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Running News Daily

Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team (Michael, Lisa, Jaime, Belinda, and Waitman). Bob Anderson, was the founder of Runner's World magazine in 1966, UjENA Fit Club 2010, Double Racing in 2010, My Best Runs (MBR) in 2014 and RUN THE WORLD Global Run Challenge in 2018. 

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IAAF releases the biggest ever biomechanics study for Track and Field

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) today released the results of, what they claim, is the largest biomechanical study in the sport’s history. Almost everything that moved in the Olympic Stadium at last year’s IAAF World Championships was recorded by 49 high-speed cameras and has now been measured and analyzed as part of the study.  "Biomechanics are crucial to the development of athletes where milliseconds and millimeters can make the difference between qualifying for a final, or not, and winning a medal, or not," says IAAF President Sebastian Coe. Among the highlights of the research was that on the steeplechase, which was recorded in detail for the first time. It is claimed the outstanding technique of American athletes Emma Coburn and Courtney Frerichs in the women’s 3,000m steeplechase clearly showed that medals were won and lost in the water. The research showed in detail that the United States team’s effective water jump clearance techniques were key to their performances.  The data captured on women's 10,000m champion Almaz Ayana of Ethiopia, meanwhile, shows a difference of up to 20 centimeters between the length of her strides from right to left - her right to left is longer than left to right. While it is hoped the reports will provide useful insight for coaches and athletes, it is anticipated they will also help the sport innovate by providing new data and graphics that can be shared with the media and fans around the world. (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
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Getting into shape, it’s not glamorous says John Quinn who almost died from a heart attack. It’s hard. You can’t fake it.

John Quinn, a retired newspaper editor, likes to wear the teal cotton T-shirt he got from the 2012 Broad Street Run, a 10-mile race in Philadelphia. It was his first 10-mile event, and he’d come a long way to get to that 2012 starting line: losing more than 60 pounds and going from calling himself “John 316,” a reference to his previous weight, to being a dedicated runner. “Getting into shape, it’s not glamorous,” he said. “It’s hard. You can’t fake it.” But less than four years later, in 2015, Mr. Quinn, now 64, had a heart attack from a complete, sudden blockage of his right coronary artery. That led to part of his heart dying and a tear in the muscle bridge that separates the left and right ventricles. If that all sounds bad, it was. Repairing that bridge is a delicate procedure, and about 50 percent of patients die within 30 days after the operation, according to Dr. Matthew L. Williams, assistant professor of cardiac surgery at Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia and Mr. Quinn’s surgeon. Today, many doctors prescribe exercise for their patients who have had heart attacks. Any exercise regimen requires careful monitoring and medical supervision. But for many, exercise post-heart attack has been shown to improve quality of life and decrease the risk for another cardiac event. “In the long run, we know that engaging in running and other cardiovascular activities prevents heart attacks,” said Dr. Mutharasan. Something like running helps the heart use oxygen more efficiently and regrow blood vessels. (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
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Joel Flora wants to make this year's Boston Marathon be number five

Joel Flora recently qualified for his fifth Boston Marathon. He is able to register in September and if successful, he will run the marathon in April of 2019. Flora’s journey began when, at the age of 35, he quit smoking. This led to him gaining some weight he wanted to get rid of. He was watching the Tour de France and got inspired to start bicycling again, something he did often as a teenager. He began biking a couple miles a day, and before he knew it, he was biking 20 miles a day. When he was 36, he got a membership to the YMCA to continue his training in the winter months. There, he started running. Unfortunately, he developed shin splints, but he didn’t let it stop him. He began walking on the treadmill and strengthened his shins and lower legs. When he turned 37, he was able to run without shin splints. This year, he plans to run 12 marathons. “I’ve always had a fall challenge, it has been going on for nine or 10 years now. Why I have these is because I’m a football fan. If they can do it every week, I can do it every week. My goal, I try to get eight to 10 races weekends in a row. Last year, I ran 17 in a row. They were 13 halves, one full, 10K, 7K, and a five miler,” Flora said. (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Lifetime runner Fred Martin (74) remembers when races did not have an age-group over 59

RUN THE WORLD:  “I will be 75 in six months,” says Fred Martín, “and my running journey has taken many twists and turns since 1960. I ran my usual weekend long run this morning (single track in woods in Northern California).  My thoughts were to savor the moment since it could be my last run,” Fred said. “It is something we all (in our age group) should think about.”   Fred went out for track his freshman year of high school (1959) and got pretty good by his junior and senior year.  Good enough to get a scholarship to Montana State. In college he competed against some of the best runners in the Pacific Northwest like Doug Brown and Tracy Smith. He ran on the US Army team from 1968-70.  He placed fifth in World Master’s 800 meters in 2011 and his team (Len, Hans and himself) won the National title for 70-79 year olds in the 8K for two straight years.  He has been racing well now for nearly 60 years. Fred has this to say about aging.  “There are more 70-year-old runners now than decades before and setting new standards, hell I remember races in the seventies that never had an age group over 59.  “As aging becomes more noticeable in our own personal lives we will be challenged more and our experience in years of training discipline comes into play.  “Times will become less important vs staying healthy and injury free, remember the old saying “if you don’t use it you’ll loose it.”  We will take our falls and mend broken bones, ward off cancer, deal with painful arthritis and tolerate medication to fix heart issues but we will be back out there doing what we love.  From the heart of a lonely long distance runner,” says Fred.  His goal is to be able to keep running into his 80’s.  What’s his thinking on the Run The World Challenge?  “I think it’s a good incentive and another tool to keep our running schedule in check,” he says.  Photo: Fred on the right end with the gang.   (Sat 14) ⚡AMP
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Mark Garrigan ran his first ultramarathon in 2012 and that race planted a seed to pursue a dream to build a trail running community in his home state

Mark’s big goal is to bring people together to run on trails. That message is all over the nurun co. website, which he designed, and it really drives every decision he makes. Mark enjoys introducing people to trail and ultra running and he is always very excited to welcome new trail runners to his races. He puts on training runs leading up to this events and is always there to answer any questions or help runners with their concerns.  As a race director, Mark’s appreciation for everyone who runs his races starts with a hand written thank you note sent to them after they register.  Besides planning and directing races and other trail events, Mark also designs all the logos and graphics for T-shirts, medals, signs, and the website. To say he puts his heart and soul into this would be an understatement. “I got into trail and ultra running because of… a girl,” said Garrigan. “I met her at my former place of employment and it just so happened she was on a relay team for a 50 miler. Since the team was full, I thought it would be a good idea to tell her I was running the solo event. Little did I know, I would not only fall in love with and marry that girl, I would also fall in love with a sport I didn’t even know existed.” Since his passion was ignited for trail running, he has completed a variety of races from marathon distance to 100 miles. What he found in the sport was an endless supply of inspiration, encouragement, and optimism. “It’s amazingly obvious how awesome the people in the trail and ultra community are,” said Garrigan.   (Sat 14) ⚡AMP
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I needed to suffer, says Kílian Jornet after breaking a record that had stood for 36 years

Early on Sunday morning, as the Lake District began to buzz with hikers walking in the glorious sunshine, Kílian Jornet took the first step towards another remarkable record. The Catalan, who last year climbed Everest twice in a week, and can run up and down Mount Blanc in under five hours, is one of the best known athletes in the fast-growing world of adventure sports. He had his sights on tackling the Bob Graham round, a challenge that involves running a 66-mile circuit of the Lake District, climbing and descending 42 of its highest peaks, in 24 hours. Only 100 hardy souls attempt it each year, and barely a third finish. Jornet, though, flew around and smashed the fastest known time for the route, which has stood for 36 years, by more than an hour. He reached the finish at Moot Hall in Keswick in an astonishing 12 hours and 52 minutes. “I knew I needed to suffer,” Jornet told the Guardian. “But it was a beautiful suffering.” The 30-year-old, who is 5ft 6in tall and weighs barely nine stone, started racing up and down the mountains in Catalonia as a three-year-old, and has been an ultrarunning star for a decade. But he conceded that the Bob Graham Challenge was among the toughest of his career. (Sat 14) ⚡AMP
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Catra Corbett Smashes the 310 mile John Muir Trail record

