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Articles tagged #Eliud Kipchoge
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IAAF’s World Male Athlete of the Year Eliud Kipchoge has been recognized at the Laureus Awards in Monaco yesterday

Eliud Kipchoge, who broke the world marathon record in Berlin last September, was honored with the Laureus Academy’s Exceptional Achievement award, a discretionary award that has only been handed out three times previously in the history of the event. Previous winners include swimming great Michael Phelps (2013), Chinese tennis champion Li Na (2015) and Italian football star Francesco Totti (2018).

“I would like to thank my fans around the world for all their support. I believe that a running world is a peaceful world, a sporting world is a healthy world and that a sporting world is an enjoyable world,” Kipchoge said after he was presented with the award by fellow athletics great Tegla Loroupe, a member of the academy.

The Olympic champion was also a finalist for the World Sportsman of the Year award, which went to tennis champion Novak Djokovic for the fourth time.

“It means a lot (to be recognized by the Laureus Academy),” Kipchoge added. “It means that I have been making a big impact in this world – to be recognized for exceptional achievement not just in athletics, but in the whole category of sport. It’s nice to mingle with the people from tennis, from basketball, from motor racing, from football, from gymnastics.”

The 34-year-old Kenyan won the London Marathon in April last year in 2:04:17, finishing comfortably ahead of one of the deepest marathon fields in history.

Five months later, he won the Berlin Marathon in 2:01:39 to smash the world record. His time in the German capital was 78 seconds faster than the previous world record, representing the biggest single improvement on a men’s marathon world record since 1967.

He is now preparing to defend his title in London in April.

(02/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei will make her marathon debut at the Haspa Marathon Hamburg

Joyciline Jepkosgei's debut over the marathon distance has been fervently anticipated since the Kenyan, now 25, produced her sensational 2017 season, breaking six world records. Four of those came in one race, the Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon, where she clocked 30:05 at 10km, 45:37 at 15km and 1:01:25 at 20km en route to a 1:04:52 performance over the full distance.

She clipped another second from that mark in Valencia the following October, lowering the world record to 1:04:51 where it currently stands. In 2017, again in Prague, Jepkosgei shattered the 10km record at the Birell Prague Grand Prix, clocking a phenomenal 29:43.

Slowed in part by illness, her follow-up year didn't produce the same record-shattering achievements, but she did race to silver at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in Valencia in March.

Hamburg organizers were quick to draw a parallel to another high profile marathon debut on their course, that of Eliud Kipchoge in 2013 when the Kenyan ace cruised to victory in 2:05:30. He's since gone on to be considered the best marathon runner of all time. Jepkosgei insists that parallel wasn't on her mind when choosing the setting for her debut.

"My manager and my coach both told me that Hamburg has a fast and flat course," she said.

"I would like to achieve a time of around 2:22. But there are still two months of preparation to come. I have to wait and see how my body reacts to the training. Once I am a week away from the race I will see what kind of form I am in. Then I will determine my final goal."

As a final preparation, Jepkosgei will run the United Airlines NYC Half on March 17 in New York.

(02/14/2019) ⚡AMP
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Haspa Marathon Hamburg

Haspa Marathon Hamburg

Be one of more than 25.000 athletes. The HASPA MARATHON HAMBURG is Germany’s biggest spring marathon and since 1986 the first one to paint the blue line on the roads. Hamburgcourse record is fast (2:05:30), the metropolitan city (1.8 million residents) lets the euphoric atmosphere spill over and carries you to the finish. Make this experience first hand and...

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Jim Walmsley said that he could beat a 2:05 marathoner if they were matched up on a trail race

Jim Walmsley ran a 1:04:00 in the Houston Half-Marathon last Sunday (January 20).  Many people have been critical of his race and returned to comparing the trail and road running scenes in a futile attempt to try and identify which discipline is more difficult. 

Walmsley is an ultra and trail runner who’s the Western States 100 course record holder, and was formerly a high school and collegiate track runner (8:41.05 3,000m steeplechaser). Walmsley was ranked 23rd male on Sports Illustrated’s Fittest 50 athletes in 2018 (marathon world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge ranked 21st) and is very well known for his accomplishments on the trails. 

His 1:04:00 at Houston qualified him for the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon trials where he will run his marathon debut. As Walsmley straddles the boundary between ultra-trail runner and road runner, he’s become a focal point for the trail versus road argument.

Walmsley was a guest on the Citius Mag podcast the week following his half-marathon and was asked to address some of the comments. Here’s what he had to say regarding a 2:05 marathoner being thrown into the Western States Endurance Run.

“The way that I attack the downhills, I will break your quads and you won’t be able to jog the flats afterwards. Like, give me a 2:05 guy, a couple hours in the canyon (like at Western States) and I’ll be the first one out.”  

(01/26/2019) ⚡AMP
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2020 US Olympic Trials Marathon

2020 US Olympic Trials Marathon

Atlanta will host the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon for both men and women, USA Track & Field and the United States Olympic Committee announced Monday. Hosted by Atlanta Track Club as the local organizing committee, the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon will be held Feb. 29, 2020, and will take place in conjunction with the...

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The total amount raised through the London Marathon will top 1 billion pounds this year ($1,319,000US)

Thousands of charities sign up runners to collect donations at the race. Last year they raised 63.70 million pounds, taking the cumulative total to 955 million pounds since the first event in 1981.

"This is a phenomenal achievement and part of what makes the London Marathon unique. No other mass participation event comes anywhere near this kind of fundraising," Hugh Brasher, the race's event director, said.

Alzheimer's Society and Alzheimer's Research UK are the race's official charities in 2019.

The men's event pits world record holder and three-time London marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya against four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah.

In the women's field, defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya is set to take on her compatriot and New York City marathon champion Mary Keitany.

(01/25/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Ethiopia’s Guye Adola, who created a sensation two years ago by recording the fastest marathon debut, is going after the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon title

Guye Adola made his debut with timing of 2:03:46 when finishing runner-up behind world record holder Eliud Kipchoge at the 2017 Berlin Marathon.

This remains the seventh fastest of all time over the classic 42.195km distance and makes him the fastest man in the elite field.

The 28-year-old Marathon Newcomer of the Year in 2017 was leading in Berlin until around the 40km before Kenya’s Olympic Champion Kipchoge finally managed to overhaul him and win by just 14 seconds.

Adola’s debut timing makes him the second fastest Ethiopian marathon runner of all time behind Kenenisa Bekele and ahead of former world record-holder and three-time Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon winner Haile Gebrselassie. “I really enjoyed everything about my marathon debut until the last few kilometers,” said Adola, who will make his third start at the marathon distance in Dubai after withdrawing from the 2018 Frankfurt Marathon due to illness in October.

In 2014, he established a 59:06 course record and personal best at the New Delhi Half Marathon. In the same year he won a bronze medal at the World Half Marathon Championships.

“Adola certainly made a name for himself in Berlin in 2017, but injury and illness have contrived to prevent him from making further inroads in the sport,” said event director Peter Connerton. “Our event has a reputation for producing fast times and this could well be the opportunity and the venue Adola needs to re-establish himself among the world’s best,” he added.

(01/21/2019) ⚡AMP
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Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon

Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon

In its relatively brief history (the race was first held in 2000), the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon has become one of the fastest, most respected and the most lucrative marathon in the world in terms of prize money. Each year thousands of runners take to the roads in this beautiful city in the United Arab Emirates for this extraordinary race...

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Cam Levins will run the 2019 London Marathon in one of the deepest fields in the race's history

The complete elite lists were announced on Friday for the 2019 London Marathon and Canadian marathon record holder Cam Levins was included. London is shaping up to have one of the strongest marathon fields in the race’s history.

Levins smashed the Canadian record this October at the 2018 Toronto Waterfront Marathon and Canadian Marathon Championships, running a 2:09:25. London will only be his second marathon, but the field is very strong and could pull him to a fast finish and maybe even another Canadian record.

Levins will face world record holder Eliud Kipchoge, 2018 Chicago champion Mo Farah and 2018 London runner-up Shura Kitata. The men’s marathon will be extremely competitive. With eight men who’ve run under 2:05:00, if Levins has a good day, he could do something very special at this race.

(01/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Could Mo Farah beat Eliud Kipchoge in London Marathon!

Eliud Kipchoge versus Mo Farah in the Virgin Money London Marathon on April 28 is one of the tastiest head-to-heads of the year – and it is a race the Briton can win.

Kipchoge has won 10 of his 11 marathons, including three times in London and at the Olympics in Rio. His most recent victory – in Berlin last September – saw him set a world record of 2:01:39. At the Breaking2 time trial in Monza in 2017, he ran even faster, too, with 2:00:25 – a performance just one second per mile short of a hallowed sub-two-hour clocking.

The Kenyan has been described, with good reason, as the greatest marathoner in history. So how can Farah hope to beat him?

