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David Sinclair and Rachel Schilkowsky were the winners at the 25th annual Hartford Marathon

David Sinclair and Rachel Schilkowsky were the men's and women's winners of the 25th running of the Hartford Marathon. Sinclair, of Peru, Vermont, clocked 2:18:20 Saturday, about 3 minutes longer than the course record. Schilkowsky, of Providence, Rhode Island, finished 9th overall clocking 2:41:03, about 8 minutes longer than the women's record. More than 10,000 runners took to Hartford-area streets on a cool and rainy morning. There was also a half marathon, a team 26.2-mile relay and a 5K. Three racers continued their streak of completing every Hartford Marathon: Peter Hawley, Andrew Bartlett and Robert Kopac. (10/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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A young couple tried to stay focused on training for the Marine Corps Marathon

The 43rd Marine Corps Marathon will be 30-year-old Kevin Rodriguez, an active duty Marine, first marathon. It’ll also be the Corpus Christi, Texas, native’s first trip to the nation’s capital. But amid all that excitement, one could probably forgive him if he doesn’t run quite as well as he had originally hoped, since training for the race has fallen somewhat on his list of priorities. Rodriguez is stationed at Camp Lejeune, in North Carolina, and Hurricane Florence made landfall only about 50 miles south of his home in the nearby city of Jacksonville. “We’re trying to stay with it,” he admitted. “Right now his wife Susanna is a lot more committed than I am.” Susanna Rodriguez used to be an active duty Marine, too. In fact, that’s how the two met; and it’s why they chose to run this race together. (10/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jake Robertson has been training hard in Kenya and is focused on running very fast at Canada’s Waterfront Marathon Oct 21

What an amazing year it has been for Jake Robertson, a New Zealand who has been training in Kenya for the last ten years.  Jake started off the year in Houston where he won the half marathon there in 60:01.  Many did not know him before that race and in fact he had to get himself there to run the race.  This would soon change.  At the Lake Biwa marathon in Japan he clocked 2:08:26, a new NZ national Record.  Then he won the Crescent City 10k with a very fast 27:28 blowing away the field.  Next up was the Commonwealth Games 10000m on the track.  He pushed the pace and finished in 27:32. Then there was Beach to Beacon in Portland, Maine.  In hot weather he wins clocking 27:38.  Most recently he broke one hour for the half running second to Mo Farah clocking 59:57.  Jake posted today, “I’ve trained hard, I’m ready.  I’m coming to Canada for something special on Sunday October 21st.  I am running the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. If you’re not running I hope you’re cheering us on, come down.”  Jake’s training in Kenya has been going well and weather permitting he is ready to run very fast in Toronto.  (10/12/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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This piece of Friday news could not be better - Dave McGillivray is on the road to recovery

Boston Marathon Director Dave McGillivray under went open heart triple bypass surgery this morning.  We are excited to report that the surgery went well and he is on his way to recovery.  His DMSE team posted, “Your love and support have been truly heart warming (pun intended).”  Millions of his friends around the world were cheering for Dave today. Dave wrote a couple of days ago,  “As you can imagine, a lot of thoughts (good and not so good) are swirling around my head. However, I’ve come to terms with all this now and realize how fortunate I am that this was caught, that I get a second chance and that I have the best medical care in the country.” (10/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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A eight-time Olympic sprint champion Usain Bolt scored the Mariners’ third and fourth goals for Central Coast Mariners

Usain Bolt marked his first start in professional football (soccer) with two goals for Central Coast Mariners to beat Macarthur South West 4-0 in a preseason friendly. Bolt, a eight-time Olympic sprint champion scored the Mariners’ third and fourth goals for Central Coast Mariners. He celebrated with his trademark lightning bolt celebration. “My first start and scoring two goals, it’s a good feeling,” the 32-year-old Bolt said after the game. “I’m happy I could come here and show the world I’m improving,” he added. (10/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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France's Morhad Amdouni is going after his second title at the 40th edition of 20km de Paris