Vegan ultramarathon runner Catra Corbett has set a new record on the legendary John Muir Trail. The 53-year-old athlete, who has openly spoken out about her previous abuse of crystal meth and alcohol, had already set a previous record on the 212-mile course. Now she has just set another in the 310-mile course known as the Muir ramble route, which covers 310 miles of California, and was originally explored and recorded in 1868 by John Muir. Corbett's new record is for the Fastest Known Time (FKT) for completion. She finished the 310 miles - which became 323 miles with diversions - in seven days, nine hours, and 49 minutes. Corbett, who has run over 100 races of 100 miles or more - and is world famous for her exploits and her commitment to positive thinking and living - was supported by a small team who paced and equipped her during the record attempt. "There is no way I could have done it without Phil Nimmo help but mostly Dave Wiskowski and Chubky they were my crew on foot the last 66 miles," Catra told followers on social media. "We spent the night in the wilderness huddled together. They pushed me and helped motivate me. We all fell apart many times out there but kept it together. "There were places there were no trails, and we had to route find our way. I'm happy I knew the last 15-mile section. We crossed slowly over two miles of rockfall, but the views were amazing. We almost had to turn around because the trail was completely gone due to a recent rockfall. Dave navigated us safely up and over it. We worked as a team to get it done." (Fri 13) ⚡AMP
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Nicky Spinks pushed the barriers of human endurace by running 116 Miles over Peaks in under 56 Hours

At the age of 51, a little-known Yorkshire (UK) farmer has completed an extraordinary mountain challenge. Nicky Spinks, a long-distance fell runner and breast cancer survivor, pushed the barriers of human endurance by twice running a brutal circuit of Scottish highland peaks that makes a marathon seem like a walk in the park. The first-ever ‘double Ramsay Round’ involved running 116 miles over the summit of 48 peaks in 55 hours and 56 minutes. Battling heat exhaustion, dehydration and sleep deprivation, she took just seven breaks of no more than a few minutes, running through two days and nights around the hills and mountains above Fort William. The ‘superwoman’ athlete had hoped to complete the run within 48 hours and admitted being ‘disappointed’ that she failed to achieve her target time. But the record-breaking run made in soaring heatwave temperatures is just the latest mind-blowing achievement of this remarkable married middle-aged beef farmer from Huddersfield. Two years ago Miss Spinks celebrated ten years of surviving breast cancer by running twice around the Bob Graham round in the Lake District. (Fri 13) ⚡AMP
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Long distance runner Felicien Muhitira is optmistic to break a six-year record at the forthcoming Marvejols-Mende half marathon

Rwanda international long distance and cross country runner Felicien Muhitira is upbeat about defending his title and even break the current record of the forthcoming 46th edition Marvejols-Mende half marathon in France. The annual 22.4kilometre race is scheduled for July 29 where about 5000 athletes from around the world are expected to participate. Last year, 24-year old Muhitira debuted and sensationally claimed a gold medal after posting one hour, and eleven minutes beating his closest contender John Lotiang from Kenya who clocked one hour, twelve minutes and five seconds. Later, Muhitira went on to compete in the 98th edition of the 24.3km Sedan-Charleville race which he won breaking a 54-year record of the fastest time in that race that was set by French Norman Ameur. “I had a good campaign last year in France and am hoping to repeat this feat this time, I have been training extensively for almost two months now, I want to defend my title but more importantly I want to set a new record there,” said Muhitira in an exclusive interview with Times Sport on Wednesday. The current standing record was set by Kenyan Luka Kanda during the 39th edition back in 2011 who won the race with a time of one hour, 10 minutes and nine seconds.“I have been trying to deduct a minute on the time I used last year which would be enough to set the new record and so far, am starting to get to the level I wanted,” he added. (Fri 13) ⚡AMP
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Deena Kastor is the honored guest at the 12th annual Missoula Marathon weekend

Deena Kastor started running at age 11 in 1984, after witnessing Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first American to ever win the Olympic marathon, and she ended up breaking Benoit Samuelson’s American record at the London Marathon. Kastor is here this weekend as the honored guest of Run Wild Missoula for the 12th Missoula Marathon weekend. She described her start in running at a very young age. “I set the American record 15 years ago at the London Marathon, and it was Joan Benoit Samuelson’s record,” said Kastor. “She is a hero and mentor of mine for many years. The year she won the first ever women’s Olympic Marathon in 1984 in the L.A. Olympics.” Kastor recently completed a book about the true challenge in running, the mind. The book is titled ‘Let Your Mind Run’. “It’s a memoir of my running life, but it only takes place in my head,” she said. “It reveals the mental twists and the great qualities of the mind that we get to cultivate over time. We just fall into habits of thinking, but it’s our job to create the right habits of thinking. So, I like to think of it more of an instructional memoir and the feedback I’ve gotten has proven that I’ve done a good job of doing that.” (Fri 13) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Mary Menton has been running for over 25 years and loves it as much now as ever

RUN THE WORLD:  Mary Menton has been running for over 25 years.  She works full time as a family Advisor Dignity memorial.  "I protect families on the worst day of their life before someone passes," Mary says.  "I have been doing this for 3 and half years and I love it as much as running."   She gets up around 5 am to run before work and if needed does a second workout in the evening.   "Running to so important to me and it always will be.  It provides peace, its like a drug.  It not only is a physical addiction for me but it is mental as well.  I need to be exercising and running.  Its a feeling and enjoyment people who don't run can't understand what it is like to be a runner," says Mary.  She was one of the top 10 Americans at the Boulder Boulder 10k and she qualified for the Marathon Olympics Trials three times.  "As a Master the work is more difficult," she says, "because we are older the injuries are much higher.  I am dealing with an injury now.  As a master it is much more relaxing and I am not so hard on myself."  She discovered running as a young girl while, "watching my older sister and a AAU sprinter.  My mom would pack PJ’s because track meets were all day. So my little sister and I would be let loose running around the stadium.  I was in awe of the runners."   Mary has three girls.  "Sara is working for the Court of Appeals in Denver. She is a lawyer.  My daughter Megan is a RN living in Denver.  My 3rd daughter Ryan will be a Senior at Trinity Catholic."  What does she think of this challenge?  "The Run The World challenge is another one of Bob Anderson's fantastic ideas.  His passion for the sport is infectious. He is not only an advocate of running but a motivator to everyone. Having the Run The World challenge spreads the importance of running and keeps people together for a common interest."  Mary's current goal is to start running regularly again and get back to 50 miles a week.  (Thu 12) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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George Kraehe wanted to finish a marathon in all 50 States, Missoula will be number 50

Coming up this weekend is the extremely popular Missoula marathon. Thousands of runners are expected to race in both the half and full distance races. One runner is looking to accomplish a lot more by finishing the race this weekend. George Kraehe set out to run a marathon in all 50 states and Sunday will be number 50. Kraehe is doing it for an organization called the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors. Team TAPS does endurance races to raise money in remembrance of fallen heroes. TAPS provides all sorts of resources for families who have lost a loved one in the armed forces, such as counseling, support groups and a 24/7 hotline if you need someone to talk to. They provide this service to families for free. (Thu 12) ⚡AMP
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Mel Sturman set a British record by finishing 10 marathons in 10 days, five times