For starters, not only did Farah smash the European record with 2:05:11 in Chicago in October, but he looked supremely smooth and strong the entire way. In the world of marathoning, he is on the upward curve whereas Kipchoge’s bubble will inevitably burst sometime.

Farah’s career has also got stronger over time. In 2003, while Kipchoge was out-kicking Hicham El Guerrouj and Kenenisa Bekele to win the world 5000m title in Paris, Farah won a mere silver at the European Under-23 Championships behind fellow Brit Chris Thompson.

Then there is home support. Farah is a Londoner and has a long history with the London Marathon. The first time his name appeared in Athletics Weekly, after all, was in 1995 when he came 10th in the Mini London Marathon aged 12.

Farah will also not be fazed by Kipchoge. He has beaten him too many times over the years to be totally intimidated by him.

Farah freely admitted in 2018 that Kipchoge is a stronger marathon runner, but the Briton knows he’s come out on plenty of occasions in the past.

In fact, the duo have a long history of clashes. Back in 2007, Farah beat Kipchoge over 3km on the roads at the Great North Run weekend. On the track, in the world 5000m final in 2009, Kipchoge and Farah were separated by less than a second in fifth and seventh in a race won by Bekele. When Farah set a British 5000m record of 12:53.11 in Monaco in 2011, Kipchoge was back in sixth.

(01/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Former world record-holder Wilson Kipsang and Chicago Marathon champion Brigid Kosgei are among the latest runners confirmed for the Virgin Money London Marathon

Wilson Kipsang won the London Marathon in 2012 and 2014, setting a course record of 2:04:29 on his second triumph. In between those victories, he earned the Olympic bronze medal in 2012 and set a world record of 2:03:23 in Berlin in 2013.

Owner of four sub-2:04 marathon performances, Kipsang will be making his sixth appearance at the London Marathon and will line up against the man who now owns the course record and world record, Eliud Kipchoge.

“This will be a comeback race for me,” said Kipsang, who will also face Olympic champion Mo Farah and last year’s runner-up Shura Kitata. “I’m focused on winning,” says Wilson Kipsang.

Fellow Kenyan Brigid Kosgei will also return to the British capital. The 24-year-old finished second last year in 2:20:13 before going on to smash her PR with 2:18:35 when winning at the Chicago Marathon six months later.

(01/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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World record holder Eliud Kipchoge will defend his title at the Virgin Money London Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge has confirmed he will be running this year's London Marathon.  The 2018 World Athlete of the Year, broke the world record in the marathon in Berlin last September, clocking 2:01:39. The 34-year-old Kenyan won his third London marathon title last year, clocking 2:04:17. He is unbeaten in three appearances in London, having notched victories in 2015 and 2016 as well. He also set the course record of 2:03:05 in that 2016 race.

Kipchoge will face Mo Farah of Great Britain, who was previously announced. Farah set the European record over the distance in Chicago last October when he clocked 2:05:11 to collect his first major marathon victory. Earlier in the year, Farah finished third in London in 2:06:21, at the time a national record.

“I had a memorable 2018, winning the Virgin Money London Marathon and then setting a new world record at the BMW Berlin Marathon," Kipchoge said. "I’m hoping that 2019 is just as good to me."

Kipchoge also said he's looking forward to another match-up against Farah.

“He is a great champion and proved in Chicago that he can win a major marathon so I relish the battle with him and also the many other great athletes that I’m sure will once again be on the start line in London.”

Those include Ethiopia’s 22-year-old rising marathon star Shura Kitata also returns after finishing runner-up to Kipchoge last year and placing second in the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon.

"There is no doubt that Eliud Kipchoge is the greatest marathon runner of all time," said Hugh Brasher, Event Director of the London race. "His world record at the BMW Berlin Marathon was a legendary sporting moment and one more win at the Virgin Money London Marathon would make him the most successful athlete in the history of the elite men’s race in our event’s illustrious history.

“Since Sir Mo Farah won the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in October, everyone has been talking about another head-to-head between Mo and Eliud and we are absolutely thrilled that this showdown will happen at the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon."

(01/14/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Eliud Kipchoge over the weekend said that breaking two hours for the marathon is very possible

World Marathon Record holder and Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge said Saturday night (Jan 12) that breaking the two-hour mark in marathon is possible.

However, he declined to confirm if he will be making another attempt to become the first man to run the marathon in under two hours.

Speaking in Mombasa on Saturday evening, Kipchoge said all that is required is focus and belief.

"It's possible. Once the human body sets the mind and focus, it will be attained and running under two hours is very much possible," Kipchoge said.

The 34-year-old ran in an experimental race under special condition in Monza, Italy in 2017 to clock 2:00.25 and though that mark was never recognized as an official work record, he has since gone on to break the world record in Berlin last year clocking an impressive two hours, one minute and 39 seconds.

"With the right training, the right environment and the right people, and with the right thinking, then all is possible. However, it requires someone to have the belief," he added.

The London and Berlin marathon champion was on Friday crowned the 2018 Kenya Sports Personality of the Year in the award gala held in Mombasa.

"Not many people are thinking of running under the two hours mark. But if one intends to run and he has no belief in his mind, then he cannot do anything. But if your belief is in the mind and in the blood, beyond the skin and into the bone marrow, then it's possible."

Kipchoge is yet to confirm if he will be running in London, with the organizers yet to release the elite list of stars for the 2019 race. However, he said he is back in training for a major city marathon.

"I hope to run soon. But that is being worked on by the management. Once they have agreed, then we will all know which will be the next stop," he added.

Kipchoge says the Monza experiment offered him great hope going into his successful world record attempt in Berlin last year when he sliced over one minute off compatriot Dennis Kimetto's previous mark of 2:02:57 set on the same course in 2014.

"It gave me the confidence that I can run faster than any normal world record," he said. "If I could run two hours and 25 seconds (in Monza), then what is two hours, two minutes and 57 seconds? It helped me gain huge confidence, which helped me get the record."

Kipchoge has not lost a race since 2013, when he finished second to Wilson Kipsang in Berlin. He has won in London, Berlin, Rotterdam and Chicago.

(01/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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BMW Berlin Marathon

BMW Berlin Marathon

The story of the BERLIN-MARATHON is a story of the development of road running. When the first BERLIN-MARATHON was started on 13th October 1974 on a minor road next to the stadium of the organisers‘ club SC Charlottenburg Berlin 286 athletes had entered. The first winners were runners from Berlin: Günter Hallas (2:44:53), who still runs the BERLIN-MARATHON today, and...

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Records set at the annual San Silvestre Vallecana 10k as Kenya’s teenager breaks Kipchoge course Record

Uganda's Jacob Kiplimo and Kenyan runner Brigid Kosgei established new men's and women's records in the annual San Silvestre Vallecana 10K race.

Kiplimo, 18, completed the course through the Vallecas neighborhood in 26:41 here on Monday, besting what was thought to be the unassailable mark of 26:54, set in 2011 by Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya.

On a pleasant night with the thermometer reaching 50F (10C), the race kicked off at a frantic pace as an eight-man pack covered the opening two kilometers in 5:24, with Kiplimo and Kenya’s Solomon Boit taking charge of the rhythm. Spain’s Toni Abadía was the only non-African among them.

The in-form Ugandan then upped the tempo, averaging a terrific 2:35 over the subsequent three kilometers to reach halfway in 13:12, well on schedule to improve on the course record. By then only Ethiopia’s world cross country bronze medallist Abadi Hadis and Eritrea’s Abrar Osman managed to remain on Kiplimo’s shoulder with Uganda’s Mande Bushendich and Tanzania’s Agustino Sulle following.

The second half witnessed Kiplimo and Hadis’s magnificent display as the pair kept knocking off kilometers at a record-breaking pace. 

Ethiopian competitor Abadi Hadis finished second with a time of 26:54, while Kiplimo's countryman Mande Bushendich completed the podium.

In the women's race, Kosgei picked up her second Vallecana trophy in three years with a time of 29:54, nearly a minute faster than Gelete Burka's previous record of 30:53.

Kenya's Helen Obiri, world champion in the 5,000m, came second, just five seconds behind the winner. Tirunesh Dibada of Ethiopia, an Olympic gold medalist, had to settle for third.

A total of 42,500 people took part in the event, which features an amateur "fun run" before the professional race.

(01/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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Best Racing Moment of 2018 and My Best Runs 2019 World Best 100 Races were announced today

My Best Runs "Best Racing Moment in 2018" and the My Best Runs "2019 World Best 100 Races" were announced today in Mountain View, California at the My Best Runs (MBR) headquarters.

First on the agenda was the announcement of the 2018 Best Racing Moment. MBR founder Bob Anderson stated, "Eluid Kipchoge was all smiles as he crossed the finish line at the Berlin Marathon September 29." 

"He had just smashed the world marathon record clocking 2:01:39.  Eliud ran the last 17k without pacers, pushing himself, taking off one minute and 18 seconds off of Dennis Kimetto's record."