Amdouni, the winner in 2016, was forced to withdraw from last year’s edition due to injury which in his absence was won by Kenyan Collins Chebii. Amdouni looks to be the favorite following his successful 10,000m title-winning run at the European Championships in Berlin in August. He clocked in 28:11.22 on that occasion and holds a PB of 27:36.80 set in May. Four days later the 30-year-old Frenchman won bronze in the 5000m and hasn’t raced since. Stephen Ogari should be one of his main rivals. The Kenyan won here in 2015, one year prior to Amdouni and eight seconds faster, 59:11 to 59:19. Gauging Ogari’s form, however, is difficult as he has only run two 3000m races this year, both with modest times. Alfred Cherop of Kenya holds the fastest PB of the field over the distance with 58:20, but that dates back to 2012. Cherop, who has a 27:59 10km lifetime best, was third in 2016 in 59:25. More recently, he clocked 1:01:58 over 20km in May. Rwanda’s Felicien Muhitira and Nicholas Mulinge Makau could be also be in contention for the podium. The former was fourth at last year’s edition in 58:43 and the latter recorded a 15km PB of 44:19 this year. Elvis Tabarach, 21, will also have a say. He finished fifth last year but was credited with the same time as Muhitira. The men’s course record of 57:19 set in 2005 shouldn’t be in jeopardy. (10/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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71-year-old Kiran Majmudar will be running his seventh Hartford Marathon

The hardest part of doing a marathon, Kiran Majmudar said, was joining his first training group. He was 65 years old, training to run his first marathon at what is now the Eversource Hartford Marathon. “I thought I’d be an embarrassment to the group,” he remembers. “I didn’t know. I thought they were all younger. Come to find out, they are young, old, everything in between. Some are stronger, some not so strong. Mothers and daughters, husband and wives.” Majmudar, of Enfield, fit right in. He finished his first marathon in Hartford in 2012 in 5:35:03.  It was a bucket list item for Majmudar, now 71. But he liked it so much, he decided to do it again. And again. “I just wanted to cross the finish line [at the first one],” he said. “After that, I did better. Because somehow you get addicted to it.” He’ll be back for Saturday’s 26.2-mile race starting at 8 a.m. in front of the State Capitol. It will be his seventh straight year at Hartford. (10/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Wesley Korir won the 2012 Boston Marathon and wants to win this year's BLOM Bank Beirut Marathon

Wesley Korir won the 2012 Boston Marathon and has not raced since April 2017 but after taking time out from his political career, the 35-year-old is planning to get back to winning ways at next month’s race in the Lebanese capital. “Everything is going well, I’m trying to get in shape after politics and run full-time again,” said Korir. “Getting a win in Beirut will give me a boost for me as I get back to the top level.” To succeed he will have to be at his best, with Ethiopia’s Bazu Worku, who has a best of 2:05:25 and was a winner at the Houston Marathon this year, also in the field. Kenyans Ezekial Omullo and Andrew Ben Kimutai, who have both run below 2:09, are also sure to run well. Omullo is a three-time winner of the Warsaw Marathon, his most dominant win coming in 2016 when he set his current PB of 2:08:55, while in April this year he cruised to victory at the same race in 2:11:17. Kimutai is also a formidable performer, the 29-year-old finishing third at the Seville Marathon earlier this year where he set his current PB of 2:08:32. There will also be a duo of exciting prospects in Uganda’s Felix Chemonges and Morocco’s Mohamed Ahmami, who bring impressive pedigree at the shorter distances. An interesting debutant at the distance is Kenya’s Kalipus Lomwai, who was a pacemaker at the race last year but carries a classy half marathon best of 1:01:22, which he ran to win in Hamburg in July. Others of note include Bahrain’s Benson Seurei, who brings the best track pedigree to this test of endurance, the 34-year-old boasting an 800m personal best of 1:45.67. Since moving to the marathon he has proved himself a capable performer, finishing seventh in Barcelona earlier this year in 2:11:27.  Wesley will have to be really on November 11 to pull off the win against this elite group of runners.  (10/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Lungile Gongqa thinks it is about time a locale runner wins the Soweto Marathon

It's about time a South African ended the foreign domination of the famous Old Mutual Soweto Marathon. Lungile Gongqa, a former Two Oceans Marathon champion, believes the country’s runners have to make it a point that they end the “seven year itch” for the People’s Race title. “I reckon the time has come for the race to have a local runner winning it after all these years,” Gongqa said as he looked ahead to the November 4 marathon through the country’s biggest township. The last local runner to win the marathon was Michael Mazibuko, who romped home in 2011 by clocking two hours, 19 minutes and four seconds. While he was careful not to make any bold promises, Gongqa will line-up for the start just outside the FNB Stadium intent on being the first one to enter the iconic 2010 Fifa World Cup venue some two hours later. “I will be targeting a top 10 finish but if they can allow me some space like they did in Two Oceans then I will win it. I will go all the way to claim my first title of the race.” Gongqa will have to overcome the challenge of the Lesotho and Ethiopian runners, who have dominated the race in recent years. Add to that the fact he will be making his debut in one of the toughest marathons in the country and Gongqa’s attempt at glory is made all the more difficult. (10/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Defending champion Mathew Kimeli is aiming to win for the second time at the Great 10k