Mel Sturman became a British record holder by becoming the first woman to have completed 10 marathons in 10 days five times. Mel Sturman completed the Great Barrow Challenge in sweltering heat to claim the title. Over 10 days she ran 10 marathons on various trails across the Suffolk and Norfolk countryside. The marathons are all logged through the 100 Marathons Club. Although a seasoned runner, having completed more than 230 marathons, the Thetford parkrun director said this was the hardest challenge yet.“It was horrible,” said the 47-year-old. “It was the toughest one of the lot because of the heat. I was starting to get really bad blisters on days six and seven I could not even get my shoes on. “I was sobbing and saying that I did not want to give up. I just had to pop them and salt water them and just shove my feet in the shoes and just deal with it.” She added: “If you really want something you can turn your mind to do it. But I was close to giving up.” (Thu 12) ⚡AMP
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Missoula’s Mark Messmer hopes to win his hometown marathon this weekend

Missoula Marathon spectators cheer for every winner, whether they come from Polson, Corvallis or Kenya. But they haven’t celebrated a hometown win in the men’s full race since 2010. Mark Messmer hopes to change that this Sunday. Messmer has considered himself a competitive runner for as long as he can remember, but the former Missoula Sentinel Spartan and Montana Grizzly feels he is just now catching his stride. “I feel like I never reached my full potential in college, definitely not in high school,” said Messmer. “And it was always the longer the race the better, so moving up into the marathon was kind of just a natural progression for me.” Messmer knows it will be painful and difficult to reach his goal on Sunday, but he admits to dreaming of a possible victorious scene in downtown Missoula. “I’ve always kind of been obsessed with the banner you run through,” said Messmer. “I want that. I know they give that to the winner. That’s something since a little kid I’ve thought about.” (Thu 12) ⚡AMP
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New virtual marathon will allow runners to qualify for the 2019 New York City Marathon from anywhere in the world

Runners may now qualify for the New York City Marathon without setting foot in the Big Apple. The New York Road Runners opened registration Wednesday for its first-ever virtual marathon race, which will take place Nov. 1-4. All participants who complete the virtual race in less than 6 1/2 hours will earn a spot in the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon, according to Michael Capiraso, the president and CEO of the Road Runners. Available spots are limited and will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis, according to the Road Runners website. “The TCS New York City Marathon is already the largest marathon in the world, and we are excited to extend the opportunity to runners all over the world,” Capiraso said in a statement. Athletes from around the world can complete the 26.2-mile run at any outdoor location. Runners must document their route via a GPS running device, and log their time through the Strava app. Qualifying virtual marathon runners will receive a complimentary virtual trainer program and a medal in addition to their 2019 marathon spot, the Road Runners said. (Thu 12) ⚡AMP
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The first ever Run The World Challenge Team has already logged in 4,092 Miles since July 4

The Run the World Global Run Challenge started July 4th.  Our goal is to login 24,901 miles (40,072k) within 30 days.  We wanted this to be a Global event and it is. Our team of 200 has already run and logged in miles in 17 different countries.  Our mission is to reach our goal but we also want to motivate, inspire others and celebrate running.  A sport we love.  Our team range in age from 11 to 81.  Team member Abbey Cannon sums up our mission,  "I think the Global Run Challenge is great because it shows that even though we are all at different levels and may run for different reasons, we in the running community from all over the globe can all come together to work for the same goal." Our team is amazing.  Willie Korir from Kenya has already logged in 173 miles. 51-year-old JR Mintz has logged in 112 and 74-year-old Frank Bozanich has logged 112 miles as well.  Grace Padillia has logged in the most miles for females with 72 miles.  Becca Pizzi who ran a marathon on each continent in seven days earlier in the year has logged 60 miles.  There are many amazing performances.  You can follow all the action on our Run The World feed.  We still have a long ways to go but we have almost already covered the distance between San Francisco and Iceland in eight days.  This is more than just logging training and racing miles.  It is a celebration of running.  To help remember what we are doing we have an official shirt and a medal when we finish.  Just click on the link and we will get out the shirt to you right away.  If you didn't join us this time, we will be doing this same Global Challenge again starting August 29.   (Wed 11) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Sara Lucas is training to run the New York City Marathon in memory of relatives

After furthering her running career at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City, where she is now an assistant track coach, Sparta native Sara Lucas is now training for something bigger: running the New York City Marathon. In 2008, Sara's mother Sabrina, the head cross country coach at Wallkill Valley Regional High School, ran the same race in memory of her father, who lost a battle with esophageal cancer.  Sara Lucas earned 12 varsity letters in cross country and track and field.  She needs to hit a fund-raising goal of $3,500 to take part in the race on Nov. 4. Lucas' contribution will be going to the V Foundation for Cancer Research. "I knew that since my mom ran it 10 years ago and that I was there last year to see it in person that I really wanted to run it," Lucas said. "And to do it for the cause that I am, growing up so close to the city and going to school there for four years of my life, being able to run the streets that I had my first internship at or saw my first Broadway show, really means a lot." It is expected that nearly 60,000 competitors will participate in this year's race. And the fact that the V Foundation only selects between 35 and 40 applicants to run for their foundation, the meaning behind Lucas' journey on Nov. 4 will go even deeper than running on those familiar New York City streets. "The fact that I had grandparents be affected by cancer and other people that I know as well, it was the right fit." "The training is very different than in high school, but I enjoyed the experience doing it," Lucas said. "In high school, I also competed in dance so the transition from being that busy in high school to college wasn't that hard. You have to be on top of everything at the Fashion Institute, so it was kind of tough to balance it all, but I think I kind of thrive when my schedule is full." (Wed 11) ⚡AMP
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Brian McArthur says managing the pain levels at the Sinister 7 ultra helped him place ninth

Brian McArthur (Right), 46, finished ninth overall and second among racers in the Masters Category with a time of 22 hours, 21 minutes and 32 seconds. He said his goal was to finish the race in under 24 hours and added he was happy with his time as well as the top 10 finish. Of the 286 runners registered, only 86 managed to finish. Last fall, McArthur raced in the Ultra-Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB), a 171km trek through France, Italy and Switzerland. That race brought him through elevations of more than 2,500m and McArthur said the experience helped prepare him for the Sinister 7. “This race, I needed to take it easy and not run too hard,” he said. “It’s a long day and you need to save yourself because there’s lots of time to run hard at the end. I laid back and took the first three stints fairly easy in the first 80km. Then started to feel recovered, then the last half I ran fairly hard and the last 40km I felt great and I ran about 20 people down.” The Sinister 7 race traveled through 6,400m of elevation and was a grueling endeavour, but McArthur said his biggest challenge was overcoming the mental fatigue. “Managing the pain levels and realizing that it will go away. That it’s just temporary. Think about other things, like the beautiful environment you’re running through,” he said. “Enjoying the moment and the other runners that you come across. Just enjoying the experience and being able to appreciate the moment.” McArthur added that he was motivated to start ultramarathons after joining a running club in Red Deer and participating in a marathon. It was through the club that he heard about longer races. Originally, he thought the idea was crazy. “Six years later, that’s what I’m doing. It kind of creeps up on you,” he said. (Wed 11) ⚡AMP
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After 11 straight days on the road, ultrarunner Dave Proctor and his support crew arrived in Calgary Monday

Proctor is running across Canada with two large goals in mind: to raise over $1 million for the Rare Disease Foundation, and to beat the cross-Canada speed record set by Al Howie in 1991. Proctor, who is from Okotoks, Alberta south of Calgary, is a highly accomplished and decorated ultrarunner who holds various records in ultrarunning. He was met by a crowd of several hundred people at a local Staples store, who joined him in a 5K as his journey continued eastward.Proctor must average 108K per day in order to meet his goal of getting to the east coast in 66 days. Howie’s run took 72 days. (Wed 11) ⚡AMP
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Canadian trail ultrarunner Adam Campbell has withdrawn from the Hardrock 100

