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Eritrean and asylum seeker Abedom Beyene, wants to be the next Mo Farah

An unaccompanied asylum seeker, whose journey to England saw him walk across the Sahara desert and cross the Mediterranean, says he hopes to be the "next Mo Farah". Eritrean Abedom Beyene, 17, arrived in the UK last year and was placed in a supported living home in Northampton. He has become a regular at the town’s parkrun, running it in a personal best time of 15 minutes 37 seconds. His coach Peter Currington said Mr Beyene is "probably the most talented youngster I have ever come across". Mr Beyene told the BBC he wants to be "the next Mo Farah", adding "I'm hoping to be a champion". (Thu 18) ⚡AMP
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Former Commonwealth Games marathon champion Flomena Cheyech has confirmed she will be competing at the Shanghai Marathon on November 18

Cheyech has had torrid season this year and barely held on to finish the Nagoya Marathon in March, finishing 19th in a slow time of 2:33:01. However, the 36-year-old has since shaken off the fatigue and injury that slowed her down and is focused on winning in China. "I have been out of competition for long because of the injury I got in Japan. But it has since healed and I am back in competition," said Cheyech after finishing second in 71:05 in the Eldoret Half marathon. Now she is focused on winning in Shanghai next month. "I normally run a few road races to prepare my body and gauge how good it is for the marathon distance. Shanghai is the next stop for me in November, and hopefully I will be able to run well and win the gold medal," she added. Ethiopian athletes have provided the stiffest challenge to Kenya's dominance, and Cheyech believes she is over the worst of her injury concerns and is ready to rise up again. She will be up against last year's champion Lydia Cheromei and Margaret Agai. Ethiopia are expected to field last year's runner-up Hirut Tibebu Damte and Gulume Tollesa Chala. (Thu 18) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Eliud kipchoge wins the Sjak Startimes sports personality award for the month of September

World marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is the Sports Personality of the Month for September 2018. Kipchoge becomes the 15th recipient of the award sponsored by Pay TV provider, StarTimes. Kipchoge got the accolade after setting a new marathon world record of 2 hours 01 minute 39 seconds on September 16 in the Berlin Marathon. Kipchoge sliced one minute 18 seconds from the previous record of 2 hours 02 minutes 57 seconds set by Dennis Kimetto in 2014. In that breath taking feat, Kipchoge also bettered the world’s best marks for 35km and 40km previously held by Kimetto. The 33-year-old blipped one hour 41 minutes, one second at 35km and one hour 55 minutes 32 seconds at 40km. In an interview, Kipchoge said the award came as a surprise to him though it will act a morale booster as he focuses on future assignments. "It is exactly one month since I broke the record on September 16 and this being October 16, I think it is a good timing on your part," Kip told the journalists. Kipchoge was awarded a 43 inch StarTimes Digital TV Set, Sh100,000 shillings and the winner’s trophy. (Thu 18) ⚡AMP
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A couple will start the Detroit Free Press Marathon as an engaged couple and finish as a married couple

A Michigan couple plans to pause at the half way mark of the Detroit Free Press Marathon to exchange vows and say their "I do's" before completing the international excursion through Detroit and Windsor on Sunday October 21.  Whitney Black, 31, and Steven Phillips, 33, plan to start as an engaged couple and finish the marathon as a married couple.  The couple has long been overcoming adversity with the help of their running habit, according to spokespeople for the marathon. Black was in a vehicle accident about 14 years ago, requiring 20 surgeries and years of physical therapy after being told she would not be able to walk again.  She then met Phillips, who encouraged her to train for a marathon. During training, she was hit by another vehicle, requiring another surgery. About eight years ago, Phillips weighed 300 pounds and wanted to get his health on track. He chose running. He's since lost 130 pounds and will run his 14th marathon this weekend. Because the two share a passion for running, they decided to forgo a traditional wedding and hold a brief ceremony during the marathon, at what they consider the perfect moment. The two plan to exchange vows in a five to seven-minute ceremony, with the bride donning a visor with a wedding veil and a shirt stating "Something Borrowed Something Blue at Mile 13.1 We'll Say I Do," and the groom sporting a tuxedo shirt.  (Thu 18) ⚡AMP
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The Canadian indoor 1,500m record-holder and Pan Am silver medallist, Nicole Sifuentes has decided at 32 to hang up her spikes

Two-time Olympian and Canadian indoor 1,500m record-holder Nicole Sifuentes, 32, originally of Winnipeg has announced her retirement from the sport of track and field. Nicole Sifuentes says, “I wonder sometimes how running became my job. As a child I didn’t have any aspirations to be an athlete.”  Sifuentes represented Canada at the 2012 Olympics in London and 2016 in Rio. Sifuentes made it to the semi-finals at both Olympics. Her lifetime 1500m best is 4:03.97. Last year, the Saucony-sponsored athlete won the B.A.A. Invitational Mile in Boston, breaking the course record in 4:33.7. This year, she won it again. Her last national team was at NACAC in Toronto this summer, where she finished 5th, and her last race was the Fifth Avenue Mile on September 9th. She finished ninth. Sifuentes wrote in a recent blog post looking back on her career, she realized the fire was gone, and that it was time to hang up her spikes. (Wed 17) ⚡AMP
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Sal Pellegrino will run the NYC Marathon for the 27th time on his 75th birthday

Sal Pellegrino will be celebrating his 75th birthday, with some 50,000 people on the streets of New York City.  Sal will be running in the New York City Marathon, the 27th time he's tackled the challenging course that starts in Staten Island and traverses all five boroughs before ending in Central Park. Pellegrino ran his first NYC Marathon at age 48 and has returned every year except 2012 when the event was canceled in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, and one year when he had surgery. He ran solo for the first 15 marathons but for the past dozen years has acted as a volunteer guide with Achilles International, which aids disabled participants.  Over the years, he has guided people who are blind and deaf, amputees, and those with multiple sclerosis, vertigo, and Lou Gehrig's disease. This year, he'll run the course with a woman who suffers from dizziness and seizures. "It's quite an inspiration that they have the courage to do this," Pellegrino said. He has no plans to stop running any time soon.   (Wed 17) ⚡AMP
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Jimmy Magee is running the Marine Corps Marathon to honor father's legacy

When most people run a marathon, the ending is the hardest part. But 58-year-old Jimmy Magee, of Conway, Arkansas, is hoping to be the exception to this. The pediatrician is running the race to honor his father, a World War II veteran who died 20 years ago. “He fought on Iwo Jima, so I was particularly intrigued by the Marine Corps Marathon not because I was in the Marines but because my dad was,” Magee said. “I think it’s unique and especially meaningful to me that this marathon actually ends at the Iwo Jima Memorial. That has a special meaning to me.” Corporal Kenneth Magee served in the 5th Marine Division, which was part of the invasion of Iwo Jima in 1945. The statue, overlooking the Potomac River, of those soldiers struggling to mount a waving flag atop a hill is an iconic memorial to those who suffered through an especially bloody, and deadly, battle. Corporal Magee survived it, but just barely. Training for the race is hard enough, but the summer and early fall in Arkansas has been hot and humid this year, he said. He admits grueling is the word that applies, but “thinking about the number of hours I’m putting in doing it, it doesn’t even hold a candle to what the soldiers went through and what our dad went through,” he said. (Tue 16) ⚡AMP
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2018 Airtel Delhi Half Marathon are using corporate honchos for its pacers

India’s leading corporate heads have confirmed their participation in the amateur section of the 2018 Airtel Delhi Half Marathon. Procam International has announced that top corporate leaders will be official pacers for the amateurs half marathon and 10Km.  Distance running has become a lifestyle activity for many in India and corporates heads will lead the way. With the ever-increasing number of running events, it is imperative to note that a lot of corporate leaders have been participating in marathons and are training seriously throughout the year. This time around, these CEOs, MDs, VPs will not be bettering their personal bests, but we’ll be helping others complete their running goals.  “It gives us immense motivation and encouragement to see leaders from the corporate world joining us in our running movement”, said Vivek Singh from the race organizers. “We are delighted to announce that all the pacers at this year’s edition are top-level executives, who are not just helping their firms run a business – but also helping amateur runners achieve their goal.”  (Tue 16) ⚡AMP
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Seattle’s Jason Damazo wins the Maui Marathon

