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Dave McGillivray who has heart issues says just because you are fit doesn't mean you are healthy

Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray was at home resting last night after undergoing his third angiogram in the past five years earlier in the day at Mass. General Hospital. The tests showed that McGillivray, who turned 64 on Aug. 22, has one heart artery 80 percent blocked and another 40-to-50 percent impaired. McGillivray plans to meet with a heart surgeon in the next week or so to decide the best avenue of treatment. “Right now, my mind is spinning out of control. I never thought during my lifetime and in my craziest dreams that I would need bypass surgery. This just wasn’t on my radar,” McGillivray said in an email sent out to friends and colleagues last night. “But, I’ve also finally learned and accepted the fact that I am not invincible. No one is.” McGillivray, who maintains a whirlwind schedule, recently served as race director/organizer of the MR8 5K event, which finished inside TD Garden last week. Just weeks before this past April’s 122nd edition of the Boston Marathon, McGillivray completed an arduous trek of running seven marathons in seven days on seven continents. Each year, to celebrate his birthday, McGillivray runs an equal amount in miles. Dave wrote in his email, "On the one hand, I wanted to keep this private.  At a certain level it is almost embarrassing to me that I am in this position.  However, I also want to expose the fact that this can happen to ANYONE and sometimes I am led to believe that the fittest athletes could actually be the most vulnerable ones because they are in such denial of their illness and don't act on it like others do.  I'm hopeful that this message can actually save others going through a similar experience and make everyone think a little deeper about their own health and act on it before it is too late."  (Thu 6) Views: 8,936
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America's Tyler McCandless and Japan's Yuki Kawauchi encounter at the Chicago Marathon

After running miles 3-15 alone at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, I caught up to reigning Boston Marathon champ Yuki Kawauchi. When I caught him I said, “come on Yuki, stay with me” and he tapped my side. I looked back a minute later and he was right on my tail and I said “good” to him. He stayed there until about mile 21 when he tried to push past me. We went back and forth over the last few miles multiple times. Once, he slipped on a turn, nearly fell and looked concerned, I said to Yuki “you’re okay, you’re good.” The rain and wind picked up and neither of us were running near where our goals were. But, we pushed each other to the best we could on ”off” days. We were both struggling, yet with 300m to go he found another gear and blew me away. There no doubt he found that gear from mental toughness and I’ve learned something from it. Moral of the story: even if you’re day isn’t what you envisioned and trained for, NEVER give up because you’ll gain indispensable experience and inspiration from it!  I ran 2:16:37, 20th overall and 7th American.  I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have faster goals, but Sunday was a real test of character and I’m proud of how I competed. It was wet, rainy and windy, and I got stuck with nobody around for the majority of the race until dueling it with Yuki Kawauchi over the last several miles. I went through halfway in 1:06:36 and simply had to be gritty and fight for every second over the second half of the race. Having a less ...than ideal weather day, and simply not having my best day out there, but toughing it out to finish with my third best marathon time is something I’m proud of.  Editors note: Yuki Kawauchi finished 19th in 2:19:26 his 82 marathon under 2:20. Tyler is sponsored by Altra Running and rabbit.  media@TrackTy (Tue 9) Views: 4,557
Tyler McCandless
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Eliud Kipchoge is a simple man who helps others - Part three of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Three: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge.  When Eliud Kipchoge passed the first 10k mark in 29:01 on September 16 in Berlin everyone was excited because he was nine seconds ahead of world record pace. Actually this was his slower 10k split of the day.  He picked up the pace and his second 10k split was 28:55, third 28:49 and fourth 28:47 clocking 2:01:39 to smash the world marathon record.  So how did he do this?  It is not drugs! He has never failed a drug test.  Besides doing some unbelievable workouts (as detailed in part 2) he pays close attention to his diet. His favorite meal is ugali, kalenjin traditional milk called mursik which nutritious and energetic, traditional veggies (such as; socha, saga, mborochet, chepkerta and mitiat).  These are herbal and they build the immune system and adds to the blood.  He eats roasted maize for carbohydrates. How does he relax? During leisure time he likes reading at least two or three inspirational books every month. This is where a man full of wisdom and maturity adds to his knowledge.  One quote he likes, "The impossible is possible and imitation is limitation. " by John Manson. Eliud is a dairy and tea farmer and when he is at home he looks after cattle.  His last born kid son started running so he can follow in his father's foot steps.  After smashing the World Marathon Record in Berlin, Eliud is expected to get $50,000 for winning and $69,000 for breaking the world record. This is 12 million Kenyan Shillings.  In additon, truck manufactures, Isuzu East Africa, which Kipchoge is a Brand Ambassador, will give him a D-max luxury double cabin vehicle. There are also gaming companies which will reward him. Eliud has involved himself in charity work too. He helps raise funds for dispensaries, pay school fees for unable kids, he helps upcoming athletes with housing and hospitals bills.  He pays for airline tickets for students going abroad on scholarship.  He helps to motivate young Kenyans on the importance of hardwork.  Kenya has been very proud of Eliud Kipchoge and since he smashed the world record the whole country is behind him.  Part one and two of these series were published the last two days on My Best Runs.   (Sat 22) Views: 3,494
Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Galen Rupp runs first sub 60 to win 44th annual Roma Ostia Half Marathon

Galen Rupp ran a personal best to win the 44th edition of the Roma-Ostia Half Marathon on Sunday (March 11). The US distance runner won the Rome race in 59:47 as he went sub 60 minutes for the first time and takes 43 seconds off his 2011 best. He had Ryan Hall’s 2007 US record in his sights and came very close only missing Hall’s time by four seconds. However, if he had dipped under the 59:43 mark it would not have stood as an American record however because the course is a point to point race and not record-eligible....Rupp launched his decisive attack between 15th and 16th kilometers when, after a tactic of waiting during which he vented his most credited opponents, he lengthened the pace by breaking the Kenyans Moses Kemei, second place in 1:00:44, and Justus Kangogo, third in 1:01:02.... The female race saw Ethiopian’s Hftamenesh Haylu in first with 1:09.02 and compatriot Dera Datta close behind in 1:09:21. Third place went to Kenya’s Rebecca Chesir, who finished in 1:11:04. (Sun 11) Views: 3,396
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Eliud Kipchoge smashed the World Marathon Record clocking 2:01:39 in Berlin

33-year-old Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya smashed the world marathon record in Berlin today (September 16) clocking 2:01:39, breaking the record by over a minute.  According to Willie Korir reporting from Kenya, "the pace was so high.  Eliud started well and maintained 2:52-2:55/k pace.  Two of the pacers dropped at 14k.  Sammy Sitwara, Kipkemboe and Boit remained up to 25k.  Eliud was alone from 25k to the end.  It is a big celebration all over Kenya especially in Eliud's home town of Kapsabet and in Eldoret, home of Champions."  Amos Kipruto (2:06:23) passed Wilson Kipsang to place second and Wilson placed third (2:06:48).  Gladys Cherono set a course record clocking 2:18:11.  Second woman was Ruti Aga 2:18:34 and Trunesh Dibaba 2:18:55.  Kipchoge maintained his form well in the closing stages and crossed the finish line in 2:01:39, taking one minute and 18 seconds off the previous world record set four years ago by Dennis Kimetto. It is the largest single improvement on the marathon world record since Derek Clayton improved the mark by two minutes and 23 seconds in 1967. "I lack the words to describe how I feel," said Kipchoge. "It was really hard [during the last 17 kilometers] but I was truly prepared to run my own race. I had to focus on the work I had put in in Kenya and that is what helped push me. I’m really grateful to my coaching team, my management, the organisation." (Sun 16) Views: 3,396
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Japan's Yuki Kawauchi was 91 seconds behind at 35K, then he made an unbelievable move to win Boston

It looked like last year's Boston Marathon winner, Geoffrey Kirui, was going to win again but he may not have realized how tough of a runner Japan's Yuki Kawauchi really is in challenging weather conditions. Kirui had taken command at 30K opening up a 28 second lead on a pack of three behind including Japan's Yuki Kawauchi who lead the pack through the half marathon mark. At this point Shadrack Biwott was the first American as Galen Rupp was not handling the weather well. Geoffrey stayed in control, hitting 35K in 1:50:49 after a 15:51 5K split. Yuki was 91 seconds back. Then Yuki made an unbelievable move (running a 5:08 mile) and overtook Kirui and never looked back. Two America's were in the top four with just a mile to go (Biwott and Pennel) and stayed that way to the finish. Yuki crossed the finish line first in 2:15:54 beating last year’s champion by over three minutes. Yuki became the first Japanese runner to win since 1987. Geoffrey finished second in 2:18:21, Biwot third in 2:18:32 and Pennel fourth in 2:18:57. In the end there were six American's in the top ten. Tenth place being almost 12 minutes behind the winner. Kawauchi said through an interpreter after the windy, rainy race that "it was the best conditions possible" for him. (Mon 16) Views: 3,205
Bob Anderson
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Galen Rupp smashed his PR and won the Prague Marathon by nearly a minute clocking 2:06:07

American’s Galen Rupp did as promised and the weather did not get in his way at the 24th Annual Volkswagen Prague Marathon Sunday morning May 6.  He ran an even pace the whole way reaching the half way point in 1:03:02.  Ethiopian’s Sisay Lemma stayed close through 30k but Galen took control and clocked 1:03:05 for his second half finishing in 1:06:07.  This smashed his previous best by three minutes and 13 seconds. This makes Galen the third fastest American ever and his time was only 29 seconds off the official American Record held by Khalid Khannouchi.  Ryan Hall’s 2:04:58 clocked in Boston is not considered official since Boston is a point-to-point course.  Galen has now finished five marathons setting a PR each time. The Prague Marathon kicked off at 9am local time from the Old Town Square.  Sisay finished second clocking 2:07:02.  Thousands of runners from all over the world enjoyed the perfect weather and the beautiful course.  Well done RunCzech for producing a world class IAAF Gold Medal Marathon.   (Sun 6) Views: 3,069
Bob Anderson
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Mo Farah sets European Record to Win The Chicago Marathon

This was Great Britian's Sir Mo Farah's first marathon win in three attempts today October 7.  He looked smooth the whole way and took control of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon over the last few miles when he stepped up the pace to 4:35. The lead group had passed the half way mark in 1:03:03.  At the finish Mo Farah clocked 2:05:11 winning his first US marathon and setting a new European record.  (Breaking Sondre Nordstad Moen record of 2:05:48 set in Japan Dec 3, 2017.)   24-year-old Brigid Kosgei from Kenya running her ninth marathon and second place finisher last year ran the last miles by herself to clock an outstanding 2:18:35, making her the 10th fastest women's marathon time ever. "I like the rain," Brigid said after winning. "I enjoy the rain and I swallowed the pain, no struggling," she said. Roza Dereje (Eth) was second cocking 2:21:18.  First American was Sarah Crouch finished sixth with 2:32:37.  "Amazing to come across the finish first," Mo said after he finished.  Ethiopia's Mosinet Geremew Bayih finished second clocking 2:05:24.  Suguru Osako from Japan finished third in 2:05:50 setting a national Japan record winning 100 million yen (almost one million US dollars) in doing so.  In fourth was Kenneth Kipkemoi from Kenya clocking 2:05:57.  Galen Rupp who fell off the pack at around 22 miles came back strong and finished fifth with 2:06:21 just 14 seconds off his PR.  Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi (Japan) finished 19th clocking 2:16:26, his 82nd sub 2:20 marathon. Mo, a  two-time Olympic champion in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, native of Great Britain finished third in the London Marathon earlier this year.  The men’s field include three former champions and 11 racers who have registered times faster than 2:08.  In the end 11 men ran faster than 2:10, nine under 2:08.  The temperature was 58 degrees at the start with light to heavy rain most of the way. Of more impact were the north-northeast winds coming off Lake Michigan as runners headed north from the start.  Mo is the most successful British track athlete in modern Olympic Games history, he was the 2012 and 2016 Olympic gold medalist in both the 5000m and 10,000m. Farah is the second athlete in modern Olympic Games history, after Lasse Virén, to win both the 5000m and 10,000m titles at successive Olympic Games. Mo moved from the track to the roads after the 2017 World Athletics Championships.  61-year-old Joan Samuelson clocked 3:12:13 not reaching her sub three hour goal.  (Sun 7) Views: 2,948
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Jake and Zane Robertson are the world’s Fastest Twins in the Half Marathon

Jake and Zane Robertson moved from New Zealand to Kenya to live and train ten years ago. When they arrived they found it very hard but then they found Shaheen [world record holder in steeplechase] training in Iten. He heard their story and said, “That’s a poor life. Tomorrow I’ll get you a house next to me. You’re on me in Iten.” They moved to Iten with Shaheen’s training group. He didn’t charge then rent. The twins lived, ate and trained like the Kenyans, who run 2-3 times a day six days per week. Running is the number one most important thing for most Kenyan runners. Did this change of life help them become two of the fastest runners in the world? They think so. Jake has run two 1:00:01 half marathons and Zane has run 59:47. Looks like their life in Kenya is working for them. Jake is running the Cresent City Classic 10K March 31...going for a repeat win. (Sun 18) Views: 2,731
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Is Yuki Kawauchi's secret weapon doing long distance runs at a slow pace? He ran 44 mile race Sunday

2018 Boston Marathon winner, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi, won the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71K ultramarathon in Nagano, Japan Sunday May 20, taking more than six minutes off the course record in the process. His winning time was 4:41:55 (6:23/mile for 44.1 miles).  He won by more than half an hour.  According to Japan Running News, Kawauchi is training for the Stockholm marathon, which is June 2.  Yuki finished sixth place there last year. This was the longest race of Kawauchi’s career so far. Kawauchi is famously unusual in his incorporation of over-distance training at a slow pace into his training, something few world-major elites do. Some believe it’s his secret weapon, though others are skeptical of its value in marathon training.   (Mon 21) Views: 2,506
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Galen Rupp was so ready to run well in Boston but the weather got in the way, next up Prague!

Galen Rupp was so ready to run a fast time and win Boston Marathon but the weather won out. So now what? Galen is going to run the 2018 Volkswagen Prague Marathon on May 6, race organizers confirmed today. Rupp dropped out of the Boston Marathon just before 20 miles due to breathing problems and hypothermia as a result of the cold, wet, and windy weather. The course record in Prague is Eliud Kiptanui‘s 2:05:39 from 2010 and the winning time has been under 2:09 in each of the past nine editions of the race. Rupp’s personal best is 2:09:20, which he ran to win the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon in October. Before his DNF in Boston, Rupp had set a personal best in each of his first four career marathons. (Tue 24) Views: 2,385
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Olympic Champion Joan Benoit- Samuelson now 61 wants to break the world 60 plus record at Chicago Marathon

Now, 61-year-old Joan Benoit-Samuelson is returning to the site of a past victory with a new goal. Samuelson won the Chicago Marathon in 1985, in a then-American record of 2:21:21, still the fifth-fastest U.S. time on record. This year, race organizers said she hopes to break the world record for the 60–64 age group, 3:01:30, set by New Zealand’s Bernie Portenski in 2010. If she succeeds in conquering a new category this year, the victory would likely feel extra sweet. Circumstances have kept her from Chicago’s streets on several of her recent attempts. In 2015, she aimed to run within 30 minutes of her winning time 30 years prior, but she was forced to drop out the day before due to a stomach bug. Last year, she set a goal of running the first sub-3 ever by a woman older than 60, but a knee injury intervened. Once again, she withdrew four days before the race.  Joan was the first-ever women's Olympic Games marathon champion, winning the Gold medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. Benoit Samuelson still holds the fastest times for an American woman at the Chicago Marathon and the Olympic Marathon.  Her time at the Boston Marathon was the fastest time by an American woman at that race for 28 years. She was inducted into the Maine Women's Hall of Fame in 2000. (Wed 3) Views: 2,369
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Bill Anderson's secrets for Running Injury Free for Over 41 years

Bill Anderson (72) started his running streak on September 27, 1976 in Fort Worth Texas. He has run at least one mile everyday since then. He is currently number nine on the Official USA Active Running Streak List. "My brother Bill has never been injured," says Bob Anderson. Asked why he has never been injured he says, "Shoes are the hidden secret to avoid injuries. I make sure they are always fresh," Bill says. "Secondly I always run within my capacity. Thirdly, I make sure I enjoy every run. Fourth, I know myself well enough to anticipate a potential issue before it happens." (Wed 7) Views: 2,335
Training
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Should Caster Semenya be forced to lower Testosterone levels to compete in Tokyo?