Eleven days before the race, Canadian trail ultrarunner Adam Campbell has withdrawn from this year’s Hardrock 100. The celebrated runner had a near-fatal mountain fall in 2016, breaking his back and pelvis and suffering numerous other injuries. This spring, less than two years later, Campbell finished third at the Lijiang Skyview Adventure in China. Campbell says he pulled out for various reasons having to do with a combination of his busy travel schedule, he is leading run clinics in Chamonix and Squamish, the resultant lack of training, and family obligations. “I respect the race too much to do it undertrained,” says Campbell. Campbell’s withdrawal yesterday made it possible for Jeff Browning of Bend, Oregon to move from the waitlist to the start list. Browning was fifth at Western States late last month, and could be a serious contender at Hardrock, certainly in terms of the “double,” for which he holds the record, set in 2016. (Wed 11) ⚡AMP
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Gabriel Geay is the hottest road racer in the US right now will be racing Crazy 8s Saturday

Crazy 8s race organizers announced Tuesday that Tanzania’s Gabriel Geay and Kenyans Isaac Mukundi, Cleophas Ngetich and Linus Kiplagat have committed to race Saturday in downtown Kingsport. Geay is on a hot streak, recently winning the BAA 10K over a stacked field that included defending Crazy 8s champ Teshome Mekonen and previous 8K world record-holder Stephen Sambu. Geay followed that with an impressive win at the Boilermaker 15K this past Sunday, once again outracing Mekonen to the tape. “Geay is arguably the hottest road racer in the U.S. right now, and we are very excited he has decided to come to Kingsport,” said Crazy 8s co-director Hank Brown. “He might just be the first runner from Tanzania to win Crazy 8s. That would be pretty cool.” He’ll have plenty of competition in Mukundi, Ngetich and Kiplagat. Mukundi, who finished second in the 2016 Crazy 8s, has won such major races as the Bay to Breakers 12K (twice), Bolder Boulder 10K and Wharf to Wharf 6 Mile. His 10K personal record is a sizzling 27:45. Ngetich is a past winner of Crazy 8s, clocking 22:28 to win in 2015, and has 13 victories over his road-race career. Kiplagat owns victories this year at the Cleveland Marathon 10K, Cotton Row 10K, in which he broke the course record, Orange Classic 10K and the Monumental Mile. The starting line will once again be stocked with superstars from around the globe, all going for The Regional Eye Center $10,008 World Record Bonus — which goes to the first runner to break the existing 8K world-best time, currently 21:45. The winner will claim the Teleperfomance $5,000 Dash For The Gold. “It should be another fast race,” Brown said. “Even though the record is tougher this year, we’re still going after guys who think they can break it. All we can do is shoot the gun and see what happens.” (Wed 11) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Pulkit Singh went out one morning at 3:30am to escape the pressure of his job and started running

RUN THE WORLD: Pulkit Singh (26) took a high pressure job after graduation in 2015 in the Steel City of India, Jamshedpur.  He started feeling burned out and he needed to do something.  "It was one normal working day that I woke up on unearthly hours and went out for a run.. It was 3:30am, I started to run and since then I have never looked back. I got infected by the running bug."  Running has changed Pulkit's life. "Running is like a tonic/medicine to my everyday routine. The pressurized work culture of my company hasn’t changed but my patience, tolerance and attitude has completely changed. Today I remain active even after working for 12+ hours a day. Running has taught me the art of ‘perseverance," he says.  He completed his first marathon in 6 hours 9 minutes.  " I am proud of the fact that I was on my feat for 6 hours. Under hot blazing sun I completed my first marathon (FM). People criticize runners who walk while running their FM. I have an altogether different aspect for this. Many a time it came in my mind that I should give up and consider a respectable DNF and come back next year in a stronger avatar. But the glory which waits at the finish line motivated me to complete."  He has many goals but one is to run the 100th annual Comrades Marathon in 2021.   Pulkit has to say about this challenge.  "The fact that you have a challenge in front of you motivates you to bring out the best in one’s own self. Once the Run The World Challenge concludes we are all winners, no matter how many miles we have logged. The fact that an individual takes up a challenge is in itself terms him/her to be a winner because they all gave up their comfort zone for a better/fitter tomorrow. You never know whom you are motivating indirectly"       (Tue 10) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge: Jennifer Bayliss is working on one major goal - to qualify for the Olympic Marathon Trials

RUN THE WORLD: Jennifer Bayliss (47) discovered running in the third grade.  She says, "Laura beat me in the 50 yard dash on the sidewalk in P.E. class at school. I did not like that. I really wanted to beat her and all the boys."  In high school and college she still wanted to beat all the Laura's and the boys. She did until injury took over her collegiate career. "I did manage to capture All American status, a conference championship title and run at the NCAA's before having to call it quits."  15 years later she returned to running as a master once her kids started driving and she found a little time to lace up her shoes.  How important is running?  "Running is where I push myself to reach goals, believe in myself, have confidence, trust the plan, feel fit and healthy, connect with people, see beautiful places, have stories to tell, learn how to deal with good and bad stress, and mostly have a blast."  Just recently she ran the Boilermaker 15K in Utica, New York. She clocked 56:59 (which is 6:05 per mile).  She was the 5th American Master woman. She was pleased with her performance as she pursues her ultimate goal.  "My goal is to run an Olympic Trial qualifier for the Marathon. For women, that means at least a time of 2:45. My plan is to race myself into shape with a hybrid of a plan- a little short, long, trail and training and racing distances from the mile to the marathon."  Jennifer is a Road Runners Club of America Certified Coach.   How did you find out about this challenge?   "I heard about the Run The World Challenge from Rosaura Briceno-Tennant and Bertrand Newson and thought- these are my friends, my people-I want to do what they are doing because they are awesome people and runners." (Tue 10) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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World Cup Soccer, Wimbledon and British 10K all this weekend

This weekend more than 10,000 runners will descend on the streets of London for the 18th Virgin Sport Westminster British 10K. Hosted by ASICS, the race takes in London’s most iconic landmarks, from Big Ben to Trafalgar Square. This year, it’s a celebration of movement and music: the streets of Westminster will be transformed into a British street party – expect Union Jacks, summer vibes and live bands and DJs at every kilometre. You’ll pound the streets to the beat. It’s set to be the hottest sporting weekend of 2018 – and not just thanks to the heatwave. The race takes place on Sunday, the same day as both the Wimbledon men’s final and the World Cup final – even more incentive to cross that finish line in record speed. (Tue 10) ⚡AMP
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There is something magical about 26 miles 385 yards say Rory Coleman who has done it 1000 times

In 1994 I had an epiphany, a real Road to Damascus moment. I was 31 at the time, and I clearly remember looking in the mirror one day and not liking the person staring back at me. I felt toxic – I didn’t want to smoke or drink anymore, and I wanted to lose some weight. I thought, runners are thin. Maybe if I go for a run that could speed up the process. I never set out to run 1,000 marathons or to coach people or run across the Sahara Desert. All I knew was on that day in 1994 I simply had to go for a jog. I ran 100 steps and I was flat out on the pavement. But I was totally euphoric because I’d found my therapy and the framework that I was going to hang the rest of my life on. I was totally ignorant of how to train. I went for my first run in my work clothes wearing leather shoes, jeans and a puffer jacket – it was at least a month before I bought any running shoes. There wasn't a lot of information about running, so I had to work things out for myself. The initial results were amazing. You lose weight quickly when your body is used to doing nothing. I exercised every day and within three months I’d done my first half marathon. It was my local one in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. There’s something magical about 26 miles and 385 yards. The first marathon I ran in November 1994 was such an achievement. I wrote in my journal that it didn’t matter whatever else I did in running, no one could take the achievement of running that marathon away from me. I felt it was such a positive thing to do, all I wanted was to do it again. My next one was the 1995 London Marathon 56 days later and once I’d finished that I was hooked. Being in a field of 30,000 running around the Cutty Sark and Tower Bridge is such an iconic thing and had a real wow factor. I ran another one the week afterwards and I’ve been running one every week ever since. I’d think that if I didn’t do them, maybe I’d return to the old Rory Coleman who I didn’t like very much. If you can make your passion your career it’s a huge bonus. In 2008 I’d come to a career break: I’d spent 25 years in print and brand development and come to the end of wanting to work for someone else. I thought, well I’m always teaching people how to run, so why not become a personal trainer? Although it’s difficult to return to school when you’re 46, I went back and did my qualifications. What had real value though were my 20-plus years of running. I always say my Guinness World Records hanging up in the kitchen are my qualifications, they’re what allow me to teach other people. I’ve been there, done it and got thousands of t-shirts! (Tue 10) ⚡AMP
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Top Ultra runner Lorena Ramírez runs in her traditional dress including basic sandals made from recycled tires