With Alina Reh and Mathew Kimeli on Sunday at the "The Bridgestone Great 10k" in Berlin both defending champion in the race, also other German top runners are at the start. In the German Junior Runner Cup 2018 the decision is made. Once again, the favorites from Kenya are aiming for world-class times on Sunday, at the highest-ranking German 10-kilometer race. Even the top-class track record of the Great 10k of Leonard Komon could be in danger. The Kenyan ran 27:12 minutes ago in Berlin eight years ago. No other German 10-kilometer race has such a fast track record. With Mathew Kimeli the defending champion comes back to Berlin. The only 20-year-old Kenyan won a year ago at Schloss Charlottenburg in 27:32 minutes. But his best time is even one second faster than the course record of Komon with 27:11 minutes. His compatriots Emmanuel Kiprono 27:26, and Vidic Kipkoech 27:57, are expected to be the toughest rivals for Kimeli. There will not be a hunt for the world-class course record of 30:37 minutes for the women, but once again Alina Reh, could provide a highlight. One year ago, the 21-year-old surprisingly won the race and with 31:38 minutes became the second-fastest German runner of all time. Having won the Cologne Half Marathon in a strong 69:31 minutes over 10,000 meters last Sunday, she can also be expected to perform first-class in Berlin. Alina Reh's rivals include Kenyan Gladys Kimaina, who has a best time of 31:15, and Fabienne Schlumpf from Switzerland, 32:08 min and Karolina Nadolska from Poland, 32:09 min. Also starting is Katharina Heinig, 33:04 min, for whom the race as well as for Arne Gabius will be a test for the Frankfurt Marathon. (10/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Australia will honor Peter Norman with statue for role in 1968 Olympic protest

Australia will erect a statue of a homegrown sprinter who backed two Americans in their famed Black Power salute at the 1968 Olympics, with authorities describing the honor as “seriously overdue.” Peter Norman, silver medalist in the 200-meter event in Mexico City, stood on the podium alongside U.S. athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who both put a black-gloved fist in the air in a civil rights protest. The gesture caused outrage at the time but Norman quietly showed his solidarity with the Americans by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge. Norman had spoken to the pair before the medal ceremony and agreed to wear the badge of the OPHR, a U.S. civil rights organization consisting of mainly black amateur athletes that campaigned to eradicate racism from sport. As a result, he was frozen out of future Olympic selection and airbrushed from Australian Olympic history until recently. Athletics Australia said Norman’s actions were now recognized as “one of Australian sports’ most iconic moments and a special moment in Olympic history.” (10/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon Race Director Dave McGillivray is going in for triple bypass surgery on Friday Oct 12

This is a follow up on a story we published September 6.  On Friday October 12 Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray is going back into Mass General Hospital for open heart triple bypass surgery. 

Dave posted this an hour ago on Facebook.  "Five years ago yesterday (October 9, 2013) I was diagnosed with “severe coronary artery disease”. The two words that hit me were “disease” and “severe”. How did I get this “disease” and how severe is “severe”? On a dime, I changed everything – what I ate, how I ate, when I ate, sleep habits, stress in my life, started taking dietary supplements and the list goes on and on. In less than a year, I had “reversed” this disease by over 40%.

"I thought I beat it. Some of it was due to heredity, some was self-inflicted. I fixed what I could fix. I did the Ironman Triathlon again, many marathons, my birthday runs and even the World Marathon Challenge (7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents).

"Once again, I thought I was over the hump. But, recently I learned that genetics trumps everything.  I am having triple bypass surgery this Friday Oct 12.  As you can imagine, a lot of thoughts (good and not so good) are swirling around my head. However, I’ve come to terms with all this now and realize how fortunate I am that this was caught, that I get a second chance and that I have the best medical care in the country.

I know there was some confusion that I already had this surgery but I only had the angiogram which showed that I needed the surgery. I expect to be in the hospital for 5-7 days and hope to be “shuffling” around the block within 3-4 weeks. I haven’t missed 3-4 days in a row of running in over 50 years.

"I can’t drive for 4-5 weeks – guess I’ll have to ride my bike everywhere...ha. This will be a new experience. I asked my heart surgeon this one question – do you think I will be able to recover enough to jog through my 47th Boston Marathon next April, that is, without pushing it between now and then (I will be a good patient – I hope)? He responded, “I would be extremely disappointed if you couldn’t do it.”