Caster Semenya is very much in the news lately. We have already published two stories about the new IAAF rule which will require Caster to take testosterone-lowering medication in order to compete on an international level. Per the report: "The IAAF, will reportedly announce the creation of a new female classification to be known as Athletes with Differences of Sexual Development, which includes those with Hyperandrogenism, such as Semenya. "From November 1, 2018, athletes who fit into that classification will be forced to undergo testosterone-lowering treatment."  Caster was born with this medical condition.  Caster is a South African middle-distance runner and a gold medalist and for sure could easily pass for a man on the outside.  Last August Caster shared this story about her love story with her wife Violet Raseboya in a TV interview.  "We met in a restroom in 2007. She was a runner and was being escorted by doping officials. She thought I was a boy and said 'What is a boy doing in here?'" "I'm not a boy. You think I'm lost? You think I can just walk in here?" It took a while for them to start dating and Caster said it was her that told Violet about her feelings for her.  "We were in denial. She had a past. She had a boyfriend. (She) was trying to deny being in love with a woman"  They got married in 2017.  This is a tough situation for the IAAF.  Seb Coe just wants the competition to be fair.  However, this is a medical condition a person is born with. Penalizing  an athlete for a natural trait of her body does not seem right.    (Tue 1) Views: 2,317
Bob Anderson
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Galen Rupp's preparation for Boston is the best ever says his coach Alberto Salazar

Galen Rupp finished second in his Boston Marathon debut last year despite not knowing if he would start the race two weeks prior. This year is a different story says his coach Alberto Salazar, "This is as good as he's ever been prepared for a marathon. Anything can happen. You can have bad luck. But by far this is the best preparation he's ever had in terms of being really prepared," says Salazar. Rupp, a two-time Olympic medalist, contests his fifth career marathon Monday. "Galen's been able to train much harder, run more miles and do more speedwork. It's gone really well, knock on wood. There have been no setbacks whatsoever," says Salazar. Rupp can bolster his argument as the best U.S. distance runners of all time. He already has Olympic 10,000m and marathon medals. In his last marathon, Rupp became the first American-born male runner to win the Chicago Marathon in 35 years. On Monday, he can become the first American-born male runner to win the Boston Marathon in 35 years. (Meb Keflezighi an Eritrean-born American runner won the 2014 Boston Marathon at the age of 38, the oldest winner in decades.) (Wed 11) Views: 2,314
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What did Yuta Shitara strap to his arm at the last aid station at the Tokyo Marathon?

Yuta Shitara ran the fastest marathon of any Japanese runner ever at the 2018 Tokyo Marathon on Sunday. He posted 2:06:11. At the last aid station he pulled something from his bottle set-up and put it around his right arm bicep. One person on Let's Run suggested it was a "a giant nicotine patch." Another said it was a "Hello Kitty Coin Purse." Michael Capper on FB said "Never seen this before." Gary Rush stated, "Maybe a gel fluid holder? I think its against IAAF rules for elites to wear or use communication devices or receive electronic updates during a race." Bob Anderson says, "After looking at more than ten photos of Yuta finishing races, I did not see a similar 'thing' strapped to his arm." In any case he blasted the last few kilometers wearing this 'thing'. Did it give him an unfair advantage? "First of all we need to know what it was," says Bob. (Sun 25) Views: 2,261
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Eliud Kipchoge says he handles pain by smiling - Part two of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Two: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. He began his move into road running in 2012 when he clocked 59:25 for the half marathon.  In 2013 Eliud ran his first marathon when he won the Hamburg Marathon clocking 2:05:30, setting a new course record.  In 2016 he won the gold medal in the marathon at the Rio Olympics.  He has won 10 out of the 11 marathons he has run.  Wilson Kipsang beat him in 2013 in Berlin when setting the world record.  Eliud trains in Eldoret, the home of Champions.  His humbleness is seen when training with athletes.  Eliud keeps a low-profile and even does house chores in camp like washing toilets, utensils, cutting grass and cleaning the dining hall.  He uses public buses or bodaboda to travel despite having good cars.  He has earned a lot of prize, bonus and sponsorship money from running especially since he moved to the road.  However, money hasn't changed his character. He says, "An athlete with 50 million Kenyan shillings ($500,000US) in his bank account can brag, but a farmer who uses the same amount to plant wheat is not even noticed as he walks around town."  Eliud loves the simple life and when he travels he arrives without many people realizing it. He loves his Nike shoes and is comfortable with NN running and with his mentor and neighbor Patrick Sang. During the Nike project, he almost broke the two hour mark clocking 2:00:23 for the full Marathon.  Yes, the conditions were perfect and he was paced like in a time trial but his body ran the distance.  He puts in a lot of hardwork, discipline and good training.  He also eats a healthy diet.  Before he lined up to run the Berlin Marathon this was the kind of workouts he was doing. 8x1600 (recovery 1:30) + 10x400m (recovery 45 seconds) in Eldoret altitude 2200m (7200 feet) above sea level.  His 1600m times were:  4:35, 4:33, 4:32, 4:34, 4:33, 4:32, 4:33, 4:33. His 400m times were: 62, 63, 63, 62, 62, 62, 61, 62, 61, 60. He always does speedwork on the track wearing racing shoes with other fast athletes like Kamworor, Brimin kipruto and Conselsius.  "You can't train alone because you need others to push you higher to reach your best limit,"  Kipchoge told me last month at Kabarak university.  No marathoner has been more dominant in the marathon than Kipchoge. The 5'6" 115 pound Eliud has never sustained a serious injury because he listens to his body and eats a healthy diet.  Even the greatest runners have days when they have a strained muscle or an upset stomach kept them from winning but not Kipchoge.  He actually has a winning formula:  Motivation plus disipline equals consistency.  Pain, he says, is nothing more than a mind set so he distracts himself with other thoughts such as the joy of running and the finish line ahead, then the pain fades with a smile on his face. He has a habit of smiling whenever pain sets in. Tomorrow in part three of this series we look closer at Eliud’s healthy diet and at the day he broke the world Marathon record.  We talk about  the prize money and how Eliud wants to help others.   (Fri 21) Views: 2,238
Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Let's understand how fast 18-year-old Phonex Kipruto ran today in Central Park

From the starting horn at the 14th UAE Healthy Kidney 10K run in Central Park in New York City today April 29, two runners—Kenyan training partners Rhonex Kipruto and Mathew Kimeli—set off to chase the bonus prize money, in addition to competing for the $10,000 first-place prize. Passing the 5K split in approximately 13:39, the two were on track to break the event record, and they would only pick up the pace from there.  On the fourth mile, the 18-year-old Kipruto began to pull away from Kimeli, and he reached the 8-kilometer checkpoint in a world-best time of 21:45, breaking the previous mark by 17 seconds. Kipruto would then lower the UAE Healthy Kidney 10K event record by 27 seconds, crossing the finish line in 27:08; that time is also the fastest in the world this year to date, the fastest road 10K ever run in the United States on a record-eligible course, and the seventh-fastest road 10K of all-time (also on a record-eligible course). Kimeli would finish second in 27:19.  This is a New York Road Runners event.  We do show that prior to this race, Phonex finished 3rd at the Birell 10K last September in Prague clocking 27:13. (Sun 29) Views: 2,162
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After seven week break Kawauchi runs another sub 2:12 marathon - his 26th

After a seven-week break from the marathon, Yuki Kawauchi scored his third-straight marathon win, second-straight course record and came just shy of a third-straight negative split as he ran a completely solo 2:11:46 to take almost six minutes off the Kitakyushu Marathon course record. Following up on negative split wins at December's Hofu Yomiuri Marathon and January's Marshfield New Year's Day Marathon, the latter a course record by half an hour, Kawauchi was on his own in Kitakyushu the whole way. After a 1:05:51 split at halfway he slowed slightly finishing the second half in 1:05:55. Along with the course record, Kawauchi extended his record for most career sub-2:12 marathons to 26 as he continues to prepare for the Boston Marathon. (Tue 20) Views: 2,150
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Alberto Salazar still holds one American Road Record which he set in 1981

DID YOU KNOW: The American Road Record for 8K is 22:04.  It was set over 37 years ago.  On January 4, 1981 Alberto Salazar ran that time in Los Altos, California at the Runner's World Five Mile Invitational (5 miles is 154 feet longer than 8K).  It is a distance that is not run very often but that is a long time for the record to still be on the books.  That same year Alberto won the New York City Marathon in 2:08:13 as he did the following year and 1980 as well.  He also won Boston in 1982 in 2:08:52.  A race that would be known later as the "Duel In The Sun."  Dick Beardsley and Alberto battled right up to the end.  Alberto was born in Cuba in 1958 and immigrated to the United States as a child with his family.  Salazar currently is the head coach of the Nike Oregon Project in Portland, Oregon. (Tue 1) Views: 2,085
Bob Anderson
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Time marches on but I just keep going says 102-year-old Ida Keeling

Ida Keeling is just 4-foot-6, weighs 83 pound and is 102-years-old. Ida rides an exercise bike, lifts weights, and runs up and down the hallways of her apartment building or on a treadmill. Her daughter, Shelley, is the one who actually got her to start running – at the age of sixty-seven after some incredible hardships. They ran a 5K that year and Ida says, "I thought that race was never going to end...however I felt so good (afterward) and have been running ever since." In 2011 she set a 60 meters world record of 29.86 seconds in her 95 year-old age group. At 99-years-old (in 2014), Ida set the fastest known time for a woman of her age in the 100-meter-dash posting 59.80. In 2016: 100-year-old Ida Keeling became the first woman in history to complete the 100-meter dash in one minute 17 seconds. Shelley could not be prouder of her mother. “The biggest thing with my mom," says Shelley, "is that she never lets anything get her down. If somebody said to her, ‘I’m going to put you in a box and you’re never going to get out,’ she’s say, ‘Just you wait.’” “You see so many older people just sitting around," says Ida, "well, that’s not me. Time marches on, but I keep going.” (Thu 15) Views: 2,052
Inspirational Stories
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Eliud Kipchoge the early years - Part one of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part One: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. Eliud was born May 11, 1984 in a village called Kapsisiywa in Nandi county, Kenya.  His mother worked as a teacher. He lost his father while still young and this forced him to start looking after cattle and sell milk to help support his family.  As a child, Eliud ran solely as a form of transport so he could get to and from school. The best athlete on the road who looks very discipline, relaxed, humble and full of wisdom today did not get past zonal level in school which is far from nationals. Due to his love for athletics, he went to his neighbor Patrick Sang, 1992 Olympics silver medalist in 3000m steeplechase, and asked for a training program.  Sang had returned to Kapsisiywa to organize sport events after winning the Olympic silver medal while studying at the University of Texas.  He met Eliud at one of the events he organized in 2001 when Eliud was 16.  "There was this kid who would come and ask me for a training program," Sang remembers.  "Every two weeks I would give him a program to follow and this went on for months."  Currently Patrick Sang is Eliud Kipchoge's coach.  "Patrick is a friend and a mentor. He changed my life," said Eliud who followed systematically Sang's advice. Through his dedication and commitment to running, doors opened for Eliud Kipchoge in 2003 when he won gold for Kenya at the World Championships in Paris.  He out sprinted Hicham El Guerrouj who was the world record holder in the mile.  Eliud was just 18 at the time. He raced on the track, 1500m, 3000m, 5000m and 10000m with great success. The track build his speed and he graduated to the marathon after a few years.  "Running is like stairs, you gain experience and maturity in every step." Kipchoge told me in February 2018 in Eldoret. Kipchoge trains in a training camp called Global based in Kaptagat.  Tomorrow in part two we will talk about his move to the roads, his training, why he has never sustained a serious injury and how he deals with pain.   (Thu 20) Views: 2,050
Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Jim Walmsley breaks the Western States 100 record by over 15 minutes on a baking hot day

We posted on Tuesday that even with the forecasted hot weather, Jim Walmsley was going to break the course record set in 2012 by Timothy Olsen who clocked 14:46:44.  For two years now, Walmsley’s public declaration that he will not only try and break the famous 100-mile course record but trim more than 45 minutes off it has bought him massive attention.  Fast forward to this year's race.  Jim hit the 85.2 mile mark in 12 hours 16 minutes.  Could he hold on for 15 more miles? The temperature in Auburn, California where the race finishes at 6pm was 96 degrees.  That was still a lot of miles in that kind of heat.  At Pointed Rocks (94.3 miles) he was still trying to hold it together.  He ran 10:50 pace for that 3.7 mile split.  It was hot.  Meanwhile Courtney Dauwalter continued to lead the women hitting 79.8 miles in 13 hours 48 minutes. Course records were still possible.  Jim passed the 96.8 mile check point at No Hands Bridge and ran right on through without stopping.  He was 14 minutes ahead of the course record still.  Courtney was 33 minutes ahead of course record at mile 80 with Lucy Bartholomew in second place some miles back. Frenchman Francois Dhaene was in second place at 90.7 miles about an hour behind the leader.  Reliable reports told I Run Far that Jim was delayed for about ten minutes by a bear with cubs along the trail at around 95 miles.  He passed the Robie Point check point (98.9 miles) running 8:11 pace now knowing he was going to finally win the Western States 100 and maybe still set the course record. He kept it together and went on to win clocking 14:30:04 on a baking hot day, taking over 15 minutes off the course record.   (Sat 23) Views: 2,028
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Michael Wardian has had very few injuries and here is why

RUN THE WORLD:  "Running is my life and who I am," says 44-year-old Michael Wardian.  "I love running and hope to run till my last days." Michael started running after he stopped playing Lacrosse in college to stay in shape. He lives in Arlington, Virginia with his wife and two children.  Michael has accomplished so much. In 2008 he won the US National 100K championships.  In 2006 he won four out of five marathons he raced in 45 days. He held the world record for the fastest marathon time pushing a baby stroller.  He set a record of running a marathon on an indoor 200-meter track.  He ran the 2012 Olympic Marathon trails clocking 2:21.  The next day he ran another marathon clocking 2:31.  He ran seven marathons in seven days on 7 continents clocking an average of 2:45 for each marathon.  With so many highlights on his resume, I asked him what would be his top two.  "In 2011 I ran 2:17:49 (PR) at Grandmas Marathon and the same year I placed second at 100k World Championships," Michael said.  He is a vegetarian and works as an International Ship-broker.  How about injuries?  "I have been very lucky, I have not had many injuries and I think my best secret is to keep moving.  After big events, I do an easy jog, hike or even just walk. It keeps everything moving," says Michael.  Why did he enter this challenge?  "I think the Run The World Challenge is cool and I hope it gets more people out there," he says.  He is a professional marathon and ultra marathon runner and has been running since 1996.  He has represented the USA in the 50k and 100k world championships, and has participated in three Olympic Marathon Trials. Just recently (July 20-21) Michael placed 11th at the Hardrock 100 clocking 30 hours and 23 minutes for the 100.5 mile very challenging trail race held in Silverton, Colorado.   (Tue 24) Views: 1,888
Bob Anderson
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Simon Ong was a couch potato weighing 230 pounds, on sunday he finished 8th at Seattle Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon

Seven years ago, Simon Ong of Calgary weighed 230 pounds (he’s 5’8″) and was pre-diabetic, with high blood pressure and chest pain from a steady diet of fast food and no exercise. On Sunday, Ong was the fastest Canadian finishing eighth overall at the Seattle Rock ‘n’ Roll Half-Marathon, setting himself a new PB and qualifying for the TCS New York City Marathon, with a time of 1:18:11. Ong, 29, a surgical nurse at Southern Alberta Eye Centre, wanted to do something about his lifestyle and his health, back in 2011. But he couldn’t run any distance without becoming winded, and even fell off the treadmill more than once when he tried to run. So he started cycling and swimming in order to improve his fitness enough to be able to run. “I had no athletic background whatsoever,” says Ong. “It took me two years to lose enough weight to be able to run a race.” His younger brother Raymond, a pharmacy technician, joined him in the effort to get healthy. It’s one thing to get off the couch and adopt a healthy lifestyle, but nobody realized there was a fast runner lurking inside that unhealthy exterior, least of all Ong himself.  (Wed 13) Views: 1,854
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Fast times are expected at the TCS World 10K May 27 with $213,000 in prize money