Wearing her traditional long dress and a pair of sandals, there was no mistaking one of the runners in Saturday’s Cajamar Tenerife Bluetrail ultramarathon. It could only be one of the famous Rarámuri runners from northern Mexico. Lorena Ramírez won third place in the annual 102-kilometer marathon on the Spanish island of Tenerife, competing in the seniors’ category, ages 18 to 39. She finished the course in 20 hours, 11 minutes and 37 seconds. It is the second highest such race in Europe, with part of the course reaching 3,500 meters, and this year attracted 2,400 runners from 38 countries. Ramírez, 23, was accompanied in Spain by fellow runners, her brother Mario and sister Juana, all of whom grew up running in the mountains of the Tarahumara Sierra in Chihuahua. Lorena Ramírez had already made a name for herself with other wins, along with the fact that she became the first Rarámuri woman to compete at Tenerife when she entered last year. She was invited to attend after she won the females’ 50-kilometer category of the Ultra Trail Cerro Rojo last year in Puebla. In that race, she ran “without a hydration vest, without running shoes, without Lycra and compression socks, without any of those gadgets used by the runners of today.” Besides, as in the Tenerife Bluetrail, she wore traditional dress including basic sandals made from recycled tires. (Tue 10) ⚡AMP
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Joseph Gray of Colorado Springs captured his 14th USATF National Championship at the Loon Mountain race

Joseph Gray of Colorado Springs captured his 14th USATF National Championship at the Loon Mountain race in Lincoln, New Hampshire on Sunday, July 8. The event hosted the US Mountain Running Championships and a deep prize purse. Gray, 34, completed the course in 50:28. The event was the selection competition for the four men and four women who will compete for the United States at the 34th World Mountain Running Championships in Canillo, Andorra on September 16. Second in the men’s field was Andy Wacker of Boulder in 51:49. David Fuentes placed third and Boulder’s Matt Daniels, running for Hudson Elite, earned fourth in 52:37. The 6.6-mile course climbed 3,200 feet and included grades of up to 48%. Despite the challenging course, the event had more than one thousand registrants. In the women’s race, Allie McLaughlin took top honors in 57:45, while Addie Bracie of Longmont placed third in 1:00:26. (Mon 9) ⚡AMP
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Children can run around for hours and not get breathless but as we get older this changes, here is what you can do to change this

As a child you could keep running around for hours, without getting breathless, but as we get older a regular complaint is that we get breathless very soon. The reason is that they have simply forgotten to breathe. It’s simply auto-mode. Courtesy of our poor posture and stress, we breathe dysfunctionally. All of us take the most important activity that keeps us alive for granted. How do you then fix an old habit? Surprisingly, it isn’t tough. It’s about accepting there is a problem and setting out to work on it. Within the rib cage is your lungs, which sit on curtain like structure called your diaphragm, which separates the lungs from organs in the abdomen. Adter long sitting hours pretty much from early childhood and then carried to in almost all our jobs, we all slouch. Stress in life leads shrugged shoulders. This combination leads to limiting the ribs movement. This restricts lungs expansion, as the ribs can’t move optimally. The trick is not to think of only sitting tall and lowering your shoulders but activating the muscles that’ll help you keep that tall posture for long.  Of course as we know, seasoned runners know that you need to get passed the heavy breathing and catch your second wind.  But in all cases this is good advice to use in your every day life.   (Mon 9) ⚡AMP
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Dillon Maggard signs professional running contract with Brooks and his next race will be at TD Beach to Beacon 10K

Former Utah State distance runner Dillon Maggard has signed a professional running contract with Brooks and will compete for the Brooks Beasts Track Club. “I had a few options to choose from, which was good, and I narrowed them down,” Maggard said. “I tried to write out the pros and cons for each option that I had and found that Brooks offered me the best financial stability and security for an extended period of time. I was kind of bouncing back and forth between trying to stay in Logan and trying to go to Seattle, but those were, honestly, my two options. “There was just a little uncertainty about whether I would be able to stay in Logan for a long, extended period of time. So, this was the most comfortable decision where if I had to move, I was going back to Seattle where I grew up and it would be an easier transition.” Maggard signed a 3 1/2 year deal with Brooks. The native of Kirkland, Washington, recently competed at the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships in Des Moines, Iowa, where he placed 13th in the finals of the men’s 5,000-meter run with a time of 13 minutes, 55.06 seconds. Maggard concluded his stellar Aggie career as a nine-time All-American. He matched the school record previously set by James Parker, who represented the United States in the hammer at the 2004 Olympic Summer Games and 2005 World Championships. Between now and then, Maggard is planning to run in three road races, beginning with the TD Beach to Beacon 10K on Aug. 4, in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. The event attracts almost 6,500 runners, making it the largest road race in the Pine Tree State. Two weeks after the TD Beach to Beacon 10K, Maggard will be competing in the New Balance Falmouth Road Race, a seven-miler set for Aug. 19. And finally, Maggard said he will cap his summer at the Murphy Mile in Tennessee. “Ever since I came to Utah, one of my biggest goals was trying to run professionally,” Maggard said. “The past four years of sacrifices, miles, hard work and training every day is definitely rewarding.” (Mon 9) ⚡AMP
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When Lauren Chiarello's cancer came back again, her first question was: “Can I still run?”

In the fall of 2007, then 23-year-old Lauren Chiarello moved from her home in South Salem, New York to New York City with two roommates. She was working at a small non-profit and enjoying life in Manhattan. Then she was diagnosed with cancer. Friends wanted to show their support, and two signed up to run their first marathon—the Nike Women’s Marathon in San Francisco raising money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. “I went out there to cheer them on,” says Chiarello. And when her cancer went into remission in August 2008, she signed up to train and fundraise for her own half marathon in January 2009. Though she was told that a relapse would be uncommon, the weekend of the race, Chiarello felt a lump on her collarbone coming back. “I was pretty devastated," she said, but she ran the race anyway, and then told the people at her new job with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center that she had cancer—again. “My first question was: Can I still run?” says Chiarello. “I was so high off the half marathon—the fundraising and training and sense of community—I didn’t want to give it up.” She did have to pause, however, and the second round of treatment was very intense. “I had high dose chemo and a stem cell transplant,” she says. “So I had to be in isolation for six weeks at the hospital to recover, and I remember just hoping to get through each day.” (Mon 9) ⚡AMP
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Mary Wacera wins the Boilermaker 15k for the fourth time

Mary Wacera of Kenya won her fourth Boilermaker 15K with a time of 50:01. This tied her with four-time Boston Marathon winner Catherine Ndereba as the winningest female open runner in Boilermaker history. Monicah Ngige and Vicoty Chepngeno, both of Kenya, rounded out the women’s podium with times of 50:03 and 50:04 respectively. Gabriel Geay of Tanzania took the top spot in the 15K Men’s Open race with a time of 43:40 while 2016 Men’s Open champion, Teshome Mekonen Asfaha of Ethiopia, finished second and Edwin Kibichiy of Kenya took third. (Sun 8) ⚡AMP
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A higher percentage of men dropped out of the 2018 Boston Marathon than women, here is why

