Running News Daily
Top Ten Stories of the Week
11/16/2019

These are the top ten stories based on views over the last week. 

Index to Daily Posts

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More disturbing news about coach Alberto Salazar of the Nike Oregon Project and what about Nike’s founder and billionaire Phil Knight

There has been much talk about Alberto Salazar and the Nike Oregon Project lately but let's not forget about mister NIKE Phil Knight.  

Just this week teenage super star Mary Cain said her career was ruined by Salazar and Nike. She was mentally abused by coach Salazar when she was part of the Nike Oregon Project. Nike knew what was going on.  

Let’s not forget who Nike is. Phil Knight built Nike into the giant company it is today. He was running things day to day at Nike when the Oregon Project was started in 2001. I am sure he pushed coach Salazar to do whatever it took for their athletes to win races.

Phil Knight ran over a lot of people and companies as he built Nike. Today he is worth over 31 billion dollars and growing. Nike stock is trading near an all time high. I am sure their $250 racing shoes must be helping. A shoe that many feel should be ban. I am sure they did not have it tested or looked at by the world’s governing body (IAAF) before they released it. They just put it on the market. That’s the Phil Knight way. That’s the Salazar way.

I am not a fan of either men. Nor am I a fan of Nike. They tired to destroy my magazine Runner’s World in the early 80’s because I would not rate their shoe number one. This is another story I have told before.  

That’s in the past and I have moved on. But things that have been going on more recently can’t be overlooked.

Nike’s power is overwhelming. They think they can do whatever they want. They are still even supporting Salazar, a long-time friend of Phil Knight. Yet Salazar has been banned for four years for doping violations. Should have been a lifetime ban.

How can we continue to turn our back on this? We can’t. We can’t just continue to buy their shoes, making Phil Knight and family even richer.

In response to Mary Cain’s allegations of forced weight loss and public shaming by former coach Alberto Salazar at a now-disbanded Nike-supported running program, Nike has started an investigation into the matter.

When asked for comment regarding Cain’s allegations Friday, a Nike spokesman issued the following statement: “These are deeply troubling allegations which have not been raised by Mary or her parents before. Mary was seeking to rejoin the Oregon Project and Alberto’s team as recently as April of this year and had not raised these concerns as part of that process. We take the allegations extremely seriously and will launch an immediate investigation to hear from former Oregon Project athletes. At Nike, we seek to always put the athlete at the center of everything we do, and these allegations are completely inconsistent with our values.”

Cain’s also claimed that Nike needs to change because it “controls all the top coaches, athletes, races and even the governing body,” and there is a need for more women to be in charge.Nike response seems rather vague to me.  What do you think we should do? Thanks Mary Cain for sharing your story. That was very brave. 

(11/08/19) Views: 1,142
Bob Anderson (Founder Runner’s World and My Best Runs)
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Edna Kiplagat, one of the world's top marathon runners plans to compete in the 2019 Manchester Road Race

One of the world's greatest marathon runners will compete at the 83rd Manchester Road Race on Thanksgiving Day. Race officials announced Monday that Edna Kiplagat, who won the 26.2-mile event at the World Championships in 2011 and 2013, will return to Manchester after a two-year absence.

She finished fourth at the 2016 MRR with a time of 24:34.

Kiplagat, who turns 40 on Nov., 15, grew up in Kenya and recently relocated to the Boulder, Colorado area. She won the 2017 Boston Marathon, the 2014 London Marathon, and the New York City and Los Angeles Marathons, both in 2010. Kiplagat recorded her best time for the event in 2012 when she placed second behind Mary Keitany at the London Marathon in 2:19:50.

The mother of five children and a former police physical fitness instructor in Kenya, Kipligat was the runner-up at the Boston Marathon last April, and finished fourth in the marathon at the 2019 World Championships, which were held last month in Doha, Qatar.

Kiplagat will join Olympic silver medalist Sally Kipyego in a highly competitive womens elite field at the annual 4.78-mile Thanksgiving Day run through Manchester's central streets.