The world’s richest 10 Km run has seen participation from top elite athletes in the world.  Having completed a decade as one of the most sought-after road races in the world, Bengaluru, India is all set to be perfect hosts yet again for the 11th edition of the Tata Consultancy Services World 10K May 27.  This year world Champions Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya and Ethiopian Netsanet Gudeta will head the mens and womens elite fields respectively. For both the runners, who were recently crowned the world champions at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in Valencia, it will be their first competitive outing since their global triumphs in March. Kamworor, 25, has established himself as one of the world's leading distance runners in recent years, winning the last two world cross country and the world half marathon titles. "I took some rest after Valencia and then started my preparations towards Bengaluru. I hold the course record at this race (27:44) so I know about the course and the city," commented Kamworor from his home in Kenya. Gudeta, 27, has also been preparing hard for her return to Indian soil. "Since Valencia, I have just been training and focusing on Bengaluru. Even though the race has been put back two weeks, that hasn't affected me. In fact, it's allowed me to prepare slightly better," she said. "I have been to India on a number of occasions in the past, including this race. I know after winning in Valencia that people will be talking about a fast time and perhaps the course record (held by Kenya's Lucy Kabuu at 31:46 since 2014), but this year there are no pacemakers. "Of course, I set the women-only world record for the half marathon (1:06:11) in Valencia. I have also run times for 10,000m on the track (personal best 30:36.75, 2016) and 10km on the road (31:35, 2017) that are better than the course record." she reflected. The TCS World 10K Bengaluru 2018 has a total prize fund of $213,000.  Besides the elites, thousands take part every year and many set PR's on the fast course. (Wed 9) Views: 1,789
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The Pre Classic will never be the same as they rip down the stadium in Eugene Oregon

This is not right. We can thank Phil Knight for putting up millions of dollars to make this happen.  Peter Thompson posted this photo on Facebook about an hour ago.  He said," Is this the required careful deconstruction of an historic structure, carefully cataloguing everything as you go and ensuring that timbers and metalwork can be re-purposed elsewhere?" Or, is it, "The wilful destruction of an iconic building?" Lots of history had been torn away. Phil Knight made millions by using Pre in NIKE advertising.  In his memory he could have built "his" new Track someplace else, as Joe Henderson pointed out months ago, in Eugene and left this stadium standing or at least the track and the east grandstands.  I know that Phil Knight has donated millions to the University and probably to the city and how could anyone stand in his way. I also know that Phil Knight and NIKE have done a lot of positive things for running but this is not one of them.  Peter continued, "Bill Bowerman's favorite seat in the upper row of the East Grandstand has been ripped out, undocumented as it was piled with all the other bleachers - and this is the true respect that Phil Knight has granted to Bill Bowerman."  I know the new track is going to look amazing but it will no longer be Pre's track.  The Pre Classic will never be the same.  This was a mistake that we let happen.  Hayward Field will never be the same.             (Sat 23) Views: 1,747
Bob Anderson
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Everything you need to know about the 2018 Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is happening this Sunday October 8...Galen Rupp who lives in Oregon won the 2017 race clocking 2:09:20, will return to battle four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah of Great Britain. The two have raced against each other 22 times, with Farah winning 21 times...Mo Farah has been training over 120 miles per week and has only one thing on his mind, to win...There are five men in the field with faster personal records than Rupp, who clocked his 2:06:07 PR winning the Prague Marathon on May 6... among the other elite men in the field include two-time world champion Abel Kirui, Geoffrey Kirui, reigning world champion and 2017 Boston Marathon winner, and four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah, Rupp's former training partner...Plus Mosinet Geremew (2:04:00 personal best) and Birhanu Legese (2:04:15), both of Ethiopia, also lead the international field...In the field of approximately 45,000 runners Sunday, 47 percent will be women...The top American women include Laura Thweatt, Sarah Crouch, Taylor Ward, Katie Matthews and Gwen Jorgensen leading the pack. Joan Benoit Samuelson, 61, who won the 1984 Olympics gold medal and Chicago in 1985, also will be running, and her goal is to break three hours.  No woman over 60 has ever run that fast...Top elite women include Roza Dereje and Birhane Dibaba of Ethiopia; Brigid Kosgei of Kenya; and fellow Kenyan and two-time champion Florence Kiplagat...Chicago is one of the flattest and fastest marathons in the world. The only thing that gets in the way of more fast times is sometimes hot weather...The weather forecast for this year is 60 degrees with humidity at 75%.  Not ideal but it has been worse...Four world marathon records have been set in Chicago. Dennis Kimetto of Kenya holds the Chicago Marathon men’s record with a time of 2:03:45 set in 2013. Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain set the women’s record in 2002 with a time of 2:17:18...Yuki Kawauchi, from Japan, holds a record for running 79 marathons in less than 2:20. In April, he won the Boston Marathon in 2:15:58. He has won 30 marathons in his career with a personal best of 2:08:14. He has competed in 20 marathons so far in 2018 and is running...The female and male Chicago winners each get $100,000. The total purse distributed among all the money winners is $803,500. There are bonuses for course records: $75,000 for men and women...Twenty-three percent of the field are from outside the US. The largest group is from Mexico, with 2,225 runners. Then: Canada (1,777), United Kingdom (1,741), China (1,347), Brazil (1,209), Germany (566), Hong Kong (481), Costa Rica (471) and Italy (453)... Rupp's 2017 victory was his first in a marathon major. He said it compares to his two Olympic medals, silver in the 10,000 meters in 2012, and marathon bronze in 2016. "Nothing can really replace the Olympics," he told Oregon Live. "But winning a major in Chicago, a city I love, was right up there."... Rupp said he is fully recovered from nagging Achilles and ankle problems that complicated his buildup. "I'm feeling good," he said. "I've been healthy the last five or six weeks."...Rupp's father grew up in Maywood, Illinois and Galen spent a lot of time in the Chicago area during his childhood. "I'm so excited to be returning to Chicago to defend my title," Rupp said. "I couldn't be more thrilled to be heading back to the Windy City."  First wave start time is 7:30am Central Time on Sunday. (Thu 4) Views: 1,697
Bob Anderson
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Potential showdown between Farah and Rupp at Chicago Marathon

Mo Farah has hinted at running the 2018 Chicago Marathon. On Monday, Farah reportedly said he is deciding between Chicago and New York for his fall marathon, but suggested that Chicago is typically a faster event. If Farah does run Chicago, he would compete against former training partner and Nike Oregon Project member, Galen Rupp. The course record is 2:03:45 set in 2013 by Dennis Kimetto.  (Paula Radcliffe holds the women's record of 2:17:18 in 2002.)  The course is fast but sometimes it can be hot.  A world record can be set on this course if everything is perfect on marathon day. (Wed 30) Views: 1,686
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Running is something that grounds Benn Griffin and helps him self-medicate

RUN THE WORLD:  Benn Griffin parents were runners. "My parents went on running dates in the 80s," says Benn. "I guess that was the start of me. Growing up I ran on the weekends with my mom and dad, usually three miles, and I did a 5k or two," he says. The movie Forrest Gump came out when he was in third or fourth grade. "Everyone called me Forrest because I could just run and run and run."  Running defines him. He has run every day since December 28, 2012. "I believe that running is a universal sport that crosses geographic, political, economic, spiritual, and physical boundaries. It unites us.  Anyone can do it. For the most part I just like to run," says Benn.  He has run races as short as a mile and as long as 72 hours (188 miles).  He has run 91 marathons and ultras. "In May I won the open division in a 12 hour ultra. It was my sixth time at that race, I'm a creature of habit."   He does not think there is a secret to success.  "It's just relentless hard work, persistence, mixed with a little bit of stupidity," he says.  Benn started the ultrarunning community in the Berkshires and is a ultra race director.  "Together with two friends we started with just three races, but then I added two more, so it's a five race summer series."  Benn is a cross country coach and a sixth grade geography teacher.  A highlight of his coaching was watching his girls have two undefeated seasons in 2015 and 2017.  He teaches at a low income charter school where 92% of the students are first generation college students.  "My sister and father are educators, as were my paternal grandparents and my aunt. So you could say, like running, it's in the blood."  Running is something that grounds him and helps him self-medicate.  "My favorite quote of all time comes from a guy named Marc Davis: "All it takes is all you got."  We already have everything we need to be successful. We just have to tap into it and unlock that potential," says Benn Griffin who has already logged in 309.65 miles for the Run The World Global Run Challenge that started July 4. (Wed 8) Views: 1,636
Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Swetha Amit says that when the endorphins kicked in after her first half she was hooked

RUN THE WORLD: 36-year-old Swetha Amit started running December of 2010 in her hometown of Mumbai, India.  She was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and as a result lost a lot of blood, strength and self confidence.  "Since I couldn’t lift weights in the gym as I used too, I took up running to build back my strength and restore my sense of worth," she says.  Six months later she ran her first half marathon in Mumbai.  "The sheer feeling of crossing the finish line and with the endorphins kicking in got me hooked. Running has been a part of my life ever since and will continue to be as long as I am alive." So far she has run one full marathon, 26 half marathons, three Double Races, two 15k's and several 10K's.  She has had eight podium finishes.  "I have gained a wonderful community called the Mumbai Road Runners which is the largest running group in India.   I have met a lot of inspiring people and learnt a lot from them. I have also run some incredible events in California in the last year which has changed my perception about running."  She came to California about a year ago with her husband and daughter.  "We met up a year ago on the Stanford campus," says Bob Anderson.  Her husband would be studyng at Stanford over the next year. Swetha would enroll in some creative writing classes.  "A Facebook friend Ram, founder of Mumbai Road Runner. told me she was coming. I was impressed by her right from the start. Obviously running was a major part of her life along with her family.  We connected right away as us runners do," says Bob.  Swetha says of her stay,  "We landed here in Stanford, California in June 2017. Coming away from my comfort zone and home in India was initially intimidating. However, I decided to embrace the opportunities."   And she did.  She has run 27 races and is doing a couple more before leaving in August.  "My stay in the Bay area has been a memorable experience."  Asked about our Run The World Challenge, "I think it’s a fantastic idea. I have always marveled at the fact that running somehow manages to connect people from across the globe. We run in different parts of the world yet there is this common thread that ultimately brings us together.  We inspire, get inspired from people of varied backgrounds, age groups and their ability to battle against the odds. I feel elated to be a part of this phenomenal challenge."  (Fri 22) Views: 1,613
Bob Anderson
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His goal is to raise One Million Dollars for a coworker battling Tonque Cancer

A man is using the deep rivalry between the Green Bay Packers and the Dallas Cowboys to help a coworker diagnosed with cancer. When Texas school assistant principal, Bruce Hermans, learned the school's choir director, Allison Hartzell, was battling Stage 4 tongue cancer, he wanted to do something for her. As an avid runner, Hermans decided to help raise money for Hartzell's treatment by running his first full marathon in his hometown of Green Bay.  Pitting Packers fans against Cowboys fans, the Run4Allison campaign's goal is to raise $1 million by asking fans to donate in the name of their favorite team. Which ever team raises the most money, is the jersey Hermans says he will wear crossing the finish line at Lambeau Field during the Cellcom Green Bay Marathon.  (Fri 27) Views: 1,556
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What is going to happen to Runner's World...more employees terminated

A month after laying off 150 employees inherited through its acquisition of Rodale, Hearst Magazines is undergoing another round of cuts. Runner's World is part of the group of titles previously published by Rodale. Hearst did not respond to a request for comment, but a source close to the company tells Folio: that at least 50 employees were notified Monday of their termination, effective immediately. It is not clear how many Runner's World employees were asked to leave. "I am concerned to see this," says RW founder Bob Anderson. "Running and Runner's World grew up together...I have been concerned with all the discounted magazine offers I have been getting...I have some ideas if whoever is calling the shots want to listen," says Bob. (Tue 13) Views: 1,551
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Millinocket Maine needed a boost, sure. But not a handout. So Gary Allen started an entry free marathon to help the town

Long-distance runners have a reputation for being as wacky as they are driven. Gary Allen is proof positive of both. As coach of the Mount Desert Island Middle School cross-country team, he trains his squad mostly by playing zombie invasion games behind the school. He has a screaming-loud stocking hat for every occasion.  He’s ebullient and sometimes long-winded but knows how to affect reticence with an authenticity that would make any fellow Mainer proud. He treats everyone like his new best friend and begins each conversation with, “Hi. I’m Gary Allen.” Allen has run a hundred marathons and won his age group in more than a few. In fact, he is one of a few worldwide who have run a sub-three-hour marathon in five different decades.  He’s the founder of the Mount Desert Island Marathon and the Great Run, a six-hour ultramarathon where competitors simply run back and forth on Great Cranberry Island as many times as they can.  But none of that means much to the 4,500 people who call Millinocket, Maine USA home. When they talk about a marathon, they’re talking about the one Allen first organized last year — the one that put the town on the long-distance map after Runner’s World picked up the story. The one that has more than 1,000 people clamoring to fly across the country for the opportunity to run here on December 10. Like most of Allen’s schemes, this one started on a whim. Around Thanksgiving last year, he read yet another newspaper article characterizing Millinocket’s economic woes. “It’s not like I set out to find a little town to help. It’s more like a little town found me.” There’ve been a lot of those articles since the Great Northern paper mill closed here in 2008. In the years since, Millinocket has become a symbol for the failure of America’s manufacturing monotowns. That doesn’t sit well with locals here. And it rubbed Allen the wrong way last fall too. Millinocket needed a boost, sure. But not a handout. So Gary Allen decided to do what Gary Allen does best: he organized an impromptu marathon. This race was open to all and charged no entry fee. Instead, Allen suggested that participants take the money they would have spent on registration and spend it in Millinocket. He didn’t advertise any of this except to post it to his Facebook page. Nonetheless, about 50 of his friends agreed to show up for what may well have been America’s first flash-mob marathon. Allen mapped the course on Google Earth. It’s a gorgeous one: a lazy loop with lots of views of Katahdin and several miles on the iconic Golden Road, a 96-mile stretch of gravel connecting Millinocket and the Canadian border, before it drops back down into town for a finish at Veterans Memorial Park. Allen warned participants that they’d need to be totally self-sufficient during the race. He printed out slips of paper detailing how to stay on the course. After they were done running, he figured they could have lunch or do some holiday shopping, then fuel up their cars and head home. Millinocket might not even realize they’d been there. But word got out around in close-knit Millinocket. By the time Allen rolled into town, local businesses had emblazoned signs welcoming the runners. Locals set up a water station around the 5-mile mark and stood for hours guiding runners on the course and directing traffic. A cheering section assembled at the finish. In other words, the marathon flash mob got flash-mobbed by the town they were supposed to be helping. And in that moment was born an unlikely love affair between one of Maine’s most charismatic runners and a town looking to get back on its feet. After last year’s race, townspeople asked Allen if he’d organize another one. He agreed. And he said he thought he could make it bigger, better. Earlier this year, he returned to Millinocket with a surveyor who could certify the course as an official Boston Marathon qualifier — the only one in the country without an entry fee. As it turned out, Allen’s hastily drawn loop on Google Earth was less than 50 yards off the exact required distance. While Allen and the surveyor were in town, a total stranger offered the two men a house to stay in for as long as they needed. That, says Allen, is the spirit of Millinocket — and Mainers in general, for that matter. For decades, the town was known as the “Magic City,” a nod to how it seemed to have sprung up overnight in what had previously been untrammeled wilderness. Millinocket, founded in 1901, is but a blip. And like the Greek goddess Athena, it seemed to emerge fully formed from the mill itself — first as dozens of tar-paper shacks and rooming houses; soon after, as an Anytown, USA, with a bustling main drag and orderly blocks of houses. (Photo by Michael Wilson) (Wed 28) Views: 1,537
Kathryn Miles
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Prize Money in major races like the Boston Marathon should be awarded based on Gun Time

The weather at this year's Boston Marathon was horrible.  Many elite runners and others just could not handle these conditions and did not finish.  For the first time I can remember, several female runners that started in wave one placed.  With all the pressure of the media, the B.A.A. is going to hand out cash awards based on chip timing.  This year's race should be looked at as unique and I do endorse the B.A.A. decision.  But to change things in the future would not be a good idea.  Chip timing works for age-group but most major road races use gun time to award prize money.  In fact, gun time is the only time accepted by both USA Track & Field and the International Association of Athletics Federation.  David Monti, publisher of Race Results Weekly, wrote Sports Day, "To score an elite race based on chip times is both rare and risky.  It's risky, because it is possible for an athlete to purposely start well behind the elites, say five minutes, then compete for prize money clandestinely and out of view.  It's very possible that the first man or woman to break the tape will not actually be the race winner if the race is scored on chip time. How would that look?"  We also know that there are people who cheat.  It is much easier to keep track of the smaller elite fields than a field of thousands.  I think we do need to stick with gun time in the future for the overall top open places.      (Fri 4) Views: 1,533
Bob Anderson
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What happend to Yuki Kawauchi? He did run his 80th sub 2:20 marathon at the Gold Coast!