In April, The New York Times published an article explaining why women had been less likely to quit the 2018 Boston Marathon than men.  The author, Lindsay Crouse, reported that 5% of men had dropped out, compared to 3.8% of women. That means the dropout rates had increased almost 80% since the 2017 race for men and just 12% for women.  Crouse spoke to a number of experts in different fields, including elite distance coach Steve Magness, who told her: "Women generally seem better able to adjust their goals in the moment, whereas men will see their race as more black or white, succeed or fail, and   if it's fail, why keep going?"  That is to say, for women, simply finishing the race may be important; for men, winning (or beating their personal best time) may be key. And the implications of this gender difference go beyond marathons, or athletic prowess. Muriel Niederle, a professor of economics at Stanford University, has done extensive research on gender differences in competitiveness. Generally, she's found that men are more likely to enter — and win — competitions than women are.  But Niederle could speculate as to why the Boston Marathon turned out the way it did.  "For women, just the fact that they finish the race has a higher value for them" than it does for men, Niederle told Business Insider. What's more, that's not necessarily something they decide in the moment, midway through the race — it's something they know from the very beginning.  "Women have more to lose in terms of how they think of themselves, or how they think others will view them, when they give up," Niederle said. "That could make it much more costly for her."  That's possibly because of gender stereotypes that suggest women are relatively weak, or not resilient. If they do quit — a marathon or any other kind of competition — they risk playing into those gender stereotypes, she said. (Sun 8) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge: Ram Venkatraman talks about the running scene in India and how important running is to him

RUN THE WORLD: Ram Venkatraman started running in 1997 when he was working in Uganda, East Africa. He had gained some weight and like so many of us could only run five minutes at first. However before long he moved it up to 90 minutes every day for six days a week.  “I ran along the beautiful roads fronting the Victoria River where the source of the River Nile is situated,” Ram says.  Running became a very important part of his life.  “Running is my meditation, my relaxation time. If I don’t run for a week, I start getting irritable. Running has improved my health as I used to get recurring bouts of cold and cough but that has diminished with running,” he says.  His club is the Mumbai Road Runners.  “The club came out of an idea to do a once a month long run along the Mumbai marathon route, basically in order to familiarise ourselves with the route, meet up and greet with friends at the end of the run, have breakfast and go home,” he says.  Subsequently it has grown by leaps and bounds and now have numerous other activities like monthly yoga, football, Frisbee, awards nite, workshops etc.  “We now also fund underprivileged runners by contributing to their registration fees, travel, stay etc.”  The running scene in India has taken off exponentially after the Mumbai Marathon came to India in the year 2004. “Since then there have been numerous marathons and half marathons in all the big cities plus Tier I and Tier II cities as well. Running clubs have sprouted up everywhere – some formal and most informal. People have begun to take running seriously mostly from the health point of view,” says Ram.  Asked what he thought of this challenge.  “It is a fantastic challenge which is bringing together people from all over the world for a single cause. It is magnificent. So many people – elites as well as amateur runners joining to achieve a target is monumental.”    (Sat 7) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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This Boston Marathon qualifier is going to be run on a track inside the Gillette Stadium, 100 Laps

Boston-area marathon runners and Patriots fans are about to have their biggest dreams come true. Gillette Stadium is hosting its first marathon on Sept. 28. The Boston Marathon qualifier is open to 100 runners. Participants will run more than 100 laps on the warning track around the field. The track is USA Track & Field certified and will be the first Boston Marathon qualifier ever run entirely in a NFL stadium. All runners must meet a $5,000 fundraising goal and the proceeds will benefit the New England Patriots Foundation. The race will begin at 5 p.m. Runners will also be treated to live music and appearances by Patriots alumni and cheerleaders. (Sat 7) ⚡AMP
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Six tips for running and dealing with hot weather this summer

It is a hot summer in many parts of the world.  Yesterday in Palm Springs it was 118 degrees. So how do we deal with this kind of heat? But it is not only the heat, the humidity can be a killer too.  There are a few tricks for beating the heat and getting in your runs this summer. 1. A simple tip - Run at cooler times of the day.  Run in the morning or in the evening. Times to avoid are noon till 3pm. 2. Wear light colored, loose fitting wicking running gear. 3. Run by your effort level rather than your typical pace until you acclimate.  Like a car, if the temperature rises too high you will overheat.  4. It takes about two weeks for your body to adapt to the heat and cool itself more efficiently.  Your body will gradually become better at cooling itself so you can run at your normal pace. 5. If it is just too hot like 119 degrees or if the air quality is bad, take your workout indoors.  Running on a treadmill might be a better idea than pushing yourself in dangerous heat.  6. Hydrate during your run.  For runs shorter than 45 minutes, water is just fine.  However for longer runs you might want to consume a cup of a sport drink every 15 to 20 minutes.   (Sat 7) ⚡AMP
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Former Army Major has been running extreme marathons to battle depression and post-traumatic stress disorder

Former Army Major Rob Shenton has been coping with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Having served in the military for more than 21 years, he was medically discharged in 2016 - but running has always been one of his coping strategies.  He completed the North Pole marathon in April.  The ultra marathon runner has just taken on the 'Race to the King', 53 miles of the South Downs Way that's just the latest on this ex-military man's growing list of epic marathons.  He's battled with depression for more than 18 years and admits it has hampered his life but running continues to help.  He says, "You end up with coping strategies... It's just a matter of realizing what your triggers are and being able to recognize them and being able to cope. "I enjoy running quite a lot... I run every single day. Even if it's half a mile, I'll put my shorts on and my running shoes and go for a jog because I find it lifts my spirits." Through his running, Rob has raised thousands of pounds for the military charity Help for Heroes, which he says continues to support him.  (Fri 6) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Running is an important part of who I am but it's not all that I am says Verity Breen

RUN THE WORLD: As a kid Verity Breen ran randomly. "I was beginning to tool my intrinsic nature inside where "the runner" lived," says Verity.   She was the youngest of four adopted children living in Australia.  When Verity was 22 (1989) she was engaged to be married to a guy who was doing the triathlon.  "I followed him when he swam, and swam too," Verity says.  She also started to run with him some nights after work.  "One night I felt a sudden gush of adrenaline and got bored with the pace and took off, beating him back to his parents house.  This was not well received. Anyway, for another reason he called off the wedding."  She got really into the triathlon and in fact in 1991 she was on the National Australia Team at the Triathlon World Championships.  "It was this ton of triathlon racing that lead me to realize that running was the great love.  Here I am three decades later of racing, still in love."  So how important is running to Verity?  "It's the one thing that is always there for you, it picks you up on down days, it carries you along on happy days and it makes me feel fully woke as I am using my entire body and mind as one.  However if you tie your identity up entirely with being seen as a runner you discount your other gifts and interests and are at a loss for who you are if at some points one must rest, recover or not race and be patient.  Running is an important part of who I am but it's not all that I am," she says.  She has run over 150 marathons and one stands out.  "Maybe on a amusing note was my Maui Marathon win in 2012.  My husband came home from work Friday afternoon and I asked him how he would feel about me flying to Hawaii to do a marathon.  He said, sure! When?  I said "tomorrow" he burst out laughing.  So on a cheap flight I managed to get for 300 bucks, he dropped me off with my small bag and wished me luck."  The next morning she was at the start line.  "Early into the hot race on an incredible one way coastal course I found myself in the lead.  Whoa.  With an 8 minute gap till the second female and the entire road to myself I was in racing heaven. As I rolled into the awesome finish chute in first hot as heck but so happy I was just amazed that I had pulled this off."  She is married to Randy. They met at Bondi Beach in Australia and got married exactly one year later.  They have two dogs, has a garden and lives in Northern California.  In 2007 she started Thirty Birds, her own brand of women's running apparel.  Asked about this challenge.  "The Run The World Challenge got my attention.   It's great to be accountable and to connect, to encourage people to move and run and share the challenge of piling up miles together as we virtually circle this amazing globe together one stride at a time.  Moving together. Love it." (Fri 6) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Ethiopian Buze Diriba Kejela has just confirmed she will be running the Boilermaker 15K