"The world has rarely seen one event so dominated by one man, Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge," says Bob who also was the founder of Runner's World magazine (1966) and publisher for 18 years.

Eliud has won many awards this year including World Athletes of the Year at the IAAF Awards.

Next up on the agenda was the annoucement of the 4th Annual My Best Runs 2019 World Best 100 Races. 

"There are so many good races in the world.  This list could easily be much bigger.  However, as we have done now for four years, we have narrowed it down to the top 100," stated Bob. 

The featured race at 44 of the best 100 are marathons.  There are 20 half marathons and 14 10ks.  There is the Western States 100 miler and the Comrades Ultra marathon in South Africa.

The shortest race is the New Balance 5th Avenue Mile in New York City.  The longest is the 156 mile Marathon Des Sables coming up March 5 in Morocco. 

Most offer prize money totally million of US dollars.  The Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon coming up January 26 is offering $1,316,000.  This marathon which was first held in 2000 top four men at the 2018 race all ran under between 2:04:00 and 2:04:06.  Four women ran between 2:19:17 and 2:19:53.

"It is good to see over $21 million (from races MBR are featuring) in prize money being offered runners," says Bob.  "Running is what these runners do and the money is well deserved and important for our sport."

Of course the Berlin Marathon is one of our top 100 but so is the Valencia Half Marathon (Spain) where Abraham Kiptum broke the world half marathon record in the 2018 race by clocking 58:18. 

The Birell 10k Race in Prague, CZE also made the list again for the 4th year. 18-year-old Phonex Kipruto from Kenya clocked 26:46 while Caroline Kipkirui clocked 30:19.  "This is one fast evening race and obviously belongs on our top 100 list," stated Bob.

The list has races from 23 different countries. 

"You can not go wrong in running any of these races," says Bob Anderson. "Your biggest challenge in many of these races will be to be able to be on the starting line. But if you can get in, you will have a blast."

(12/19/2018) ⚡AMP
by My Best Runs
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Berlin marathon silver medalist Amos Kipruto is in his preparations for the Tokyo marathon in March 2019

Berlin marathon silver medalist Amos Kipruto is optimistic he will excel at the Kolkata 25km road race in India on Sunday and boost his preparations for the Tokyo marathon in February 2019.

Speaking in Nairobi on Thursday, Kipruto, who was overshadowed by the world record set by Olympics Champion Eliud Kipchoge at the Berlin Marathoin in September, where he settled for silver medal, said it is time for him to become a man on his own and stake claim to the gold medal in the Indian city.

"In 2018, I was third in Tokyo and second in Berlin. In both cases I was not given the required attention. But I have a chance to correct that and win with a course record time in India. That is what is motivating me to go for the title," he said. Kipruto together with World half marathon record holder Eric Kiptanui together with former Chicago marathon champion Florence Kiplagat is departing Nairobi on Thursday for India.

Kipruto did not mince his words saying his eyes are firmly on the course record of 1:13:48 set by Ethiopia's Kenenisa Bekele last year. "I am fit and strong and want to break that record," said Kipruto. I have a fast best time in half marathon of 1:00:24 from Sweden and I believe running fast in 25km is achievable."

(12/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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The magical Kenyan Diet and training at altitute are two keys factors why Kenyan runners are having so much success

One unique and interesting thing about Kenyan runners is their daily diet. 

A diet that gives them energy to run for a long time and fast.  Many wake up at 5am and eat something like a slice of bread or ugali with tea to provide energy. 

Some prefer going for their morning run on an empty stomach but after training they take tea with rice or ugali. This is common in Kenya as well as drinking at least two glasses of tea in the morning.

The most important meal of the day for many Kenyan runners is lunch.  Most eat a heavy amount of ugali, rice and beans/potatoes or stew depending on the athlete. 

For example super stars like Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang, love ugali with traditional vegetables like spinach accompanied by milk called mursik (sour milk).

Mursik is sour milk that taste so sweet.  It contains enough proteins to help build and repair muscles due to tearing during daily training and competition. With daily intake it helps the runner be more energetic, strong and more able to be tough.

The Mursik Factor has been making headlines when an athlete wins a race or breaks a record because Mursik never disappoints. Mursik and ugali are both key. The ingredients of ugali itself is such a secret and many keep wondering where the energy of Kenyans comes from.

Ugali is a carbohydrate but has amazing ingredients. Ugali is a type of cormeal porridge and is made from maize four. 

It is cooked in boiling water or milk until it reaches a stiff or dough-like consistency. 100g of maize flour contains folates 0.6mg, vitamin A 0.5mg, vitamin B1 3.0mg, vitamin B2 2.0mg, vitamin B3 14.9mg, vitamin B6 2.0mg, vitamin B12 0.007mg, iron 21mg, and Zinc 33mg.

In addition the roughage helps in digestion. On top of this energizer, the high altitude helps the body produce a lot of hemoglobin due to less oxygen giving runners an easy time to run fast in low altitude outside Kenya.

This is the magical Kenyan diet that propel Kenyan runners like a space ship going into the universe. 

How can you doubt anything that Eluid Kipchoge does to run a 2:01 marathon?

(12/05/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Eliud Kipchoge and Caterine Ibarguen were named World Athletes of the Year at the IAAF Awards

Kipchoge underlined his status as the world’s most dominant distance runner. The 34-year-old Kenyan won the London Marathon in April in 2:04:17 to finish comfortably ahead of one of the deepest marathon fields in history.

Five months later, he won the Berlin Marathon in 2:01:39 to smash the world record. His time in the German capital was 78 seconds faster than the previous world record, representing the biggest single improvement on a men’s marathon world record since 1967.

Not content with being the best triple jumper in the world, Ibarguen also tested herself against the world’s best in the long jump this year – and consistently came out on top in that too.

The 34-year-old Colombian won both horizontal jumps at the Central American and Caribbean Games, the IAAF Continental Cup and at the IAAF Diamond League finals – winning the latter two titles in two different cities within the space of 24 hours.

She was unbeaten in all eight of her triple jump competitions, ending the year with a world-leading mark of 14.96m in her specialist event and a national record of 6.93m in the long jump.

(12/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge feels that Geoffrey Kamworor will surpass what he has done in running

This evening, the IAAF will name their Athlete of the Year and Eliud Kipchoge discussed how he sees the future of running. The IAAF reported that Kipchoge was asked to evaluate the prospects of his training partner. He responded, “I think Geoffrey, in future will surpass what I have done in this sport.” Now that’s humility. Kamworor responded that he’s interested in continuing his half-marathon and cross-country career for now. Kamworor has won three World Half-Marathon titles and two World Cross-Country titles. He was also the 2015 World Championship silver medallist over 10,000m and the 2017 New York City Marathon Champion. As far as Kipchoge’s future plans are concerned, he’s not rushing to reveal his winter or spring schedule. But he is the feature runner in a newly published book, which he signed copies of today. The book is called, “Eliud Kipchoge 2:01:39.” The other athletes in the running against Kipchoge for Athlete of the Year are: Christian Coleman, Timothy Cheruiyot, Armand Duplantis, Emmanuel Korir, Noah Lyles, Luvo Manyonga, Kevin Mayer, Abderrahman Samba and Tomas Walsh. The award will be presented this evening in Monte Carlo, Monaco. (12/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Joshua Cheptegei sets a new 15K world record clocking 41:05 in Nijmegen Netherlands

Joshua Cheptegei, 22, set a new world record for 15k.  The Ugandan distance athlete ran the 15K Sunday morning in 41:05 in Nijmegen, Netherlands at the Seven Hills Run. This is the third men’s world record to fall on the roads in 2018. Eliud Kipchoge clocked 2:01:39 for the marathon world record in Berlin, then Abraham Kiptum’s set the half-marathon world record of 58:18, and now Cheptegei’s 15K world record. Cheptegei took 8 seconds off of the previous mark. The Ugandan runner took the lead from the beginning, tiring his pacers out before the 5K mark, but managed to finish strong on his own. This was the runner’s fourth win at the Seven Hills Run. He closed his race in a solo 2:37 kilometre and averaged 2:44 for the entire run. (11/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono named AIMS Best Marathoners for 2018

The AIMS athletes’ nomination committee has decided that for this year (October 2017 to September 2018) Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono were the outstanding candidates for the awards based on their performances over the past 12 months. Kipchoge is undefeated in the marathon in 2018, winning in London and Berlin. His victory in Berlin was in a world record of 2:01:39, taking 78 seconds off the previous record – the biggest single improvement on the world record for more than 50 years. Cherono won the Berlin Marathon in a world-leading time of 2:18:11. She finished fourth at the London Marathon earlier in the year in 2:24:10. The achievements of the two Kenyan athletes will receive global recognition during the AIMS ‘Best Marathon Runner’ Awards Gala in Athens, Greece on November 9. (11/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympic silver medallist Feyisa Lilesa had been in exile in the US since making this anti-government gesture

