Get The App

Running News Daily

Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team (Michael, Lisa, Jaime, Belinda, and Waitman). Bob Anderson, was the founder of Runner's World magazine in 1966, UjENA Fit Club 2010, Double Racing in 2010 and My Best Runs (MBR) in 2014.

Index to Daily Posts · Sign Up For Updates

881 Stories, Page: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18
Share

Sarah Couch wins her third consecutive half marathon

America’s Sarah Crouch extended her half-marathon winning streak. She won her third consecutive half marathon Sunday in Spain, winning the Madrid Rock ‘n Roll Half Marathon. Her time of 1 hour, 18 minutes, 50 seconds won the elite female division by 1:45. Crouch won Rock ‘n’ Roll series half marathons in Dallas and New Orleans last month. Crouch’s victory capped a successful weekend for the Crouch-Porter sisters. Georgia Porter won the open division of the London Marathon in her first marathon. Her time of 2:44:50 qualified her for the U.S. Olympic Trials. (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Surprise winner at Vienna Marathon, WR holder Dennis Kimetto failed to finish

Morocco’s Salaheddine Bounasser was the surprise winner of the Vienna (Austria) marathon on Sunday while world record holder Dennis Kimetto’s injury frustration continued as he failed to finish. Bounasser, who won in two hours, nine minutes and 29 seconds, and Kenya’s Ishmael Bushendich broke away from the rest of the pack as they passed the Ernest Happel stadium. They raced side-by-side for around 20 minutes before Bounasser made his move at the 39-kilometre mark and left the Kenyan in his wake. Bushendich finished second in 2:10:03 and his fellow Kenyan Samwel Maswai was third. Kimetto, who ran a world record of 2:02:57 in Berlin 2014, was hoping to rekindle his career in Vienna after a series of injury frustrations. The 34-year-old has not finished a marathon since London in 2016 and suffered another unhappy day as he also dropped out in Vienna. Kimetto was clearly limping as he lost touch with the leading pack around halfway through the race and he dropped out after one hour and 20 minutes. (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Many struggled with the heat at the hottest London Marathon on Record

Tens of thousands of people lined the streets of the capital on Sunday to cheer on friends, family – and complete strangers – who were running in the hottest London Marathon ever. As the mercury hit 74F runners who had trained throughout Britain’s particularly long and cold winter struggled to cope with the heat. Warnings from organisers about the heat failed to deter some entrants from wearing costumes and fancy dress, which ranged from trees and bananas to rhinos. An officer for the St John’s ambulance said more runners needed treatment this year than in past races. As 71-year-old Kathrine Switzer – who in 1967 became the first woman to officially compete in the Boston Marathon – passed the 11-mile mark, three runners required medical attention, including one who collapsed against the barrier. At the nine-mile mark, the newspaper columnist Bryony Gordon and plus-size model Jada Sezer were all smiles as they went past in their underwear. Raising money for Heads Together, the pair vowed to run in their knickers to prove that anyone, no matter their size or shape, could compete in the race. (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Yuki Kawauchi is going to turn Pro and leave his day job

Yuki Kawauchi runs a lot of races and in fact placed 12th at the Gifu Half Marathon on Sunday clocking 1:04:35. Not bad for the runner who just won this year’s Boston Marathon six days ago. He has been racing despite having to train around his full-time work as a civil servant. He is finally going to quit his day job and turn professional. “I want to join races around the globe,” the 31-year-old runner told reporters at Narita Airport upon his return from the United States. “I have less than 10 years left to run to the best of my ability. I don’t want to have any regrets when I die.” Kawauchi said he would leave his job with the Saitama prefectural government in March 2019, the end of the fiscal year. He said he had hinted to his close friends that he wanted to quit work and become a full-time athlete, but the $150,000 (15.9 million yen) in prize money for winning the April 16 Boston Marathon cemented his decision. “I will become a professional runner, and I will use (the prize money) as a support fund for my training,” he said. Top-level runners in Japan are usually funded through corporate sponsorships or are hired by companies to join their corporate sports teams. As a civil servant, Kawauchi has had no sponsors. And although he can receive prize money, he cannot accept fees from race organizers even if he is invited as a guest runner. (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

A “knackered” Mo Farah crossed the London Marathon finish line in a time of 2:06:21

Mo Farah became the fastest marathon runner in British history as he produced a promising and gutsy performance to finish third in his second London Marathon. A “knackered” Farah crossed the line in a time of 2:06:21, comfortably clear of Steve Jones’ 33-year-old British record of 2:07:13. The race was won by Eliud Kipchoge, the Olympic champion and the man considered by many to be the greatest marathon runner ever, in a time of 2:04:17. Mo had vowed to stick with the leaders, no matter the pace, and was true to his word as he remained with the leading pack for much of the race despite Kipchoge leading the contenders in a blistering start. “They were going for world record pace,” Farah said. “So it was do or die. I went with it and hung on as much as I could. It was ridiculous.” The 35 year-old is now fully focused on marathon running after retiring from a track career in which he won 10 world and Olympic titles, and this was an encouraging start to his full-time career over the longer distance. The impressive time came despite Farah’s rhythm being disrupted by two mix-ups involving water bottles as he struggled to identify his drink on two separate occasions.“ (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Vivian Cheruiyot wins the hottest London Marathon on record

Vivian Cheruiyot wins women’s London Marathon after Mary Keitany fades The 34-year-old from Kenya finishes in 2hr 18min 31sec. Mary Keitany and Tirunesh Dibaba fail in world record attempt. Kenya’s Vivian Cheruiyot sprang a major surprise in the women’s London Marathon, surging from way back at halfway to win in a massive personal best of 2hr 18 min and 31 seconds. The race had been billed as a shootout between the Kenyan Mary Keitany and the Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, who had spent the build-up talking up their ambitions of beating Paula Radcliffe’s world record of 2hr 15min 25sec, which has stood imposing and impenetrable for the past 15 years. Yet both went out too quickly in some of the hottest conditions in the race’s 37-year history and paid a steep price. Dibaba dropped out not long after 30km, while the pre-race favourite Keitany shuffled painfully over the line over five minutes back. (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Kipchoge wins London Marathon, Mo Farah finishes third and smashes British Record

Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya has won the 2018 men’s London Marathon clocking 2:04:17. The 33-year-old, winner in 2015 and 2016, made it a hat-trick of victories with Ethiopia’s Shura Kitata Tola second clicking 2:05:00. Great Britain’s Sir Mo Farah broke the British marathon record with a time of two hours, six minutes and 32 seconds to finish third. Farah, who won gold in the 5,000 metres and 10,000m in the past two Olympic Games, admitted his second full marathon had taken its toll in a race where there was a world record pace at the halfway point. He told the BBC: “I am knackered. The guys went for it, they were on for world record pace, so it was do or die. I went with it and hung in as much as I could. “It’s so different to the track. It’s incredible. It’s different pain, different training but I’ve really enjoyed it. I gave it all, 110 per cent as I normally do. “I’ve got a long way to go in the marathon. You get heavy legs. Mentally you’ve just got to be strong, take your drink and just pace yourself.” (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

She will be running the London Marathon without kidneys

Every night, Maddy Warren hooks herself up to a dialysis machine for seven hours in order to stay alive. At just 13, she developed the autoimmune disease focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, which attacked her kidneys. She suffered swollen eyes and nausea, had crippling headaches and was left exhausted all the time – a dramatic change from the previously fit and energetic girl she had been. Despite her condition, Maddy, now 34, is tackling the London Marathon this year and will be the first dialysis patient to ever do so. “I’ve always kept fit through circuit training and general adventures, but I knew this would be a different challenge altogether,” she says. “Without kidneys, my body can’t manage its own fluids or electrolyte balance, and constantly running for five or more hours means I have to be so incredibly careful and really listen to my body. I want to show how I can do anything I set my mind to.” Maddy, from South London, had symptoms that pointed to chronic kidney failure. “At first I was treated with steroids, but they had little to no effect. "Then I had chemotherapy and immunosuppressant drugs to stop my immune system attacking my kidneys, but nothing worked,” she says. Now a business consultant, Maddy also enjoys competitive skydiving, scaling mountains and horse riding, and has raised thousands for Kidney Care UK and Kidney Research UK. (Sat 21) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

It is going to be warm for marathoing at London Marathon

The current forecast for the London Marathon on Sunday is not as bad as it was earlier in the week. Right now (Saurday at 7pm in London) it is 68 degrees and the weather forecast is saying it will be 65 degrees at the start and go up to 70 degrees). Warm for marathoning but runners can handle this. Here is some solid warm weather advice: 1. Adapt your goal according to the conditions on Sunday. 2. Listen to your body. If your feel thirsty, drink water. if you feel overly tired slow down. 3. Wear the appropiate clothing. this should ideally be lightweight clothing designed for use in warmer conditions. 4. Drink according to your thirst. Be careful not to overdrink, drinking too much water can be dangerous. 5. Drink, Douse, Drain, Drop. when you take water. Drink if you feel thirsty. Douse your head and the back of your neck with the remaining water. 6. Sunscreen. You may be out in the sun for several hours so remeber to apply a good quality sunscreen. (Sat 21) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

My brother presence electrified Hayward Field in a way that had never been done before, we can't tear down history

My name is Linda Prefontaine. Steve Prefontaine is my brother. I understand there is a City Council meeting on the 23rd and I’m hoping my letter can be read at that time in support of saving the history of Hayward Field. I moved to Eugene in 1973 to continue my education at the University of Oregon. When I moved to Eugene it was a nice, small college town. The atmosphere was laid back and the pace was pleasant. I thought I would live there until I died. Over the years the town has changed in many ways. Some of the changes were necessary because of the economy’s dependence on wood products that the town needed to move away from. Real growth and expansion of the business sector is very evident today. Another fact about the early days of Eugene is that my brother made Hayward Field come to life. His presence electrified Hayward Field in a way that had never been done before. People from all over the world came to Eugene to watch him compete. Today people from all over the world still come to Eugene to walk on the historic track at Hayward Field. They do because Steve Prefontaine ran on that track. They come because there is a history there that is magical and cannot be replaced or duplicated. When I attend track meets at HF I can still feel his presence. If Hayward Field is demolished along with the east grandstands I don’t think as many people will be drawn to come to Eugene and Hayward Field. Why would they? The history of Hayward Field will be taken away for ever. I probably won’t be attending as many meets there. It won’t be the same. I moved away from Eugene last fall, back to Coos Bay. I no longer like what Eugene has become and do not want to live in the atmosphere and the mindset of the city that exists today and what I fear it will become in the future. (Sat 21) ⚡AMP
by Linda Prefontaine
Share
Share

Mike Fremont will be attempting to set an American road mile record, he is 96

96-year-old Cincinnati native Mike Fremont will be running the Grand Blue Mile! April 24 in Des Moines, Iowa. He's attempting to set an American record in the road mile. He is the current single-age world marathon record holder in the 88-and 90-year-old age categories and the single-age world half marathon record holder in the 90 and 91 age categories. “I suggest you have a hearse ready for me at the finish line,” Fremont joked and then said. “I know I’m lucky to still be running, and I don’t want to take a single day for granted.” (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Parents should do everything possible to Inspire their kids to take up running or other form of exercise

A WORD FROM HAL HIGDON: Should children run road races, given the danger of injuries later in life? Have no fear. The positive aspects of running so outweigh the negative risks that running parents should do everything possible to inspire their children to take up running and other forms of exercise. 86-year-old Hal Higdon says, "Among my most enjoyable activities is helping runners train. I estimate that I have assisted nearly a million runners reach the finish line of races from 5K to the marathon." (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
by Hal Higdon
Share
Share

I walked with the camels, sat on top of sand dunes, sang songs, mediated and helped Runners through some tough moments at MDS

Lisa Smith-Batchen wanted to see "The view and experience from the back and middle pack" for the long 55 mile stage of the Marathon des Sables in Morocco recently completed. She posted her experience on Facebook today. “This ones for you mom. Thank you for always being such a powerful bright light in my life. I love you and miss you... I went to MDS to have a very different experience. It was everything I asked for and more. I carried a heavy pack (max weight) used poles and walked most every step. I wanted to see "The view and experience from the back and middle pack" Humbling to say the least. I walked with the camels, sat on top of sand dunes and mountains, sang songs, prayed,meditated and helped a few runners through some tough moments. I cried a great deal missing my mother but she helped carry me through. I watched the full moon rise and set as I did the sun rise and sunset. I lied down under the miraculous stars and gave thanks over and over for the life I have been given. The best part of all, the people and the lifetime friends. My tent mates and MDS friends are forever in my heart. I am left full of gratitude that I got to have this journey and have come to realize that first place or last place..it's all the same. It's the journey of self discovery.'' (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
by Lisa Smith-Batchen
Share
Share

Will Ethiopia's Geremew powerful finishing sprint help him win Yangzhou for third time?