It was hot and humid at the Gold Coast Marathon (Australia) July 1.  It was 65 degrees with 100% humidity.  Not the best conditions for running a marathon.  Yuki Kawauchi said,  "I could not run well."  He finished 9th clocking 2:14:50.  (Kenneth Mungara won clocking 2:09:49, Kenta Murayama second 2:09:50 and Jo Fukuda third 2:09:52.)  Yuki posted on Facebook, "But, I achieved my 80th time of sub 2:20 at this race."    "The Australian people were kind to me," Yuki says. (Photo: Yuki with fan/marathoner Dion Finocchiaro.  Dion ran 2:24:36 a PR for him.  Maybe meeting Yuki gave him that extra push?) Yuki's next marathon is going to be the New Caledonia International Marathon August 26.  Their site says, "This is an Olympic-level world-class marathon as runners battle for victory along a spectacularly scenic route winding around Noumea's bays."  Yuki posted on Facebook, "This race is my important memorial marathon.Because this race was my first oversea race. If I didn't run this race 10 years ago, I might not run oversea races like now.   I want to build a course record."  Where is this marathon?  Their site says, "Surrounded by the vast expanse of the South Pacific, New Caledonia, with a surface area of 18,564 km², lies to the east of Australia and south of the thousands of islands and archipelagos making up Melanesia and Micronesia."        (Mon 2) Views: 1,527
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I liked the way I felt after finishing a run and have never missed a day in nearly 38 years

Lois Bastien of Pinellas Park, Florida, who is 81, has run at least one mile everyday for 37.85 years (13,823 days as of today), which is the longest female streak in the US. "It wasn't a conscious decision, nor a New Year's resolution," she says. "I was just being a good mom and supporting a daughter who wanted to make her high school cross country team. That was 37 years ago," says Lois, now a great-grandmother. "I've just been at it every day since." Her then-teenage daughter developed knee problems and had to stop running. "But I liked the way I felt after finishing a run, full of vigor and glad to be alive, so I kept going. It is just part of my daily routine," Lois says. (Tue 20) Views: 1,515
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Ultra Marathoner Giant Roy Pirrung has won 85 National Titles

RUN THE WORLD: 69-year-old Roy Pirrung is looking forward to the Run The World challenge and is looking at posting 75 miles weekly. Ultra Running Magazine wrote this:  In 1980, at the age of 32, Roy Pirrung was 60 pounds overweight, smoked 2 packs of cigarettes a day, and was a self-described binge drinker. He decided to take up running to help change his lifestyle. Within a year he was 60 pounds lighter, tobacco and alcohol free, and ran his first marathon, in 3:16. Only two years after that his marathon time was down to 2:38. It would seem he was born to run. In 1985 he ran his first ultra, the Ice Age 50 Mile trail race in Wisconsin, finishing 5th in one of the most competitive trail ultras in the country. Only four months later he won the Fond du Lac 24-Hour race with just under 138 miles, and found himself ranked #1 American at that event for the year. Yes, he was born to run. Ultra racing success continued at a brisk pace for Pirrung. In 1987 he became a national champion for the first time, winning the USA 100 Mile Championship in New York City. A year later he garnered his second national title and his first national record, winning the inaugural USA 24-Hour Championship in Atlanta with a new American Road Record of 145 miles, 1464 yards. Roy Pirrung’s ultra career continued at a world-class level for over two decades, and continues today at a similar level in the Masters age-group categories. He has raced in almost every state in the USA, and in 26 different countries on five continents. He has run in almost two dozen USA 24-Hour National Championships, has won two of them, and has placed in the top five in 17 of them. In addition to his three open National Championship gold medals and his three open American Records, he has won over 80 Masters age-group National Championship Titles and has broken over 50 Masters age-group National Records. He is an American Ultrarunning Association Hall of Fame member with over 50 American records and 86 national titles. Lifetime miles over 100,000. Lifetime races over 1,000.  "We are super excited to have Roy on our team," says Bob Anderson.  Carey Stoneking one of his Facebook friends posted, "OK Roy...But don't over-do it.  They only want to go around the world...Once."  (Thu 21) Views: 1,496
Bob Anderson
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Mo Farah says medals and not money is his incentive

Mo Farah has denied that his move to the marathon is motivated by money and says he is increasingly hopeful he can win a medal at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. He will run his first race in nearly six months at Sunday’s Vitality Big Half in London. It is rumored he has agreed to a race package worth close to $1.5 million which includes running in the 2018 and 2019 London marathons. On Sunday he will race 13.1 miles against his fellow countryman Hawkins and also last year’s London marathon winner, Wanjiru. Mo said that his desire to prove himself over 26.2 miles matters far more than anything else. “I wouldn’t be competing if I didn’t enjoy running,” he said. “You have to set yourself a target. If you look at every great athlete, like Gebrselassie, they have succeeded when they have stepped up to the marathon.” (Fri 2) Views: 1,484
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Mo Farah will run the 2018 Chicago Marathon, and will be facing Galen Rupp

Four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah will run the 2018 Chicago Marathon, race organizers announced Thursday. The Chicago Marathon will be only Farrah's third marathon. Farah is a six-time world champion and five-time European champion. In 2012, he became the first British athlete to win an Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 meters and the second athlete in history to earn consecutive gold medals in the 5000 meters and 10,000 meters competing in the 2012 and 2016 Olympics. The field in this year's October race also includes defending champion Galen Rupp, who used to train with Farah. Farah finished eighth in the London Marathon in 2014, clocking 2 hours, 8 minutes and 21 seconds. In 2016, he finished third in London with a national record time of 2:06:21. “Mo and Galen are two of the greatest distance runners of all time,” Chicago Marathon director Carey Pinkowski said in a statement. (Thu 14) Views: 1,439
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Galen Rupp is going to be racing half marathon on Sunday in Italy

The IAAF has confirmed that "Galen Rupp will be in the spotlight at the 44th edition of the Huawei Roma-Ostia Half Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on Sunday March 11 in Rome, Italy." “I am very happy to run in Rome, I have heard great things about this race,” Rupp said. “My goal is to run a fast time in my preparation for the Boston Marathon.” “I like the Roma-Ostia course as it is flat and it will give me the chance to fulfill my potential. I think it will be a high-level race, where I will run to win. I am aiming to run my personal best. If I am fit I can attack the US record.” That mark in 59:43, set by Ryan Hall in Houston in 2007. Rupp’s lifetime best in 1:00:30 set in 2011. However, since this is a point to point course it would not count as an official American Record. (Fri 9) Views: 1,438
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Desiree Linden was wet, was cold and wanted to stop but she didn’t as marathoners do and won Boston and $150,000

The weather Monday in Boston was more than bad, it was terrible. Shalane Flanagan posted, “Those were the most brutal conditions I’ve ever run in.” One elite woman just kept putting one foot in front of the other faster than anyone else until the end. Desiree Linden even at one point waited for Shalane at a bathroom stop. This brief break, might have helped Desiree get life back in her legs as well. Desiree caught back up to the lead pack but Shalane couldn’t hang. In the end Desiree won by nearly four minutes and became the the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since Lisa Rainsberger in 1985. Afterwards she said there were many moments she wanted to drop out but she kept on going. Was it worth it? For her efforts she was given a check for $150,000. She could have easily not finished. It is interesting to note that according to the race director 95.5% of those who started finished. Very impressive but then again marathoners are a different breed. (Tue 17) Views: 1,421
Bob Anderson
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We now know what Yuta Shitara picked up at the 40K Aid Station

Yuta Shitara, who won a million dollars (US) breaking the Japanese marathon record in Tokyo Sunday, picked up this arm sleeve at the 40km aid station, and then blasted onwards to the finish in 2:06:11. We asked our Japan's contributor Osamu Tada about the arm sleeve. "His family gave him his portrait," says Osamu. "Maybe it is a new way of cheering...as an aside his twin brother is going to run the Biwako Marathon this weekend." The mystery behind this event certainly caught the attention of many. "I think this is great," says Bob Anderson. "Yuta is one good runner and if more people now know his name because of this event, all the better." (Tue 27) Views: 1,391
Osamu Tada (in Japan)
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17-year-old Jakob Ingebrigtsen shocked the world when he won both the 1500 and 5000 at European Championships

The hottest middle distance Track runner right now is just 17-years-old.  Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen even makes winning look easy.  In the middle of the 5000m in the European Championships he gives his brother (Henrik) a high five.  Jakob must have been thinking a second gold was going to happen.  Nothing was going to get in his way even his older brother.  Jakob clocked 13:17, a personal best, for the win and his brother placed second.   It was the golden double (1500/5000) that rippled around the world, a feat of athletic mastery most could only dream of at any stage of their careers, never mind at the tender age of 17. But sit Jakob Ingebrigtsen down and ask him just how he became this good, this early, and the Norwegian is happy to elaborate and explain why his is an otherworldly talent that has not just been born, but also made. “I’ve been a professional runner since I was eight, nine, 10 years old,” he says. “I’ve been training, dedicated and following a good structure – the same as my brothers – from an early age.  For years he has been on the radar of anyone with a finger to the pulse of junior athletics, but when Jakob completed the 1500m/5000m double this week at the European Championships in Berlin, his star truly went supernova.  Speaking on BBC TV, British long distance athlete Paula Radcliffe said: "Jakob Ingebrigtsen just goes to the front when he wants and dares everyone else to come alongside him. Nobody dares to go past him and he's 17. "To bounce back from last night (1500m) and all the emotion that must have come with it as well - to be able to run with that maturity and control is unbelievable." The brothers, from the small Norwegian city of Sandnes, have all grown into world-class middle-distance runners under the tutelage of their father Gjert. At the age of 16, Jakob became the youngest man ever to break the four-minute mile and broke the European 1500m junior record with a 3:31.18 run in Monaco last month. "In two years' time, we will be back to win four medals, not just three," added Henrik. "We're definitely coming back to improve the stats in our family. There are no limits for us, and we have another brother who is turning five years old, and soon can join the Ingebrigtsen team."   (Sun 12) Views: 1,376
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Man Kaur a 102-Year-Old Runner, shares her secrets as she is still running and racing winning gold medals

At 102, Man Kaur is still running — and winning gold medals. The phenomenon from India just nailed the gold medal in the 200-meter race for the 100-to-104 age group at the World Masters Athletics Championships in Malaga, Spain. She finished in 3 minutes and 14 seconds. Kaur has a message for younger folks: Keep away from junk food and stick to an exercise regimen! Her own routine is impressive for any age. She wakes up at 4 a.m., bathes, washes clothes, makes tea, recites prayers until about 7 a.m. Sometimes she goes to the Gurdwara, the place of worship for Sikhs, other times she prays at home. And then she goes to the track for an hour of sprinting practice.The diminutive Kaur hasn't been a lifetime runner. Far from it. She started running in 2009, when her son, Gurdev Singh, who's now 80, urged her to take up track and field. Singh, the second of her three children, is her coach as well as cheerleader. He also a long-time track competitor: "I was on my college track team and in school, I ran track and I played on the [soccer] team. I have been running in the master level for the last 25 years." Singh has amassed more than 80 racing medals since 1992. What made him take his then 93-year-old mother to the track? It was mainly a whim, he explains — but also a desire to keep her fit. "She was very well, with no health problems, and she moved fast. So I took her to the university track with me and asked her to run 400 meters. She did it, slowly, and I thought 'Yes, She can do it.' " Kaur enjoyed it enough to want to return. She liked running, she said. And quickly she started to improve. Two years later, given how well she was doing, her son registered her for international events he was participating in. Kaur agreed with no hesitation. And she hasn't stopped running. (Fri 28) Views: 1,372
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We are running this challenge like an old fashion road race when a line was drawn on the road and someone yelled out set, go!

Global Running Day (June 6) has already started eight hours ago in Sydney Australia and it just started in Paris.  It will start in nine hours in San Francisco.  Bob Anderson, founder of My Best Runs always is looking at ways to help inspire people. Just today he came up with the idea of the MBR Global Running Day 500 Challenge.  It is just a fun event and it is being run like an old fashion road race when the organizer drew a line on the ground and said set, go.  There are no prizes, no money is being raised and any costs is being covered by My Best Runs.  The whole deal is simply to get more people out running within a 36 hour period of time.  The goal is that at least 100 people will run or run/walk at least 500 miles during the period.  If we get more, all the better.  To be part of this you need to post your mileage on my Facebook page.  (Just click on the title above and it should take you to my FB page.)   You can tell us about your run, post your time or anything else OR just post your mileage.  The main thing is to get out and get in at least one mile.  Tell your friends...This will be our first My Best Runs Global Run Challenge.  (Tue 5) Views: 1,370
Bob Anderson
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How Boulder Colorado became the Mecca for elite distance runners and runners of all abilities

DID YOU KNOW: Frank Shorter helped turn Boulder into the mecca for elite distance runners and hotbed for recreational athletes that it is today. The two-time medalist, gold in 1972, silver in 1976, came to Boulder for the first time after graduating from Yale. Raised in New York, Shorter became an early believer in the benefits of altitude training. In setting his course for Olympic glory, he chose Boulder because the University of Colorado had the only indoor track above 5,000 feet in the United States. He remembers only a couple of other post-collegiate runners in town at the time, including a hotel dishwasher who ran a crash pad for hippies. Two years after his first training stint in Boulder, Shorter became the first American in 64 years to win an Olympic marathon.  Shorter’s historic breakthrough at the Munich Olympics, coupled with his silver medal four years later in Montreal, helped ignite the recreational running boom of the late 1970s, and inspired subsequent Olympic hopefuls to move to Boulder for the same reasons he did. Then-exceptional international runners, including three world-record holders, arrived in the ’80s. After that came the world-class cyclists and triathletes. Meanwhile, CU emerged as a power in cross country running, producing six individual national champions and seven team titles. Today, Boulder teems with world-class endurance athletes and some of the country’s fastest recreational runners, and it all traces back to Shorter’s hunch about altitude training. Runners of that era didn’t know why it worked — scientific explanations would come later — they just knew if they trained at altitude, they ran faster when they raced at sea level. “I sensed it,” Shorter said. “There was no real science you could look at. I didn’t know your blood volume increased. All I knew was that I was getting better, more on an exponential curve than even a straight line. I knew that there was something about doing it that didn’t just have to do with my increased training intensity.” (Sun 13) Views: 1,369
John Meyer/ The Denver Post
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Running has become an essential part of my life says Joyce Lee

For the first half of Joyce Lee's life, the only sports she did was swimming and gymnastics. "I never would have thought in a million years I would come to enjoy running," says 37-year-old Joyce.  In college she spent her summers teaching private swim lessons.  "I needed another form of exercise, so I turned to running since it seemed like a simple way of getting in some cardio. I didn't own any running sneakers so I just wore my gym shoes and set out to run for an hour in my hilly neighborhood. I had no idea how far I went, or what my pace was; the goal was to just keep moving," she remembers.  At first she was only using running to stay fit but that changed.  "Running has been a multi-faceted way to maintaining my overall physical, mental and emotional health. Getting the heart pumping has an amazing way to bringing issues to the front of mind for me, and allowing for some creativity to work its magic. I am able to sort out problems, formulate new ideas and work through painful patches of my life.  Running has become an essential part of my life," Joyce says.  On Juanurary 1, 2013 she decided she would run at least a mile every day for a year. "I often like to fly by the seat of my pants and live with little planning, so this presented a very interesting challenge for me. Any sensible person would carve out time in their morning, wake up early and fit their daily run then, but that wasn't me. In my first year, I flew over 75,000 miles across the Pacific and around the country for business, weddings and of course a handful of road races. The time zone changes, fatigue from travel, unpredictable weather, lack of facilities required me to get very creative with how I would fit my mileage in. I have run on a cruise ship track, airport terminals, stairs, and even a hotel hallway on my birthday at midnight. I am now into my sixth year of running every single day," she says with pride.  She likes the idea of the Run The World Challenge and this is why she signed up.  "It is a wonderful way for runners near and far to work together as a team, joined by their passion, to work towards a common goal.  This is an awesome way for runners to socialize online and cheer each other on," says Joyce.  Recently she placed first in the 50 mile Run De Vous Ultra. "I was adequately heat trained from having served as crew and pacer at the Badwater 135 Ultramarathon in Death Valley, I was able to successfully run the entire 50 mile distance. The heat reached as high as 101 degrees in Morgan Hill (California), but I was able to outrun the second place runner by over two hours. It felt incredible to cross the finish as first overall winner rather than first female, something I never imagined I'd ever experience. I'll never forget it," she says.  Some of her PR's include 20:02 for 5K, 1:34:20 for the half, 3:27:20 for the marathon and 29:41:23 for 100 miles.  (Wed 29) Views: 1,297
Bob Anderson
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Did 4200 Marathoners cheat to get the medal or did the timing company screw up?