Eight years ago, Jason Damazo and his wife, Lindsey, visited Maui for their honeymoon. Fast forward to Sunday, and the 34-year-old Seattle native and his wife were again celebrating on the Valley Isle, sharing a warm embrace after he was the first to cross the finish line in front of the Kaanapali Beach Hotel to win the Maui Marathon. Damazo finished in a time of 2 hours, 52 minutes, 2 seconds, 10 seconds ahead of runner-up Sage Sarchet of Wailuku. James Newby of Squamish, B.C., finished third in 2:57:21. Damazo credited Sarchet for pushing him throughout the 26.2-mile trek from Hookele Street in Kahului to Kaanapali. “He almost ran with me every step of the way,” Damazo said. “I definitely wouldn’t have been able to make that time without a companion for most of the route.” Damazo said Sarchet broke away from him around the 20-mile mark of the race, but he was able to keep him in sight before he was able to catch up and take the lead in the final stretch of the race. Hannah Bocksnick of Honolulu won the women’s race in 3:25:47. Her time was good for 10th overall. It was only the 27-year-old’s second marathon ever. (Tue 16) ⚡AMP
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Sydney McLaughlin is a 2016 Olympian, an NCAA champion and now a signed athlete with new Balance

2016 Olympian, Sydney McLaughlin and NCAA champion has joined the New Balance team. McLaughlin burst onto the scene in 2016 when she qualified for the Rio Olympics as a 16-year-old high school student. The 400m hurdler now has nearly 300,000 Instagram followers and a multi-year New Balance contract. McLaughlin graduated high school in 2017 and started at the University of Kentucky last fall. Many running fans were surprised at the hurdler’s decision to go to school as opposed to turning pro right out of the gate, but her first year in the NCAA was very successful. The freshman managed to set the collegiate outdoor record and world junior record in the 400m hurdles, running 52.75, and a world junior record in the indoor 400m of 50.36. Immediately after the NCAA Outdoor Championships, McLaughlin announced that she would not be returning to collegiate running. McLaughlin said in a press release, “New Balance has a long-standing history as an excellent running company and they are the perfect partner for me. I’m thrilled to join the Team New Balance family, a brand that not only shares the same values and principles that are important to me but also supports its athletes on and off the track.” (Tue 16) ⚡AMP
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The RTW team logged 24,901 miles and 52.4 of these miles were run inside an NFL stadium

Did you Know? Run The World Challenge 2 team members Becca Pizzi and Michael Wardian both ran the marathon (first woman and first man) that was run inside the Gillette Stadium in Boston September 29.  This 114 lap race was the first-ever marathon held entirely inside and on the field of an NFL football stadium.  Dave McGillivray (also a RTWC 2 team member) was the race director. "Dave's marathons are my absolute favorite and his DMSE support team is second to none," says Becca.  A ton of funds were raised for the New England Patriots Foundation helping the homeless...Both Becca and Michael have signed up for the RTW Challenge 3 team.  Run The World is an event created by lifetime runner 70-year-old Bob Anderson.  He ran 260 miles for challenge 2 and even through he did not complete anything close to what Becca and Michael did, he still doubled his normal weekly mileage.  Many team members were also motivated to run more hitting milestones of 50, 100, 200 or more miles before we finished. "The finish line of the RTW Challenge is when our team have logged 24,901 miles," says Bob Anderson.  It took 44 days 18 hours and 29 minutes to complete the task this time.  Runners age 11-74 ran miles in 24 different countries. In the little country of Palau 1,187 miles were logged. 74-year-old Frank Bozanich ran and logged 801 miles in the 44 days. There are so many amazing stories. What has become really popular and a good motivator is the Run The World Feed.  Many team members post notes and photos daily for other members to leave comments. "I read every post and look at every photo and comment on each one," says Bob. "I started this with Challenge 1 and found this was a good motivator."  Lize Dumon in South Africa wrote, "The RTW community is very precious to me. It is like an extended running family, a safe place to share everything running."  RTW Challenge 3 starts October 29. The Challenge will help get you in better shape so you can reach your goals. This can be a tough time of the year to get out the door.  We will help each other.  Sign up today and join our team.      (Mon 15) ⚡AMP
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Altra announced the addition of Kara Goucher to their Elite Professional Team

Altra is excited to announce the addition of Boulder’s Kara Goucher to their Elite Team of professional athletes.  Goucher is one of the most accomplished female distance runners in the world. She has represented the US at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and 2012 London Olympics, and she brought home a World Silver Medal in the 10,000m from Osaka, Japan. She has many accolades ranging from the track distances to the marathon which includes the fastest marathon debut by an American woman. “I’m excited to partner with Altra as I enter the next phase of reaching my goals,” Goucher said. “They’re different than they were 10 years ago, but they still matter and they’re still big. In addition, I am looking forward to teaming up with a like-minded brand who gives back to the running community, believes in clean sport and cares about women’s running and all generations of the female athlete. Together, we hope to motivate, inspire and lead by example.” (Mon 15) ⚡AMP
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Men’s and women’s course records were broken at The 2018 Ironman World Championships

The 2018 Ironman World Championships produced two winning performances that made history. Both the men’s and women’s course records were broken with inspiring performances from Patrick Lange and Daniela Ryf on Saturday in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. In front of a roaring crowd on the coast of Kailua Bay, the women’s course record was shattered once again by Daniela Ryf, who completed the ultimate endurance test with a final time of 8:26:16. The performance marked Ryf’s fourth straight title, which means that the Swiss athlete is one of three women in history to win Kona more than three times in a row. She follows Hall of Famer Paula Newby-Fraser and Natascha Badmann in her accomplishment. Saturday’s race was arguably Ryf’s most hard-fought championship as she was stung by a jellyfish during the swim portion of the 140.6-mile course. “It’s incredible. Maybe the jellyfish gave me some superpower. I don’t know,” she said on the live television broadcast after crossing the finish line. Ryf endured the pain and completed the 2.4-mile swim in 57:27, at which point she was in 14th place. She fought her way back throughout the 112-mile bike portion with a split of 4:26:07, a new course record. The previous record was 4:44:19 set by Jodi Jackson in 1999. Ryf closed out the race with a time of 2:57:05 in the 26.2-mile run. Lange broke the finish line tape in a record time of 7:52:39. He is the first athlete in Ironman’s 40-year history to break eight hours on the grueling Kona course. His splits were 50:37 for the swim, 4:16:04 for the bike, and 2:41:31 for the run. (Mon 15) ⚡AMP
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The 62nd Annual Isle of Wight Marathon was won by Gary Marshall his first race ever

Gary Marshall (bib 102) was the surprise winner of the Isle of Wight Marathon (UK) on Sunday in a time of 2:58:06.  Despite his victory, it was still some way off the men's record, which is held by Peter Thompson who clocked 2.40.29.  Gary described his victory as beyond his wildest dreams, although he had aimed at running a sub 3 hour time.  He was well in control during the first half of the race, before experiencing heavy legs. Gary held on though and was pleased to record a qualifying time for the 2020 London Marathon. In contrast, Matt Cheyney of Denmead Striders has clocked up 39 Marathons, with a best time of 2:51 in London. Running steadily throughout he took the runner up slot after 21 miles and finished in 2:58:43.  Elizabeth Steward was the first woman clocking 3:34:26. She said that she had enjoyed the race, but it was a real challenge. (Mon 15) ⚡AMP
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Elisha Kipchirchir Rotich won the 35th annaul Eindhoven Marathon in 2:07:32