The 83rd Manchester Road Race is scheduled will take place on Nov. 28 at 10 a.m.

(11/12/19) Views: 276
Chris Dehnel
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Marathon world record holder Brigid Kosgei is one of five finalists for the Female World Athlete 2019 award

Last month the Kenyan broke Briton Paula Radcliffe's 16-year-old world record, running a time of 2hrs 14mins 04secs to win the Chicago Marathon.

Kosgei, 25, also became the youngest winner of the London marathon in April.

American Dalilah Muhammad, Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Venezuelan Yulimar Rojas and the Netherlands' Sifan Hassan are also up for the award.

Sprinter Fraser-Pryce won the world 100m and 4x100m titles in world-leading times of 10.71 and 41.44 in Doha, while Hassan broke the world mile record with a time of 4:12:33 in Monaco.

Triple-jumper Rojas won nine of her 12 competitions, including gold at the World Championships with 15.37m, while Muhammad set a new world record of 52.16 in the 400m hurdles in Doha.

Britain's world heptathlon gold medallist Katarina Johnson-Thompson missed out on the shortlist, having featured among the initial 11 nominees.

The male and female World Athletes of the Year will be announced live on stage at the World Athletics Awards 2019 in Monaco on Saturday 23 November.

(11/12/19) Views: 158
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Jaxon Hindman is training for his next marathon, he’s a survivor, who was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2014

“The doctor called my mom back and when she came out again like 15 minutes later, she was just bawling,” recounted Hindman. “I didn’t really understand at the time. Her exact words at the time were ‘there’s something in your head that doesn’t need to be there.’”  

He underwent 30 radiation treatments and four chemo treatments before becoming cancer-free 6 months later.

That same year, Team Jaxon 2 was created, where his family ran the St. Jude race in his honor. From that point on, Jaxon wanted to run too.

With a 5K and two half-marathons under his belt, Jaxon got the okay from his doctor to finally run a marathon last year.

A smile comes to his face, when he’s asked how it felt to cross that finish line.

“Watching that, I started to tear up,” Hindman said. “It’s just so inspiring. I had my whole family beside the finish line holding my banner.”

Now the high school senior is a proud eagle scout and shoots competitive air rifle.

In December, he’s gearing up for St jude, another 26.2 miles.

“That’s been one of the biggest things for me to realize how much of an impact I have on other people being a patient and going out and running a full marathon.”

The motivation comes from patients like himself.  

“I’m running this race for them,” commented Hindman. “So I can’t quit now. They can’t quit either.”

Jaxon’s team has raised over $10,000 for St. Jude Hospital. 

However, he’s not stopping there. Jaxon has plans to study anesthesiology and return to St. Jude to help other patients in the future.

(11/12/19) Views: 156
Rebecca Butcher
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Joshua Cheptegei was born under an avocado tree, Cheptegei’s story is not merely a testament to his incredible ability but of the inspirational power of sport

Joshua Cheptegei was born under an avocado tree in Cheptendan, Kapchorwa. “The mothers those days were strong,” he jokes.

His favorite pastime growing up was swinging on the ropes of some “very big tree that was near our home. You could spend the whole day swinging.”

And his dream was to be a teacher, just like dad. Talent, however, has a way of messing up things, of overturning plans, reshaping destinies. Cheptegei, a would-be literature teacher is now a multi-millionaire superstar world athlete, on track to being one of the greatest sportsmen Uganda has ever seen.

Life is obviously the best imitation of art and Cheptegei’s story is scarcely believable even if its best chapters may be yet scripted. Cheptegei is a strong favorite to win the 5000m and 10,000m double at the World athletics championships in Doha next month, which would, arguably, be the greatest feat in the history of Ugandan sport.

This by a man who is already the reigning world cross country champion, and 5000m and 10,000m Commonwealth champion, 2017 IAAF World Athletics Championships silver medalist and the fastest man over 15km ever recorded.

“I dream of becoming a world record holder in the 5000m, 10,000m and later the half marathon and maybe also the full marathon,” he says.