Mosinet Geremew set a Chinese all-comers’ record of 59:52 in Yangzhou in 2015, five months after he set a PR 59:11 in New Delhi. Although his times in 2016 and 2017 were outside 60 minutes, the Ethiopian’s powerful finishing sprint has carried him to two narrow victories in Yangzhou over the past two years. Last year, he emerged from a four-man contest and took a thrilling win by only 15 hundredths of a second. The in-form Geremew has enjoyed a successful start to 2018. He trimmed more than two minutes off his marathon personal best in January to win the Dubai Marathon with a world-leading 2:04:00 to break the course record. On Sunday Geremew will face four other runners with sub-60-minute PBs so he will have to be at his best to retain his title. Bahrain’s Abraham Cheroben, who finished third in Yangzhou last year, could be Geremew’s biggest threat. The 25-year-old set an Asian record and world-leading mark of 58:40 from his victory in Copenhagen last September, making him the third fastest man in history over the distance. (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Victory for Michelle Jensen was simply the outcome of joy expressed

Michelle Jensen was the first woman to cross the finish line in the 2008 Race to Robie Creek. Jensen previously won the race in 1995 and 1999. Running was always a source of joy for Michelle Jensen. Each swift, steady step along the trail provided motivation for the next. But Jensen did not run with the end goal of victory in mind. Victory was simply the outcome of joy expressed. While she excelled in her own right as a nine-time All-American at Western State Colorado University in track, cross country and Nordic skiing, and later qualified for the Olympic Trials in the marathon, Jensen was equally skilled at bringing out the best in others. Race organizers plan to honor Jensen at the 41st annual Race to Robie Creek on Saturday. The 13.1-mile half-marathon starts at noon at Fort Boise and finishes at Robie Creek campground. Jensen, a three-time Robie champion, passed away peacefully on Nov. 19, 2017, at her Boise home from lung cancer. She was 47. “She had a subtle quietness, but also a real joy for the sport that she shared with everybody,” “She was an amazing runner, just a whole level above,” said Sherrie Haggett, a close friend and running partner. “Literally the only way I could run with Michelle, and granted I had a full-ride scholarship at Boise State, was to basically say, ‘Tell me your life story,’ and keep her talking so I could hang on tight. I was just so thrilled to be able to run with somebody who was making me a better runner.” (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

An accidental marathon runner and grandmother is running London in memory of a friend

Christine Card will pound the streets of the capital this weekend as she takes part in the Virgin Money London Marathon. The energetic grandmother is hoping to raise money for the Motor Neurone Disease Association in memory of popular head teacher Simon Adams who died in October 2011 after battling MND. Christine is looking forward to the challenge this weekend. Christine said, “Simon was truly inspirational in the way he handled the disease with so much dignity and humor. I want to continue his legacy by running for MND in the hope of continuing his wish that one day there will be a cure.” Christine describes herself as an accidental marathon runner after putting her name in the ballot for London, but not really expecting a place. “I was shocked when I got a letter saying I had a ballot place in the marathon,” she said. “But I realised it was a great opportunity to run in memory of Simon.” (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Boston Marathon's Champion Yuki Kawauchi is already Racing again on Sunday

The three most recent winners of the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon will clash on Sunday. Earlier this week Kawauchi became the first Japanese runner to win the Boston Marathon in 31 years. In a gripping race held in harsh conditions, Kawauchi put in numerous surges with his final effort proving decisive. He crossed the finish line in 2:15:58 to beat world champion Geoffrey Kirui by more than two minutes. It was Kawauchi’s fifth consecutive marathon victory – all of which have been achieved in a four-month time span – but his record at the half marathon isn’t quite as strong. He has contested the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon on five previous occasions but is yet to finish inside the top 10. But his performance on Monday once again showed that distance-running fans should always expect the unexpected from Kawauchi. The 31-year-old currently works 40 hours a week as a civil servant, but he recently announced that he will leave his job and turn professional next year. “I need to change my environment (to move up to another level),” he said. “I have not improved my personal best for five years. I want to see my true potential as a runner. I am determined to compete against the best in the world. (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Wilson Kipsang speaks up why many Kenyan Runners are moving to other countries

A top Kenyan athlete has opened up on why many of his colleagues have been opting to change nationality and represent other countries in global sporting events. According to Wilson Kipsang, the former world record holder in the marathon, Kenyan athletes are moving to other countries due to lack of motivation by the government. "It’s so unfortunate that the government of Kenya does not motivate their athletes and yet they expect results," said Kipsang in Iten, Kenya on Tuesday. He further said some of the allowances allocated to athletes who represent the nation on international events are always not sufficient. “If Kenya wants results then they should make athletes happy by motivating them," noted Kipsang. The bronze medallist in the marathon at the 2012 Summer Olympics further regretted government's delay in paying athletes are being underpaid. “Winning a Gold medal for Kenya could cost a million shillings ($10,000US) only which is so little compared to other countries where a Gold medal can cost up to Sh50 million ($500,000US)," said Kipsang. He called for concerted efforts between the government and other sports stakeholders so as more investment is put in developing and motivating athletes and other sportsmen and women. (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Derek Clayton who held the World Marathon Record for 14 years, says shoes and pacemakers is why today's times are so fast

DID YOU KNOW: On June 12, 1965 Japan's Morio Shigematsu broke Abebe Bikila's world marathon record clocking 2:12:00 at the Polytechnic Marathon near London. Then on December 3, 1967 Australian's Derek Clayton shattered that record clocking 2:09:36 at the Fukuoka Marathon. Derek was training over 250 miles a week and was clearly the world's best marathoner at that time. Then on May 30, 1969 he ran a marathon in Antwerp, Belgium mostly on cobble stones. He clocked 2:08:33 beating his own time by over a minute. Sceptics throughout the following decades would speculate that the course must have been short. Yet only 11 days before his historic run in Belgium, Derek ran at high altitude and won a marathon in Turkey May 19th clocking 2:17:26. “I had to run faster than I'd planned. If I hadn't run in Turkey I would have run 2:07 in Antwerp," Clayton said. "Maybe the course was short but Derek had nothing to do with that," says Bob Anderson, MBR & RW founder and a good friend of Derek. "Any way, worse case scenario is that Derek held the world record he set in Fukuoka until Ron Hill ran faster (2:09:28) on July 23, 1970. That is two and half years. Best case scenario, Derek held the world record for 14 years, until Robert De Castella ran 2:08:18 December 6, 1981 at Fukuoka. Derek was one of the world best marathoners of all times, the first under 2:10. Yet even today when Derek's name comes up there is talk about the possible "short" course. I think it is about time we give him the credit that is due." Yes, times today have gotten a lot better but there are two things that are clearly different today. "...the shoes they are wearing...and something I am dead set against, pacemakers," says Derek. (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
Share
Share