The Ethiopian had been in exile in the USA since making an anti-government gesture while crossing the finish line of the marathon and clinching the silver medal at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. But after Feyisa Lilesa recent return to Ethiopia following the election of a new reformist government, the 28-year-old – who won half marathons in New York and Bogota during his exile in the USA – has returned to training and set his sights on once again competing at the highest level of distance running, starting with his first appearance at the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon since finishing fourth in 2015. “It has been a difficult time for Feyisa but we are delighted he has chosen to compete in the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon, which is the only IAAF Gold Label race in the Middle East,” said event director Peter Connerton. “Although his training regime was disrupted while in exile, he has a personal best of 2:04:52 to his name as well as being an Olympic silver medallist, finishing second to current world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge, and a World Championships bronze medal winner. “Now that he is home in Ethiopia and training in familiar surroundings, we look forward to seeing him back to his best when we stage the 20th anniversary of the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon. (11/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Can Geoffrey Kamworor become only the second male runner in 20 years to win consecutive New York Marathon titles

Geoffrey Kamworor, 25-year-old Kenyan, won last year’s New York City Marathon by three seconds, is back in New York aiming to become only the second male runner in the past two decades, and the seventh in the 48-year history of the race, to win consecutive titles. He knows the field, stacked with other Olympians and major marathon winners, will be gunning for him. Kamworor has a secret weapon though: his training partner. Six days a week for most of the year, he runs stride for stride in Kenya with Eliud Kipchoge, the world-record holder in the marathon and the greatest marathoner ever. In many ways, the runners have a mentor-protégé relationship. Kipchoge is older by eight years and has already made the progression from the track to road racing and marathons.    (11/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Abraham Cheroben will battle it out with at least 14 other sub one hour runners at the Valencia Half Marathon

Defending champion Kenyan-born Abraham Cheroben of Bahrain will battle it out with 30 elite athletes, with at least 14 having run in less than an hour, at the upcoming Valencia Half Marathon.  Cheroben is aiming to retain the crown he won last year in 59:11. Among the elite field is a host of Kenyans led by two times Family Bank Half Marathon champion Jorum Okombo Lumbasi (58:48), Solomon Kirwa Yego (58:44), Mangata Ndiwa (59:09), Abraham Kiptum (59:09) and Josphat Boit (59:19) the pace maker, who guided Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge to break the world marathon record in Berlin. (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Lawrence Cherono shattered the course record at Amsterdam Marathon

Kenyan’s Lawrence Cherono shattered the course record at the TCS Amsterdam Marathon, clocking 2:04:06 at the 43rd edition of this IAAF Gold Label Road Race on Sunday October 21. Running in nearly ideal conditions with cloudy skies and very light winds - Cherono clipped more than a minute from the 2:05:09 course record and lifetime best he set last year. The 30-year-old also broke the Netherlands' all-comers record of 2:04:27 set by Duncan Kibet in Rotterdam in 2009. A lead group of 14, including Cherono and Kenenisa Bekele, sped through the opening five in 14:33 and 29:08 through ten, in range similar to the 14:29 and 29:01 splits that propelled Eliud Kipchoge to his world record run in Berlin last month. The leaders reached 15 in 44:03 and 20k in 59:00, well inside the 59:52 course record pace that guided Cherono last year. When the half was reached in 1:02:11, 11 men still remained in contention.  But after 25 kilometers (1:13:48) the lead group slowly began to unravel. The last remaining pacesetter, Edwin Kiptoo, completed his chores just before the 30 -mark, with Bekele, Özbilen and Alamirew falling back soon thereafter. Cherono switched gears near the city's Filmmuseum before pulling away for the decisive victory. "I am happy with my race," said Cherono, whose performance squalled the fourth fastest run of 2018. "Today the weather that was very good: little wind and an ideal temperature. That made it possible to run harder this year. My goal was to run 2:04 and that worked." Wasihun and Deksisa were next, clocking 2:04:37 and 2:04:40 respectively, also under the previous course record. There was good depth behind them. Kipketer was fourth in 2:06:15, Özbilen fifth in 2:06:24 and Laban Korir sixth in 2:06:33. Abate (2:06:47) and Jonathan Korir (2:06:51) also broke 2:07. Bekele meanwhile didn't finish, dropping out near his hotel at about 40 from where he chose to walk back to his room. (10/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jerome Drayton's Canadian marathon record of 2:10:09 has stood for nearly 43 years

 Jerome Drayton's mark of 2:10:28 from the 1975 Fukuoka Marathon is the current national Canadian record. Drayton, who lives in Toronto, is 73 years-old now. "Two-ten is obviously a good time," remarked two-time Canadian Olympic marathoner Reid Coolsaet, who came close to Drayton's record at the 2015 BMW Berlin Marathon where he ran 2:10:28. Speaking at a press conference here this morning in advance of Sunday's Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon he added, "[But], especially after Eliud Kipchoge's record (2:01:39) we need a faster national record. With guys like Cam stepping up to the marathon, it's just a matter of time before it goes." "Cam," of course, is Cameron Levins, the 29 year-old Canadian Olympian who holds the national record of 27:07.51 for 10,000m. A former Nike Oregon Project athlete who now represents Hoka One One, Levins will be making his long-awaited marathon debut here this Sunday. He'll be running primarily for the Athletics Canada national title, but with a CAD 43,000 bonus (USD 32,800) on the line for taking down Drayton's mark, the record is definitely on Levins's mind. His 10,000m best is equivalent to a 2:06:38 marathon by using one popular conversion formula. "I'm in great shape," Levins told the media here today, looking relaxed in a hooded sweatshirt, his hands folded in his lap. "I'm ready to attack the Canadian record." Levins, who was notorious for running exceptionally high mileage during his NCAA career at Southern Utah University, stuck with a high-mileage diet for this race, too. He estimated that he averaged 168 miles (270 kilometers) per week, splitting his time between his sea level home in Portland, Ore., and the high altitude of Cedar City, Utah, where he lived and trained in college. He said he adapted well to marathon training after an uncertain start. "I was a little nervous about getting into the new kind of training," Levins told Race Results Weekly. "I mean, I'm into it now. I know I'm going to do more beyond this. I can see it becoming, just, what I do." But first, he had to get through Sunday's race. Long-time race director Alan Brookes has assembled one of his best elite fields led by two-time race winner Philemon Rono of Kenya (2:06:52 PB), 2012 Olympic Marathon champion Stephen Kiprotich of Uganda (2:06:33), 2017 Seoul Marathon runner-up Felix Kandie of Kenya (2:06:03), and New Zealand record holder Jake Robertson (2:08:26). Levins, who said he will run with the second group, made sure he put enough long runs which included very specific goals. As a track runner, his long runs were mostly just for adding miles, he said, at an easy pace. (10/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Eliud kipchoge wins the Sjak Startimes sports personality award for the month of September

World marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is the Sports Personality of the Month for September 2018. Kipchoge becomes the 15th recipient of the award sponsored by Pay TV provider, StarTimes. Kipchoge got the accolade after setting a new marathon world record of 2 hours 01 minute 39 seconds on September 16 in the Berlin Marathon. Kipchoge sliced one minute 18 seconds from the previous record of 2 hours 02 minutes 57 seconds set by Dennis Kimetto in 2014. In that breath taking feat, Kipchoge also bettered the world’s best marks for 35km and 40km previously held by Kimetto. The 33-year-old blipped one hour 41 minutes, one second at 35km and one hour 55 minutes 32 seconds at 40km. In an interview, Kipchoge said the award came as a surprise to him though it will act a morale booster as he focuses on future assignments. "It is exactly one month since I broke the record on September 16 and this being October 16, I think it is a good timing on your part," Kip told the journalists. Kipchoge was awarded a 43 inch StarTimes Digital TV Set, Sh100,000 shillings and the winner’s trophy. (10/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Why are the best times run on Kenya soil so slow? Part 2: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