Can he do it? Perhaps the question is, who can bet against him?

Cheptegei’s story is not merely a testament to his incredible ability but of the inspirational power of sport.

One of nine children, Cheptegei was on the way to a normal, rain-soaked Sebei existence. With the modest earnings from his mother’s agriculture and the father’s teaching career, Cheptegei would have, in the best-case scenario, completed university and settled for a life as a Shakespeare expositor.

“My father wasn’t impressed when I first told him I wanted to become a professional athlete,” Cheptegei recalls.

“He wanted me to first finish school. That time I had just finished high school. I was due for a Bachelor’s degree in education. Dad wanted me to become a literature teacher”.

Cheptegei joined university but kept running, finishing second in the 2014 Inter-University Games. He also finished second in the national cross country championship, which he followed up by winning the World University Cross Country.

The breakthrough came at the U-20 World Athletics Championships in Oregon, where he won gold in the 10,000m.

The rewards Cheptegei was consequently invited to State House and received a car and sh20m from president Yoweri Museveni. It was the runner’s first big payday but certainly not biggest nor the last.

Subsequent victories in major world races, have seen Cheptegei etch towards the sh1b mark in career earnings. Imagine that!

“He is an extremely rich man,” said a top athletics official who once coached Cheptegei.

Barring any major injury setbacks, Cheptegei is poised to reap success from 5000m, 10,000m, world cross country, 10km, 15km and half marathon races for the foreseeable future. That means more prize money and sponsorship earnings not to mention government rewards and Police promotions.

And all of this because of the still oft-devalued path called sports.

“There is a need to support talent whenever it is realized,” Joshua counsels “Whether it is your child or any other person support them. It does not matter what sport it is. It is also the same for talents like music. Once you realize any talent invest in it.”

(11/13/19) Views: 86
Charles Mutebi
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New York and Boston Marathon winner says everyone should run at least one marathon

When Meb Keflezighi ran his first competitive race in the seventh grade, his motivation was simple: to get a t-shirt for his school’s running club that his older brothers also wore.

Yet after running a mile in 5 minutes, 20 seconds, he discovered he had a unique talent. His teacher at the time told him, “You’re going to go to the Olympics.” And word in school quickly spread.

“I didn’t speak English at the time, but my picture by the gym made history,” said Keflezighi, who immigrated to the U.S. from Eritrea.

“They said, ‘Hey, here’s the fastest kid,’ and people started giving me high-fives,” he added. “And that was how my running started.”

Today, Keflezighi, 44, is the only runner to have won an Olympic medal, the Boston Marathon and the New York City Marathon. 

Before winning the New York City Marathon, Keflezighi faced a number of setbacks that led him to question whether he would ever be able to run again. That included a stress fracture in his hip that left him crawling on his hands and knees just to get around.

“I couldn’t stand up to bear weight, and I remember looking over the window of the city, because I couldn’t stand up,” Keflezighi said.

Around that time, his friend and fellow professional runner Ryan Shay died of a heart attack.

“You can’t compare when the guy you were sitting next to on the bus to the starting line passed away,” Keflezighi said. “That kind of puts life in perspective.”

Keflezighi, who was already an Olympic silver medalist, considered retiring. But something internally told him he was not done.

“What it taught me was to celebrate every personal best,” Keflezighi said. “Just to be able to run, you’re grateful when it’s not taken away from you.”

He set his sights on winning the New York City Marathon. In 2009, with a time of 2:09:15, he became the first American to win the race since 1982.

The challenges did not end there. In 2011, Nike declined to renew his contract. Though Keflezighi still had other sponsors, he relied on the shoe brand for the bulk of his financial support.

He went without a shoe contract until August of that year, when Skechers stepped up.

“They took a risk,” Keflezighi said. “They gave me a one-year contract.

“I said, I need more than that, but let’s see how it goes,” he added. “And it went really well.”

In 2012, Keflezighi made the U.S. Olympic team and placed fourth in the summer Olympics marathon. “Finishing fourth, that kind of sparked a little light in me to say, ’Hey, I can still win,” he said.