Mary Keitany wants to follow in the footsteps of the legend Paula Radcliffe

Kenya's Mary Keitany, three-time London marathon winner and the current women's world record-holder (women only), will make an attempt to break Paula Radcliffe’s world record at the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon on Sunday April 22. Last year, Keitany beat Radcliffe's world best of 2:17:42 by 41 seconds, which inspired her to take the bar higher and go for the ultimate prize of running under 2:15:25. "At last year's London Marathon, I was feeling good but it was hard to run nearly half the race on my own. By having male pacemakers, I will be able to have the support throughout the race," Keitany, 36, said on Thursday. During her win last year, Keitany’s halfway split in 2017 was 66:54 – the fastest ever in a marathon – but she was unable to sustain that pace when running solo in the latter stages of the race. This time the 36-year-old hopes a “systematic” pace will help her, but she is under no illusions about the scale of the task ahead. “It is not easy – 2:15 is something else,” she said. “We will try to follow in the footsteps of the legend Paula. We are ready to try our best to see if we will be able to go that far. The race has been billed has a head-to-head between Keitany and Ethiopian great , who placed runner-up behind her Kenyan rival in London last year with a time of 2:17:56. While Keitany is keen to find out what she might be capable of with the support of male pacemakers, Dibaba said her preparations and the competition she will face could prove more significant. “I know that the organisers have put on good pacemakers but what is more important is my own condition,” she said, speaking through an interpreter. “If I have prepared well then I will race well,” she added, explaining that she feels in even better shape this year than she did in 2017. (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

If Mo Farah tries to stick with the lead group at the London Marathon, it could blow him apart

Mo Farah has a marathon-sized gap on his record. In his only attempt, in London four years ago, he finished eighth in two hours eight minutes 21 seconds - far from a disastrous debut, but nowhere close to the debuts of those two Ethiopian greats, Haile Gebrselassie and Kenenisa Bekele. Now, track career over, at the age of 35, Mo is back in London. With the marathon only days away, lets take a closer look. Bekele ran 2:05:04 on his own marathon debut in Paris in 2014. Gebrselassie led London on his 2002 debut until the 25th mile, and it took a world record from Khalid Khannouchi to beat him. Eliud Kipchoge, faster now than both of them, ran 2:05:30 in his own marathon bow, in Hamburg in 2013. There is a significant gap back to Farah, who also has a 10,000m best slower than both the Ethiopians. But there is much he learned on that warm April day in 2014, and much he is trying to improve. "I don't think Mo should be judged a failure if he doesn't win. I do think he should be judged a failure if he doesn't significantly improve his personal best. And I mean significantly," says Dave Bedford. Up against the brilliant Kipchoge, against Bekele, who has run 2:03, as well as 2017 London winner Daniel Wanjiru, Farah is competing in one of the most stacked fields in marathon history. In 2014 he could not stick with the lead group. If he tries to this year, at a possible world record pace, it could blow him apart. "It's a loaded race, so I need to make sure I don't make any mistakes, to save as much energy as I can, but to mix it with the other guys too, not to be afraid of them," he says. "He should keep them in sight," is Bedford's advice. "He shouldn't get too agitated with them at the start. If it were me, I'd have them within eyesight - maybe 60 or 70 metres at the most, concentrate on how he is feeling, get to halfway and then go for it." (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
by Tom Fordyce BBC Sports
Share
Share

Including stretching and strength training in your workout can help prevent injuries

Often runners spend so much time running that they neglect stretching and strength training. Many runners who do not include strength training into their weekly routine are at a higher risk of injury. The most common injuries for runners are caused by over-use of certain muscles. Overuse injuries are generally caused by strength imbalances, other muscles surrounding that muscle have to work harder to compensate for the weakness. These surrounding muscles can become overworked and susceptible to strains and tears. Studies show that strengthening the hips and core can help prevent runner’s knee, whilst strengthening the calves and feet can prevent runner’s foot. However, strength is not only important for injury prevention, it can also improve your muscle power and performance. In addition, strength training improves posture and running technique, allowing your body to move more efficiently with the added bonus of increasing your lean body mass and reducing body fat. (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

This 87-year-old trains so much that his family have threatened to set fire to his shoes!

John Starbrook, is the oldest runner entered for this year's London Marathon. The 87-year-old trains so much that his family have threatened to set fire to his shoes. And tomorrow the super-grandad will be lining up for his 51st marathon. John, who only took up running at the age of 43, credits his sporty lifestyle with keeping him young, explaining: “I am always mixing with people in their 50s and 60s. "I’ve been down to the old age people’s place but it depressed me so much I came away. I didn’t have much in common with them." John’s determination may have its roots in his tough childhood . Born in 1930s London, his dad died when he was just five months old, and his mum struggled to cope with a new baby and her older children so John ended up in Nazareth House orphanage. During the war he was evacuated to Bristol and then Swansea before returning to Croydon, aged 15. “I joined a swimming club then and that was the start of it,” he explains. “My first job was on a milk round. After the war all the old fellas used to do the milk and they used to take young lads with them to do the walking in and out because the old boys were too old to do it. “We went out on the horse and cart and then I had to do all the running in and out of each house with the bottles. That kept me fit as well.” This year will be John’s 30th London marathon – amazing considering he nearly gave up after his first one in 1983. “I heard the marathon advertised on the radio so I thought I’d like to have a go at that, so I started running. “I did my first one and thought I am never, ever going to do that again it was so hard. But then I entered the next year and I’ve done it almost every year since. (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Rachel was told she would never walk again nine years ago, now is running the London Marathon

Rachel Farrant was told she might never walk again after a major stroke at the age of 18, now she is going to run the London Marathon. Rachel collapsed nine years ago, just two weeks after starting university, and suffered a stroke after treatment for a blood clot on her lungs. The runner woke up unable to see, walk or feed herself and had severe memory loss - but has since made a full recovery. When Rachel tightens her shoes and races through her local park, the sense of freedom lifts her. “I really like nature - the trees, the horses,” she says. “I’m running through the woods and it’s all enclosed, and then suddenly I come out into this wide open space and I feel like I’m flying. It’s the best.” The 27-year-old is a big believer in the mental health benefits of running. “It’s fantastic because you can just do it anytime. You can go out and clear your mind,” she says. (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Ben Smith sold his possessions and set off to run 401 marathons in 401 days