The best times run on Kenyan soil are not nearly as good as times run by Kenyan runners outside the country. The best marathon time run on Kenya soil is 2:10:12 clocked by Moses Kigen in 2009. The best time for women is 2:28:04 clocked by Alice Chelangat.  Even world record holders like Eliud Kipchoge who recently clocked 2:01:39 at the Berlin Marathon don't attempt to race on Kenya soil due to stiff competition from juniors or seniors who haven’t gotten the opportunity to run abroad.  Most of the major races recognized by IAAF are run at very high altitude (2600m-8500 feet) above sea level.  In cities like Eldoret, Iten, Nairobi, Nyahururu, Nakuru, and Ngong there is less oxygen making it hard to run world record times.  In cities at low altitude like Garrisa in Northern part and Mombasa where the marathon and world cross-country have been held, the humidity is very high and temperatures are so hot that a lot of runners faint due to dehydration.  For example at the 2007 world cross-country championship in Mombasa, Kennenisa Bekele dropped out of the 10km cross country race due to high humidity and hot temperatures. Kenya has thousands of athletes, but no race has ever been controlled at world record pace.  This is because most of athletes have no managers or even links to run abroad take out the pace of 2:40/K (13:20 5K pace) or even below in long distsance races like the marathon making it hard to break a world record due to fatigue.  Other national records run on Kenyan soil include: 1:01:21 half marathon clocked by Philemon Baaru and 1:08:12 for women clocked by Paskalia Chepkorir.  In the 10km for example Kamworor ran 29:11 in the 2018 cross-country while world leader in 3000m Beatrice Chepkoech ran 34:04 which is totally different when abroad. Many races are long.  Like many 10k's are actually 10.2 or 10.3.  Sometimes the clock does not start until the 200m to 300m out due to large number of athletes in a race. This has to be done to avoid athletes injuring themselves due to each athlete running very fast at the start. Most athletes do not have good training facilities or managers.  Pacing is a big problem in many races held in Kenya.  This is very noticeable in many major races (like the Nairobi Standard Charter Marathon) because Kenyans are used to being front runners and they run too fast at the beginning.  Another factor is race terrain.  Most of Kenyan courses are very hilly and hard to run good times.  Many half marathons winning times in Kenya are like 65 minutes making race organizers avoid putting on marthons.  All of these factors are why there is a big difference in best times run in Kenya and abroad.  This is why all Kenyans dream is to race outside Kenya.    (10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Thousands of Kenyan runners have the same dream Part 1: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

Kenya is famous for producing many of the best runners in the world.  Just recently Kenyan’s Eliud Kipchoge smashed the world record for the marathon clocking 2:01:38 in Berlin. What makes Kenyan runners so fast? There are many theories.  One of them suggests that since many runners originate from the mountainous districts of the Rift Valley, they get an edge due to living at high altitude.  However, the same advantage would be for athletes living at high altitudes in central Asia and Mexico.  So maybe this is not the reason?  Kenya is a nation blessed with thousands of athletes of approximately 85,000.  A majority of them are distance runners. More than 12,000 can run below 75 minutes for 21km (half marathon) and about 25,000 can run a sub 35 minutes 10km.  Thousands can run a marathon in under 3 hours 20 minutes. Very impressive for elite performances. Most runners in Kenya are between the ages of 12-45.  There are very few master runners (40 plus) compared to other countries.  This is because most runners in Kenya make running as their primary source of livelihood to feed the family and even help their relatives or friends and the community.  There are very few runners 45-60 years or older because of health conditions like diabetes or heart conditions.  It is rare to find a runner 70 plus in Kenya unlike countries like the USA.  They are like endangered species and there are less than 20 athletes in the whole country that are 70 plus.  The current life expectancy for all people in the US is 78.74 years while in Kenya it is 62.13 years.  The total population in Kenya is 45 million compared to 325 million in the US.  Kenya is the size of Texas. The median age in Kenya is 18, half that of the United States and 41 percent of the population is 14 or younger.  For many Kenyan's their whole life is centered around running.  Many train three times per day logging in over 100 miles per week.  They live modestly making ends meet on $100US per month or less.  They dream of being a super star and they train very hard.  This started when Kipchoge Keino came on the scene in 1962 at the Commonwealth Games in Perth.  Kip Keino in 1968 won the gold medal in the 1500m in Mexico City and after that many have followed in his footsteps.  But it wasn't until later when millions of dollars of prize money came available did things really change.  Now the best runners in Kenya can earn millions of dollars (US) in prize money and sponsorship money.  There is the possibility that through hard work, dedication and connections that any talented Kenyan can make their dream become a reality.  Thousands of Kenyans have the same dream. This is no different than the dream kids have in America of being a famous baseball, basketball or football player.... There is one thing, however that seem to be missing in Kenya.  The times run on Kenya soil are not that good compared to the times run by Kenyans outside the country.  Why is this?  In Part two we will address this situation.   (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Sandy Bodecker One of the most influential behind-the-scenes figures in the sports world has died at the age of 66

One of the most influential behind-the-scenes figures in the sports world, Sandy Bodecker, has died at the age of 66. Bodecker was Nike’s V.P. of Special Projects, the most famously special to runners being 2017’s Breaking2, which also led to the creation of the Vaporfly and Zoom Fly shoes. Though media reports were not specific, Bodecker had battled cancer in the past. According to Nike, Bodecker was obsessed with the marathon’s 2-hour barrier, so much so that he had 1:59:59 tattooed on his left wrist. “The sub-two-hour marathon is the last big, once-in-a-generation barrier,” he said at the time. “It will impact the way runners view distance running and human potential forever.” The athlete who came the closest, Eliud Kipchoge, paid tribute to his friend in a tweet. Bodecker had been with Nike for more than 35 years. He started as a shoe wear-test co-ordinator and was deeply involved in football and action sports before becoming the brand’s first head of global design. (10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Vienna Marathon champion Nancy Kiprop will face a big challenge at the Frankfurt Marathon

Vienna Marathon champion Nancy Kiprop of Kenya, former Xiamen Marathon winner Mare Dibaba face a big challenge to run in less than two hours and 20 minutes at the Frankfurt Marathon women's race on Oct. 28. It means that Kiprop must improve her own best time past the current mark of 2:24:18, which she set in April to retain her title in Austria's capital. "To shake off four minutes is a big challenge. But after seeing what Eliud Kipchoge did in Berlin, I believe anything can go and I want to see how fast I can run in Frankfurt against some of the strongest challengers. Of course the first priority is to dictate the pace and win the race, then the time will fall in," said Kiprop on Monday in Eldoret. Kiprop and Dibaba lead a carefully selected elite list for the race with organizers offering 30,000 US dollars as bonus for whoever beats the course record alongside the 24,000-dollar prize for winning the race. The men's race is led by 2017 Berlin marathon silver medalist Guye Adola of Ethiopia. Adola will face two other notable runners-up in Frankfurt Marathon when he lines up against fellow Ethiopian Kelkile Gezahegn and Kenya's Martin Kosgey, the second-place finishers at the past two editions. Last year Olympic 5,000m champion Vivian Cheruiyot won her maiden marathon race in 2 hours 23 minutes and 35 seconds. The organizers have thrown down the gauntlet challenging the elite runners to push for faster time and Kiprop will take it upon herself secure this feat and improve her personal best time. The organizers have assembled an elite women's field with impressive strength in depth. The course record stands at 2:21:01 set by the Ethiopian Meselech Melkamu six years ago and, given good weather conditions, this should come under threat on Oct. 28. (09/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Amos Kipruto is considering either running the Xiamen or Tokyo marathon

The Xiamen marathon, the third biggest race in China after Beijing and Shanghai, will be staged on January 6 while Tokyo marathon is scheduled for February. However, Kipruto has already competed in Tokyo last year where he claimed the bronze medal. "I want to rest and hopefully return stronger and focus on my next race. Tokyo or Xiamen are very good races. I have not raced in China and this may be my time," said Kiruto on Thursday in Eldoret. In Berlin, Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge was the star focus after he clinched the gold in world record time of 2:01.39, which was almost five minutes faster than what Kipruto posted 2:06:20 in second place. But Kipruto believes he has what it takes to stage his own conquest and Xiamen marathon in China will be an attractive destination should his management team 2 Running Club get an incentive offer. "I have run the last two races without a win. I was third in Tokyo and second in Berlin. It is an improvement but I have a chance to ascend to the winner's podium in my next race," he said. Kipruto made his marathon debut back in 2016 and defied the odds to win the Rome Marathon. However, he was given a rude shock four months later when he finished in position 12 at the Amsterdam Marathon clocking 2:09:06. Last year, he returned stronger mentally and triumphed at the Seoul Marathon timed at 2:05:54. He returned to the Netherlands and was fifth at the Amsterdam Marathon in 2:05:43. "Next year I would love to go back to Berlin. I went there hoping to finish third, because we had tough runners in Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang. But I was happy to finish second. My management team are already working on a deal and we will see what happens," he said. (09/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge is a simple man who helps others - Part three of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Three: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge.  

When Eliud Kipchoge passed the first 10k mark in 29:01 on September 16 in Berlin everyone was excited because he was nine seconds ahead of world record pace.

Actually this was his slower 10k split of the day.  He picked up the pace and his second 10k split was 28:55, third 28:49 and fourth 28:47 clocking 2:01:39 to smash the world marathon record.  

So how did he do this?  It is not drugs! He has never failed a drug test.  

Besides doing some unbelievable workouts (as detailed in part 2) he pays close attention to his diet. His favorite meal is ugali, kalenjin traditional milk called mursik which nutritious and energetic, traditional veggies (such as; socha, saga, mborochet, chepkerta and mitiat).  These are herbal and they build the immune system and adds to the blood. 