In 2014, he did win, coming in first in the Boston Marathon, with a time of 2:08:37. At the time, he was the first American man to come in first since 1983. The race was one year after the notorious bombing. To pay tribute to victims of that terror attack, Keflezighi wrote their names with marker in small letters on his bib.

“As a lead athlete, they tell you not to tamper with your bib, but I took a risk,” Keflezighi said. “I just wrote it with a Sharpie to give them respect and to draw inspiration from them.”

In 2017, Keflezighi retired at the New York City Marathon after running 26 marathons.

Today, he works to inspire other runners through the Meb Foundation, which works to help promote children’s health, education and fitness.

Last week, he was inducted into the New York Road Runners Hall of Fame, 10 years after his New York City Marathon win. And the lessons he has learned along the way inform his advice for other runners.

When Nike pulled their contract, Keflezighi still had the support of other sponsors. However, the loss of that income prompted the athlete and his wife to scale back financially.

They rented their home in San Diego and moved to Mammoth Lakes, California, to cut down on commuting costs. And for a long time, they had one car for the family.

“It’s not how much you make, it’s what you do with that money,” Keflezighi said. “You have to be a saver, and that’s what we try to do.”

Participating in races is a great way to increase your motivation. But nothing compares to running a full marathon, according to Keflezighi.

“I tell people you should do one marathon in your lifetime,” Keflezighi said. “After that, it’s optional.”

That’s because running that 26.2-mile distance can teach you things that running a half marathon or 10K or 5K race can’t, he said.

“If you can overcome those challenges to get ready for a marathon and get to that finish line, it changes your life,” Keflezighi said. “You are going to find something you never thought you were capable of doing.”

It’s important to stay focused on your goals, even when you are faced with setbacks.

“You go through ups and downs in life, and you go through ups and downs in training,” Keflezighi said.

With the sport often come injuries. The beauty of running, Keflezighi said, is you can scale down your efforts or cross train with another activity, such as swimming or biking.

“If you’re hurting, get healthy, refocus and set a new goal,” Keflezighi said.

The same goes for long-term achievements that you look to accomplish in life, he said. For those goals, it’s important to remember that one setback does not have to interfere with your progress over months or even years.

“Don’t give up on your dreams,” Keflezighi said.

(11/10/19) Views: 83
Lorie Konish
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Uganda´s Joshua Cheptegei will target 10K world record in Valencia

Joshua Cheptegei of Uganda, the reigning world champion over 10,000m as well as cross-country, announced he will be looking to set a new world record at the 10K Valencia Trinidad Alfonso, to be held in conjunction with the Valencia Marathon on December 1.

Cheptegei already holds the world record in the 15K, which he set a year ago in the Netherlands, winning the Seven Hills race in Nijmegen for the fourth time, in 41:05. Cheptegei is 23.

In winning the 10,000m in Doha on October 6 in a world-leading 26:48.3, the Ugandan won his country’s first-ever gold medal in that event, though he also took gold in the 2018 Commonwealth Games over both 5,000m and 10,000m and set a new Games Record in the 10.

He is the only person besides the great Kenenisa Bekele to win both the world cross-country title and the world or Olympic 10,000m title in the same year (Bekele did it three times in a row–in 2003, 2004 and 2005).

The current 10K world record was set by Leonard Patrick Komon of Kenya at 26:44 at Utrecht in the Netherlands in 2010, and it was Komon who held the previous record in the 15K also.

Cheptegei is a member of the NN Running Team, which also includes marathon world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge and several of the men who paced him at the INEOS 1:59 Challenge, where he successfully ran the marathon distance in 1:59:40.

Cheptegei has been nominated for IAAF Male Athlete of the Year, the first Ugandan to be honored in this way.

(11/08/19) Views: 81
Anne Francis
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Alberto Salazar Responds To Mary Cain's Allegations Of Abuse

In response to Mary Cain's accusations of physical and emotional abuse against her former coach, Alberto Salazar has provided a statement to The Oregonian's Ken Goe refuting Cain's claims.