Running a single marathon is a remarkable achievement. However, one man took his love of running to new heights. The story of Ben Smith, who decided to run 401 marathons in 401 days is remarkable. People thought he was mad, until they heard his story, then they began to understand. Having endured years of bullying as a child, Ben tried to take his own life. In adulthood, Ben struggled to feel content with the life that was mapped out for him. But having found his passion in running, Ben sold his possessions, escaped his old life and set off on what seemed like an impossible mission – The 401 Challenge. During his 10,506.2-mile odyssey criss-crossing the UK, Ben ran in 309 different locations, accompanied by more than 13,500 people. He visited 101 schools, burned an estimated 2.4 million calories, wrecked his back and braved every extreme of the British weather, while raising £330,000 ($467,000US) for charity, touching the lives of millions. So how does an individual go from enjoying running as a therapeutic activity to taking on the challenge of a lifetime and inspiring the world in the process? What may sound like a huge leap was actually a gradual transition for Ben Smith, the 36-year-old from Portishead. (Thu 19) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

This year’s London Marathon could be the hottest ever but you never know with weather forecasts

London Marathon organisers say they will send advice to runners this week, with forecasts suggesting Sunday's race could be the hottest on record. Expected temperatures of up to 24C (75F) could surpass the 22.2C recorded in both 1996 and 2007. Organisers told the BBC they have made contingency plans, but that it is too soon for an accurate prediction. "We monitor the weather forecast for race day very closely," said Hugh Brasher, the marathon's event director. "We have a number of contingency plans in place in case of hot weather and we will be sending advice to runners and spectators later in the week that will be proportionate to race day." In 2007, organisers installed four run-through showers along the route and added an extra 2,600 bottles of water to the normal stock of 25,000 bottles at each station to help runners deal with the high temperatures. "This year's London Marathon will end up being one of the warmest on record, potentially even the warmest," said BBC weather presenter Simon King. "Temperatures on Sunday are expected to reach 22-24°C with some strong April sunshine. "The heat will no doubt cause issues for the runners, but I can offer the smallest of relief in that there is a small chance of a thunderstorm through the morning which will temporarily drop the temperature." Marathon schedule: Sunday April 22 Start times (BST): Elite Women (09:15), Elite Men & Mass start (10:00) (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Former Portland Marathon Race Director agreed to pay $865,000 in penalties

Under a settlement with the Oregon Department of Justice, the former race director of the Portland Marathon agreed to pay $865,000 in penalties. The DOJ found that Lester Smith had taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in loans from the Marathon for himself or his companies. The practice is illegal and occurred at a time when the Portland Marathon nonprofit lacked adequate oversight of a board, as required of nonprofits. In all, $50,000 of the settlement covers costs for the state investigation. The rest will go back to the Portland Marathon, Inc. Smith disputed the findings, according to a copy of the settlement documents, provided by DOJ. But in addition to the monetary settlement, Smith has agreed not to lead or serve on the boards of any nonprofits, operate any foot races in the future, and, as a lawyer, will not seek to be reinstated to the state bar. He also agreed to dissolve his company, his for-profit company Next Events, LLC. The investigation into the nonprofit began around the time the race was facing an uncertain future in Portland. Under Smith's leadership, the permit for the race last year was initially rejected by the city. The race proceeded last year, and the Portland Marathon nonprofit is now under new leadership. (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

85-year-old Katherine Beiers was the oldest runner to battle the rain and wind Monday in Boston

All kinds of history was made Monday during the 122nd Boston Marathon. Among the record-breakers and head-turners was 85-year-old Katherine Beiers, who ran the 26.2-mile course in 7 hours and 50 minutes, and in the process, became the oldest woman to ever complete the race. Beiers battled through weather conditions so harsh that 25 elite runners dropped out, and more than 2,500 runners were treated by medical staff, most with symptoms of hypothermia. In fact, when the first gun went off at 8:40 a.m., it was 37 degrees, making it the coldest Boston Marathon start of all-time. It’s no wonder the winning men’s and women’s times were the slowest they’ve been in more than three decades. Still, Beiers, who now has 14 Boston Marathon finishes to her name, pressed on. Think she’s used to running in the cold? No way. She lives in Santa Cruz, California, and ran 45 warm miles per week to get ready for Bean Town. Preparing for the inclement race day weather certainly wasn’t feasible. (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Another look at the 2018 Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi

Yuki Kawauchi’s improbable victory at the Boston Marathon on Monday is the crowning glory in the career of an amateur Japanese runner who has defied every convention in modern athletics and taken the road less travelled to make his mark. The 31-year-old from Saitama, who becomes the first Japanese man to win the Boston Marathon since Toshihiko Seko in 1987, holds down a full-time job working at a local school, and trains without the aid of a coach or sponsorship. And he has competed in more than 80 marathons. After splashing across the finish line through wind and rain ahead of defending champion Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya on Monday, Kawauchi was in no doubt he surprised a few people. “I don’t think there was a single person in Boston who thought I would win this today,” he said with a smile. “In the marathon you never know what could happen.” (editor’s note: we did think that Yuki was the best runner in the field winning other races in extreme weather conditions. This being posted Sunday on MBR.) Many of Kawauchi’s marathon wins have come in awful weather and he said being battered by wind and rain in Boston played right into his hands. “I think the conditions were instrumental in being able to win …” he added. He has won his last five marathons, including four in 2018 alone, and ran 12 last year. Kenya’s reigning Olympic champion Eluid Kipchoge by comparison ran only two. “I love to run races,” said Kawauchi. “Races gives me the opportunity to travel and in a more practical sense, because I train by myself if I didn’t put in a lot of races I wouldn’t be able to put in the same quality.” (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Southampton Marathon could bring £1million into the city

Southampton , UK could be set for a £1million ($1.42US) boost when runners hit the streets this weekend to compete in the ABP Marathon. More than 10,000 people have signed up to take part in the city’s biggest annual running event, on Sunday. And with an estimated 30,000 spectators coming to cheer them on, organisers predict as much as £1 million could be spent in the city over the weekend. Thousands of runners will be taking part to raise money for worthy causes and race organisers are hoping this could be the year they reach a milestone £1m raised for charity. The event also falls on the same day as Saints’ FA Cup semi final match against Chelsea at Wembley, and organisers are confident that the city will be as bustling as ever. (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Ethiopian Gebretsadik and Kenyan Kipketer are favorites at the EDP Rock 'n' Roll Madrid Marathon