He eats roasted maize for carbohydrates. How does he relax? During leisure time he likes reading at least two or three inspirational books every month. This is where a man full of wisdom and maturity adds to his knowledge. 

One quote he likes, "The impossible is possible and imitation is limitation.” by John Manson.

Eliud is a dairy and tea farmer and when he is at home he looks after cattle.  His last born kid son started running so he can follow in his father's foot steps. 

After smashing the World Marathon Record in Berlin, Eliud is expected to get $50,000 for winning and $69,000 for breaking the world record. This is 12 million Kenyan Shillings.  In additon, truck manufactures, Isuzu East Africa, which Kipchoge is a Brand Ambassador, will give him a D-max luxury double cabin vehicle.

There are also gaming companies which will reward him. Eliud has involved himself in charity work too. He helps raise funds for dispensaries, pay school fees for unable kids, he helps upcoming athletes with housing and hospitals bills. 

He pays for airline tickets for students going abroad on scholarship.  He helps to motivate young Kenyans on the importance of hardwork.  Kenya has been very proud of Eliud Kipchoge and since he smashed the world record the whole country is behind him.  

(Editor’s note: Part one and two of these series were published the last two days on My Best Runs.)

(09/22/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Eliud Kipchoge says he handles pain by smiling - Part two of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Two: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. He began his move into road running in 2012 when he clocked 59:25 for the half marathon.  In 2013 Eliud ran his first marathon when he won the Hamburg Marathon clocking 2:05:30, setting a new course record. 

In 2016 he won the gold medal in the marathon at the Rio Olympics.  He has won 10 out of the 11 marathons he has run.  Wilson Kipsang beat him in 2013 in Berlin when setting the world record. 

We Eliud trains in Eldoret, the home of Champions.  His humbleness is seen when training with athletes.  Eliud keeps a low-profile and even does house chores in camp like washing toilets, utensils, cutting grass and cleaning the dining hall.  He uses public buses or bodaboda to travel despite having good cars.  

He has earned a lot of prize, bonus and sponsorship money from running especially since he moved to the road.  However, money hasn't changed his character. He says, "An athlete with 50 million Kenyan shillings ($500,000US) in his bank account can brag, but a farmer who uses the same amount to plant wheat is not even noticed as he walks around town." 

Eliud loves the simple life and when he travels he arrives without many people realizing it. He loves his Nike shoes and is comfortable with NN running and with his mentor and neighbor Patrick Sang. During the Nike project, he almost broke the two hour mark clocking 2:00:23 for the full Marathon.  Yes, the conditions were perfect and he was paced like in a time trial but his body ran the distance.  

He puts in a lot of hardwork, discipline and good training.  He also eats a healthy diet.  Before he lined up to run the Berlin Marathon this was the kind of workouts he was doing. 8x1600 (recovery 1:30) + 10x400m (recovery 45 seconds) in Eldoret altitude 2200m (7200 feet) above sea level.  His 1600m times were:  4:35, 4:33, 4:32, 4:34, 4:33, 4:32, 4:33, 4:33. His 400m times were: 62, 63, 63, 62, 62, 62, 61, 62, 61, 60.

He always does speedwork on the track wearing racing shoes with other fast athletes like Kamworor, Brimin kipruto and Conselsius.  "You can't train alone because you need others to push you higher to reach your best limit,"  Kipchoge told me last month at Kabarak university.  No marathoner has been more dominant in the marathon than Kipchoge.

The 5'6" 115 pound Eliud has never sustained a serious injury because he listens to his body and eats a healthy diet.  Even the greatest runners have days when they have a strained muscle or an upset stomach kept them from winning but not Kipchoge. 

He actually has a winning formula:  Motivation plus disipline equals consistency.  Pain, he says, is nothing more than a mind set so he distracts himself with other thoughts such as the joy of running and the finish line ahead, then the pain fades with a smile on his face. He has a habit of smiling whenever pain sets in.

Tomorrow in part three of this series we look closer at Eliud’s healthy diet and at the day he broke the world Marathon record.  We talk about  the prize money and how Eliud wants to help others.  

(09/21/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Eliud Kipchoge the early years - Part one of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part One: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. Eliud was born May 11, 1984 in a village called Kapsisiywa in Nandi county, Kenya.  His mother worked as a teacher. He lost his father while still young and this forced him to start looking after cattle and sell milk to help support his family. 

As a child, Eliud ran solely as a form of transport so he could get to and from school. The best athlete on the road who looks very discipline, relaxed, humble and full of wisdom today did not get past zonal level in school which is far from nationals. Due to his love for athletics, he went to his neighbor Patrick Sang, 1992 Olympics silver medalist in 3000m steeplechase, and asked for a training program. 

Sang had returned to Kapsisiywa to organize sport events after winning the Olympic silver medal while studying at the University of Texas.  He met Eliud at one of the events he organized in 2001 when Eliud was 16. 

"There was this kid who would come and ask me for a training program," Sang remembers.  "Every two weeks I would give him a program to follow and this went on for months."  Currently Patrick Sang is Eliud Kipchoge's coach. 

"Patrick is a friend and a mentor. He changed my life," said Eliud who followed systematically Sang's advice. Through his dedication and commitment to running, doors opened for Eliud Kipchoge in 2003 when he won gold for Kenya at the World Championships in Paris. 

He out sprinted Hicham El Guerrouj who was the world record holder in the mile.  Eliud was just 18 at the time. He raced on the track, 1500m, 3000m, 5000m and 10000m with great success. (Photo 2003 World Championships 5000m).  The track build his speed and he graduated to the marathon after a few years. 

"Running is like stairs, you gain experience and maturity in every step." Kipchoge told me in February 2018 in Eldoret. Kipchoge trains in a training camp called Global based in Kaptagat.  Tomorrow in part two we will talk about his move to the roads, his training, why he has never sustained a serious injury and how he deals with pain.  

(09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Two-time Chicago Marathon champ Florence Kiplagat is ready to reclaim her title after recovering from an injury

Kiplagat announced her recovery from a muscular cramp, which ruled her out of competition for nine months. The 31-year-old sustained the injury in Chicago last year in October, failing to complete the race. Kiplagat has not raced since. "The injury is over. I am back to my normal training schedule. I have been in rehabilitation to get the muscular cramp better and it has kept me away from competing in many events. Last year, my body didn't respond well in Chicago and I have had enough time to rest," she said. Kiplagat will be among the elite women, who will be lining up at the start of the race. However, last year's bronze medalist Jordan Hasay has pulled out. Kiplagat, who has a personal best time of 2:19:44, won the Chicago marathon in 2015 and 2016, with times of 2:23:33 and 2:21:32, respectively and will be eyeing her third title in four attempts. Mexico's Madai Perez has also pulled out. The men's race defending champion Galen Rupp of the USA will return to seek a second win, but Abel Kirui, who was second last year, is keen to return to winning, especially after seeing his training partner Eliud Kipchoge obliterate the opposition to win the Berlin marathon in 2:01.39 and set a new world record. "I have since moved in with the Global Sports Communications management team and we train together with Kipchoge. I have improved a lot and ran my personal best time during the London Marathon in April," said Kirui, who trains under Richard Metto and Patrick Sang. (09/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is not sure when will be his next race before Tokyo

Kenyan world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge will not confirm his next race, but says he remains focused on defending his title at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Kipchoge, 33, will consider competing at the Doha World Championships in October 2019, but that will depend on his management. However the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo is already at the back of his mind. "It's about the gold medal but the preparation is the same - you should be comfortable with pacemakers and without pacemakers. Tokyo seems far away but it's at the back of my mind that I will really assemble myself in Tokyo," said Kipchoge on Tuesday. On what it will take for his record to go down, Kipchoge was hesitant. "It's too early to do that because it's only a few hours since I ran the fastest time ever," he said. "I don't think it's good to think about it - the core thing now is to make sure I recover fully," he said. Three more races in Boston, Tokyo and New York remain of interest to Kipchoge in his quest to become the greatest marathon runner. Already Kipchoge has won in London, Chicago and Berlin. In fact his win in Berlin was the third in four attempts. After smashing the world marathon record with a time of 2:01:39 in the Berlin Marathon on Sunday - the biggest improvement since 1967 - only the world marathon championships remain on his wish list. "In sport you need to have a good team. That's why, in terms of where I'm going to run next, I'm going to have a full discussion with the management, with the sponsors, technical team and the coaching team," he said. (09/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Toronto Waterfront Marathon elite field is lead by last year's winner Philemon Rono