“Mary’s father is a medical doctor, and both of her parents were deeply involved in her training, competition and health throughout the period she was coached by me. For example, Mary’s father consulted on medications and supplements Mary used during her time at the NOP. Neither of her parents, nor Mary, raised any of the issues that she now suggests occurred while I was coaching her. To be clear, I never encouraged her, or worse yet, shamed her, to maintain an unhealthy weight.”

Salazar writes: “Mary at times struggled to find and maintain her ideal performance and training weight."

Salazar told Goe that the Nike Oregon Project did employ a nutritionist and sports psychologist, contrary to what Cain has asserted.

Salazar also shared a text message that Cain sent him in April of this year.

“Thanks again so much for a great trip -- I’m excited to be working together again and I really want this. Haha got back to a chilly morning in NY and even skipped class just to prioritize training and recovery since that’s my No. 1.”

In a tweet thread this morning, Cain discussed her decision to reach out to Salazar then.Nike released their own statement on the matter, calling Cain's allegations "deeply troubling," while also pointing out that Cain had shown interest in rejoining NOP in April. The brand said they will launch an immediate investigation

 

(11/09/19) Views: 80
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Laura Muir will attempt to break the 1,000m world record when she races in the Indoor Grand Prix at Glasgow's Emirates Arena in February

Four-time European Indoor champion Muir, 26, broke the British and European marks in 2017.

She sits second on the all-time list behind Maria Mutola, who has held the record for the past 20 years.

"I can't think of a better way to begin 2020 than with a world record attempt in front of a home crowd," Muir said.

"I feel that going quicker that two minutes 30.94 seconds is a real possibility, and I can't think of a better place to go for the record than in Glasgow and at such a world-class event.

"I know all about the Glasgow crowd from the European Indoors this year and I know they will be crazy as ever, so the opportunity to achieve something as historic as a world record with them cheering me all the way is really special."

At her last event at the Emirates - earlier this year - Muir won 1500m and 3,000m gold at the European Indoor Championships.

(11/08/19) Views: 70
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Zwift, the multiplayer online training and racing platform for cyclists and runners, proudly announces its new partnership as the Official Training Partner of the Los Angeles Marathon presented by ASICS

Zwift brings its training gamification concept to Los Angeles Marathon runners through a custom tailored 26-week training plan, weekly in-game group runs, and a series of virtual races.

The progressive 26-week training plan has been designed to help runners of all levels conquer both the Pasadena Half Marathon on January 19, 2020 and the Los Angeles Marathon’s iconic 26.2-mile Sea to Stadium course on March 8, 2020.

To access the Los Angeles Marathon training tools and events, runners need access to a Bluetooth-enabled smart treadmill or a traditional treadmill with a running shoe-based foot pod sensor like the Zwift RunPod and as part of the partnership Zwift is providing RunPods to all registered 2019/2020 LA Road Runner program members, the official training program of the marathon.

“By partnering with Zwift, we are offering runners a world-class training tool and a meaningful new avenue for social connection," said Murphy Reinschreiber, Chief Operating Officer. "With Zwift as our official training partner, more athletes than ever – regardless of where they live in the Greater Los Angeles Area or the world –  are able to best prepare for the epic running experience that is our Stadium to Sea course.”

Zwift will also hosting a series of Virtual Santa Monica Classic Races each month between now and March 2020. The virtual editions of the sold-out race, which took place on September 8, 2019, is the only remaining way for runners to earn the 2020 Conqur LA Challenge medal–– a top-tier accomplishment which required runners to complete all 3 of Conqur’s marquee events; Santa Monica Classic, Pasadena Half Marathon and the Los Angeles Marathon.

“For 35 years, the Los Angeles Marathon has helped hundreds of thousands of athletes achieve their goals, hand in hand with a long list of worthy charities,” says Eric Min, CEO and co-founder of Zwift. “We know that we can bring even more people together to train socially and discover the efficiencies and sheer fun of running on Zwift.”

(11/08/19) Views: 61
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