Mexico City Marathon officials disqualified 4200 runners after an investigation revealed widespread cheating at their August 2017 race. There were 28,260 finishers. There were Facebook posts showing runners allegedly cheating by taking shortcuts, beginning the race along the course (officials are now saying most everyone crossed the starting line?) or even allegedly boarding trains (this was never confirmed). Marathon Investigation reported that most of the cheaters did not do so in order to qualify for the Boston Marathon. Rather, Derek Murphy wrote, they did it for the collectible medal. Or was this a timing company technical issue. "I think if it turns out to be a timing error and they disqualified a bunch of runners for an error on their end, that would be really bad for them," Murphy said. For the 2018 race the director says, “We are not handing over any medals at the end of the marathon, until we have thoroughly reviewed that [all runners] have completed the full race course,” De La Vega says. He believes that one of the major reasons for concern is runners' desire for completing the word "Mexico." Since 2013, the medals feature a different letter from the word. This year's event will complete the letter "O." (Sat 10) Views: 1,296
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge is focused on only one thing as he gets ready for the Berlin Marathon Sunday

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya says he has a crazy dream to be the fastest man in history. He hopes will inspire his quest to shutter the world marathon record in Berlin on Sunday. Kipchoge, 33, will be racing in his 10th marathon since he graduated from the track back in 2012. The London champion has only one loss in his career back in 2013 against compatriot Wilson Kipsang. He has won in Hamburg, Chicago, London, Rio (Olympics) and Berlin. "It's only a crazy dream until you do it. Don't be the fastest runner in the world, but strive to be the fastest runner in history," said Kipchoge on Monday in Nairobi. Kipchoge will be running his fourth Berlin marathon on Sunday and has sounded out world marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto (2:02.57) saying he will be focused on lowering his personal best time, which is only eight seconds off the mark. "Don't ask if your dreams are crazy. Ask if they are crazy enough," he added. "In Berlin the focus will be to improve on my personal best time of 2:03.05. Last year the weather was not good but I managed strongly to finish the race," he said. (Mon 10) Views: 1,295
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Marathoner Tony Collier did not know he had terminal Cancer

Tony Collier was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer when he was 60 in May 2017. He was never prompted to get tested for prostate cancer. He never had any symptoms. “I’m a keen runner. After completing the Paris marathon in April, as part of my training for the Comrades ultra-marathon, I had pain in my groin which wouldn’t go away...When I found out I was devastated, even more so when I was told the cancer was terminal." The doctor informed him that it will be a lot tougher to run. However, he is still running 3-4 times a week and plans on running the London marathon in April to raise funds for Prostate Cancer UK. (Thu 1) Views: 1,290
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Shalane Flanagan’s Mother once held the World Record in the Marathon

DID YOU KNOW: Cheryl Bridges, now Cheryl Treworgy, once held the American and world record in the marathon. Cheryl Bridges was born December 25, 1947 in Indiana. She began her running career as a sophomore at North Central High School in Indianapolis. In her senior year in high school, she competed in the national cross-country championships. In 1966, she became the first female athlete in the U.S. to receive an athletic scholarship to a public university — Indiana State University. She graduated in three years with a degree in physical education. In 1969, she finished fourth in the World Cross Country Championships in Scotland. She set the American records in the 3 mile and 5,000 meter distances. On December 7, 1971, Bridges ran her first marathon, finishing the Culver City Marathon in a world record time of 2:49:40. She had a lot of ideas and ambitions. She was the holder of a patent on utility sports bras and was the former buyer and part-owner of Frank Shorter Sports stores. Cheryl, now 70, is a professional photographer for her own company, Pretty Sporty, and was recognized in 2010 as Track and Field Writers of America Photographer of the year. Cheryl is the mother of Shalane Flanagan, who among other achievements set an American record in the 2008 Summer Olympics Beijing in the 10,000m and won the New York City marathon on November 5, 2017. Shalane is going after a dream on Monday. This dream is to win the Boston Marathon. Her mom would be proud. (Wed 11) Views: 1,279
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Kiranpal only jogged and never competed until he was sixty and now regularly places in his age division

RUN THE WORLD: Kiranpal Singh Dhody (62) has lived in Mumbai India since 1976. He is married and has three children.  "My son is now 25 and has recently joined me in my business," says Kiranpal, "giving me much wanted relief to concentrate on my running."  Kiranpal was a fitness freak from an early age and would jog regularly in the morning but never did any racing.  "Some boys, seeing me running on the tracks for hours every day, told me to take part in road races."  So at the age of 60 he started running races and started winning prizes.  "At that point I realized that I have some endurance and power within me and can compete well with the other runners."   He has participated in many road races 10k, 21k and has placed in his age-group many times.  "My Personal Best being Airtel Delhi Half Marathon in Nov 2016 clocking 1:43:40 getting 4th place in my age category." The same year he ran the New Delhi 10k Challenge clocking 46:20 a personal best.  "But the one I love most is SCMM ( Standard Chartered Mumbai Marathon/Half Marathon) the biggest marathon event of India," he says.  In 2017 he finished fifth in his age-group clocking 1:49:24 for the half. "Since the last two years I started participating in Masters Athletics Championship and won Silver and Bronze medals in 10,000m and 5,000m and got selected for the Asia Masters Athletic Championship." Running is very important to him.  "I get up every morning at 4:30 am and reach the tracks by 5:45am to start my daily practice by 6:00 am."  So what is his secret I asked? "Secret to my success lies in being regular at the Sports Authority of India ground every morning at 6:00 am, except Sunday (being my rest day), dedication to running, determination and punctuality. Not eating any junk or processed foods or aerated drinks. I eat a lot of fruits in the morning and also in the evening, I eat green vegetables, sprouts, dry fruits, nuts, and juices."  I asked him why he joined our challenge.   "Mr. Bob, you have done a very good thing by creating this Run The World event where we can all become examples for the young and old people so that they can also start running and thus improve their lifestyles,"  Kiranpal said. After getting his MBA and working for his brother for awhile he started his own business, Automobile Spare parts.  "We are a wholesaler trading in spare parts for vehicles. My business is about 40K away from my residence and every morning after my workout is over I have to travel by local train.  The train is crowded and takes over an hour to reach my destination.  Being tired, many times I sleep in the train and do the same thing on my return back home in the evening."   (Sun 29) Views: 1,234
Bob Anderson
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Why did Emil Zatopek gift one of his Olympic Gold Medals to Ron Clarke?

Exactly 64 years ago today on Jun 1, 1954 – Emil Zatopek runs World Record 10,000 meters 28:54.2. This was the first sub-29 minute clocking and his 4th 10k World Record.  The amazing Czech Rocket won the 5,000 meters, 10,000 meters and marathon at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Finland - an unparalleled achievement!  One of the most beautiful things he did was to secretly give a small box to Australian Ron Clarke with one of his Olympic Gold medals as he thought Ron would have earned a Gold medal if the 1968 Olympics weren't at altitude. (Photo - Ron Clarke with the gold medal Emil gifted to him.)  (Fri 1) Views: 1,196
Gary Cohen
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Abebe Bikila had only run two marathons before winning and running a PR by over six minutes in Rome

DID YOU KNOW? Abebe Bikila was a member of the Imperial Bodyguard, and was a last-minute addition to the Ethiopian team but caused a sensation by running barefoot through the streets of Rome and winning gold, at the 1960 Olympic Games. Four years later he retained the title, this time wearing shoes. On both occasions he clocked world best times... Abebe participated in a total of sixteen marathons, winning twelve and finishing fifth in the 1963 Boston Marathon. In July 1967, he sustained the first of several sports-related leg injuries which prevented him from finishing his last two marathons. On March 22, 1969, Abebe was paralyzed as a result of a car accident. Although he regained some upper-body mobility, he never walked again. He died at age 41 on October 25, 1973, of a cerebral hemorrhage related to his car accident. He had only run two marathons before Rome and there he set a PR by over six minutes. (Tue 13) Views: 1,172
Olympians
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Boston Marathon's Champion Yuki Kawauchi is already Racing again on Sunday

The three most recent winners of the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon will clash on Sunday. Earlier this week Kawauchi became the first Japanese runner to win the Boston Marathon in 31 years. In a gripping race held in harsh conditions, Kawauchi put in numerous surges with his final effort proving decisive. He crossed the finish line in 2:15:58 to beat world champion Geoffrey Kirui by more than two minutes. It was Kawauchi’s fifth consecutive marathon victory – all of which have been achieved in a four-month time span – but his record at the half marathon isn’t quite as strong. He has contested the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon on five previous occasions but is yet to finish inside the top 10. But his performance on Monday once again showed that distance-running fans should always expect the unexpected from Kawauchi. The 31-year-old currently works 40 hours a week as a civil servant, but he recently announced that he will leave his job and turn professional next year. “I need to change my environment (to move up to another level),” he said. “I have not improved my personal best for five years. I want to see my true potential as a runner. I am determined to compete against the best in the world. (Fri 20) Views: 1,165
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If you love running and would like to show the world, this 24,901 mile challenge circling the world is for you

This challenge is about five things. First to celebrate running. Second to motivate people to reach their goals. Third to inspire people to run regularly. Four to show the world how much we love running.  Five to see if our group can log enough miles to circle the world.   "Our group will start logging miles July 4th and hopefully within 30 days reach our goal of circling the world, 24,901 miles (40,074K)," says Bob Anderson. "As of June 18 we are 68 runners strong and we think we can average 2,471 miles per week. More runners are needed for us to reach our goal within 30 days."  On August 5th the team will run a victory lap (800m) in San Franicco and receive a medal and shirt to celebrate reaching the goal. Runners from 12 different countries and from across the US have already signed. "We know many team members will not be able to join us in San Francisco," says Bob Anderson. "The Victory Medal and shirt can be mailed out.  The key thing is to get signed up." If you love running and want to tell the world that running is an important part of your life, this would be a good challenge to join. If you can make a commitment of posting miles this challenge is for you. There is no entry fee and only if you want a shirt and medal is there any fee. Click on the title to sign up and get more information. Lifetime runner Bob Anderson has put this together. (Mon 18) Views: 1,165
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Japan's Suguru Osako wins nearly one Million Dollars in placing third at the Chicago Marathon

Japan's Suguru Osako placed third at the 2018 Chicago Marathon clocking 2:05:50, a new national Japan record.  This beats the record of 2:06:11. The Japanese Corporate Track and Field Federation (Project Exceed program) will pay him a 100-million-yen bonus ($879,465 U.S. dollars) for setting a new national record.  Before the race Suguru Osako said, ““I want to try to break the national record, but the most important thing to me is to be competitive with the other runners.  I’m really excited and proud to run with Mo and Galen. I’m going to enjoy the challenge.””  Osako trains in Oregon and is part of the Nike Oregon Project.  Osako was born May 23, 1991.  He won the 10,000 meters gold medal at the 2011 Summer Universiade in Shenzhen and holds the Asian junior record for the half marathon. Born in Machida, Tokyo, he attended Saku Chosei High School and began to establish himself nationally in 2010.  Suguru Osako made his marathon debut at the 2017 Boston Marathon, landing on the podium in third in 2:10:28. At the time, he was the first Japanese man to finish among the top three since Seko won Boston in 1987. He closed out 2017 with an impressive personal best and third place finish at the Fukuoka Marathon, 2:07:19.  He becomes the first Japanese man and just the second non-African-born runner to break 2:06.  (Sun 7) Views: 1,162
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The Run The World Challenge is not over until it is over, until we login 24,901 miles says team leader Bob Anderson

The Run The World Challenge is one of the longest running events on the planet.  “Our team will log in enough miles to circle the world, that is 24,901 miles,” says team leader Bob Anderson.  A team can not be no larger than 200 active runners.  “Our team needed members to run miles in at least 20 different countries (we have logged in miles in 29 countries). We also had to at least have one runner in each age group (14 and under, 15-19, 20-29, 30-39,40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 and 80 plus).  We met all these Run The World Challenge standards,” says Bob.  The goal was to do this in 30 days.  “What we did not know is that with a team this size, things happen, injuries, work and family situations, life challenges, or just running out of time to log.  So after 30 days our team has logged in 19,600 miles,” Bob says.  This team is 78.7% of the way around the globe. “Our team of 163 active runners are amazing.” Willie Korir from Kenya is the leader and has been running two to four times per day to login his 630 miles.  That is 21 miles per day.  Jen Baylis from the US has logged in 465.34 miles with Grace Padilla right behind her with 464 miles.  25 members of the team has logged in 200 miles or more.  45 have logged 150 miles or more and 85 a hundred or more.  “One of our team members, Michael Wardian (photo) logged in 100.5 miles in one day.  No, we are not finished. We are not finished until we reach 24,901 miles,” says Bob.  Maybe during the next challenge a team will reach 24,901 miles in 30 days.  The next Run The World Challenge starts August 29.  “In the meantime we are continuing until we reach our goal. We are hoping to reach it within 40 days or in ten more days,” says Bob Anderson.   (Thu 2) Views: 1,157
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Seb Coe may need to make tough decisions that don’t favor Nike, then What?

“No conflict of interest as far as I'm concerned,” says Carla van Kampen in response to Nike naming a building in Seb Coe’s name. “Coe was one of the greatest runners of all time (800/1500),” Carla continued. “If Coe shows any favoritism towards Nike in the future, well then that's something else. I met Coe a couple of years ago while he was in Rome for the World Race Walking Championships before the Rio Olympics, and he was a class act, so engaged and friendly.” Bob Anderson, the founder and publisher of Runner’s World for 18 years (1966-1984) and now MBR answered, “I agree, Lord Seb Coe is a class act. But if he needs to make some decisions on matters that does not favor Nike, he needs to be able to do this without Nike retaliating. Many years ago when we published that, at the time, Brooks made a better shoe in our shoe issue, Nike retaliated by not attacking RW (since everyone loved our magazine) but Nike attacked me. They sent out a press release to all their dealers questioning my integrity and then pulled out one million dollars of advertising. They were our largest advertiser but we published the shoe ranking results in the order as our Penn State lab presented them to us. (Nike's action caused the FTC to do an investigation. After a year or so they announced no company was favored unfairly.) What is important now is that the IAAF runs our sport not Nike. However, Nike’s support (just like their support of RW from 1966 to 1980) is very valuable to our sport. It is a fine line.” Bob says. (Wed 14) Views: 1,156
Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Not only does running keep me sober, it helps me feel balanced says Henry Ward

RUN THE WORLD:  Henry Ward has been sober since November 17, 2008 and after his son was born in March of 2012 he noticed he was becoming squirrelly. "Even though I wasn't drinking or using," Henry says.  "I became restless. Sort of like a dry drunk. I knew I needed to do something."  He was going to visit a friend and Henry asked what they were going to do.  "My friend was thinking about running a 8k race.  He said he would run if I did. I said sign me up! I didn't even know how far an 8k was," Henry remembers.  "I hated every step of that race, and vowed never to run again. Every time a runner past me, I was angry. I honestly wanted to trip or elbow all runners I saw.  But when I finished, I received a glass medallion.  I also had a feeling that I will never forget.  A feeling of accomplishment, and happiness, that prompted me to seek out another race as we drove back to my friend's house." Henry signed up for another 5k the following weekend and then a 4 miler.  He was hooked. Henry is from Boston and currently lives in Tempe, Arizona.  He is married and has a 6-year-old son. "Family is always first, running comes second," he says.  He is a chef by trade.  "I get to sweat, lift things and log 30,000 steps at work alone!  Plus eat!  I love to eat.  I eat 4000 calories a day," Henry says.  "I run to survive, to help me deal with life on life's terms.  When I run and exercise I feel alive and it helps my day flow. If I didn't find running I would be a neurotic mess."  He loves how he feels during and after running.  "The Runner's high, and endorphin kick was like no other. I am thankful that I found running, and it has changed my life for the better. Not only does it keep me sober and it helps me feel balanced," he says.  He believes that anyone can change, if they want to.  "If I can change, anyone can!  I have come along way, but know that I still have a lot of work to do on my personal character defects."   He moved up from the 5K to doing ultras.  In 2017 he completed the 250K six day stage race, 4deserts Patagonia.  In 2018 he did the Boston Quad which is running the Boston Marathon four consecutive times.  "The official marathon was number four. We had snow, freezing rain, 50 mile an hour winds and torrential downpours," Henry says.  He wants to help inspire others and motivate many along the way.  That is one of the reasons he joined the Run The World Challenge.  "I think the challenge is really cool because I get to connect with people who are doing the same thing for different reasons, and people from around the world."  He has two 100 mile races coming up and he hopes to qualify for the 2019 Badwater 135 race in death valley.   (Wed 1) Views: 1,146
Bob Anderson
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Teen runs the second fastest road 10K ever, Phonex Kipruto clocked 26:46 at the Birell Prague Grand Prix