"That is all I needed...let’s get ‘er done. I have a lot more work to get done, miles to run and goals to accomplished. See you all on the other side."  (Photo taken when Dave finished his 46th straight Boston Marathon)

(10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
by Dave McGillivray
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Joe Sinclair is preparing for his sixth Marine Corps Marathon

72-year-old Joe Sinclair is readying for his sixth Marine Corps Marathon in Washington.  He now has run more than 200 marathons and shows no signs of stopping any time soon. Despite the miles he’s put in other races, the Marine Corps Marathon, which will be run on Oct. 28 this year, is his favorite. “It’s spectacular, mind-blowing,” he said. “It and Boston are the top marathons. You’ve got 30,000 runners from all over the world.” The MCM also has time limits that must be met at several stages or the runner is pulled from the race. That, Sinclair said, gives him incentives to reach all along the 26-mile route. He said the entire race is inspiring, from the support staff along the way to the members of the military branches who are running or taking part in the race. (10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Why are the best times run on Kenya soil so slow? Part 2: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

The best times run on Kenyan soil are not nearly as good as times run by Kenyan runners outside the country. The best marathon time run on Kenya soil is 2:10:12 clocked by Moses Kigen in 2009. The best time for women is 2:28:04 clocked by Alice Chelangat. 

Even world record holders like Eliud Kipchoge who recently clocked 2:01:39 at the Berlin Marathon don't attempt to race on Kenya soil due to stiff competition from juniors or seniors who haven’t gotten the opportunity to run abroad. 

Most of the major races recognized by IAAF are run at very high altitude (2600m-8500 feet) above sea level.  In cities like Eldoret, Iten, Nairobi, Nyahururu, Nakuru, and Ngong there is less oxygen making it hard to run world record times.  

In cities at low altitude like Garrisa in Northern part and Mombasa where the marathon and world cross-country have been held, the humidity is very high and temperatures are so hot that a lot of runners faint due to dehydration. 

For example at the 2007 world cross-country championship in Mombasa, Kennenisa Bekele dropped out of the 10km cross country race due to high humidity and hot temperatures.

Kenya has thousands of athletes, but no race has ever been controlled at world record pace.  This is because most of athletes have no managers or even links to run abroad take out the pace of 2:40/K (13:20 5K pace) or even below in long distsance races like the marathon making it hard to break a world record due to fatigue.  

Other national records run on Kenyan soil include: 1:01:21 half marathon clocked by Philemon Baaru and 1:08:12 for women clocked by Paskalia Chepkorir. 

In the 10km for example Kamworor ran 29:11 in the 2018 cross-country while world leader in 3000m Beatrice Chepkoech ran 34:04 which is totally different when abroad. Many races are long and not measured correctly.  

Like many 10k's are actually 10.2 or 10.3.  Sometimes the clock does not start until the 200m to 300m out due to large number of athletes in a race. This has to be done to avoid athletes injuring themselves due to each athlete running very fast at the start. 

Most athletes do not have good training facilities or managers.  Pacing is a big problem in many races held in Kenya.  This is very noticeable in many major races (like the Nairobi Standard Charter Marathon) because Kenyans are used to being front runners and they run too fast at the beginning. 

Another factor is race terrain.  Most of Kenyan courses are very hilly and hard to run good times.  Many half marathons winning times in Kenya are like 65 minutes making race organizers avoid putting on marthons. 

All of these factors are why there is a big difference in best times run in Kenya and abroad.  This is why all Kenyans dream is to race outside Kenya.   

(10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir (Reporting from Kenya)
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Meb Keflezighi is Considering Coming Out of Retirement for 2020 Olympic

America’s Meb Keflezighi is considering coming out of retirement to try to make his fifth U.S. Olympic team at the age of 44 years old at the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials.

As the most decorated U.S. marathoner in history, Keflezighi won a silver medal in the 2004 Olympic marathon. He also won the 2009 New York City Marathon, the 2012 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and the 2014 Boston Marathon. Keflezighi, currently 43, made his first U.S. Olympic team on the track in 2000 and then competed in the marathon at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Summer Games.

He announced his retirement from competitive running after racing the 2017 New York City Marathon, which was his 26th career marathon. “I still believe I can run 2:12 or 2:13, and maybe even faster on a great day,” Keflezighi added.

“The question that I have to ask myself is whether or not I want to do the work to get in 2:14 shape. I really don’t know.” The 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials will be held on Feb. 29, 2020 in Atlanta.  

“Meb should do this,” says Bob Anderson.  “US marathoning needs this even if it just inspire others but I think you could pull off at least a top three if he puts in the training.”