Elisha Kipchirchir Rotich from Kenya, won the 35th annual Eindhoven Marathon this weekend. He set a personal record. He clocked 2:07:32. His fellow-countryman Laban Mutai came second. Laban Mutai set a time of 02:07:37. Vincent Kipsang Rono, also from Kenya, finished third. He finished in 02:07:50. All three winners set personal records. From start to finish, Kipchirchir Rotich was part of the leading group. Though the number of athletes in this group declined during the marathon, he remained part of it. With twelve kilometers to go, only six runners remained in the leading group. Two kilometers later, the group fell apart with Kipchirchir Rotich continuing on his own. He ran the last two kilometers leading. The winning time of 2:07:32 is slightly slower than the previous record of 2 hours and 6 minutes. The warm weather slowed the field this year.  (Mon 15) ⚡AMP
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Samuel Tsegay wins the 40th annual 20km de Paris on Sunday

Samuel Tsegay and Ophélie Claude-Boxberger were the winners of the 40th edition of the IAAF Silver Label road race in 58:23 and 1:09:48 respectively. From the gun, a large group detached itself from the field. The leading pack then splintered into two parts. Tsegay, Gojjam Belayinem of Ethiopia, Felicien Muhitira of Burundi and Morhad Amdouni of France reached five in 14:40. They were followed five seconds later by a group of six men, including the 2015 winner Stephen Ogari and France’s Hassan Chahdi. Amdouni, the 2016 champion, was forced to drop out due to calf pain, leaving Tsegay, Belayinem and Muhitira in contention for victory. The trio passed through the halfway point in 28:56, meaning the second five-kilometre section was covered in 14:16. Alfred Cherop and Chahdi detached themselves from the chasing group and were 19 seconds behind the leaders at 10km. Belayinem couldn’t maintain the pace and was dropped by Tsegay and Muhitira, who passed through 15 in 43:26, 38 seconds ahead of Belayinem. Chahdi remained in fourth place in 44:20, three seconds ahead of Cherop. Tsegay, who was a last-minute entrant, made his move soon after 15 . He built a small lead over the Burundian, who wasn’t able to answer to the attack but maintained a good rhythm. Tsegay, the 2014 world half marathon silver medalist, maintained his advantage to cross the line in 58:23. It was only his second race in 2018 following a 1:02:08 half marathon clocking in March. Muhitira held on to take second place in 58:35, 12 seconds after the winner. Samuel Targaryen  (Mon 15) ⚡AMP
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Sinead Diver age 41 clocked the fastest female marathon time on Australian soil

Sinead Diver, a 41-year-old mother of two clocked a 2:25:19 marathon this morning.  This is the second fastest marathon ever by an Irish-born female athlete. The Irish native and Australian international Sinead Diver posted a fantastic 2:25:19 to set a new course record at the Medibank Melbourne Marathon on Sunday (October 14). Diver emigrated to Australia in 2002, and on Sunday she showed that when it comes to the marathon running, age is only a number after taking over six minutes off her personal best. The 41 year-old, who has two young sons, is now the second fastest Irish-born female, and her winning time is also the quickest by an Australian female athlete on Australian soil. (Sun 14) ⚡AMP
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Kenyans Rebecca Korir and Ednah Mukwana will headline the women´s field at Beirut Marathon

Kenyans Ednah Mukwana and Rebecca Korir  will headline the elite women field at the 16th edition of the  Beirut Marathon on November 11. Mukwana has a best of 2:30:24 which she ran to take victory at the Zhengzhou Marathon earlier this year, while Korir has a best of 2:29:16, which she ran to finish third at the Rotterdam Marathon in 2016. Another who will be in contention is Lithuania’s Raza Drazdauskaite, a three-time Olympian who clocked 2:29:29 to finish 26th at the London Games in 2012. Belarus’s Sviatlana Kudzelich comes in with impressive form at the shorter distances. The 31-year-old was a European indoor silver medallist over 3000m in 2015 and earlier this year she set her half marathon personal best of 1:11:45 in Prague. Ethiopia will have a trio of strong contenders in the form of Almensh Herpha, Medina Deme Armino and Nigist Muluneh Desta. Herpa took victory at the Lagos City Marathon on her most recent outing over this distance, while the Ethiopian has previous form at the BLOM Bank Beirut Marathon, finishing third in 2016. Armino has been enjoying a breakthrough year after lowering her PB to 2:33:17 when taking victory at the Treviso Marathon, while Desta lowered her best to 2:36:54 when finishing third at the Shenzhen Marathon last December. Another potential champion is Kazakhstan’s Gulzhanat Zhanatbek, who finished 14th in the marathon at the Asian Games in Jakarta in August. There will also be a strong local contingent, with Nisrine Njeim, Nadine Kalot and Hiba Traboulsi hoping to make an impact against their international rivals. Fellow Lebanese elite athletes Chirine Njeim, Nadia Dagher and Zainab Bazzi will tackle the half marathon, where Njeim will be targeting the Lebanese record. Athletes will compete for a first prize of US $15,000 with additional time bonuses on offer. There will also be substantial prize money and time bonuses available for the first Lebanese finishers. (Sun 14) ⚡AMP
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The Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games was a pivotal point in athletics history

After getting underway on October 13, during the eight days of athletics in the Mexican capital records tumbled with an astonishing frequency but the Games – and in no sport more so than athletics – also caught the zeitgeist of the era with technical innovations and social changes, many of which have had a lasting impact 50 years later. The tone was set at the opening ceremony for the Games, which had taken place a day earlier in the 83,700-capacity Estadio Olympico Universitario that was subsequently to play host to the athletics, when the Mexican hurdler Norma Enriqueta Basilio became the first woman to light the flame in the Olympic cauldron. It was an occasion that was seen while it happened in many parts of the world and, thanks to developments in satellite technology, much of the Olympics was also transmitted live. For the first time, athletics at an Olympic Games was also available to an international audience in color, even though only a fraction of the global population had TV sets capable of receiving such images. Nevertheless, the pictures transmitted from the athletics events in Mexico City truly captured the world’s imagination in a way that had not been done before. Mexico City also saw the start of the Kenyan gold rush at a global level with three victories, including Kip Keino’s audacious gun-to-tape 1500m triumph in an Olympic record of 3:34.9 which defied the conventional logic considering the 2240m altitude. It was to be 1984 before his Olympic record was improved. At the time the headlines were dominated by the effect Mexico City’s altitude had on the endurance events and the demise of well-known and favoured runners like Australia’s world record holder Ron Clarke in such unfamiliar conditions. Relatively little credit was given internationally at the time to the feats of Keino and his fellow Kenyan gold medalists Naftali Temu and Amos Biwott – although they were appropriately feted at home – but retrospectively they can be seen as the defining moment when Kenya became an athletics global superpower and their success acted as a catalyst for Africa’s domination of endurance events today. (Sat 13) ⚡AMP
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The Run The World Challenge 2 team has finished and here are the awards