18-year-old Rhonex Kipruto from Kenya runs 26:46 Saturday evening at the Birell Praque Grand Prix.  This is the second fastest-ever road 10k, while his compatriot Caroline Kipkirui moved to third on the women’s world all-time list.  Phonex Kipruto – who was third in Prague last year in 27:13 and then ran 27:08 in New York before claiming the world under-20 10,000m title in Tampere – clocked 26:46 for a dominant win. It was a Kenyan top three as Geoffrey Koech ran 27:18 in second and Mathew Kimeli 27:26 in third. A total of 11 athletes dipped inside 28 minutes. The women’s race was much closer and Kipkirui won in 30:19 ahead of Fancy Chemutai (30:22) and Diana Chemtai Kipyokei (30:23) to complete another Kenyan clean sweep. Running alone with his opponents rapidly dropping back, Kipruto went through 5km in 13:31 before clocking a negative split of 13:15 to take 22 seconds off his PB. Only his compatriot Leonard Komon has run a faster time with his world record 26:44 set in 2010. (Sat 8) Views: 1,112
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Bill Sumner is one of the fastest 70 plus runners in the country

Bill Sumner has been running the Carlsbad 5000 for years. This year he moved into a new age-group (70-74) and he placed first running 21:11. This is the second fastest time (70+) over the last 12-months of all the races My Best Runs is tracking. Only Dave Glass (70) who ran 20:54 at the Syracuse Festival of Races is faster... "Bill and I have been bumping into each other in Carlsbad over the last 25 years," says Bob Anderson. "I have beaten him a few times but not lately. Two things has not changed over all these years. First his love for running is as strong as ever. And secondly he is always happy with a warm smile." Bill in his prime ran a 30-minute 10,000 meters, and was a 4:16 masters miler in his 40s. Sumner helped start Cal Coast running club in the 1970s, when he organized a campaign to collect "gently used" running shoes for needy high school teams. The club is still going strong. "I'm trying to save everybody," Bill says. "I read that if you try to please 100 percent of the people 100 percent of the time, you'll fail. But I'm still trying." (Wed 28) Views: 1,101
Bob Anderson
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I am skipping the biggest meets that remain at Hayward Field, just too sad to go back to this doomed place

Full destruction of Hayward Field is guaranteed, now that the City Council has refused to consider a last-ditch attempt at historic status designation. I’m already distancing myself from the place, skipping the biggest meets that remain, Pre and NCAA. This isn’t a call to boycott. It’s just too sad for me to go back to this doomed place. There are many happier places in Eugene...Coverage of the total teardown and replacement has overlooked the neighbors. This might be the right change, but it's in the wrong place. Hayward Field outgrew its location by at least 1972 (the first year I visited there for the Trials). On-street parking was scarce then and has become more so. The neighborhood has grown ever more crowded, from new construction on and near campus. Neighbors range from barely tolerant of the big events to wishing them away. Hayward sits amid property owned by UO Physical Education and Recreation — four turf fields and the Rec track. These are heavily used, up to 18 hours a day. I’ve taught a running class there since 2001, and we typically get evicted whenever a big track meet comes to Hayward. The effect of construction will be devastating on all student uses of these fields and track, and some of that space will never be replaced because there’s no spare room. The end of Hayward would have been the perfect time to locate the new stadium anywhere but here, anywhere with surrounding space. The old track, minus the stands other than a smaller replica of the East, could have become Hayward Heritage Park — open to students and the public alike. Now it’s too late. Sad that the suggestions of nearest neighbors seemingly never were solicited.  (Joe Henderson was the editor of Runner's World in the early years and continued to write for the magazine for many years.  He has written many books and is currently coaching his team in Eugene.) (Thu 10) Views: 1,099
Joe Henderson
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Brent Weigner has flown way over two million miles traveling to marathons and beyond

Last weekend I ran my 320th marathon, this one in the Falkland Islands. I have run marathons or beyond in 153 countries... I have flown way over two million miles going to marathons, ultra marathons, 150 mile multi day stage races, and snowshoe ultras. I have been flying my entire life. We have flown around the globe when competing in a Global Scavenger Hunt. In 1976 I bought a round the world standby ticket for $999.00 on Pan American Airlines. In 1985 I received my private pilots license and flew about 200 hours for a couple years. Since 2013 I have been trying to run marathons/ultras in 20 new countries each year. My personal record was 38 new countries in 2017... My wife and I retired the same day, June 4, 2010. We were in are early 60s and everything was paid off. We have no bills and spend all our money on traveling. We buy experiences and not things that are dust catchers. When we die the only thing we want to take with us is what we have given away while we were alive. Photo - marathon I ran in the country of Benin in Africa. Editor's Note: No one has run marathons in more countries than Brent Weigner and in his younger days he ran 2:45:50 at the Boston Marathon. (Wed 21) Views: 1,095
Brent Weigner
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Being hit by a truck didn’t stop this Marathoner from qualifying for Boston two weeks later

Lucy McCausland has always enjoyed the challenges of running a marathon. The 63-year-old McCausland was at the start of the Five Points of Life Marathon a year ago. Because she was there at all. There, ready to run, instead of being home in bed or laid up in a hospital or, well, even somewhere worse. A little more than two weeks earlier, a routine training run came to an abrupt and frightening end when she was struck by a truck that ran through a stop sign. The impact sent McCausland sprawling onto the hard asphalt, injuring her back and head. “I thought he saw me, but he didn’t,” she says. She was sent to the emergency room, where she underwent tests to determine the severity of her head injury. There were some anxious moments before the doctors came back with some good news. “I took it as a motivation thing. I was just so lucky... I ran within 17 seconds of the time I wanted, which got me into Boston Marathon this April,” she said. (Sat 17) Views: 1,091
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world. Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September. Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record. For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January. The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday. I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck. In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions.  The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13. The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched. Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km. (Sat 15) Views: 1,086
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70-year-old Bob Anderson will be running his 60th Double Racing Event on August 5

Bob Anderson ran his first "official" Double Racing event in October, 2010,  "That was the Double Road Race in Cabo Mexico," says 70-year-old lifetime runner Bob Anderson.  "It was very hot and humid and the second 5k leg was tough but I did it."  For that Double, runners first ran 10K and then one hour and forty-five minutes ran a 5K.  Times are added together for scoring. Since then Bob has run 59 Double Racing events of different lengths.  On August 5 in San Francisco, Bob will be running the 4th Annual Golden Gate Double 8K.  The first leg is a 5K and the second 3K leg starts one hour and 15 minutes later.  "It is always hard getting started on the second leg but once I get going I get back into the rhythm" says Bob.  "My pace is always faster the second leg.  I have had some sciatic nerve issues this year but that seems to be behind me now.  I can't wait to run the Golden Gate Double 8K and on September 30th the Pacific Grove (California) Double Road Race.  I am hoping to win my division at both." (Tue 8) Views: 1,081
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Run The World Global Run Challenge is a 24,901 Mile Event circling the world

Run The World Global Run Challenge is a special running event celebrating running and inspiring people.   Our group will login enough miles to circle the world. We are starting July 4, 2018 and will finish once we have logged in 24,901 miles (40,074 kilometers).  We are doing this Run The World Global Run Challenge to show the world that running is important to us no matter where we live in the world. We are Runners and we are proud of it.   We run regularly, many of us daily, and we mostly do it for ourselves because it makes us a better person.  Some of us can only run a mile or so at this point while others can easily handle a marathon and beyond.  Running is magical.  It helps keep things in perspective.  Running helps smooth out the bumps. Running relieves stress and gives us fitness making our lives better.  Running is much more than putting one foot in front of the other.  Many of us run races to gauge our fitness level and to be around other people who love running as much as we do.  I am Bob Anderson and I am a lifetime runner. I started running February 19, 1962 and four years later started Runner's World magazine and published it for 18 years. We had 2.5 million monthly readers by 1985.  I am starting the Run The World Global Run Challenge to help inspire us.  I love to have more reasons to log in miles. This is pure running.  I hope you will join us. Just log in your training or racing miles. We have made it easy to log miles. Just set up an account on My Best Runs and log there starting July 4.  There is no cost to be part of our challenge.  People can join at any time along the way and log in miles.  Runners can sign up now and give an estimate on how many weekly miles they will post.  (Thu 14) Views: 1,079
Bob Anderson
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A Chance Encounter with Rupp and Salazar on a Roman Holiday

Carla van Kampen posted this Saturday on FB, "Had a chance encounter with lifelong running idol, the great Alberto Salazar and his Olympic silver and bronze medal athlete Galen Rupp! Galen had just finished an easy three mile run and was doing exercises as Salazar showed up from his two mile run. After a quick dash into their hotel to get a change of sneakers for Galen for his 100 meter strides, Salazar measured the distance by his steps and used a broken pair of glasses on the road as his marker. Salazar told him to run them in 14 seconds.....and Galen did just that." ...The next day Galen ran the second fastest Half Marathon ever run by an American...59:47. (Mon 12) Views: 1,078
Carla van Kampen (in Rome)
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Wilson Kipsang is going after sub 59 minutes at Gothenburg Half Marathon

Kenya's former world marathon record-holder Wilson Kipsang will have his first competitive race after almost three months when he takes part in the Gothenburg Half Marathon on May 19. Kipsang, 34, had to let his Tokyo Marathon title go without much fight after he developed problems just 15 kilometers into the race back in February. However, he has recovered from his injury and will be trying to gauge himself against some of the fastest half marathon runners in the Swedish race on Saturday. "During my last race, I really wanted to go fast, but after suffering from stomach problems just days before the race, I didn't have the power to run a decent race. I'm still disappointed, I was really ready for it," said Kipsang on Tuesday from Iten, Kenya. The former world marathon record holder (2:03:23) and Olympic bronze medalist believes he has the strength to challenge his personal best time of 58:59 when he lines up in Gothenburg, the second-largest city in Sweden. "I have done well since pulling out of Tokyo Marathon and will be keen to test my limits again," he said. Kipsang will be out to use the race in Gothenburg as part of his preparations before the latter half of the year, where he is expected to race in Berlin, Chicago or New York.  Kipsang faces a strong line-up including Kenyan teammates Leonard Langat (59:18) Peter Kirui (59:22), Albert Kangogo (59:25), Richard Mengich (59:35) and Ethiopia's Abera Kuma (60:19). Former world 10,000m champion Ibrahim Jeilan, who has a best time of 61:47 will also compete. The women's race features Kenya's Joyce Chepkirui (66:19) and top Ethiopians Sutume Asefa (67:54 PB), Meseret Tola (68:09 PB) and Shure Demise (68:53 PB). Chepkirui, who was fourth in her last race in Istanbul in April, has said she is gunning for a fast time as she seeks to return to top form. (Tue 15) Views: 1,060
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The crazy Bay To Breakers 12k with it's costumed runners, elites and centipedes is May 20

The Bay to Breakers (BTB) is one of the most popular footraces in the United States. On May 18, 1986 the annual 12K race in San Francisco drew 110,000 participants.  The Guiness Book of World Records recognized it as the world's largest footrace until October 10, 2010 when an event in Malina had 116,086 participants. The BTB route is typically dotted with various local bands performing. In February 2009, SF city officials and race sponsors announced changes to the race regulations.  The regulations included an official ban on floats, alcohol, drunkenness and nudity. The changes were made to address the concerns of San Francisco residents along the route, who say the race has gotten out of hand in recent years. Many Bay Area residents said the changes would destroy much that has made the race a national treasure for most of the last century...The first BTB was run January 1, 2012.  American's men won every year until Australian's Chris Wardlaw won in 1976 clocking 37:28.  Runners from Kenya have dominated since 1991, winning 25 times out of 27.  The course record is held by Kenya's Sammy Kitwara set in 2009 when he clocked 33:31. The first women to official run was Frances Conley in 1966.  She clocked 1:00:07.   Six-year-old Mary Etta Boitano won in 1969 clocking 1:01:12.  Mary also won in 1974, 1975 and 1976.  Her best time was 43:22 (1974) which was the course record until Laurie Binder broke it in 1979 clocking 43:07.  The women's course record was set in 2010 when Kenya's Lineth Chepkurui clocked 38:07.  The one runner who won the most times was Kenny Moore who won six times in a row between 1968 to 1973. His best time being 36:39 (1972).  Moore ran in the Olympic marathon at both Mexico City and Munich, finishing fourth in 1972.  After his running career, Moore became a journalist and screenwriter. He had a twenty-five-year career covering athletics for Sports Illustrated.   Alaska Airlines Bay to Breakers is a race built by the people. Since 1912, Over 2 million costumed runners, walkers, elites and centipedes have completed the iconic 12K journey from the San Francisco Bay to the breakers on Ocean Beach.  (Thu 10) Views: 1,045
Bob Anderson
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Sarah Sellers focus is now to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics after Boston

Sarah Sellers who came out of nowhere to finish second at the Boston Marathon, is turning her attention to trying to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Sellers, an Ogden (Utah) High School and Weber State graduate, initially wanted to hit the 'A' standard Olympic qualifying time of 2 hours, 37 minutes earlier this month in Boston. As soon as she saw the weather — wet, windy and miserable — she abandoned that goal, but still hit the 'B' standard with her time of 2:44:04 (the 'B' standard is 2:45:00).   "I still don't feel like it's quite a reality yet, but I'm really excited because it's definitely very motivating to try really hard and to train smart, because there's a lot of really good marathoners in the U.S.," she said. Sellers, a nurse anesthetist at Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona, qualified for the Olympic trials, which will be held Feb. 29, 2020. "I don't know what my potential is there, but I think I'm definitely motivated to do everything I can to do the best I can at the trials," she said. Sellers is taking it easy for a while to help her body recover from the marathon. She will try to incorporate things like strength training and biking, but doesn't anticipate running a race for awhile as she recovers. (Mon 30) Views: 1,041
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Shalane Flanagan Has captured the hearts of so many after winning New York

“Focused, determined, and stubborn. Let’s crush this week,” posted Shalane Flanagan last week on Instagram. Then Friday it was announced that Carrie Underwood's new music video "The Champion," showcases a series of inspiring moments in history including footage of Shalane winning the New York City Marathon to Martin Luther King Jr. giving a speech.... Shalane Flanagan then posted, “The lyrics and imagery gives me chills and makes me want to go crush a run and cry at the same time.” Wow, how can you not love her? The Boston Marathon is now only weeks away. There is a lot of pressure on Shalane but one thing is for sure, she is going to give it all she has. (This photo Jeff Cohen took shows a very determined woman. As they say “a photo is worth a thousands words.”) (Mon 5) Views: 1,028
Bob Anderson
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One of the Greatest American Distance Runners of all times has to be Gerry Lindgren

DID YOU KNOW: Here are some reasons why Gerry Lindgren is still one of American's greatest distance runners ever...In 1964, as a high school senior, Lindgren ran 5000 meters in 13:44, on a clay track in Compton, CA setting a U.S. high school record that would remain unbroken for 40 years...On July 25, 1964, Lindgren outran two seasoned Russian runners to win the 10,000m event in the US-USSR Track Meet in Los Angeles...Lindgren ran 200 miles a week for 6 weeks in preparation for the US-USSR meet. After that victory, he also set a new teenage record of 13:17.0 for 3 miles while competing in Jamaica...Lindgren and Billy Mills battled each other in the 6-mile at the 1965 AAU Nationals meet. Mills won with a diving lean, while both were timed in 27:11.6, a new world record...Maybe Lindgren's greatest race came during a May 1966 NCAA Regional meet at age 20, in the 3-mile run on a dirt track during a cold, windy day in Seattle. He raced to 12:53.0, just missing the world record of 12:52.4 held by Ron Clarke..."Gerry did some amazing things in his short career," says Bob Anderson. "It was very exciting meeting Gerry and featuring him in our movie A Long Run." Gerry has been living in Hawaii since 1980 and still runs regularly. (Thu 1) Views: 1,007
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The four white Kenyans..It's all in the training..sacrifice and quality...