The Elite Field for Sunday’s 41st running of Utica’s Boilermaker 15K has gotten stronger.  Buze Diriba Kejela, 24-year-old from Ethiopia has already won three major road races this season — including the New York City Half-Marathon, the Cherry Blossom 10-Mile Run in Washington, D.C., and the Lilac Bloomsday 12K Run in Spokane, Washington. Diriba Kejela ran her first Boilermaker 15K last year and finished fifth in the Women’s Open field with a time of 49:40. Wacera, the Boilermaker champion in 2014 and 2015, won her third title in four years with a time of 49:18, and she will join Catherine Ndereba as the only four-time winner with another victory Sunday. Diriba Kejela was one of 11,077 women running the New York City Half-Marathon on March 18, and she won that race with a late sprint past American Emily Sisson in a course record time of 1:12.:23. Sisson was only one-tenth of a second back at the finish. Two wins on the Professional Road Running Organzation (PRRO) Circuit — which the Boilermaker is a part of — has put Diriba Kejela in contention for the 2018-19 PRRO Championship bonus. On April 8, she won the Cherry Blossom 10-Mile Run in 53:45; she had finished second in the race the previous two years. On May 6, she finished the Bloomsday 12K with a time of 39:25 and won that race by a single second. (Fri 6) ⚡AMP
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Sam Chelanga is retiring from running to enlist in the U.S. Army but why now?

Sam Chalange is going to retire from professional running after finishing 4th at the USATF 10k Championships at the Peachtree Road Race July 4 in Atlanta. Chelanga, 33, is going to enlist in the U.S. Army. On July 29, he will report to Fort Jackson in South Carolina for basic training.  Then it will be off to Officer Candidate School in Fort Benning, Georgia, beginning October 15.   Even though Chelanga says he grew to love running, he was never motivated by medals or glory. He won four NCAA titles and five U.S. titles on the roads as a pro (he became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2015).  Other things were moe important to him, a college degree, helping his family and home village back in Kenya, representing the United States, supporting his wife, Marybeth, and their two sons.  When asked what his proudest accomplishment in running was, he says that it wasn’t a race, but instead the moment when he realized he was actually going to graduate with a college degree “because that is why I started running.” The obvious question is why now? He was the top American finisher at last year’s World Cross Country Championships, finishing in 11th place. This year, Chelanga ran a half marathon personal best of 60:37 in Houston in January, finished 14th at the World Half Marathon Championships in March (again, he was the top U.S. finisher), and won the U.S. 25K title in May. He has plenty left in the tank. Which is precisely why Chelanga felt it was important to join the Army now. “I’ve done everything that I wanted to do in running,” says Chelanga, who achieved personal bests of 13:04 in the 5,000m and 27:08 (still the collegiate record, set in a very famous race where Chris Solinsky ran 26:59 and Galen Rupp 27:10) in the 10,000m. “I’ve got more than I asked for when I came in…I don’t want to wait until I’m old. I feel young, I feel fresh, I feel like I have a lot of energy and I want to take this job when I’m going to serve at the best level of my ability.” (Fri 6) ⚡AMP
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Shelby Houlihan surges past three contenders to win the 1500m while Semenya placed sixth

Shelby Houlihan of the US ran a new PR and set a meet record in the 1,500m at Lausanne Diamond League today, with the UK’s Laura Muir finishing second and the Netherlands’ Sifan Hassan third. Houlihan clocked 3:57.54. Caster Semenya of South Africa was well back, finishing sixth, with a time of 4:00.44. It was the third straight 1,500m win for Houlihan, an Olympic 5,000m runner who is having an incredible outdoor season in 2018, winning the 1,500m at both the Prefontaine Classic on May 26 and the USATF Outdoor Championships on June 23. Semenya holds South Africa’s national record in the event (3:59.92, set at Doha Diamond League in May). She won the 800m and set a new PB, without benefit of a pace rabbit, at Paris Diamond League on June 30 (Thu 5) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Carla moved to Rome in 1992 after seeing the movie Roman Holiday

RUN THE WORLD:  Carla van Kampen (57) from Westport Connecticut has lived in Rome, Italy for 26 years now. "I have never stopped feeling like a tourist," Carla says. "When I first came in 1992 Rome was a very different city, a bit gentler in some ways and definitely frustrating in others. Customer service was an unknown concept." However training in Rome was and is a dream. "I workout year-round at the Stadio delle Terme di Caracalla, with spectacular views of the ruins of the Baths of Caracalla! I rarely have to cancel a run because of bad weather, short of a torrid downpour. And the Italians are running crazy with races of all kinds every weekend of the year." she says.  She has been running since she was 11 or 12 years-old, motivated by watching the 1972 Olympics. "We would hold neighborhood 100 yard dashes on the private road flanking our house, boys and girls mixed. I loved the feeling of beating a boy! In high school I ran the 880 and the mile and was the captain of the first girls cross country team under the Title IX rule." Carla did not abandon running but did not run competivity for a few years.  "I only started running competitively again in my late 40s when I decided to run a marathon. To help prepare for the Florence Marathon in 2007 I enlisted the services of my club trainer and the rest is history...we have been together for 10 years (four marathons and more than 20 half marathons later)." Carla, however first love is racing on the track. "In 2012 I made the switch from the road Back to the track with success in my age-group in the 400 and 800 meters, and in June, winning a national 4x400 title in the category 50-54." Asked about this challenge, "The Run The World Global Run Challenge is what I love about running: from the fastest elite-level athlete participating to the non-competitive jogger, we are all part of a community passionate about this sport!" (Photo is from a race in Rome Called the "Miglio di Roma"....they were trying to re-create a 5th Avenue Mile. Carla is in red.) (Thu 5) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Running does not define Michael T Anderson but it is an integral part of his daily life

RUN THE WORLD: Michael T Anderson started running as a sophomore in college after he quit the baseball team, had put on weight and realized he needed to get back in shape.  "There was a race in November called the Turkey Trot which I wanted to run," he says.  "I trained all summer, losing about 30 pounds in six months."  Michael ended up coming in 8th overall and shocked everyone. "I was totally hooked. A year later in 1978 I ran my first marathon in 2:50 at the New York City Marathon at age 20.  That began a life long love with this sport that has never stopped," he says.   Running is an integral part of his daily life.  "I love running and it is part of my daily life. It doesn't define me, but has provided motivation, focus, competitiveness, dedication and spirit to my life."  He has logged in almost 130,000 miles since he started back in 1977.  He has run 53 marathons and two ultra-marathons.  "My PR is 2:25:02 at the New York City Marathon in 1981."  He has won four marathons and was part of a masters relay team that won the overall masters title at the Hood To Coast Relay (10th overall).  I asked him about being part of this challenge.  "I think this is an amazing endeavor! To show that this can be done with a little organization, determination and passion by so many people who are involved in this sport/activity is beyond description."  Michael (60) has lived in Atlanta GA since 1982.  "I have been married for 31 years to an ex-marathoner, Molly who has a PR of 3:15 and now is an endurance swimmer due to knee problems."  They have two children.  Most recently Michael ran the Peachtree 10K on July 4th logging these miles for Run The World.     (Thu 5) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Wilson kipsang, Eliud Kipchoge and Zersenay Tadese will face off at BMW Berlin Marathon