"We have finished," says Lize Dumon (photo) a RTW Challenge 2 team member from South Africa, "Great achievement! But this morning, going out for my run just felt that little bit harder. I haven't realized how precious this RTW community has become to me. It is like an extended running family, a safe place to share everything running without rolling eyes and sighs from non-runners. It has become a place where I learn so much about running from reading everybody's posts and a place of immense encouragement! I don't want to leave this place... bring it on Challenge 3!" Run The World Global Run Challenge is a global event celebrating running, motivating the team, inspiring others and completing the goal.  The 131 member RTW Challenge 2 team ran and logged miles in 24 countries reaching a total of 24,901 miles in 44 days 18 hours 29 minutes.  "This event is a real motivator. Many of our members (including me) ran many more miles than usual," says Run The World Challenge Team Caption, Bob Anderson. 34-year-old team member Carmen Gair from South Africa posted, "Thank you...for this amazing challenge...thank you...for motivating me to run more than double my usual mileage in this amount of time." She ran and logged 151 miles in 44 days.  Team members added this challenge to their existing goals and used the Challenge to further motivate them.  "Here are the special awards for our RTW Challenge 2 team," says Bob Anderson who reached 260.66 miles himself. For Outstanding achievement: Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 801 miles...Most Inspiring: Lize Dumon set her goal to reach 200 miles and she did that. She also motivated other team members in South Africa that she recruited to reach their goal as well...Most Motivating: Aaron L. Salvador from the little country of Palau logged 377.99 miles, recruited others and posted a note and photo everyday...For Best Performance: Willie Korir from Kenya logged the most miles (993.88) which is an average of 22.5 miles per day. This is being shared with Joel Maina Mwangi also from Kenya who not only logged in 610.44 miles but he raced four half marathons during the Challenge period clocking 1:02:52, 1:03:19, 1:02:50 and 1:02:54...Five Most Inspiring stories: based on their story posted on My Best Runs: (this award goes to the five who received the most views on My Best Runs) Joyce Lee (1178 views), Michael Wardian (851 views), Gloria Nasr (616 views), Joel Maina Mqangi (492 views), Pete Magill (400 views)...Best Youngest performance: Zander Brister age 11 logged 16.32 miles. He ran one mile in Hollister clocking 6:19 and he also averaged 7:42/mile pace at the Pacific Grove Double Road Race 15k...Best Oldest performance: Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 801 miles. Shared with 71-year-old Paul Shimon who logged 655.37 miles...Top Fifteen Spirit awards: (Based on posts on the RTW Feed) Aaron L Salvador, Michael Anderson, Brent Weigner, Danilo Purlia, Larry Allen, Asya Cabral, Lize Dumon, Roger Wright, Geoffrey Smith, Carmen Gair, Annie Conneau, Joseph Brazil, Vince Martignetti, Marnie Margolis, Willie Korir... Best Single Run: Michael Wardian when he ran 184.5 miles in 36 hours 48 minutes 14 seconds on the C&O Canal Trail...Notable Mentions: Boaz Kipyego logged 788.61 miles and came to the United States and placed fourth at the Twin City Marathon. Rosaline Nyawira was first female logging 454.37 miles. Brent Weigner (69) has been running races every weekend including running a marathon in another country Sri Lanka. He logged 258 miles. James Kalani has gotten back into running (this challenge motivating him) and has already run 4 miles at 5:33 pace. He logged 252 miles. Ultra marathon star Gloria Nasr from France logged 237 miles. Rosaura Tennant ran both the Berlin and Chicago marathon during this Challenge. Becca Pizzi was first woman in the marathon run inside a NFL stadium in Boston..."Everyone is a winner on our team," says Bob Anderson.  "I can't wait to do this again."  RTW Challenge 3 start Oct 29.  (Sat 13) ⚡AMP
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World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei has been added to the women’s elite field for the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

World record holder Jepkosgei joins Delhi Half Marathon to challenge Dibaba, brightening prospect of a mouth-watering head-to-head with three-time Olympic gold medallist Tirunesh Dibaba. The pair have met twice before. Firstly, at last year’s Ras al Khaimah Hal Marathon when Jepkosgei finished third and the Ethiopian legend was fifth; secondly in May this year at the Manchester 10km in Great Britain when Dibaba (whose participation in the ADHM 2018 has been previously announced) got the upper hand with a convincing win – 31:08 to 31:57 – with the Kenyan runner in second place. However, Jepkosgei will come to the ADHM 2018, scheduled for October 21, in fine form buoyed by a half marathon win over a classy local field in a high-altitude race in her native Kenya last Sunday. “The Airtel Delhi Half Marathon is my first-ever trip to India and so I am very much looking forward to visiting and also competing against, once again, Tirunesh Dibaba as well as the rest of the field of accomplished and confident women,” said the 24-year-old Jepkosgei. (Sat 13) ⚡AMP
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David Sinclair and Rachel Schilkowsky were the winners at the 25th annual Hartford Marathon

David Sinclair and Rachel Schilkowsky were the men's and women's winners of the 25th running of the Hartford Marathon. Sinclair, of Peru, Vermont, clocked 2:18:20 Saturday, about 3 minutes longer than the course record. Schilkowsky, of Providence, Rhode Island, finished 9th overall clocking 2:41:03, about 8 minutes longer than the women's record. More than 10,000 runners took to Hartford-area streets on a cool and rainy morning. There was also a half marathon, a team 26.2-mile relay and a 5K. Three racers continued their streak of completing every Hartford Marathon: Peter Hawley, Andrew Bartlett and Robert Kopac. (Sat 13) ⚡AMP
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A young couple tried to stay focused on training for the Marine Corps Marathon

The 43rd Marine Corps Marathon will be 30-year-old Kevin Rodriguez, an active duty Marine, first marathon. It’ll also be the Corpus Christi, Texas, native’s first trip to the nation’s capital. But amid all that excitement, one could probably forgive him if he doesn’t run quite as well as he had originally hoped, since training for the race has fallen somewhat on his list of priorities. Rodriguez is stationed at Camp Lejeune, in North Carolina, and Hurricane Florence made landfall only about 50 miles south of his home in the nearby city of Jacksonville. “We’re trying to stay with it,” he admitted. “Right now his wife Susanna is a lot more committed than I am.” Susanna Rodriguez used to be an active duty Marine, too. In fact, that’s how the two met; and it’s why they chose to run this race together. (Sat 13) ⚡AMP
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Jake Robertson has been training hard in Kenya and is focused on running very fast at Canada’s Waterfront Marathon Oct 21

What an amazing year it has been for Jake Robertson, a New Zealand who has been training in Kenya for the last ten years.  Jake started off the year in Houston where he won the half marathon there in 60:01.  Many did not know him before that race and in fact he had to get himself there to run the race.  This would soon change.  At the Lake Biwa marathon in Japan he clocked 2:08:26, a new NZ national Record.  Then he won the Crescent City 10k with a very fast 27:28 blowing away the field.  Next up was the Commonwealth Games 10000m on the track.  He pushed the pace and finished in 27:32. Then there was Beach to Beacon in Portland, Maine.  In hot weather he wins clocking 27:38.  Most recently he broke one hour for the half running second to Mo Farah clocking 59:57.  Jake posted today, “I’ve trained hard, I’m ready.  I’m coming to Canada for something special on Sunday October 21st.  I am running the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. If you’re not running I hope you’re cheering us on, come down.”  Jake’s training in Kenya has been going well and weather permitting he is ready to run very fast in Toronto.  (Fri 12) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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This piece of Friday news could not be better - Dave McGillivray is on the road to recovery

Boston Marathon Director Dave McGillivray under went open heart triple bypass surgery this morning.  We are excited to report that the surgery went well and he is on his way to recovery.  His DMSE team posted, “Your love and support have been truly heart warming (pun intended).”  Millions of his friends around the world were cheering for Dave today. Dave wrote a couple of days ago,  “As you can imagine, a lot of thoughts (good and not so good) are swirling around my head. However, I’ve come to terms with all this now and realize how fortunate I am that this was caught, that I get a second chance and that I have the best medical care in the country.” (Fri 12) ⚡AMP
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A eight-time Olympic sprint champion Usain Bolt scored the Mariners’ third and fourth goals for Central Coast Mariners

Usain Bolt marked his first start in professional football (soccer) with two goals for Central Coast Mariners to beat Macarthur South West 4-0 in a preseason friendly. Bolt, a eight-time Olympic sprint champion scored the Mariners’ third and fourth goals for Central Coast Mariners. He celebrated with his trademark lightning bolt celebration. “My first start and scoring two goals, it’s a good feeling,” the 32-year-old Bolt said after the game. “I’m happy I could come here and show the world I’m improving,” he added. (Fri 12) ⚡AMP
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France's Morhad Amdouni is going after his second title at the 40th edition of 20km de Paris