Philemon Rono, will be aiming for third Toronto title. He made further history a year ago when he also ran the fastest marathon ever on Canadian soil. His time of 2:06:52 was also a personal best. “I’m very happy to come to Toronto again,” said the 27-year-old. “What comes to my mind is that it was a nice race (last year) because I set my personal best and it was a good chance for me. I took the lead between 32 and 35K and I said to myself ‘today is my day’ and I felt good,” Rono reminisced.   Under the guidance of coach Patrick Sang, the 1992 Olympic steeplechase silver medallist, Rono has thoroughly blossomed. Sang’s training team includes a large group of elite marathon runners represented by Netherlands-based Global Sports Communication, including world record holder Eliud Kipchoge. They are also members of the NN Running Team, a unique professional group sponsored by NN, an insurance and asset management company.  "I am really happy, training hard and looking forward to competing in this big race in Toronto,” said Kiprotich, who also won the marathon title at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, joining Ethiopia’s Gezehegne Abera as the only man to ever win both major competitions.  (09/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Two world records were set Sunday September 16, the Marathon and the Decathlon

Two world records were broken on Sunday, September 16th. Eliud Kipchoge set the world record in the marathon, running a shocking 2:01:39. Hours after that record was set, Kevin Mayer of France followed in the decathlon, scoring 9,126 points and breaking Ashton Eaton’s former record by 81 points. The record was set at the Décastar meet in Talence, France. Mayer told the IAAF post-race, “I’ve been waiting for this moment for a long time. I couldn’t cry. I don’t have any more tears left because I was crying so much before the 1,500m.” Mayer achieved personal bests in three of the 10 events. He’s the reigning world champion, and was second to Eaton at the 2016 Olympics. Since the 2016 Olympics, Eaton and his wife, Brianne Theisen-Eaton have both retired from professional athletics. Both Olympics medallists in the multi-events, the Eatons said after Rio, that they had achieved everything they wanted to in sport. (09/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge smashed the World Marathon Record clocking 2:01:39 in Berlin

33-year-old Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya smashed the world marathon record in Berlin today (September 16, 2018) clocking 2:01:39, breaking the record by over a minute. 

According to MBR's Willie Korir reporting from Kenya, "the pace was so high.  Eliud started well and maintained 2:52-2:55/k pace.  Two of the pacers dropped at 14k.  Sammy Sitwara, Kipkemboe and Boit remained up to 25k.  Eliud was alone from 25k to the end. 

It is a big celebration all over Kenya especially in Eliud's home town of Kapsabet and in Eldoret, home of Champions." 

Amos Kipruto (2:06:23) passed Wilson Kipsang to place second and Wilson placed third (2:06:48).    

Kipchoge maintained his form well in the closing stages and crossed the finish line in 2:01:39, taking one minute and 18 seconds off the previous world record set four years ago by Dennis Kimetto.

This is the largest single improvement on the marathon world record since Derek Clayton improved the mark by two minutes and 23 seconds in 1967.

"I lack the words to describe how I feel," said Kipchoge. "It was really hard [during the last 17 kilometers] but I was truly prepared to run my own race.

I had to focus on the work I had put in in Kenya and that is what helped push me. I’m really grateful to my coaching team, my management, the organisation."

For the women, Gladys Cherono set a course record clocking 2:18:11.  Second woman was Ruti Aga 2:18:34 and Trunesh Dibaba 2:18:55.

(09/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world. Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September. Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record. For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January. The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday. I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck. In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions.  The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13. The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched. Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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BMW Berlin Marathon, fast times and intense battles, maybe a world record

Eliud Kipchoge is just like the rest of us runners. All he wants from his next race is to beat his personal best. The only difference is that his next event is the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16 and a Kipchoge PR could mean a new world record!, Eliud Kipchoge is the marquee signing for the 45th edition of BMW Berlin Marathon as the current Olympic champion and undisputed number one for consistency and quality in recent years. His PR, set in London 2016 (2:03:05), prefaced his Olympic marathon gold in Rio the same year. Meanwhile, Denis Kimetto's world record (2:02:57) remains tantalisingly just out of reach for the three-time London champion and double Berlin winner. Kipchoge surely has pace to burn as his brilliant 2:00:25 in 'laboratory' conditions at Monza motor racing circuit in May last year demonstrates. This was never going to be ratified as a record but serves to indicate there is much more to come from the 33-year-old Kenyan, who said: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.” The women's field in Berlin is the best for many years and is headlined by the third fastest in history, Tirunesh Dibaba, from Ethiopia (2:17:56) who set her PB in London last year chasing Paula Radcliffe's legendary 2:15:25 from 2003. Dibaba will face the defending champion Gladys Cherono (Kenya) and former double Berlin winner Edna Kiplagat (Kenya), who is the oldest of the leading trio at 38 years old. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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2012 Olympic champion Uganda’s Stephen Kiprotich will target fast time in Toronto

Over its decades-long history, the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon has been graced by some of the world’s greatest marathoners, but never an Olympic champion. That will all change on October 21, when Uganda’s Stephen Kiprotich will race in this IAAF Gold Label event. The 2012 Olympic marathon champion will accompany two-time Toronto champion Philemon Rono from their mutual training base in Iten, Kenya in what should be an intense battle between the two accomplished marathon runners. The pair are both friends and training partners, but each will want to take home the CAD$30,000 first-place prize money. “I am really happy and training hard and looking forward to competing in this big race in Toronto,” says Kiprotich, who also won the marathon title at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, joining Ethiopia’s Gezehegne Abera as the only men to ever win both major competitions. “I was speaking with Rono and I asked him what is the course like,” he says of the man who set a Canadian all-comers’ record of 2:06:52 in Toronto a year ago. “He said the course is good and nice. I was telling him if we go fast and run the first half in 63 minutes, we can push at the end to 2:05. He told me it is possible.” Kiprotich’s major championship success is outstanding and all the more remarkable since he chose to make Iten his training base. There he lives in the camp built by Dutch based management company Global Sport Communications with a group which includes not only Rono but the world’s No.1 marathon runner, Eliud Kipchoge. They are coached by 1992 Olympic steeplechase silver medallist Patrick Sang. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge is focused on only one thing as he gets ready for the Berlin Marathon Sunday

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya says he has a crazy dream to be the fastest man in history. He hopes will inspire his quest to shutter the world marathon record in Berlin on Sunday. Kipchoge, 33, will be racing in his 10th marathon since he graduated from the track back in 2012. The London champion has only one loss in his career back in 2013 against compatriot Wilson Kipsang. He has won in Hamburg, Chicago, London, Rio (Olympics) and Berlin. "It's only a crazy dream until you do it. Don't be the fastest runner in the world, but strive to be the fastest runner in history," said Kipchoge on Monday in Nairobi. Kipchoge will be running his fourth Berlin marathon on Sunday and has sounded out world marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto (2:02.57) saying he will be focused on lowering his personal best time, which is only eight seconds off the mark. "Don't ask if your dreams are crazy. Ask if they are crazy enough," he added. "In Berlin the focus will be to improve on my personal best time of 2:03.05. Last year the weather was not good but I managed strongly to finish the race," he said. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dennis Kimetto says Kenyan athletes have the strength and skills to run the fast Berlin Marathon course in under 2 hours and 50 seconds

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03.05) and New York marathon silver medalist Wilson Kipsang (2:03.13) will be the top Runners at the Berlin marathon on Sept 16 and Kimetto believes either athlete can run away with the world record. Kimetto's world record stands at 2:02:57. "First there is a race to be won and then the record. Kipchoge is the best so far but Kipsang has the ability to sprint and win if he has his tactics right. Both athletes are under pressure since they will all want to prove a point," said Makau on Thursday in Nairobi. Kipsang was forced to pull out of Berlin marathon last year under rainy and windy conditions after just 31km, citing stomach cramps. He recovered and a month later, and proved his critics wrong to secure silver in New York. "My training has gone on very well and I'm looking forward to a good run in Berlin. It has been an injury-free period for me since running in Tokyo although there has been lots of rain but that didn't stop me from achieving my dream," said Kipsang. Like Kipchoge, Kipsang will be running his fourth marathon in Berlin, having made his debut in 2013 running a world record time of 2:03:23 and has since followed it up with 2:03:13 for a second-place behind Kenenisa Bekele (2:03.03) in 2016. (09/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto says he has overcome his injury worries and hopes to make another comeback, this time running at the Shanghai Marathon in China in November

Kimetto wants to set a new all-time best mark in China as he seeks his first win in marathon since 2016. Speaking in Iten, Kimetto, 35, warned his rivals that it will take more than their skills to improve on his world mark. "I am in right frame and shape to return to marathon running. Shanghai in my next stop in Nov," Kimetto told Xinhua on Thursday in Iten. Compatriots Wilson Kipsang (2:03:13) and Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03:05) like patient vultures have been circling the carcass that has been his world record for the last three years. The two will be in Berlin next week eyeing shutter the record but Kimetto is sitting pretty saying the record is safe. "It depends on their strategy. They are the fastest in the last two years and it depends on their pace makers. If they go past the 30km mark in under one hour and 27 minutes, then they will be able to break the record. But it is fast running and needs a lot of endurance," he warned. Kimetto, who has not finished a marathon since London in 2016, suffered another unhappy day in Vienna, Austria in April when he aggravated his calf muscle injury. He has been in and out of hospital in Germany and hopes when he returns to Hamburg next week for review, he will be given the all clear signal. "I am going for a review in Germany next week. I have just cleared my long run now and am resting. There has not been any pain my leg and I believe it is clear sign I am getting back to my best form," he said. "I will be running in Shanghai in November and I want to check with the doctors to be certain I am ready for the race. If Kipchoge and Kipsang fail to break the record, I want to tell them I will be back next year and will run even faster. But for now, winning Shanghai Marathon is my main concern," said Kimetto. (09/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia's Guyer Adola ran 2:03:46 for his first marathon is running his second marathon Oct 28 in Frankfurt