Wilson Kipsang is a strong contender.  Now 36, the Kenyan set his world record time of 2:03:23 in 2013 in Berlin. Kipchoge and Kipsang lined up last year with the target of breaking 2:03 as a key objective but such hopes were dashed by steady rain throughout. Kipchoge won in difficult conditions clocking 2:03:32 while Kipsang dropped out do to stomach issues. Another runner to be taken into consideration is Zersenay Tadese of Eritrea, five times a winner of the world half marathon title as well as world record holder for the distance. Eliud Kipchoge has a strong claim to be the greatest marathon runner of all time. He is the reigning Olympic champion, having won the title in Rio in 2016, three times a winner in London (2015, 16 and 18), twice winner of the BMW Berlin Marathon title as well as winner of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2014. He finished runner-up in Berlin in 2013 when Wilson Kipsang broke the world record. He broke into new territory in May last year when running 2:00:25 for the marathon distance, achieved on the Formula One circuit of Monza in Italy though substitute pacemakers made the time ineligible as a record. In Berlin on September 16 Eliud Kipchoge is keen to show what he can do in regular competition and under hopefully favorable weather conditions: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on Berlin. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.”  With good weather conditions the world record could fall Berlin.   (Thu 5) ⚡AMP
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Tyler Penner says he surprised himself by placing third at the Peachtree 10k today

America’s Tyler Penner surprised himself today at the AJC  Peachtree Road Race 10k.   He wrote, “In such a strong field I didn't know how well I could run. I had been working out alright, but not fantastic. Last week, I felt awful, and my confidence was not where it usually is. All that carried over to the race. I felt terrible in the first half, with doubts creeping into my mind. I was drifting off the back of the back at times, almost just wanting to let them go. I took a few minutes regroup and reset. I told myself, "I've made it this far, be tough, all that strength from the marathon should be kicking in anytime now." Surprisingly that worked. I began to stick my nose in the race, eventually getting to the front truly believing I could win. Unfortunately the speed at the end was not quite there, but it's coming back.”  Tyler finished third clocking 28:49 only four seconds back of Bernard Lagat.  It was a hot and humid day and this is a challenging course.   (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
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Many experts consider running to be the closest thing to a miracle drug

Many experts think human bodies are shaped the way they are because we evolved to be extremely effective endurance runners. The shapes of our hips and feet, the length of our legs, our shock-absorbing spinal discs, and our ability to sweat make it possible for us to run mile after mile. So it's perhaps no surprise that running is strongly associated with a number of benefits for our bodies and brains.   As a form of cardio exercise that's easily accessible, running is one of the most straightforward ways to get the important benefits of exercise. Since it improves aerobic fitness, running is a great way to help improve cardiovascular health. Plus, it burns calories and can build strength, among other things. There's also a long list of psychological benefits runners gain from their sport. Getting used to running, if you haven't done it in a while or ever, can be brutal. But once your body and mind start to acclimate, running can be blissful, meditative, and provide a sense of freedom.  One piece of advice from several experienced runners made a big difference during a race when they said: remember that you're running to have fun. (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Liz Dumon speical moments are training with a buddy when the conversation is your breathing and sounds of your feet hitting the ground

RUN THE WORLD: At the age of 49 Liz Duman joined the gym. Once fit enough she started running and it was love at first run. Running helped her lose 38 pounds.  A year later she ran her first half-marathon. "I live in a small town in South Africa next to the Kruger National Park and the Blyde Canyon," says Lize.  Running has become a very important part of her life.  "I have made the best friends, I love the challenges, grit and achievements. Running has become part of who I am," she says.   She likes running races, however.  "Running races is great, but the most special moments remain those training runs when you run with a running buddy and at times the only conversation is your breathing and sound of your feet hitting the ground."  Liz has been married for 25 years and have three boys.  Asked about why she joined this challenge.  "Run The World Challenge is a fantastic challenge, joining us together across age, gender, proficiency or location to celebrate the one thing we all love - running."  (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Yuki Kawauchi confirms another marathon and says he wants to match up races to his desire to travel the world

Yuki Kawauchi has confirmed another marathon.  He will run the 33rd annual Huawei Venice marathon October 28.  One of Yuki’s goals is to run 100 marathons under 2:20 and he wants to do that or better in Venice.  He just ran his 80th Sub 2:20 in Australia.  Kawauchi is much loved in the running community for not only winning Boston but in challenging weather conditions, but because he embodies that ideal of an athlete who makes running his hobby.  The marathon runner of the "next door" or the "citizen runner" as many say. He plays extravagantly, as when he ran a half marathon disguised as a Panda or in moccasins, a jacket and a tie. But Kawauchi is above all the man of the records. He is the only athlete in history to have run two marathons in 2:09 within 14 days.  He ran two 2:08 marathons within 42 days.  And he is the only one to have raced for 26 times under 2:12' and 78 times under 2:20.  Since the beginning of this year has already run five marathons (winning four), 11 half marathons, 2 ultras and by the end of 2018 he has plans of running five more marathons including Venice.  "The Venice Marathon has an important double meaning," says Yuki, "my first Italian marathon and my first time in Italy and in Venice. I come to win and I can not wait to do it because, in addition to running, I would like to taste Italian cuisine and your tiramisu that I love. Food and marathon will make this weekend unforgettable. My dream is to run 100 marathons under 2:20." continues Kawauchi, "but what matters most to me is to match races to my desire to travel and get to know the world." (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Aaron Salvador lives and runs on the Beautiful Island of Palau

RUN THE WORLD: Aaron Salvador says, "Running in Palau is a great experience."  Palau is a little country made up of hundreds of islands in the western Pacific Ocean.  Originally from the Philippines 27-year-old Aaron currently is residing in Palau for the last three years. He works as a full time waiter in a restaurant. "I love to read books, snorkeling and strolling around the islands with natural sceneries and historical sites," he says.  While in school he discovered that he had potential in running.  "But because of the ways of life I've been apart of running due to work. But then when I came here to the Pristine Paradise of Palau I started running again and enjoy every mile." He has done a lot of 5K's, 10K's and always finishes in the top three. He also won the 2017 Palau Marathon half marathon the the 2018 full marathon. Asked about running in Palau.  "I'm not Palauan by blood but in my heart, Palau is my home. There are lots of hills and beautiful sceneries,” he says. Aaron’s passion is running. "After reading the stories of Runners doing the challenge, it gave me reason to join this Run The World Challenge, because I was inspired.  If they can, why can't I.  I want to challenge myself to where my capabilities lasts, to test myself and to prove that noting is impossible. With great determination l am aiming for my goals. Ill start, i will go through and I will run until the end."  Aaron set his goal at 50 miles per week and already logged in 10 miles on the first day of Run The World.  (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Mission accomplished, a five-time Olympian Bernard Lagat wins AJC Peachtree Road Race

Bernard Lagat wanted to see it again. He was determined to return to Atlanta and win The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race after finishing fifth a year ago. Mission accomplished: With a time of 28:45, Lagat won the 2018 Peachtree Road Race.  “I wanted to come back again, and I wanted to win this,” Lagat said. “So I trained so hard. I decided not to race in some other races before this. My last race was in March. From March until this, there’s a lot of races I missed. But I thought it wouble be worth the sacrifice.” Lagat, a five-time Olympian, prepared for the hill challenges presented in the course. He had a much deeper understanding of it than a year ago. (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
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Stephanie Bruce wins the women's elite at the AJC Peachtree Road race

Stephanie Bruce, of Flagstaff, Arizona, won the 2018 Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race. It was Bruce’s first Peachtree win with a time of 32:21, defeating defending champ Aliphine Tulimuk (32:29). The victory also clinched Bruce the USA Track and Field 10K championship. “It was a long time coming,” Bruce said. “I’ve been trying to win a national title for the last 10 years.” Bruce has two sons, Riley and Hudson. She was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2010, but has battled through the condition as one of the country’s top runners. She won first in the Synchrony Financial Rock ‘n’ Roll Arizona Half Marathon in January. She won second in the Freihofer’s Run for Women 5K on June 2, and third in the USATF Outdoor Championships 10,000 meters in June 21. When she crossed the finish line, Bruce dropped to her knees. “It was relief, it was all the years of putting in hard work,” she said. “It was the heat and humidity Atlanta provided. The crowds were incredible. This really is ‘Running City USA.’” (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
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