The Rock 'n' Roll Madrid Marathon is one of the most important races in Spain and is part of the Rock 'n' Roll series takes place this Sunday April 22. The course takes runners through the city of Madrid. In the elite field, Ethiopian's Gebretsadik Abraha and the Kenyan's Valentine Kipketer are the favorites in the men's and women's categories. Abraha and Kipketer have the best times, with 2:06:23, and 2:23:02. Over 40,000 participants have signed up for either the full marathon, half or 10K. (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Maybe the most beautiful and most challenging Marathon in the world, Big Sur

Sunday April 29 is the Big Sur Marathon on the Monterey Bay in Northern California. The course is 26.2 miles of the most beautiful coastline in the world - and, for runners, the most challenging. The athletes who participate in the Big Sur International Marathon may draw inspiration from the spectacular views, but it takes major discipline to conquer the hills of Highway One on the way to the finish line. Named "Best Marathon in North America" by The Ultimate Guide to Marathons, the Big Sur International Marathon continues to sell out earlier and earlier each year and, as a major destination marathon, draws entrants from all over the world. On their way from Big Sur to Carmel's Rio Road, runners wind through majestic redwoods and past Pacific Ocean views. If you have not entered put it on your bucket list for next year. It does sell out very quickly however. Check their website for details. (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Desiree Linden was wet, was cold and wanted to stop but she didn’t as marathoners do and won Boston and $150,000

The weather Monday in Boston was more than bad, it was terrible. Shalane Flanagan posted, “Those were the most brutal conditions I’ve ever run in.” One elite woman just kept putting one foot in front of the other faster than anyone else until the end. Desiree Linden even at one point waited for Shalane at a bathroom stop. This brief break, might have helped Desiree get life back in her legs as well. Desiree caught back up to the lead pack but Shalane couldn’t hang. In the end Desiree won by nearly four minutes and became the the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since Lisa Rainsberger in 1985. Afterwards she said there were many moments she wanted to drop out but she kept on going. Was it worth it? For her efforts she was given a check for $150,000. She could have easily not finished. It is interesting to note that according to the race director 95.5% of those who started finished. Very impressive but then again marathoners are a different breed. (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
Share
Share

By far this was the most emotional race (Boston) I have ever run says 4th place finisher Tyler Pennel

Tyler Pennel place 4th in the Boston Marathon, second American. He posted this a few hours ago on Facebook. "We are different, in essence, from other men. If you want to win something, run 100 meters. If you want to experience something, run a marathon.” - Emil Zatopek. While I have always thought this quote to be true, yesterday’s Boston Marathon confirmed it. Only runners would have been out in what most people would describe as horrid conditions, let alone run 26.2 miles in it. We are a different breed. There is a level of persistence and stubbornness that distance runners of all ability possess, and yesterday’s race was all about grit and persistence. By far this was the most emotional race I have ever run. I went through times where I wanted to just stop; I was cold, wet, and miserable, only for a mile or two to pass and I would feel great. Crossing the line, the only thing I was happy about was that I had run the Boston Marathon and I was done. I could finally get some dry clothes on and warm up. Only after learning that Nicole placed 5th did I find out I was 4th. It was just the cap to an emotional two and a half hours. I would not have been on the starting line with out the support of ZAP Fitness. Five and a half years ago, they offered me a spot on the team, and I would not have made it to this level of running without them. Thank you! (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
by Tyler Pennel
Share
Share

This ultra-marathoner is always decked out in brightly colored, punk-inspired outfits flashing a smile

Vegan ultramarathoner Catra Corbett placed first in the female division of this past week’s 72-hour Beyond Limits Ultra race. The plant-based athlete covered 192 miles, breaking a personal record. The ultramarathon took place over the course of three days at Pathfinder Ranch, a wildlife preserve situated in California’s San Jacinto mountains, just south of Palm Springs. Participating runners repeatedly traversed a two-mile trail loop over 72 hours. According to the website, the Beyond Limits Ultra is considered “one of the most unique ultra events in the southwest.” “This year my plan was to win 1st Female in the 72-hour race and beat my previous 72-hour record which was 174 miles,” the vegan runner told Great Vegan Athletes, declaring that “If you’re not having fun you’re doing it all wrong!” Having fun is clearly an essential part of this endurance challenge, at least for Corbett. In every photo, she can be seen decked out in brightly colored, punk-inspired outfits, flashing a smile. (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Mo Farah knows that he must improve dramatically to be in the medal mix in Tokyo

Farah, 35, retired from the track last year in order to switch his focus to road running. He is ranked 27th in the world over the marathon distance but is targeting a top-three finish in London this weekend. "It's going to be different, but every race I go into I aim to fight for a podium place," he said. He is moving to marathon and has not ruled out a shot at Tokyo 2020. Many distance runners have transitioned to marathon, few have had a day at the world championships more-or-less dedicated to their final track appearance. Farah’s long-term goal is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in the marathon. He knows, however that he must improve dramatically to be in the medal mix in Tokyo. (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Walking up and down the stairs does not burn calories like running does

Your body's biggest muscles are all in your legs, and running benefits all of them: your inner and outer thighs, your gluteus maximus, get ready to turn some heads with your backside!, quads, hamstrings, and calves. It's like a dozen leg workouts in one. And besides Climbing stairs is a healthier option for you as compared to elevators and escalators because it keeps your body moving. But walking up and down the stairs does not burn calories; running does. Running up and down stairs increasing your heart rate and pumps more blood to all parts of your body. This induces high-calorie burn as compared to the number of calories you burn when you do the same on a flat surface. (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Firemen running the London Marathon to raise funds for the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire

Among the many thousands of runners taking part in the Virgin London Marathon this month will be a group a firefighters giving it their all for a very special cause. A group of 18 firefighters who attended the Grenfell Tower blaze are training to run the London Marathon in a bid to raise vital funds for groups supporting local people affected by the fire. Nine of the firefighters are from the Red Watch at North Kensington Fire Station and the other nine are from the Red Watch at Paddington Fire Station. The firefighters were among the first to arrive on the scene of the Grenfell Tower fire on June 14 2017. Seventy one people are now known to have died. “We’re doing circuits of Hyde Park as a group once a week and the rest of the time we’re having to do our training individually. “We’ve managed to run a few 13-milers already as a group. We are trying to ensure we’ve got the stamina we’re going to need.” Tom is one of only two runners with marathon experience. “I ran London in 2016 and did it in a little over four hours. I was aiming for 3:30 but I was carrying an injury. This time round we’re running as group. We’ve got runners of varying ability and we’re really focused on the fundraising so anything around five hours would be great.” (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Desiree Linden this year was all alone as she crossed the finish line in Boston unlike in 2011