"These four runners listed below live and spend long seasons in Kenya at altitude, training with Africans with their custom meals, sleeping in their cots, training at 6am, fasting, and eating ugali The White Kenyans... 1. Julien Wanders this morning ran 60:09 at half marathon in Barcelona, a new Swiss record 2. Zane Robertson from New Zealand ran a 59:47 Half 3. Sondre Moen 2:05:48 Marathon From Norway, European record 4. Jake Robertson 60:01 Half Marathon in Houston From New Zealand They sacrifice themselves like the Kenyans... they run like the Kenyans... It doesn't matter that their skin is not black. It's all in the training. It's the sacrifice and the quality." (Sun 11) Views: 983
Gonzalo Sukunza
Fast Half Marathons
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Kipsang's brother will be one of his pacemakers on Sunday

"I missed out on the world record narrowly last year (Tokyo Marathon) and I want to see if I can be able to achieve that time on Sunday with my pacemakers," Wilson Kipsang said Monday before his departure to Japan. Interestingly, Kipsang’s brother, Noah Kiprotich will be among the pacemakers for Sunday’s race. Kiprotich, who has been training alongside Kipsang, is optimistic that he will be able to help his brother lower the course record. “I’m privileged to be among the top cream of pacemakers in Tokyo and our mission is to help my brother lower the course record and if possible break the world record time,” he said, after a training session with Kipsang. Kiprotich, 29, has been participating in road races and has a personal best of 60:25 achieved at last year’s Udine Half marathon triumph in Italy. (Wed 21) Views: 983
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This group that became 80 runners accepted my 500 mile June 6 Challenge

Yesterday, June 6, was Global Running Day.  A day celebrating running.  It is exciting to have our own day, celebrating what many of us do daily or at least regularly.  Among other things the day is about inspiring people.  At noon the day before I had just finished doing my daily run-to-lunch few miles.  I was enjoying an avocado toast and the best ice tea in town before heading back to the office.  Knowing that Global Running Day was the next day, I was thinking that My Best Runs needed to do something.  I knew there were already a lot of well thought out programs taking place June 6.  I decided, on the spot, that we would do something just for the fun of running.  We would run our challenge like a road race back in the 1970's.  Since we needed to get the word out quickly, we would use my Facebook account to reach people.  I would record everything by hand.  Making things more interesting,  I was flying down to our MBR/Ujena office in Mexico in the middle of the day Wednesday.  (I would be out of touch for nearly five hours.)  There would be no entry fee and no prizes.  There would be no official results.  It was all about running.  We would not be raising money for a cause.  Each of us would run on June 6 and log in miles on my FB account.  Just to see if we could do it, my goal was for our group to run at least 500 miles June 6 and hopefully have 100 participants   Everyone had to post their miles by midnight.  In the end, 80 people posted 560.12 miles for our My Best Runs Global Running Day 500 Mile Challenge.  We did it.  We showed the world that a group of people can come together (with no notice) from all over the world and run the equivalent distance from San Francisco to San Diego.  All types of runners from slow to fast joined our challenge.  I am very proud of each and every participant but I would like to mention some of our gang here.  We had two time Boston Marathon winner (Geoff Smith) post 10.5 miles, Co-owner of Worlds Marathons Malin Andersson from Sweden posted 6.2 miles, Bertrand Newson who heads up a popular bay area running group (2L2Q) posted 8.45 miles and Willie Korir from Kenya posted the most miles with 22.5.  Verity Breen posted the most miles for a female hitting 19 miles and Boston Marathon historian Tom Derderian ran 5 miles.  The youngest female to win Bay To Breakers (age 11) who ran her first marathon at age 5 Mary Etta Britano now 55  posted 10 miles, Julie who we met at the front desk of our hotel in Paris ran 5 miles, Ram VenKatraman who heads up a major running group in Mumbai, India ran 4.69 miles and super ultra-marathon star Michael Wardian ran 12.5 miles.  Phil Camp who among other things won the 4th annual Marine marathon (1979) posted 8.3 miles, Roger Wright used to weigh 278 pounds a few years back before he started running marathons logged 13.5 miles and ultra runner since the early 1970's superstar Frank Bozanich ran 9 miles. Joshua Holmes Ultra runner and Run It Fast founder posted 2 miles, Brent Weigner who has run more marathons in more countries than anyone posted 1.5 miles, and the list goes on and on.  One common thing about our group of 80 runners is that everyone loves running.  Until our next challenge! Run on...  I ran 6.6 miles which I thought was only fitting.  This was our first Global Run Challenge.  (Thu 7) Views: 979
Bob Anderson
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Bruce Tulloh, the original barefoot runner and world class runner has died at age 82

Bruce Tulloh, European 5000m champion in 1962, one of Britain's best and most popular runners of the 1960s, trans-America record-breaker, and an ongoing influential figure in British athletics as a coach and writer, has died aged 82.  In 1969, Tulloh ran 2876 miles across America from Los Angeles to New York City in 64 days. This is described in his book Four Million Footsteps, published by Pelham Books in 1970.   "I read Four Million Footsteps many times," said Bob Anderson.  "It was a wonderful account of his journey across America.  Bruce was a super friendly, inspiring runner and he will be missed."  Bruce told Simon Freeman (editor at Like the Wind Magazine). "Bruce Tulloh says he can’t remember a time when he wasn’t running. His mother was a runner and — according to Tulloh — she never lost a race. His whole family were active, sporty people, including the perceptive grandfather, an international tennis player."  He told Simon in 2015, "There’s nothing nicer for me than to go out to a lovely bit of grass or on to the beach and run,” he says. “Even though nowadays I’ll be running a bit, walking a bit. It’s just a natural human activity.” And it is possibly thanks to his decision to not wear shoes that Tulloh will be best remembered. However, it would be a mistake to think that there wasn’t science and planning behind the choice to go barefoot.  He was the originial barefoot runner.  (Sun 29) Views: 952
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Catching Up with Sarah Sellers, her life has changed since placing Second in Boston

The last time we checked on Sarah Sellers, she was being deluged with worldwide media requests and coping with overnight fame in the wake of her stunning second-place finish in the Boston Marathon. More than a month later, the nurse who came out of nowhere to defeat world and Olympic medalists in the world’s most famous road race is still riding the wave she created in Boston. She now has her own Wikipedia page, an agent, a weekly podcast and a shoe deal. She has an invitation to ride the lead float in a Phoenix parade this fall. She has received calls from Oakley and Timex, among other companies, about endorsing their products. And the interviews continue. During the broadcast of the London Marathon, she got up in the middle of the night to do live interviews for BBC radio and TV (after performing jumping jacks to wake herself).  Sellers has been invited to run road races on the pro circuit, and this time she won’t have to pay her entry fee or expenses, as she famously did at Boston. Her first post-Boston race will be the New York Mini 10K (all women) on June 9; her second will be Salt Lake’s Deseret News 10K in July. She hasn’t chosen her next marathon, but she has an offer from the Gold Coast Marathon in Australia, among others. Sellers is a hot commodity in running circles and her anonymity is long gone. Hey, aren’t you that marathoner? According to her agent, Bob Wood, Sellers had 6.9 million Google searches for her name the first two days after the Boston race. “It’s been a life-changing thing,” says Wood. “She’s got so many people who want a piece of her, and she’s been very accommodating.” Sellers, an Ogden native, has returned to work as a nurse anesthetist at Banner-University Hospital in Tucson, while also training at an elite level for professional road races. She still does her training runs at 4 a.m. before she goes to work, and, if she is doubling that day, she’ll run again in the evening after work. When she isn’t running or working, she’s trying to respond to the demands of fame. “I’m just trying to respond to all the messages,” she says. “Sometimes I feel like I’m making progress, but I’m not. It’s been good and exciting, but this is added on top of trying to work full time and train. It’s not sustainable.” (Tue 22) Views: 931
Doug Robinson/ Deseret News
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Courtney Heiner started off as a 300m hurdler and became a 1500m National Champion

RUN THE WORLD: Courtney Heiner didn't make the high school basketball team, so she decided to do track instead. "I started off as a 300 meter hurdler my sophomore year," says Courtney. "By my senior year, I started to really have a passion for running." Her coach convinced her to run cross country the fall of 2008.  "That season we made it to the California State meet with only five varsity runners.  It was definitely an experience that I will never forget," she remembers.  She later met Jeanette Powless, the    women’s distance coach at American River College. "Jeanette really took me under her wing and showed me how to steeplechase.  After two years at American River, Jeanette helped me get a scholarship to Cal State Stanislaus and put me in contact with coach Taylor. "There she became a five time All American and a National Champion in the women's 1500m.  Now Courtney nuns for the Strava Track Club coached by Dena Evans.  " Dena is always so positive and we both know there’s more in the tank.  Hopefully, over this next year I can work hard to get one step closer to my goals." Running is extremely important to her however,  "I think its always important to maintain a balance.  During heavy training blocks I run six days a week.  I almost always take Sundays off.  This helps me recover physically and mentally for the week," she says.  I asked her what is her goal?  "My ultimate running goal would be to qualify for USA Outdoor Championships in the steeplechase.  There’s no doubt that it seems like a lofty goal, and sometimes it feels so far out of reach, but if you don’t dream big, then you miss out on a lot of incredible opportunities along the way.   "Besides running and coaching she also works full time at her family business, they pretty much put a logo on anything. "It’s called A4 Promotions and we specialize in branded merchandise," she says.  Courtney and her husband also enjoy spending time in the mountains.  So why did she join this challenge? "The Run the World Challenge is so cool and its really neat to be apart of it.  It’s so unique and that’s what really attracted me to it.  Its incredible to bring runners together to run 24,901 miles collectively. It’s been awesome to read about other runners and their story."                         (Sat 28) Views: 931
Bob Anderson
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Michael Wardian ran 184.5 miles at 11:55 per mile pace breaking the record set in 1976

Michael Wardian woke up one day and decided to go after a record set in 1976.  He left Cumberland, Maryland at 5am Saturday morning September 1st.  A little more than an hour ago he finished running the entire C&O Canal Trail (184.5 miles) that goes through Maryland and ends at Rock Creek Parkway in Washington DC.  The trail surfaces are crushed stone, dirt and gravel. The record he wanted to beat was set by Park Barner in 1976 when Park clocked 36 hours, 48 minutes, 14 seconds.  Michael clocked 36 Hours 36 Minutes 3 seconds today which is an average of 11:55 per mile.  He had to also deal with temperatures that reached over 90 degrees.  This one run also takes him to the top of the Run The World Challenge 2 leader board which he is also participating in that started August 29.  Enough miles to circle the globe are being logged by 175 Runners from around the world.   (Sun 2) Views: 911
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Dag Aabye is 76, Lives in a Bus in the Woods and still runs Ultras

Dag Aabye is considered by some as "the most elusive man in North America." With the growing popularity of vanlife happening right now, living in a repurposed school bus in the woods might be a dream for some people. For Dag it is a reality. Somewhere hidden in the mountains of Vernon, British Columbia Aabye enjoys a simple life away from modern society while living amongst nature and training for ultramarathons. Aabye is 76-years-old and a champion of the 80-mile ultramarathon aptly named the "Death Race." He is the oldest person to have ever finished the race. Aabye is a rare breed of human that has lived his own path and blown the doors off the perception of what life has to be. And he certainly exudes plenty of wisdom for any that are willing to listen. (Wed 21) Views: 907
Inspirational Stories
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Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi will be facing Mo farah and Gallen Rupp at Chicago Marathon men elite field

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that reigning Boston Marathon champion and “citizen runner” Yuki Kawauchi and 2016 Olympian and Nike Oregon Project runner Suguru Osako will join the elite competition as they both seek to become the first Chicago Marathon champion from Japan since Toshihiko Seko took the crown in 1986. "I'm really happy to have the chance to race in the Bank of America Chicago Marathon and the Abbott World Marathon Majors," Kawauchi said. "I'm looking forward to running the same race where Toshinari Takaoka set the former national record and so many other great Japanese athletes have run well. My results in the other American Abbott World Marathon Majors races, Boston and New York, were pretty good, and I'll do everything I can to line up in Chicago ready to produce good results there too." “Yuki and Suguru are exciting additions to our elite field,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “Yuki has taken an unconventional path to marathon stardom; there’s no other elite runner competing today like him. And Suguru is young in his marathon career with a real chance at breaking the Japanese national record in Chicago.” Before becoming the 2018 Boston Marathon champion amidst freezing temperatures and pouring rain where he said, “for me, these are the best conditions possible,” Kawauchi gained global renown for his prolific racing schedule. He holds the record for the most marathons run under 2:20 (79), he boasts a PR of 2:08:14, he has won more than 30 career marathons and he finished 12 marathons in 2017 alone. He has raced more than 20 times in 2018, including running the Kuki Half Marathon dressed in a panda suit and setting a course record at the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71K ultramarathon in May. He won there by 30 minutes.   (Mon 18) Views: 905
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Jake Robertson sets a 10K PR and wins Crescent City for second time

New Zealand’s Jake Robertson, 28, also known as the “white Kenyan” since he has been training in Kenya for ten years, came to New Orleans for one reason. He wanted to be a repeat winner and set a new 10k PR. He did both and more winning the Crescent City 10K in a new PR of 27:28. Jake blew away the field winning by 50 seconds. Edwin Sol was second in 28:18. Jake’s time ties the New Zealand national record in a 10K road race, with his twin brother. "I think it is even more special than breaking my brother's record, so it's cool," he said. "I'll keep it for one year. I really tried to change my approach today even though it didn't look like it. I did slow down at one point because I wanted to save a little bit more in the last mile. I really want to get that course record, and I keep getting closer every year." 2018 was a huge year for the Crescent City Classic as it marks the 40th anniversary. (Sat 31) Views: 895
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Krista DuChene placed third at the 2018 Boston Marathon and her 16th Marathon will be STWM

Krista DuChene, the 41-year-old mother of three from Strathroy, Ont., finished third at the 2018 Boston Marathon clocking 2:44:20 said afterwards, “Our Canadian winters prepare us for days like this." Krista announced yesterday that she will run the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon (STWM) on October 17. It will be her fifth time running what she has called her favourite race, and her 16th marathon in 16 years of competition. She joins Reid Coolsaet, two-time Olympian and second-fastest marathoner in Canada’s history, who will also run Scotiabank this year.  Krista wrote on Instagram, "“There are lots of reasons: it’s close to home, it’s a Canadian championship, it’s a quality field but it’s just, no matter where I am racing, my thoughts are on this race. It’s the one I want to do even though I could pick any race in the world.”  Krista was part of the 2016 Canada Olympic Team. (Thu 21) Views: 894
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Global Run Challenge Profile: When your legs can't run anymore, run with your heart says Victor Reynoso

RUN THE WORLD CHALLENGE: 41-year-old Victor Reynoso loves to run and to run races.  He logged 157 miles in the first challenge and is anxious to get started again and do more.  He is a single dad with a 8-year-old daughter.  "She is very smart and is my world, motivation and my little teacher," Victor says.  Victor started running in 2000.  He was invited to run with a group at the company and he got hooked right away.  He says, "Running makes me happy."  He is an apprentice electrician, owns his own house and, "I love to spend my time off with my daughter and make new friends and share how I happy I am."  His range of distances starts with the 5k and goes up to 50k.  His PR for 5k is 17:49, Half is 1:24, Full 3:10:57 and 50k is 4:11:08.  On July 28th he finished second overall and first master at the Urban ICT 50K posting his PR.  That is 8:05/mile pace. What is his secret? "When your legs can't run anymore, run with your heart."  Run The World Challenge 2 starts August 29.  (Wed 22) Views: 890
Bob Anderson
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Another look at the 2018 Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi

Yuki Kawauchi’s improbable victory at the Boston Marathon on Monday is the crowning glory in the career of an amateur Japanese runner who has defied every convention in modern athletics and taken the road less travelled to make his mark. The 31-year-old from Saitama, who becomes the first Japanese man to win the Boston Marathon since Toshihiko Seko in 1987, holds down a full-time job working at a local school, and trains without the aid of a coach or sponsorship. And he has competed in more than 80 marathons. After splashing across the finish line through wind and rain ahead of defending champion Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya on Monday, Kawauchi was in no doubt he surprised a few people. “I don’t think there was a single person in Boston who thought I would win this today,” he said with a smile. “In the marathon you never know what could happen.” (editor’s note: we did think that Yuki was the best runner in the field winning other races in extreme weather conditions. This being posted Sunday on MBR.) Many of Kawauchi’s marathon wins have come in awful weather and he said being battered by wind and rain in Boston played right into his hands. “I think the conditions were instrumental in being able to win …” he added. He has won his last five marathons, including four in 2018 alone, and ran 12 last year. Kenya’s reigning Olympic champion Eluid Kipchoge by comparison ran only two. “I love to run races,” said Kawauchi. “Races gives me the opportunity to travel and in a more practical sense, because I train by myself if I didn’t put in a lot of races I wouldn’t be able to put in the same quality.” (Wed 18) Views: 884
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How come you think everything is funny? Just seems funny to me!