Amdouni, the winner in 2016, was forced to withdraw from last year’s edition due to injury which in his absence was won by Kenyan Collins Chebii. Amdouni looks to be the favorite following his successful 10,000m title-winning run at the European Championships in Berlin in August. He clocked in 28:11.22 on that occasion and holds a PB of 27:36.80 set in May. Four days later the 30-year-old Frenchman won bronze in the 5000m and hasn’t raced since. Stephen Ogari should be one of his main rivals. The Kenyan won here in 2015, one year prior to Amdouni and eight seconds faster, 59:11 to 59:19. Gauging Ogari’s form, however, is difficult as he has only run two 3000m races this year, both with modest times. Alfred Cherop of Kenya holds the fastest PB of the field over the distance with 58:20, but that dates back to 2012. Cherop, who has a 27:59 10km lifetime best, was third in 2016 in 59:25. More recently, he clocked 1:01:58 over 20km in May. Rwanda’s Felicien Muhitira and Nicholas Mulinge Makau could be also be in contention for the podium. The former was fourth at last year’s edition in 58:43 and the latter recorded a 15km PB of 44:19 this year. Elvis Tabarach, 21, will also have a say. He finished fifth last year but was credited with the same time as Muhitira. The men’s course record of 57:19 set in 2005 shouldn’t be in jeopardy. (Fri 12) ⚡AMP
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71-year-old Kiran Majmudar will be running his seventh Hartford Marathon

The hardest part of doing a marathon, Kiran Majmudar said, was joining his first training group. He was 65 years old, training to run his first marathon at what is now the Eversource Hartford Marathon. “I thought I’d be an embarrassment to the group,” he remembers. “I didn’t know. I thought they were all younger. Come to find out, they are young, old, everything in between. Some are stronger, some not so strong. Mothers and daughters, husband and wives.” Majmudar, of Enfield, fit right in. He finished his first marathon in Hartford in 2012 in 5:35:03.  It was a bucket list item for Majmudar, now 71. But he liked it so much, he decided to do it again. And again. “I just wanted to cross the finish line [at the first one],” he said. “After that, I did better. Because somehow you get addicted to it.” He’ll be back for Saturday’s 26.2-mile race starting at 8 a.m. in front of the State Capitol. It will be his seventh straight year at Hartford. (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Wesley Korir won the 2012 Boston Marathon and wants to win this year's BLOM Bank Beirut Marathon

Wesley Korir won the 2012 Boston Marathon and has not raced since April 2017 but after taking time out from his political career, the 35-year-old is planning to get back to winning ways at next month’s race in the Lebanese capital. “Everything is going well, I’m trying to get in shape after politics and run full-time again,” said Korir. “Getting a win in Beirut will give me a boost for me as I get back to the top level.” To succeed he will have to be at his best, with Ethiopia’s Bazu Worku, who has a best of 2:05:25 and was a winner at the Houston Marathon this year, also in the field. Kenyans Ezekial Omullo and Andrew Ben Kimutai, who have both run below 2:09, are also sure to run well. Omullo is a three-time winner of the Warsaw Marathon, his most dominant win coming in 2016 when he set his current PB of 2:08:55, while in April this year he cruised to victory at the same race in 2:11:17. Kimutai is also a formidable performer, the 29-year-old finishing third at the Seville Marathon earlier this year where he set his current PB of 2:08:32. There will also be a duo of exciting prospects in Uganda’s Felix Chemonges and Morocco’s Mohamed Ahmami, who bring impressive pedigree at the shorter distances. An interesting debutant at the distance is Kenya’s Kalipus Lomwai, who was a pacemaker at the race last year but carries a classy half marathon best of 1:01:22, which he ran to win in Hamburg in July. Others of note include Bahrain’s Benson Seurei, who brings the best track pedigree to this test of endurance, the 34-year-old boasting an 800m personal best of 1:45.67. Since moving to the marathon he has proved himself a capable performer, finishing seventh in Barcelona earlier this year in 2:11:27.  Wesley will have to be really on November 11 to pull off the win against this elite group of runners.  (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Lungile Gongqa thinks it is about time a locale runner wins the Soweto Marathon

It's about time a South African ended the foreign domination of the famous Old Mutual Soweto Marathon. Lungile Gongqa, a former Two Oceans Marathon champion, believes the country’s runners have to make it a point that they end the “seven year itch” for the People’s Race title. “I reckon the time has come for the race to have a local runner winning it after all these years,” Gongqa said as he looked ahead to the November 4 marathon through the country’s biggest township. The last local runner to win the marathon was Michael Mazibuko, who romped home in 2011 by clocking two hours, 19 minutes and four seconds. While he was careful not to make any bold promises, Gongqa will line-up for the start just outside the FNB Stadium intent on being the first one to enter the iconic 2010 Fifa World Cup venue some two hours later. “I will be targeting a top 10 finish but if they can allow me some space like they did in Two Oceans then I will win it. I will go all the way to claim my first title of the race.” Gongqa will have to overcome the challenge of the Lesotho and Ethiopian runners, who have dominated the race in recent years. Add to that the fact he will be making his debut in one of the toughest marathons in the country and Gongqa’s attempt at glory is made all the more difficult. (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Edinburgh Marathon champion Julius Kiplagat Korir, hopes to claim victory at this year’s Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon on October 28

Julius Kipyego Keter, who finished second at the 2017 Standard Chartered Hong Kong Marathon and Edinburgh Marathon champion Julius Kiplagat Korir will race this year’s Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon slated for October 28 in Nairobi. Keter, who is yet to compete this year, won the Mérida Marathon in Mexico in January last year in 2:21:22, before finishing second at Hong Kong’s Standard Chartered Marathon in 2:10:34 a month later. Keter would then settle for second again at the Santiago de Chile Marathon in a personal best 2:09:55 in April while Korir, who won Edinburgh Marathon in 2:17:13 last year, is fresh from claiming victory at Las Palmas Gran Canaria Marathon in 2:18:14 in Spain. Speaking during the sponsorship launch at Uhuru Park, Nairobi on Thursday, Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon local organising committee chairman, Peter Gitau disclosed that Keter and Kori are part of the 10,000 participants, who have so far registered for the event. (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Defending champion Mathew Kimeli is aiming to win for the second time at the Great 10k

With Alina Reh and Mathew Kimeli on Sunday at the "The Bridgestone Great 10k" in Berlin both defending champion in the race, also other German top runners are at the start. In the German Junior Runner Cup 2018 the decision is made. Once again, the favorites from Kenya are aiming for world-class times on Sunday, at the highest-ranking German 10-kilometer race. Even the top-class track record of the Great 10k of Leonard Komon could be in danger. The Kenyan ran 27:12 minutes ago in Berlin eight years ago. No other German 10-kilometer race has such a fast track record. With Mathew Kimeli the defending champion comes back to Berlin. The only 20-year-old Kenyan won a year ago at Schloss Charlottenburg in 27:32 minutes. But his best time is even one second faster than the course record of Komon with 27:11 minutes. His compatriots Emmanuel Kiprono 27:26, and Vidic Kipkoech 27:57, are expected to be the toughest rivals for Kimeli. There will not be a hunt for the world-class course record of 30:37 minutes for the women, but once again Alina Reh, could provide a highlight. One year ago, the 21-year-old surprisingly won the race and with 31:38 minutes became the second-fastest German runner of all time. Having won the Cologne Half Marathon in a strong 69:31 minutes over 10,000 meters last Sunday, she can also be expected to perform first-class in Berlin. Alina Reh's rivals include Kenyan Gladys Kimaina, who has a best time of 31:15, and Fabienne Schlumpf from Switzerland, 32:08 min and Karolina Nadolska from Poland, 32:09 min. Also starting is Katharina Heinig, 33:04 min, for whom the race as well as for Arne Gabius will be a test for the Frankfurt Marathon. (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Australia will honor Peter Norman with statue for role in 1968 Olympic protest