Desiree Linden became the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since Lisa Rainsberger in 1985, ending the drought on a day when the runners faced a deluge of rain. Linden came two seconds from winning Boston in 2011. Before the race, Linden told Boston.com that her goal was to “compete up front and hopefully have that battle on Boylston again. And have a different outcome this time, for sure.” The first battle she was referring to came in 2011, when she matched Caroline Kilel stride for stride down the stretch but fell two seconds short of a laurel wreath. Linden, racing in her marathon debut, crossed the line in a personal best of 2:22:38. People expected her to feel ecstatic about the result, but she had spent four months convincing herself every day that she was going to win the race. “So when I crossed the finish line second, it was the first time in four months that I wasn’t the winner of the Boston Marathon and I was pretty pissed,” Linden said. There was no one to battle on Boylston this time around as she pulled away from the pack and raced alone to the finish line. (Tue 17) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

So who is Sarah Sellers who place second at this year’s Boston Marathon?

Many of those who watched the Boston Marathon — even the ones who follow the sport of running — had the same question Monday: Who in the world is Sarah Sellers? Sellers crossed the finish line in second place at the prestigious 26.2-mile race, in rain-soaked conditions, as a virtual unknown. Few online road-race results existed for Sellers, and she was not listed among the elite field for Boston. In the wet and windy conditions, Sellers wore a nondescript outfit, with no visible sponsors, and crossed the finish line by simply clicking the timer on her watch. Her time of 2 hours 44 minutes 4 seconds put her second among the seven American women who placed in the top 10. Desiree Linden was the first American woman to win the race since 1985, a historic finish in a race full of surprises. But Sellers’s finish may have been the most improbable. “I mean, I still can’t believe I finished second,” Sellers, 26, said in a phone interview Monday afternoon. “I’m going to wake up and this will be a dream.” Sellers never planned to podium at Boston. Not when she was a standout runner at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, where she grew up. Not even when she qualified for Boston after winning the Huntsville Marathon last September in Utah in 2:44:27. She only signed up for Boston because her younger brother, 24-year-old Ryan Callister, was running it. (Ryan finished in 2:48:20.) Plus she’s also a nurse anesthetist who works full-time in Tucson. She doesn’t have an agent, or any sponsors, and has to fit in her workouts at either 4 a.m. before work or 7 p.m. after her 10-hour shifts at Banner Health Center. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

I am very happy it is over and very proud that I finished says Rosaura at this year’s Boston Marathon

I did finish and with a decent time of 3:44:34 I think. Today was a very tough day for everybody. No matter what I did to stay dry nothing worked as I expected except for the shower cap on my hat. I was wet and cold way before getting in the bus, then at the village mud all over, so I have to add I had muddy shoes and I couldn't feel my toes. It was a brutal day, the rain never stopped and the wind was very strong, I never felt warm so I struggled a lot. I had to stop at mile 24 to walk for about 3 min because my lower back was getting stiff and painful. To recover our bags was a nightmare because they were running short of volunteers, I don't blame them for not sticking with their job, they were looking worst than we were; then when I got my bag it was almost impossible to open it since my hands were super cold, so little by little I was able to open it with my teeth (full of germs probably but I didn't care); from there I started a painful walk to meet my big supporter, my husband, who was also suffering from being cold. Overall an interesting day and a big new experience, One of the worst conditions I have run a marathon. Well done everybody. We never know what kind of surprise Boston's weather has for us. Until the next one! (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
by Rosaura Briceno-Tennant
Share
Share

Unlike most professional runners, this year’s Boston Marathon champion has a full time job in Japan

Boston Marathon 2018 champion, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi has run many races in challenging weather conditions both hot and cold. He holds the world record for sub-2:20 marathons with 79 now. Unlike many professional runners he has a full time job. He works in the administration office of a high school. “This year the high school is celebrating its 100th anniversary, so I’ve been quite busy writing the commemorative magazine for that,’’ he said. And of all the marathons he has run and of all the places this sport has taken him, it was here, these spectators and avid Boston fans, that left an impression on him. “It’s the best crowd support I’ve had anywhere in the world,’’ he said. “Thank you, Boston.’’ (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Boston Marathon, Yuki Kawauchi
Share
Share

Kenya´s Defending champion Nancy Kiprop heads strong women’s field for Vienna Marathon

In one of the strongest women’s fields ever assembled for Austria’s number one road running event four athletes feature personal bests of sub 2:25. Kiprop is one of them with a PB of 2:24:20 but Helen Tola of Ethiopia has been well over a minute faster with a record of 2:22:51. In a thrilling battle for victory Nancy Kiprop was just five seconds ahead in the Vienna City Marathon 2017, clocking her personal best. It was the closest women’s finish in the history of the event. And it could well end similar on 22nd April. Despite the wind she ran the second fastest time ever recorded in the race. With 2:24:20 the Kenyan missed the course record by just 33 seconds. Italy’s Maura Viceconte clocked 2:23:47 back in the year 2000. Kiprop may have to further improve in Vienna to defend her title. Despite being already 38 years old she did just that last September in a half marathon. She was second in Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic, when she smashed her PB with a time of 67:22. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Japan's Yuki Kawauchi was 91 seconds behind at 35K, then he made an unbelievable move to win Boston

It looked like last year's Boston Marathon winner, Geoffrey Kirui, was going to win again but he may not have realized how tough of a runner Japan's Yuki Kawauchi really is in challenging weather conditions. Kirui had taken command at 30K opening up a 28 second lead on a pack of three behind including Japan's Yuki Kawauchi who lead the pack through the half marathon mark. At this point Shadrack Biwott was the first American as Galen Rupp was not handling the weather well. Geoffrey stayed in control, hitting 35K in 1:50:49 after a 15:51 5K split. Yuki was 91 seconds back. Then Yuki made an unbelievable move (running a 5:08 mile) and overtook Kirui and never looked back. Two America's were in the top four with just a mile to go (Biwott and Pennel) and stayed that way to the finish. Yuki crossed the finish line first in 2:15:54 beating last year’s champion by over three minutes. Yuki became the first Japanese runner to win since 1987. Geoffrey finished second in 2:18:21, Biwot third in 2:18:32 and Pennel fourth in 2:18:57. In the end there were six American's in the top ten. Tenth place being almost 12 minutes behind the winner. Kawauchi said through an interpreter after the windy, rainy race that "it was the best conditions possible" for him. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
Share
Share

America’s Desiree Linden beats the weather and is first American to win the Boston Marathon in 33 years.

