. She currently sits in 12th place on the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XI leaderboard, and a strong finish in Chicago could propel her further up the list. (07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi will be facing Mo farah and Gallen Rupp at Chicago Marathon men elite field

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that reigning Boston Marathon champion and “citizen runner” Yuki Kawauchi and 2016 Olympian and Nike Oregon Project runner Suguru Osako will join the elite competition as they both seek to become the first Chicago Marathon champion from Japan since Toshihiko Seko took the crown in 1986. "I'm really happy to have the chance to race in the Bank of America Chicago Marathon and the Abbott World Marathon Majors," Kawauchi said. "I'm looking forward to running the same race where Toshinari Takaoka set the former national record and so many other great Japanese athletes have run well. My results in the other American Abbott World Marathon Majors races, Boston and New York, were pretty good, and I'll do everything I can to line up in Chicago ready to produce good results there too." “Yuki and Suguru are exciting additions to our elite field,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “Yuki has taken an unconventional path to marathon stardom; there’s no other elite runner competing today like him. And Suguru is young in his marathon career with a real chance at breaking the Japanese national record in Chicago.” Before becoming the 2018 Boston Marathon champion amidst freezing temperatures and pouring rain where he said, “for me, these are the best conditions possible,” Kawauchi gained global renown for his prolific racing schedule. He holds the record for the most marathons run under 2:20 (79), he boasts a PR of 2:08:14, he has won more than 30 career marathons and he finished 12 marathons in 2017 alone. He has raced more than 20 times in 2018, including running the Kuki Half Marathon dressed in a panda suit and setting a course record at the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71K ultramarathon in May. He won there by 30 minutes.   (06/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Molly Huddle will head one of the best professional athlete fields at the New York Mini 10K

Three-time United Airlines NYC Half winner Molly Huddle of the United States will headline one of the best professional athlete fields ever assembled for the NYRR New York Mini 10K on Saturday, June 9. Keitany, who won the race in 2015 and 2017, and Huddle, who won the race in 2014 in the fastest time ever by an American at the event, will join previously announced Boston Marathon podium finishers Des Linden, Sarah Sellers, and Krista DuChene at the start line of the world’s original women’s only road race. The women’s open division, representing nine different countries, will include 10 Olympians in total racing the historic event that was established in 1972 as the world’s first road race exclusively for women. “We are excited to have one of the best professional athlete fields ever assembled for the NYRR New York Mini 10K – the most prestigious all-women’s road race in the world – and one which includes past champions, Olympians, and Abbott World Marathon Majors race winners,” said Peter Ciaccia, president of events for NYRR and race director of the TCS New York City Marathon. “Led by Mary, Molly and Des, this phenomenal group of women lining up will certainly thrill the spectators along the course on June 9, as well as those fans around the globe watching the race on USATF.TV.” (05/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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How the Abbott World Marathon Majors $820,00 was dished out

Series XI of the Abbott World Marathon Majors concluded in dramatic fashion Sunday (April 22) at the London Marathon with a double win for Kenya. In the elite men’s series, Eliud Kipchoge destroyed the best men’s field ever assembled to take his third consecutive AWMM title, while his compatriot Mary Keitany destroyed herself in her bid to break the mixed-race women’s world record, failing in that quest but picking up the AWMM win as a consolation. Series XI kicked off at last year’s London Marathon with a new one-year format featuring a rotating start and finish for each of the six annual series races. A new prize structure was also introduced for Series XI, with prize money awarded to the top three men and women in both the open and wheelchair series, rather than just individual winner. The Series XI champions receive US$250,00 each with US$50,000 going to second and $25,000 to third, while the top wheelchair racers will get $50,000 each, with $25,000 and $10,000 going to second and third respectively. Kipchoge claimed his Series XI crown in stunning style, taking 25 points for his London win yesterday to add to the 25 he earned for his Berlin Marathon victory last year. After the disappointment of coming fifth in yesterday’s London Marathon, Keitany also took her third Abbott World Marathon Majors title thanks to the 25 points she earned in London last year and her second place in New York last November. Geoffrey Kirui with 41 points placed second. Yuki Kawauchi with his Boston win placed third with 25 points. For women Tirunesh Dibaba placed second with 41 points and Brigid Kosgei placed third with 32 points. Wheelchair winners were Marcel Hug and Manuela Schar with 100 points each. (04/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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A London Marathon win will ensure Dibaba a Marathon Majors Win and $500,000

Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba has been named the Ethiopian Airline Brand Ambassador... She made her marathon debut in London in 2014, finishing third in 2:20:35 before returning last year and coming second behind Mary Keitany in an Ethiopian record of 2:17:56, putting her third on the world all-time list behind Paula Radcliffe and Keitany. She returned to the track last summer to win a silver medal in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships London 2017 before picking up her first marathon win at the Chicago Marathon in October (2:18:31). That victory put her joint top of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XI leader board which started with last year’s London Marathon and concludes after this year’s race, counting the results of the World Championship marathon plus the marathons in Berlin, Chicago, New York, Tokyo and Boston. A win for Tirunesh in London this year will ensure she would secure the AWMM Series XI title. (03/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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One more race to go: Jeannie Pardy prepares for Tokyo marathon

Jeannie Pardy has been running for 20 years and participating in marathons for ten. She runs 30 miles a week. Now she is preparing for a race that will mark a significant milestone in her career. She is preparing to run the Tokyo Marathon on Feb. 25; when she completes it, she will be the first person in Central Newfoundland Canada to complete all the Abbott World Marathon Majors. One thing is for certain. “I’ll run till I die – till I drop. I don’t want to give up running,” Pardy said. It is the satisfaction of running that keeps her moving. (01/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Michael Wardian World Marathon Challenge Record Might Be Unbeatable

Michael Wardian is an American marathoner and ultra-marathon. He is not running the World Marathon Challenge this year but his record he set in 2017 is going to be hard for anyone to beat. He averaged 2:45:57 for each of the seven marathons. Additionally he ran the fastest ever time (2:31:09 average) for all the Abbott World Marathon Majors (Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, New York). He holds the world record for the fastest marathon on an indoor 200-meter track and so many more records. Michael is one astounding runner... (01/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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The 2018 Boston Marathon International Elite Field

Six Boston Marathon champions and 17 top U.S. runners will challenge an exceptional men’s and women’s international field that includes 23 Olympians. Altogether, the John Hancock Elite Athlete team has won 14 Olympic and IAAF World Championships Marathon medals, as well as more than 100 global marathons including 17 Abbott World Marathon Majors. The field’s success in strategic and tactical championship style racing will prove critical as they run the world’s most historic marathon. (01/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Age Group World Championships to be held in 2020

Abbott World Marathon Majors,the collective of the world’s six greatest marathons, and partners Abbott and Wanda Group announced recently the creation of its first global age group marathon ranking system and age group world championships. The new program will launch in September 2018 and the top-ranked age group athletes will qualify to participate in the AbbottWMM Wanda Age Group World Championships in the spring of 2020. The rankings will cover age groups for men and women from age 40 to 80+. (12/19/2017) ⚡AMP
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Kiplagat Wins $500,000 - World Marathon Majors

Abbott World Marathon Majors today awarded the Series X women’s title to 38-year-old Edna Kiplagat (KEN). "Edna’s outstanding victory in Boston in 2017 and her second place in Chicago in 2016 make her the winner of Series X." Kiplagat will receive $500,000 for topping the leaderboard with 41 points. Abbott World Marathon Majors is a series consisting of six of the largest and most renowned marathons in the world. The races take place in Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York City. (12/19/2017) ⚡AMP
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