Australia will erect a statue of a homegrown sprinter who backed two Americans in their famed Black Power salute at the 1968 Olympics, with authorities describing the honor as “seriously overdue.” Peter Norman, silver medalist in the 200-meter event in Mexico City, stood on the podium alongside U.S. athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who both put a black-gloved fist in the air in a civil rights protest. The gesture caused outrage at the time but Norman quietly showed his solidarity with the Americans by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge. Norman had spoken to the pair before the medal ceremony and agreed to wear the badge of the OPHR, a U.S. civil rights organization consisting of mainly black amateur athletes that campaigned to eradicate racism from sport. As a result, he was frozen out of future Olympic selection and airbrushed from Australian Olympic history until recently. Athletics Australia said Norman’s actions were now recognized as “one of Australian sports’ most iconic moments and a special moment in Olympic history.” (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon Race Director Dave McGillivray is going in for triple bypass surgery on Friday Oct 12

This is a follow up on a story we published September 6.  On Friday October 12 Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray is going back into Mass General Hospital for open heart triple bypass surgery.  Dave posted this an hour ago on Facebook.  "Five years ago yesterday (October 9, 2013) I was diagnosed with “severe coronary artery disease”. The two words that hit me were “disease” and “severe”. How did I get this “disease” and how severe is “severe”? On a dime, I changed everything – what I ate, how I ate, when I ate, sleep habits, stress in my life, started taking dietary supplements and the list goes on and on. In less than a year, I had “reversed” this disease by over 40%. I thought I beat it. Some of it was due to heredity, some was self-inflicted. I fixed what I could fix. I did the Ironman Triathlon again, many marathons, my birthday runs and even the World Marathon Challenge (7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents). Once again, I thought I was over the hump. But, recently I learned that genetics trumps everything.  I am having triple bypass surgery this Friday Oct 12.  As you can imagine, a lot of thoughts (good and not so good) are swirling around my head. However, I’ve come to terms with all this now and realize how fortunate I am that this was caught, that I get a second chance and that I have the best medical care in the country. I know there was some confusion that I already had this surgery but I only had the angiogram which showed that I needed the surgery. I expect to be in the hospital for 5-7 days and hope to be “shuffling” around the block within 3-4 weeks. I haven’t missed 3-4 days in a row of running in over 50 years. I can’t drive for 4-5 weeks – guess I’ll have to ride my bike everywhere...ha. This will be a new experience. I asked my heart surgeon this one question – do you think I will be able to recover enough to jog through my 47th Boston Marathon next April, that is, without pushing it between now and then (I will be a good patient – I hope)? He responded, “I would be extremely disappointed if you couldn’t do it.” That is all I needed...let’s get ‘er done. I have a lot more work to get done, miles to run and goals to accomplished. See you all on the other side."  (Photo taken when Dave finished his 46th straight Boston Marathon) (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
by Dave McGillivray
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Joe Sinclair is preparing for his sixth Marine Corps Marathon

72-year-old Joe Sinclair is readying for his sixth Marine Corps Marathon in Washington.  He now has run more than 200 marathons and shows no signs of stopping any time soon. Despite the miles he’s put in other races, the Marine Corps Marathon, which will be run on Oct. 28 this year, is his favorite. “It’s spectacular, mind-blowing,” he said. “It and Boston are the top marathons. You’ve got 30,000 runners from all over the world.” The MCM also has time limits that must be met at several stages or the runner is pulled from the race. That, Sinclair said, gives him incentives to reach all along the 26-mile route. He said the entire race is inspiring, from the support staff along the way to the members of the military branches who are running or taking part in the race. (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
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Why are the best times run on Kenya soil so slow? Part 2: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

The best times run on Kenyan soil are not nearly as good as times run by Kenyan runners outside the country. The best marathon time run on Kenya soil is 2:10:12 clocked by Moses Kigen in 2009. The best time for women is 2:28:04 clocked by Alice Chelangat.  Even world record holders like Eliud Kipchoge who recently clocked 2:01:39 at the Berlin Marathon don't attempt to race on Kenya soil due to stiff competition from juniors or seniors who haven’t gotten the opportunity to run abroad.  Most of the major races recognized by IAAF are run at very high altitude (2600m-8500 feet) above sea level.  In cities like Eldoret, Iten, Nairobi, Nyahururu, Nakuru, and Ngong there is less oxygen making it hard to run world record times.  In cities at low altitude like Garrisa in Northern part and Mombasa where the marathon and world cross-country have been held, the humidity is very high and temperatures are so hot that a lot of runners faint due to dehydration.  For example at the 2007 world cross-country championship in Mombasa, Kennenisa Bekele dropped out of the 10km cross country race due to high humidity and hot temperatures. Kenya has thousands of athletes, but no race has ever been controlled at world record pace.  This is because most of athletes have no managers or even links to run abroad take out the pace of 2:40/K (13:20 5K pace) or even below in long distsance races like the marathon making it hard to break a world record due to fatigue.  Other national records run on Kenyan soil include: 1:01:21 half marathon clocked by Philemon Baaru and 1:08:12 for women clocked by Paskalia Chepkorir.  In the 10km for example Kamworor ran 29:11 in the 2018 cross-country while world leader in 3000m Beatrice Chepkoech ran 34:04 which is totally different when abroad. Many races are long.  Like many 10k's are actually 10.2 or 10.3.  Sometimes the clock does not start until the 200m to 300m out due to large number of athletes in a race. This has to be done to avoid athletes injuring themselves due to each athlete running very fast at the start. Most athletes do not have good training facilities or managers.  Pacing is a big problem in many races held in Kenya.  This is very noticeable in many major races (like the Nairobi Standard Charter Marathon) because Kenyans are used to being front runners and they run too fast at the beginning.  Another factor is race terrain.  Most of Kenyan courses are very hilly and hard to run good times.  Many half marathons winning times in Kenya are like 65 minutes making race organizers avoid putting on marthons.  All of these factors are why there is a big difference in best times run in Kenya and abroad.  This is why all Kenyans dream is to race outside Kenya.    (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
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Meb Keflezighi is Considering Coming Out of Retirement for 2020 Olympic

America’s Meb Keflezighi is considering coming out of retirement to try to make his fifth U.S. Olympic team at the age of 44 years old at the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials. As the most decorated U.S. marathoner in history, Keflezighi won a silver medal in the 2004 Olympic marathon. He also won the 2009 New York City Marathon, the 2012 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and the 2014 Boston Marathon. Keflezighi, currently 43, made his first U.S. Olympic team on the track in 2000 and then competed in the marathon at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Summer Games. He announced his retirement from competitive running after racing the 2017 New York City Marathon, which was his 26th career marathon. “I still believe I can run 2:12 or 2:13, and maybe even faster on a great day,” Keflezighi added. “The question that I have to ask myself is whether or not I want to do the work to get in 2:14 shape. I really don’t know.” The 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials will be held on Feb. 29, 2020 in Atlanta.  “Meb should do this,” says Bob Anderson.  “US marathoning needs this even if it just inspire others but I think you could pull off at least a top three if he puts in the training.” (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
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Stacy Ndiwa will challenge the Ethiopians at the Delhi Half Marathon

The 2018 African Championships 10,000m winner and Commonwealth Games runner-up Stacy Ndiwa will challenge the Ethiopians. Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba is among star attractions.  Three Kenyans must be at their best to stop Ethiopia’s Belihu and Gebresilase. Eric Kiptanui, the 2018 Berlin Half Marathon champion, will be up against his training mate Daniel Kipchumba at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon on October 21. Kipchumba paced Kiptanui during the Berlin race to the 15 kilometer mark and the contest in the Indian capital will no doubt give them an opportunity to size up each other. The two, who are guided by Italian coach Renato Canova, will carry their under 60 minutes best times they posted last year. Yangzhou and Istanbul Half marathons champion Ababel Yeshaneh hope to outclass Dibaba. Yeshaneh had earlier this year set a personal best over the half marathon distance in Turkey where she ran 69:36. She weathered a strong competition to come in second in the 2017 Delhi Half Marathon. (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
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America's Tyler McCandless and Japan's Yuki Kawauchi encounter at the Chicago Marathon