America's Desiree Linden took the lead at the 35K mark (2:12:22) with Kenya's Gladys Chesir right behind. Mamitu Daska from Ethiopian was elven seconds back in third place. Shalane Flanagan is not handling the weather well but is still hanging in there. There were four American's in the top ten at 35K. Des still lead the pack at the 40K mark of with an elapsed time of 2:31:13 and lead to the finish. Des went on to win in a time of 2:39:54. In the end seven American women finished in the top ten. Shalane Flanagan hung on to finish 7th. Desiree splashed her way through icy rain and a near-gale headwind to be the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since 1985. The two-time Olympian and 2011 Boston runner-up pulled away at the end of Heartbreak Hill and ran alone through Brookline to finish almost four minutes ahead of second place. That's the slowest time for a women's winner since 1978. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Kenya´s Daniel Kipchumba clocks 59:06, at the Lake Maggiore Half Marathon in Verbania

Kenyan trio Daniel Kipchumba, Mangata Kimai Ndiwa and Josphat Kiptoo Boit finished inside 59:20 on their half marathon debuts at the 11th edition of the Nexia Audirevi Lake Maggiore Half Marathon. Held on a spectacular course from Verbania to Stresa in perfect weather conditions and with no wind, the previous course record of 1:00:00 was bettered by all three men. One week after pacing training partner Erick Kiptanui to a world-leading time of 58:42 in Berlin, Kipchumba crossed the finish-line here first in 59:06, holding off compatriot Ndiwa by just one second. Boit completed the all-Kenyan podium in third place in 59:19. Kipchumba, Ndiwa Ndiwa and Boit broke away from the rest of the field after three kilometres. Running at 2:46-per-kilometre pace, they passed through 10 kilometres in 27:47. The following five-kilometre section was covered in 14:16, then they upped the pace again with a 14:05 split between 15 and 20 kilometres. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Aidan Puffer broke the world 5k record clocking 15:47 for 13 year-olds

A 13-year-old youngster from Manchester (United Kingdom), accustomed to youth records, showed himself on Saturday in Boston, as part of the B.A.A. 5K through the streets of Boston, two days before the Boston Marathon. His time is amazing: 15:47! This is the world record in this category. Aidan Puffer started running at age 10 and in just three years he managed to do 4:18 in 1500 meters, 9:22 in 3000 and now 15:47 in 5000. This young athlete has as idol one of the most great of history. "My idol is Mo Farah, but I still do not have his autograph," says Aidan Puffer. In a typical week, Aidan runs 40 miles over six days, with one day of cross-training (35 minutes on the elliptical). If he does a long run on the weekends, his dad will often ride a bike alongside him. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

New record set for pushing a triple stroller for Half Marathon in San Jose

When Ann Marie Cody’s 16-month-old triplets get fussy, instead of taking them for a spin in the car to calm them, she straps them into their 4-foot-wide triple stroller and takes them out for a run. It works like a charm, the mother from Sunnyvale says, because the two boys and one girl seem to like being pushed while she jogs. Cody used her kids’ calm temperament while in the stroller to her advantage Sunday morning as she bested the Guinness World Record time for fastest half-marathon while pushing a triple pram, running in the inaugural Silicon Valley Half-Marathon in downtown San Jose today April 15. She finished in 1:46:13, beating her previous time by nearly two minutes, which she set in the Fresno California Classic Half-Marathon last year. The time will still need to be ratified by Guinness before becoming official. Even with the stroller, Cody placed 49th out of 753 women registered for the event, and 153rd overall out of 1,474 entrants. “I went out hard, I tried to not leave any gas in the tank,” Cody said after finishing the race Sunday morning, still dripping in sweat and fighting off cramps in her feet. “It was awesome.” (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

One elite Boston Marathon runner, Yuki Kawauchi handles extreme weather well

Maybe the one elite runner in the Boston Marathon field that has performed the best in extreme weather conditions is Japan's Yuki Kawauchi. He is running his first Boston. He was one of just three runners in the Marshfield Road Runner's 37th New Year's Day Marathon. He was attempting to break the world record of 75 sub 2:20 marathons he co-held with Doug Kurtis which he did. It was very cold and windy. The temperature was 4 degrees and he ran 2:18:59. Colder than what is predicted for Monday. Most Runners would not have run on News Year Day but it didn’t stop Yuki. The 31-year-old, who has won more than 30 international marathons, has a best of 2:08:14. What will the weather be like race morning? As of late Sunday morning, Boston was just a couple of degrees above freezing, and it won’t be much better early Monday. Should be a little warmer but most likely there will be rain and wind. How will this play out? We will know in 24 hours. (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

The weather most likely will be a factory on Marathon Monday, Here is what you need to know

There are going to be showers the entire day, and, at times, there could be some heavy downpours for the Boston Marathon. However this could change. The good news is that cold and wet is better than hot weather. David Epstein, a 30 year meteorologist just posted this today. "On April 15, 1881, the temperature in Boston only reached 40 degrees. Until today, that marked the coldest April 15 in the record books. While the cold is certainly notable, it’s the rain that will really affect Patriots Day and impact the most number of folks outside. As of late Sunday morning, Boston was just a couple of degrees above freezing, and it won’t be much better early Monday. Sunday night will be raw and chilly, and there could be some very light freezing rain or sleet showers before everything trends over toward just a drizzle by morning. It will remain breezy from the east all night. Monday will be a raw and cold day to start, but it will turn a bit milder as the rain pushes into the region, especially in the afternoon. Hopkinton will be about 37 or 38 degrees when the wheelchair racers begin and only a degree or two higher for the first couple of waves. This will be the coldest running of the marathon in many years. There are going to be showers the entire day, and, at times, there could be some heavy downpours. There’s even the risk of thunderstorms in the afternoon as a frontal system pushes through the region. Wind is going to be another factor. A headwind in the morning will turn to a crosswind during the day. At times, especially during some of the heavy downpours, the winds could gust over 25 mph, and that’s enough to create a little bit of instability for the runners. (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
by David Epstein
Share
881 Stories, Page: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18


Running News Headlines


Copyright 2018 MyBestRuns.com 294