"I can always count on Gary Fanelli Sr. to see the humor in my FB posts," says Bob Anderson. "It is refreshing." I asked him about this. He says, "Growing up I had an unusually keen sense of humor... it runs in my family on my Mom's side aka Irish wit . I saw humor in just about everything. It got me in trouble in school. Sometimes my Mom would ask "Gary, how come you think everything is funny?" I'd answer "Well I don't know, it just seems funny to me." He was one of the first to wear a costume in a race. After running 25 flat in a five mile race as Elwood Blues his next stop was the New York City Marathon. He said, "Fred Lebow liked the idea...The reaction at NYC was fabulous... I enjoyed so much running races as ' Elwood Blues." I felt I was truly entertaining people." Gary started racing in 1961 as a 10 year old in the Philadelphia area. Gary kept on running until he reached World Class level. He participated in two US Olympic Marathon Trials and has a marathon best of 2:14:15 set in 1980 in Montreal. (Mon 12) Views: 879
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Boston Marathon Champ Des Linden will Run 2018 TCS New York City Marathon

The New York Road Runners announced 2018 Boston Marathon champion and two-time U.S. Olympian Des Linden will run the 2018 New York City Marathon on Sunday, Nov. 4. In April, Linden, 34, became the first American woman in 33 years to win the Boston Marathon despite battling rainy and cold conditions. Last year's New York City Marathon was won by Shalane Flanagan, who became the first female American champion in the race in 40 years. Flanagan, 36, contemplated retirement after her win but decided to run the 2018 Boston Marathon, where she finished sixth. Flanagan has yet to commit to a fall marathon. Linden is looking to become the first woman to win the Boston Marathon and New York City Marathon in the same year since Norway's Ingrid Kristainsen in 1989. (Wed 27) Views: 870
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What is the point of runing junk miles? Mixing in some walking is a better solution

I can remember a time when I would never walk during a run.  I would never count any walking mileage in my weekly numbers.  That changed a few years ago and I am thinking maybe I should have changed my thinking on this years before.  However, the best way to run well is to get in running mileage.  Walking miles is not going to get you through your 10K, half marathon or certainly not a marathon or beyond.  However, there are times when walking is a better option than running.  I run at least 20 miles per week and currently about 15-25% of that is walking.  Over this past weekend I got in 12 miles.  Today my legs were tired.  For me just to run slowly for a mile (i cover at least one mile everyday) would not have proved anything other than it would not have been fun.  Running needs to be fun.  My legs needed rest.  So today I started off walking, then I decided to run 25 steps, then I walked, then I ran 50 steps, I walked and then ran 100 steps and so on.  Even for as long as I have been running I still from time to time need to do something like this.  I finished the mile just under 14 minutes.  I broke a sweat and I got in my "run."  My legs will be ready to run tomorrow but if not I will do something like what I did today.  Lots of times our body says no (like mine today) but we run anyway and wonder why we get injured.  I have done it many times over the years.  Running junk miles is not going to make you a better runner.  Next time mix in some walking and see what you think.  It works for me.  I have been running since 1962 and  I am still racing.  (photo - 70-year-old Bob Anderson after finishing the Paris 20K May 27, 2018, placing second (1:56:24) in his division on a tough course.)       (Mon 4) Views: 862
Bob Anderson
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Roger Bannister who was the first person to break four minutes for the mile has died

Sir Roger Bannister, the first athlete to run a sub-four minute mile, has died aged 88 in Oxford, his family have said. A statement released on behalf of Sir Roger's family said: "Sir Roger Bannister, died peacefully in Oxford on 3rd March 2018, aged 88, surrounded by his family who were as loved by him, as he was loved by them. "He banked his treasure in the hearts of his friends." British Prime Minister Theresa May led the tributes to the former athlete, who later became one of Europe's leading neurologists and was made a knight. Sir Roger "made the impossible possible" and completed his record-breaking feat in 3 minutes 59.4 seconds at Iffley Road sports ground in Oxford on May 6, 1954 (Sun 4) Views: 859
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Dickson Chumba wins the Tokyo Marathon again...six Japanese Runners under 2:09

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba (the 2014 Tokyo and 2015 Chicago champion) opened a nice gap as they approach 38km and went on to win in 2:05:29. At 40k Japan’s Yuta Shitara takes another swig from his festive bottle and grits his teeth as he hunts down and passes Amos Kipruto. This is a man on a mission! Yuta Shitara did not let up and accomplished the following: 1. Ran a Japanese marathon record of 2:06:11 2. Finished 2nd in the Tokyo Marathon (highest finish ever by a Japanese man at a World Marathon Major) 3. Won 100 million yen for setting the NR. That's $936,000US...Wilson Kipsang dropped out at 15k...Amy Cragg finished third in the women’s race taking five minutes off her PR. (2:21:42). Ethiopian’s Birhane Dibaba won the female race in 2:19:51...This year’s race was the biggest field ever with 35,500 starters. (Sat 24) Views: 848
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New Half Marathon Record for a Mom pushing a Triple Stroller with three kids onboard

Ashlee Eskelsen set a new world record for pushing a triple stroller with her 3 sons on board in Saturday’s Montgomery Half Marathon. “We had some hard hills out there,” says Eskelsen. Her motivation? She ran in last year’s Boston Marathon. “I was 14 weeks pregnant with my little son and it’s always been a dream of mine to do it and once I did I was looking for something else,” she said. The previous Guinness world record was 1:47:59. The combined stroller and kids weighed about 150 pounds. But she still was able to beat the old record with a time of 1:47:29. “Those last few miles were hard. I don’t know if I have ever had miles that hard before. I had to stay strong mentally... no one else was allowed to touch the stroller,” says Eskelsen. (Sat 10) Views: 842
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Gene Dykes is currently the world's top 70 Plus runner - My Best Runs Exclusive Profile Part One

Gene Dykes is the world's best runner in the world currently seventy plus. "One of my 'secret' training methods for marathons is to run a lot of ultras," Gene told My Best Runs in this exclusive profile. "I’ll begin training for Boston in January, and to kick it off I’ll run a 50-miler in January and both a 100-miler and a 200-miler in February. During March I’ll convert that training base into marathon speed." Sounds wild and unconventional but it has been working for 70-year-old Gene Dykes from Philadelphia..."It was thought by many of us that Canada's Ed Whitlock's records were way beyond reach," says lifelong runner and Runner's World and My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson.  "At age 73 Ed became the first 70 plus runner in the world to run the marathon under three hours."  In 2004 73-year-old Ed Whitlock clocked an amazing 2:54:48 at the Scotiabank Tornonto Waterfront Marathon.  No one ever had run a marathon that fast 70 plus. The late Ed Whitlock was in a league of his own until now.  At the same marathon this year on October 21, 70-year-old Gene Dykes clocked 2:55:18.  My Best Runs wanted to find out more about this new super star, a runner who has set PR's at all distances (other than the 5k) over the last year from 1500m to 200 miles. How did Gene discover running?  "It’s probably more accurate to say that I discovered running twice," said Gene. "The first time, when I was about fourteen, it just kind of popped into my head to run three miles to the house of a girl I was interested in.  After about a mile and a half, I had to walk for a bit.  I was really disgusted with myself, and I swore I would never again resort to walking on a run.  I actually kept this promise, until I started doing trail races, of course, where there are lots of good reasons to walk now and then."  After this he ran track in high school for a couple of years. "In my senior year I thought I was pretty good when I dominated the 2-mile run in my county.  That notion was quickly dispelled when I ran track in college and I was totally blown away by the competition.  For the next four decades, I would stay in jogging shape much of the time, but it never occurred to me to race because it had been firmly impressed upon me that I wasn’t a very good runner," Gene remembers.  He rediscovered running in 2004 at the age of 56 after a six year layoff because of a torn hamstring... "A golfing acquaintance told me he had a running group and that I should join him sometime.  A classic case of falling in with a bad crowd.  They encouraged me to run some races with them, and discovering that I wasn’t half bad, my running career was born," Gene told us.  So how important is running to Gene?  "It started out as an activity I looked forward to on weekends, and it slowly took over as my main hobby.  Probably starting around 2011 when I ran my first adventure race and started training for Comrades (56-mile race in South Africa) it became way more than just a hobby.  While it will never quite reach the point of being 'all-consuming.' I suppose you would be forgiven for thinking that, considering that I’ll have done 38 races in 34 weekends this year."  The obvious next question was, tell us about your training.  "For about nine years I just stumbled my way through training.  I did lots of long, slow runs with occasional track workouts.  I gradually improved, and I was having a lot of fun, but I was worried that my best days were behind me when I fell miserably short of a new marathon PR at the 2013 Toronto Marathon.  Swallowing my pride and opening my wallet, I hired a coach.  What a life changing decision that was!  In just five months I went from a half decent runner with modest goals to a runner capable of competing at the highest levels. Training now consists of fewer miles, but harder workouts and fewer rest days," says Gene.  He has set PR's in the last 12 months from 200 miles down to the 1500m.  He clocked 98 hours, 10 minutes 22 seconds for 200 miles, 23:41:22 for 100 miles, 1:26:34 for the half marathon and 5:17 for 1500m.  In 2018 he won ten USATF national championships. His 2:57:43 clocked at this year's Rotterdam Marathon was a world single age record until he bettered it in Toronto.  Gene says, "I’m particularly fond of having won championships at both track 1500 meters and trail 100 mile this year.”  In part two Gene talks about his diet, going after more records, dealing with injuries and a lot more.  Coming tomorrow October 29 on My Best Runs.           (Sun 28) Views: 835
Bob Anderson
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Michael Wardian wins the first ever full marathon held inside a NFL stadium

On Friday evening, 17 runners participated in the first full and half marathon around the home turf of the New England Patriots.  It was also the first marathon run entirely inside a NFL stadium. Participants in the half marathon ran just over 59 laps on the warning track surrounding the turf, while the full marathon participants ran 118 laps. The course is USA Track & Field (USATF) certified and a Boston Marathon qualifier.  Runners enjoyed special appearances by Patriots cheerleaders and the end zone militia, in-stadium music, motivational videos on the HD video boards and other entertainment throughout the evening.  “We are thrilled to be hosting our first marathon inside Gillette Stadium,” said Josh Kraft, president of the New England Patriots Foundation. “This is a really unique opportunity and this event will help us raise critical funds for the New England Patriots Foundation to benefit homeless shelter programs throughout the region.”   The race was directed by Dave McGillivray who also is the Boston Marathon race director.  44-year-old Michael Wardian placed first clocking 2:49:26.  Michael had also won the marathon held inside Fenway Park a few months ago.  Becca Pizzi was the first woman clocking 3:49.  Both are also participating in the second Run The World Global Run Challenge and these miles bring Michael’s total to 384 miles run and logged since August 29.  He is currently in 7th place.  The team is running and logging enough miles to circle the globe (24,901 miles).      (Fri 28) Views: 829
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Something You Might Not Know about Princess Beatrice

Princess Beatrice of York is the elder daughter of Prince Andrew, Duke of York. Prior to the birth of Princess Charlotte in 2015, Beatrice was the highest ranking female in the line of succession to the British throne. She is currently 7th in line to the throne. She is also a runner and in fact in 2010 she ran the London Marathon and became the first British royalty to do so. In December 2017 she ran the 5 mile Olympic Park Run. Earlier in the year the 28-year-old ran the Lady Garden 5K in London's Hyde Park. (Thu 8) Views: 822
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Gallen Rupp and Jordan Hasay have confirmed they will be running the Chicago Marathon

The Chicago Marathon announced on Wednesday that Nike Oregon Project team members Galen Rupp and Jordan Hasay will return to the race on October 7. In 2017, Galen Rupp became the first American man to win the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in more than a decade. That same year, Jordan Hasay became the fastest American woman to run the Chicago Marathon.  In 2018, they'll look to do it all again. Rupp and Hasay will both return for the 41st annual marathon in Chicago, being held Sunday, Oct. 7, race organizers announced Wednesday. Rupp emerged from the 40th anniversary Chicago Marathon last year as the first US winner since Khalid Khannouchi won in 2002. Joined by Hasay, the two became the first American duo to finish in the top three since Jerry Lawson and Kristy Johnston took home a pair of second-place finishes in 1996. “Galen and Jordan are leading an exciting American resurgence in the marathon, and we are thrilled to welcome them back to Chicago this coming fall,” Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski said in a statement. “Galen won in a decisive move last year and just dominated a talented men’s field. He’s a phenomenal athlete who has taken his track speed to the roads with incredible success. "Jordan ran with pure guts and she was rewarded with a podium finish and the fastest American time ever run on Chicago’s course. She has found her distance with the marathon.” (Wed 16) Views: 804
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Ultra marathon mom, stopped to breast feed her baby during the 106-mile Mont-Blanc Trail Race

A British mom has made headlines all over the world after being photographed taking a break to breast feed her baby son during a 43-hour ultra marathon. Sophie Power, who recently competed in the 106-mile, high-elevation Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc trail run through France, Italy, and Switzerland, has been applauded for showing “motherhood endurance” and “the strength of the human body” in the snap, which was taken by photographer Alexis Berg. The 36-year-old mother of two and avid runner took time to nurse her 3-month-old infant, Cormac, during the challenging race. “Cormac usually feeds every three hours, “This isn’t a story about me,” she wrote. “It’s a story about the daily struggle of being a new Mum. A story about the need to nurture our babies the best we can. And the importance to priorities our physical and mental health — to be ourselves as well as be a mother. “I have been overwhelmed by the positivity and supportive messages. They are for all mothers for we are all in this together.” Despite having to stop to feed her son, Power managed to complete the marathon in 43 hours and 33 minutes.  She believes that keeping active and maintaining a healthy lifestyle during pregnancy is really important.  She has logged 273 miles on Strava so far this year, 27 races.  "In a typical race I would get in and out of the aid stations as quickly as possible," she says.  "But here I had to focus on keeping down enough food for me and for Cormac, and resting." (Wed 12) Views: 798
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Bob Anderson's passion for running is contagious and some may even say, a bit fanatical

In this episode of Runners Connect Podcast we speak with Bob Anderson photographer, filmmaker and founder of Runner’s World Magazine, My Best Runs and runner-finisher of a grueling year-long race challenge that consisted of one race a week for 50 weeks. He averaged 6:59/mile pace for the 350.8 miles at age 64 which was 81% age-graded. The next year at age 65 he ran the Boston Marathon finishing in 3:32:17. Bob started running at age 15 and two years later launched Distance Running News, a 1,000 copy magazine that later blossomed into the 2.5 million monthly readers periodical known as Runner’s World. But, as successful as Runner’s World became, it was not without a cost which we learn about in this interview. Bob shares personal ups and downs with running, especially as they relate to his early creation of Runner’s World. We move on to discuss his epic film A Long Run detailing his one year race challenge and featuring many of Bob’s running peers including Paula Radcliffe and Bill Rogers; the creation of a new running event called Double Racing; and the development of an informational and interactive website, mybestruns.com which features the best, most interesting and unique races from around the world. Bob’s passion for running is contagious and, some may even say, a bit fanatical as detailed in the year long 50 race challenge documented in the film A Long Run. His ideas and direct involvement in fitness continue into the current decade where Bob broke into a new race age category, 70 plus. We hope you enjoy our conversation with Bob Anderson. (Fri 6) Views: 794
Stephanie Atwood
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