After running miles 3-15 alone at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, I caught up to reigning Boston Marathon champ Yuki Kawauchi. When I caught him I said, “come on Yuki, stay with me” and he tapped my side. I looked back a minute later and he was right on my tail and I said “good” to him. He stayed there until about mile 21 when he tried to push past me. We went back and forth over the last few miles multiple times. Once, he slipped on a turn, nearly fell and looked concerned, I said to Yuki “you’re okay, you’re good.” The rain and wind picked up and neither of us were running near where our goals were. But, we pushed each other to the best we could on ”off” days. We were both struggling, yet with 300m to go he found another gear and blew me away. There no doubt he found that gear from mental toughness and I’ve learned something from it. Moral of the story: even if you’re day isn’t what you envisioned and trained for, NEVER give up because you’ll gain indispensable experience and inspiration from it!  I ran 2:16:37, 20th overall and 7th American.  I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have faster goals, but Sunday was a real test of character and I’m proud of how I competed. It was wet, rainy and windy, and I got stuck with nobody around for the majority of the race until dueling it with Yuki Kawauchi over the last several miles. I went through halfway in 1:06:36 and simply had to be gritty and fight for every second over the second half of the race. Having a less ...than ideal weather day, and simply not having my best day out there, but toughing it out to finish with my third best marathon time is something I’m proud of.  Editors note: Yuki Kawauchi finished 19th in 2:19:26 his 82 marathon under 2:20. Tyler is sponsored by Altra Running and rabbit.  media@TrackTy (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
by Tyler McCandless
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Thousands of Kenyan runners have the same dream Part 1: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

Kenya is famous for producing many of the best runners in the world.  Just recently Kenyan’s Eliud Kipchoge smashed the world record for the marathon clocking 2:01:38 in Berlin. What makes Kenyan runners so fast? There are many theories.  One of them suggests that since many runners originate from the mountainous districts of the Rift Valley, they get an edge due to living at high altitude.  However, the same advantage would be for athletes living at high altitudes in central Asia and Mexico.  So maybe this is not the reason?  Kenya is a nation blessed with thousands of athletes of approximately 85,000.  A majority of them are distance runners. More than 12,000 can run below 75 minutes for 21km (half marathon) and about 25,000 can run a sub 35 minutes 10km.  Thousands can run a marathon in under 3 hours 20 minutes. Very impressive for elite performances. Most runners in Kenya are between the ages of 12-45.  There are very few master runners (40 plus) compared to other countries.  This is because most runners in Kenya make running as their primary source of livelihood to feed the family and even help their relatives or friends and the community.  There are very few runners 45-60 years or older because of health conditions like diabetes or heart conditions.  It is rare to find a runner 70 plus in Kenya unlike countries like the USA.  They are like endangered species and there are less than 20 athletes in the whole country that are 70 plus.  The current life expectancy for all people in the US is 78.74 years while in Kenya it is 62.13 years.  The total population in Kenya is 45 million compared to 325 million in the US.  Kenya is the size of Texas. The median age in Kenya is 18, half that of the United States and 41 percent of the population is 14 or younger.  For many Kenyan's their whole life is centered around running.  Many train three times per day logging in over 100 miles per week.  They live modestly making ends meet on $100US per month or less.  They dream of being a super star and they train very hard.  This started when Kipchoge Keino came on the scene in 1962 at the Commonwealth Games in Perth.  Kip Keino in 1968 won the gold medal in the 1500m in Mexico City and after that many have followed in his footsteps.  But it wasn't until later when millions of dollars of prize money came available did things really change.  Now the best runners in Kenya can earn millions of dollars (US) in prize money and sponsorship money.  There is the possibility that through hard work, dedication and connections that any talented Kenyan can make their dream become a reality.  Thousands of Kenyans have the same dream. This is no different than the dream kids have in America of being a famous baseball, basketball or football player.... There is one thing, however that seem to be missing in Kenya.  The times run on Kenya soil are not that good compared to the times run by Kenyans outside the country.  Why is this?  In Part two we will address this situation.   (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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After 22 years, Cathi Remington, now a 56-year-old grandmother is running the Marine Corps Marathon

Cathi Remington, a 56-year-old grandmother who ran the marathon four times in the 1990s and finished under the 3 1/2-hour mark each time, is returning to the race. "There’s just something about the Marine Corps Marathon," Remington said. If you made a list of the things that 56-year-old Cathi Remington really, really loved, high up on it would be her country, the Marines and grueling races. And so it only makes sense that this grandmother from New Hampshire would look to satisfy that itch for competition by returning to the Marine Corps Marathon for the fifth time. Remington served in the Marines in the early and mid-1980s, and ran the race four times before — every year between 1993 and 1996. Her best finish came in 1995 when she ran the race in 3:14:40, a nearly 14-minute improvement from the year before. In fact, all four times she finished under the 3 1/2-hour mark. “I decided that at age 56 I wanted to get back into racing,” said Remington, who runs a bead shop in Hampton, New Hampshire. “So (22) years later, I’m coming back.” And coming back to this race as opposed to the famed Boston Marathon is a much bigger deal where she’s from. She notes with her heavy New England accent, “everyone loves Boston, and I do too, but for some reason there’s just something about the Marine Corps Marathon.” (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba has been added as the latest star to the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

The Ethiopian legend, Tirunesh has won three Olympic Games gold medals and five world titles on the track to add to the four world cross country championships victories as a senior. She is also the current 5000-metre world record holder. Tirunesh will now run the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2018 on Sunday, October 21. The ace is an obvious favorite to add the Delhi Half Marathon trophy to her packed cabinet of precious metal ware. In the wake of her third place at last month’s Berlin Marathon, her third run under 2:19 over the classic distance in the last 18 months, she will be chasing two half marathon marks in Delhi, win which comes with a check for $27,000. The Airtel Delhi Half Marathon course record stands at 66:54 since 2009 in the name of Kenya’s Mary Keitany. The presence of Tiruensh this year is posing a threat to the 9-year-old record. “After Berlin, I felt good about myself and felt I could still run fast over the half marathon despite the short recovery time. I didn’t achieve my aims completely in Berlin, although I certainly have to be pleased with my performance, because I went there to win and run faster than my time of 2:18:55 so there is no better race than the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon to make my return to racing. I am excited about coming to India and I look forward to make my presence felt,” said the 33-year-old Tirunesh. (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series added a half marathon in Beijing

The Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon Series® announced the addition the Rock ‘n’ Roll Beijing Half Marathon, which will make its debut on October 13, 2018. The new venue becomes the latest addition to the China event calendar with half marathon and 5K run distances. “With the host city of Beijing joining the international tour, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series will now feature an event in one the most globally recognizable locations in China,” said Jeff Edwards, General Manager of Operations for IRONMAN China. “To run in this historic setting will be an incredible experience for athletes and spectators alike.” The musically themed running series is known for Bringing Fun to the Run™ with live music and entertainment on the course. Runners will get the chance to take in the scenic Beijing Olympic Forest Park, with dedicated running paths accompanied with great spectator and volunteer support. The races start and finish adjacent to the Olympic Green, directly below the iconic Beijing Olympic Tower with the post-race concert stage in the Southern Garden of the Olympic Forest Park. Beijing, the capital city of China has no shortage of wonderful attractions and is home to some of the country's best-known historical destinations, including a section of the famous Great Wall of China. Beijing, one of China’s four ancient capitals, is an enchanting and fascinating city with a history of more than 3,000 years. Widely considered one of the most magnificent cities in the world, Beijing is the cultural, political, and historical center of China. (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Registration Opens for the 500 Festival Mini-Marathon 2019