Guye Adola of Ethiopia, last year’s surprise newcomer on the marathon scene, will run his next marathon in Frankfurt on October 28. He set an unofficial world record as a first time marathoner with 2:03:46 to finish second at the 2017 Berlin Marathon, coming within a hair’s breadth of beating the Kenyan superstar Eliud Kipchoge. The Mainova Frankfurt Marathon will feature a contest between a trio of runner-ups, setting Guye Adola against his fellow Ethiopian Kelkile Gezahegn and the Kenyan Martin Kosgey. The latter two each finished second in Frankfurt in the previous two years. The German record holder Arne Gabius will make his fourth appearance in Frankfurt while Japan’s Hiroyuki Yamamoto will also be on the start line. The organizers expect up to 15,000 entrants for the 37th edition of the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon which is an IAAF Gold Label race, the highest category in international road running. Guye Adola is the marathon runner who almost broke the lengthy dominance of the Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge a year ago. Just before 40 kilometers in Berlin the 27-year-old was in the lead but Kipchoge, unbeaten in the marathon since 2013, was able to reel him in. (09/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Martin Kosgei goal is to win the Frankfurt Marathon

Kenya's Martin Kosgei will return to Frankfurt Marathon course on Oct. 28 aiming for gold.   He finished fourth last year winning $6500US.  Kosgei, 29, says he was not well prepared last year as he tackled windy conditions clocking 2:09:39 in a race that was dominated by Ethiopian runners.   "I want to win the race this time round. I have experience now and I know the course very well. I thank the organizers for giving me the opportunity to return and try and win the race for the third time," he said Wednesday in Nairobi. Kosgei has three marathon wins to his credit since his debut in 2012. He started off winning in Salzburg (Austria), Marseille and Lyon (France). He was second in Hannover and Frankfurt in 2016. This year's race will be the third time Kosgei will be attempting to win in Frankfurt. "I believe I have the strength to do well. Hopefully it will be third time lucky," said Kosgei. Ethiopia's Guye Adola, who clocked 2:03:46 on his marathon debut in the Berlin Marathon last September losing to Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge, has also confirmed his availability to race in Frankfurt. Adola will face opposition from teammate Kelkile Gezahegn and Kosgei, who finished second and fourth respectively in last year's race. "We are looking forward to a thrilling men's race with world-class runners. We are pleased when athletes of this caliber choose Frankfurt for their marathon. It is always our aim to present world-class athletes and at the same time to offer perfect conditions for every single runner," said Jo Schindler, the Frankfurt marathon Race director. (08/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba has been confirmed for the 45th annual BMW Berlin Marathon

The third fastest female marathoner of all-time will face previous winners Gladys Cherono and Edna Kiplagat in the German capital. Tirunesh Dibaba has been confirmed in elite women’s field for the 45th edition of the 2018 BMW Berlin Marathon, which takes place on September 16. The 32-year-old, who has won three gold medals at consecutive Olympic Games (2008 and 2012) and five World Championships from 2003 to 2013, will be joined by Kenyan athletes Gladys Cherono and Edna Kiplagat, who have both won twice in the German capital before, and fellow Ethiopian Aselefech Mergia. All four athletes have personal bests under 2:20 making it the strongest women’s field for many years. Defending champion Eliud Kipchoge is among the leading entries in the men’s field, which was announced in June. Dibaba, one of the best female distance runners of all time and the third fastest in the history, will start as the favorite, and also has a point to prove after dropping out of the London Marathon in April. (07/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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Wilson kipsang, Eliud Kipchoge and Zersenay Tadese will face off at BMW Berlin Marathon

Wilson Kipsang is a strong contender.  Now 36, the Kenyan set his world record time of 2:03:23 in 2013 in Berlin. Kipchoge and Kipsang lined up last year with the target of breaking 2:03 as a key objective but such hopes were dashed by steady rain throughout. Kipchoge won in difficult conditions clocking 2:03:32 while Kipsang dropped out do to stomach issues. Another runner to be taken into consideration is Zersenay Tadese of Eritrea, five times a winner of the world half marathon title as well as world record holder for the distance. Eliud Kipchoge has a strong claim to be the greatest marathon runner of all time. He is the reigning Olympic champion, having won the title in Rio in 2016, three times a winner in London (2015, 16 and 18), twice winner of the BMW Berlin Marathon title as well as winner of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2014. He finished runner-up in Berlin in 2013 when Wilson Kipsang broke the world record. He broke into new territory in May last year when running 2:00:25 for the marathon distance, achieved on the Formula One circuit of Monza in Italy though substitute pacemakers made the time ineligible as a record. In Berlin on September 16 Eliud Kipchoge is keen to show what he can do in regular competition and under hopefully favorable weather conditions: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on Berlin. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.”  With good weather conditions the world record could fall Berlin.   (07/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge seeking again to challenge the world record at Berlin Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge will race the Berlin Marathon for the fourth time on Sept. 16, seeking again to challenge the world record on the world’s fastest record-eligible course, according to event organizers. Kipchoge, a 33-year-old Kenyan Olympic champion, won Berlin in 2015 and 2017 and was second in 2013, his only defeat in 10 career marathons. Kipchoge’s personal best of 2:03:05, set at the 2016 London Marathon, is eight seconds shy of Dennis Kimetto‘s world record from the 2014 Berlin Marathon. Kipchoge’s two Berlin wins came in 2:04:00 in 2015 (with his soles flapping out from the back of his shoes) and 2:03:32 last year in rain and humidity. Fellow Kenyan Wilson Kipsang, who lowered the world record at the 2013 Berlin Marathon and has run four sub-2:04s, is also in the Berlin field. As is Eritrean Zersenay Tadese, the half-marathon world-record holder whose marathon personal best is 2:10:41, though he ran 2:06:51 in Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon attempt not run under record-eligible conditions where Kipchoge famously clocked 2:00:25 last year. (06/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge says what makes a runner dope is easy money, he wants to empower our youth

Kenya marathon star Eliud Kipchoge plans to establish lucrative road race, Speaking at a business forum organised by Rich Management in Nairobi on Saturday, Kipchoge, the Olympic champion and three-time London Marathon winner, urged aspiring athletes to be empowered to resist the urge to dope in the sport. "When I retire, I will have a 10K, 21K or a marathon race where all youth can take part and earn good money. What makes a sportsman dope is easy money. They know when they perform, they will get money. They are those who want to get a high lifestyle without working for it," said Kipchoge who bagged his third Marathon crown on April 23. In slamming dope cheats as 'greedy' the Rio 2016 marathon gold winner stressed the vice that has cast a dark shadow over the rich legacy of Kenya's distance running excellence can only be fought by sensitisation. "When you dope, you will be guilty even in your deathbed. You cannot stand and say you have done this or that in the sport. We should empower our youth to leave a legacy by training hard to win," he said.  (05/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Morris Gachaga ran the world's best time for 12K in Cape Town last year and on Sunday wants to go faster

The fastest man ever over 12K will return to defend his title at the FNB Cape Town 12 ONERUN on Sunday. Morris Gachaga, 23, stormed to a 33min 27sec win at last year’s event to set the fastest time ever recorded over the 12km distance. The Kenyan is in even better shape than before. On February 9 this year, he finished fifth in the RAK Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon, clocking 59:36. That was followed up with a third-place finish in Lisbon where he covered the Half marathon in 60:17 on March 11, before heading off to London as pacemaker to Eliud Kipchoge, who won the 2018 London Marathon. The 59:36 (in the RAK Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon) places Gachaga eighth in the world this year over the half marathon and it’s a personal best for him over the distance by more than a minute. Clearly, he will be coming into the race on May 20 in the best shape of his life and could potentially challenge his own ‘record’ time if the rest of the field go with the required pace. ‘I’m looking forward to coming back to Cape Town to defend my title,’ says Gachaga. ‘I have good memories of that race and want to do well. I am in great shape. If things go well, maybe I can better my 33:27 and lower the world best.’ This will be Gachaga’s third visit to South Africa and his second to Cape Town since running that world best.  The 12km is a non-standard race and hence the time is ratified as a world best, not a world record.  More than 14,000 runners took to the streets of Cape Town last year and more are expected on Sunday.  Many run i customes.   (05/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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