The 500 Festival, a nonprofit organization providing life-enriching events and programs that celebrate the spirit and legacy of the Indianapolis 500®, today announced that registration has opened for the 2019 OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon. Set for Saturday, May 4, the 2019 OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon will mark the race’s 43rd running. Named one of “America’s Most Iconic Races” by Runners World, the OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon is one of the nation’s largest half marathons (for the past 20 years) and annually attracts participants from all 50 states and 15+ countries around the world. Known as The Greatest Spectacle in Running, the race starts and finishes in downtown Indianapolis and includes a lap around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, home of the Indy 500. The flat, fast course is packed with thousands of the nicest volunteers you’ll ever meet, 16 course aid stations and nearly 100 course entertainment acts. Now through October 31, participants can lock in the race’s lowest rate of $65. Prices will increase starting Nov. 1. “The OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon has become an incredible tradition to kick start the month of May in Indianapolis, and no city does a better job of hosting massive events than Indy,” said Bob Bryant, president and CEO of the 500 Festival. “This 13.1-mile course has so much history and iconic allure with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, but it’s the people and volunteers who come together to provide entertainment throughout the course, massive cheering sections and pit stations that make all the difference. We’re excited for the next edition of The Greatest Spectacle in Running.” (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Significant changes and new regulations for 2019 IAAF Label road races to improve the quality of events

Significant changes have been made to the regulations for IAAF Label road races starting in 2019 to improve the quality of events for the athletes who take part and the fans that follow them. An IAAF Label denotes high standards in event organization, full application of the IAAF competition rules, complete support from authorities for the event, a commitment by the organizer to the advancement of the sport, and concrete steps in the global fight against doping. Several changes have been made to the IAAF Label regulations for 2019, including the introduction of a 'Platinum Label', the use of IAAF World Rankings to determine an athlete's Label status, and allowing 5km races to apply for Labels. “This is a milestone for the IAAF and the global road racing community," said IAAF President Sebastian Coe. "It’s a stepping stone towards 2020, when we will have an even more coherent structure of races, with better defined tiers to guide fans and athletes, and with integrity measures that are proportionate to the level of the competition. In 2019 we will be reducing the pool of athletes who hold the coveted 'Gold Label Status' to ensure the highest-earning pros are subject to out-of-competition drug-testing . “I’d like to thank the AIU and Abbott World Marathon Majors for their guidance in this area, and stress that these changes are being introduced in cooperation with race and athlete representatives, who have been very supportive all the way. A more robust regulatory framework for athlete representatives is also in the making.” The 2019 regulations will apply to any road races seeking Label status for 2020. (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Kenyans Raymond Choge and Milliam Ebongon raced to victory at the 95th edition of the Kosice Peace Marathon on Sunday

Running in pleasant conditions, Choge outsprinted Ethiopian Aychew Bantie over the final 400 meters to take the four-second victory in 2:08:11, a personal best and the third best winning time in Kosice. Bantie’s 2:08:15 was also a lifetime best. Shumet Mengistu, another Ethiopian, was third in 2:08:50, also a lifetime best. Defending champion Reuben Kerio was fourth in 2:09:23 with Nicholas Korir, who was making his marathon debut, rounding out the top five in 2:11:33. “I wanted to be better than last year and I was also hoping for new personal best,” said Choge, who was fifth last year. “My goals were fulfilled, I must be satisfied.” The women’s race provided a surprise. It wasn’t Sheila Jerotich, the defending champion, was followed the fast tempo of set by male pacer Cyrus Kiplagat, but instead it was Ebongon, who debuted in the marathon last spring in Enschede where she ran alone. Here, running with the pacesetter, she reached the half in a promising 1:12:00. Jerotich tried to maintain contact but ultimately dropped back. Ebongon meanwhile was rewarded with a big personal best of 2:27:16 and a course record to secure the fifth Kenyan double at this race. (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Emily Sisson wins Reebok Boston 10K in record time but course was 380 meters short

Update: When we first reported this story it was thought that an American Record was set today in Boston as reported by the Boston Globe.  However, the course was 380 meters short, somehow the cones got moved just past the 5k mark. Most likely she still would have run sub 32. Emily Sisson separated herself from the competition early, at the Reebok Boston 10K for Women Monday afternoon. The 26-year-old from Rhode Island pulled away from Buze Diriba of Ethiopia at the 3-mile mark and held on to her lead down the stretch to claim victory in 30:39 — a comfortable 33 seconds ahead of the second-place Diriba. The time at first was thought to be an American record breaking the record set by Shalane Flanagan (30:52) in 2016 in the same event. But the course was short and the race director is trying to find out why cones were moved...The win is Sisson’s second in three years, as she also won in 2016 in 31:46. She becomes the first repeat winner since Huddle, who won the event four times, including three straight from 2008-10. Diriba’s time of 31:12 also broke the benchmark set by Huddle but was not good enough to beat Sisson. Formerly known as the Tufts Health Plan 10K for Women, the race is the largest all-woman running event in New England and has been a Columbus Day staple in Boston since 1977. Running through the Back Bay and into Cambridge, competitors make their way along the Charles River before finishing on Charles Street between the Public Garden and Boston Common. Other finishers: Diriba, Erin Clark of Arizona (32:19), Dylan Hassett of Rhode Island (32:28), and Holly Rees of the United Kingdom (32:46) rounded out the top five finishers in the open division.   (Mon 8) ⚡AMP
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Jack Rayner of Australia and Uganda’s Juliet Chekwel win at the Cardiff Half Marathon

Rayner took pride of place as he beat off a Ugandan and Kenyan challenge in the race of his life to take the men’s title in a 1:01:01. That gave him a seven-second cushion over Fred Musobo, with a second Ugandan in third a further nine seconds back. Uganda took the team title with Australia second. In the women’s race, Uganda’s Juliet Chekwel took the title in 1:09:45 with Australia’s Celia Sullohern coming home in the silver medal position in a six-minute PB time of 1:11:04. Uganda won the team event and Australia second. “I knew it would be tough after looking at the start list because a lot of them had run 62, 61 and even 60 minutes," Rayner said. "I knew I was in at the deep end and I’d have to do something special to win." “I felt I could run a lot faster than my PB and I did that. It is just amazing and it makes the win even better than this is the first time they’ve held the Commonwealth Championships.” Looking down the list of competitors the night before the race, the 28-year-old Juliet Chekwel admitted she was unsure if she could win the title. But she dominated the race from the one-kilometre mark to win by a massive 79 seconds. (Mon 8) ⚡AMP
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Elisha Barno crosses the finish line to win the men's title at the Twin Cities Marathon on Sunday

A familiar name finally claimed victory at Sunday's Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. After finishing as runner-up the past three years, Elisha Barno broke through and won the men's title with a time of 2 hours, 11 minutes, 58 seconds. Sinke Biyadgilgn won the women's marathon title with a time of 2:33:04. Race officials reported that more than 6,800 runners finished the 37th annual marathon, while a record 10,896 runners finished the accompanying 20th annual Medtronic TC 10 Mile race. Runners took to the two course on a cool, calm morning, with temperatures in the 40s. Barno, who is from Kenya and trains in New Mexico, also has won the past four Grandma's Marathons in Duluth. On Sunday he finished 14 seconds ahead of the second-place finisher, fellow Kenyan Boniface Kongin. Race officials reported that Barno took the lead at Mile 25. "I tried to push and I saw Boniface was very strong," Barno said in a post-race news release. "Boniface put on a surge and I was right with him. I feel very happy and feel like I want to cry — to be a champion is not easy." Biyadgilgn, of Ethiopia, won the women's marathon title with a time of 2:33:04. That's six seconds ahead of second-place finisher, Ethiopia's Serkalem Abrha. (Mon 8) ⚡AMP
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Natasha Wodak broke the course record for Women at 39th annual GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon

With nearly 8,000 athletes participating, the 39th annual GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon was another huge success in the capital city. The wet weather was more of a help for the runners than a disadvantage, cooling off the athletes as they tested their endurance in three different races. In the half marathon, Victoria’s Natasha Wodak broke the course record for females, finishing with a time of 1:11:45, breaking a record she set herself back in 2012. In the full marathon, all eyes were on Kenya’s Daniel Kipkoech, who has won the last four years in a row. The 31 year old, who now calls Lethbridge home, took home another victory on Sunday, his fifth consecutive win, tying the Victoria Marathon record for most wins and most consecutive wins. Kipkoech finished with a time of 2:22:39. (Mon 8) ⚡AMP
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