(10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Stacy Ndiwa will challenge the Ethiopians at the Delhi Half Marathon

The 2018 African Championships 10,000m winner and Commonwealth Games runner-up Stacy Ndiwa will challenge the Ethiopians. Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba is among star attractions.  Three Kenyans must be at their best to stop Ethiopia’s Belihu and Gebresilase. Eric Kiptanui, the 2018 Berlin Half Marathon champion, will be up against his training mate Daniel Kipchumba at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon on October 21. Kipchumba paced Kiptanui during the Berlin race to the 15 kilometer mark and the contest in the Indian capital will no doubt give them an opportunity to size up each other. The two, who are guided by Italian coach Renato Canova, will carry their under 60 minutes best times they posted last year. Yangzhou and Istanbul Half marathons champion Ababel Yeshaneh hope to outclass Dibaba. Yeshaneh had earlier this year set a personal best over the half marathon distance in Turkey where she ran 69:36. She weathered a strong competition to come in second in the 2017 Delhi Half Marathon. (10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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America's Tyler McCandless and Japan's Yuki Kawauchi encounter at the Chicago Marathon

After running miles 3-15 alone at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, I caught up to reigning Boston Marathon champ Yuki Kawauchi. When I caught him I said, “come on Yuki, stay with me” and he tapped my side.

I looked back a minute later and he was right on my tail and I said “good” to him. He stayed there until about mile 21 when he tried to push past me.

We went back and forth over the last few miles multiple times. Once, he slipped on a turn, nearly fell and looked concerned, I said to Yuki “you’re okay, you’re good.”

The rain and wind picked up and neither of us were running near where our goals were. But, we pushed each other to the best we could on ”off” days. We were both struggling, yet with 300m to go he found another gear and blew me away.

There no doubt he found that gear from mental toughness and I’ve learned something from it. Moral of the story: even if you’re day isn’t what you envisioned and trained for, NEVER give up because you’ll gain indispensable experience and inspiration from it! 

I ran 2:16:37, 20th overall and 7th American.  I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have faster goals, but Sunday was a real test of character and I’m proud of how I competed. It was wet, rainy and windy, and I got stuck with nobody around for the majority of the race until dueling it with Yuki Kawauchi over the last several miles.

I went through halfway in 1:06:36 and simply had to be gritty and fight for every second over the second half of the race. Having a less ...than ideal weather day, and simply not having my best day out there, but toughing it out to finish with my third best marathon time is something I’m proud of.  

Second photo is Yuki leading the pack at the 2018 Boston Marathon, a race he won.

(Editors note: Yuki Kawauchi finished 19th in 2:19:26 his 82 marathon under 2:20. Tyler is sponsored by Altra Running and rabbit.  media@TrackTy)

(10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Tyler McCandless
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Thousands of Kenyan runners have the same dream Part 1: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

Kenya is famous for producing many of the best runners in the world.  Just recently Kenyan’s Eliud Kipchoge smashed the world record for the marathon clocking 2:01:38 in Berlin. What makes Kenyan runners so fast? There are many theories.  One of them suggests that since many runners originate from the mountainous districts of the Rift Valley, they get an edge due to living at high altitude.  However, the same advantage would be for athletes living at high altitudes in central Asia and Mexico.  So maybe this is not the reason?  Kenya is a nation blessed with thousands of athletes of approximately 85,000.  A majority of them are distance runners. More than 12,000 can run below 75 minutes for 21km (half marathon) and about 25,000 can run a sub 35 minutes 10km.  Thousands can run a marathon in under 3 hours 20 minutes. Very impressive for elite performances. Most runners in Kenya are between the ages of 12-45.  There are very few master runners (40 plus) compared to other countries.  This is because most runners in Kenya make running as their primary source of livelihood to feed the family and even help their relatives or friends and the community.  There are very few runners 45-60 years or older because of health conditions like diabetes or heart conditions.  It is rare to find a runner 70 plus in Kenya unlike countries like the USA.  They are like endangered species and there are less than 20 athletes in the whole country that are 70 plus.  The current life expectancy for all people in the US is 78.74 years while in Kenya it is 62.13 years.  The total population in Kenya is 45 million compared to 325 million in the US.  Kenya is the size of Texas. The median age in Kenya is 18, half that of the United States and 41 percent of the population is 14 or younger.  For many Kenyan's their whole life is centered around running.  Many train three times per day logging in over 100 miles per week.  They live modestly making ends meet on $100US per month or less.  They dream of being a super star and they train very hard.  This started when Kipchoge Keino came on the scene in 1962 at the Commonwealth Games in Perth.  Kip Keino in 1968 won the gold medal in the 1500m in Mexico City and after that many have followed in his footsteps.  But it wasn't until later when millions of dollars of prize money came available did things really change.  Now the best runners in Kenya can earn millions of dollars (US) in prize money and sponsorship money.  There is the possibility that through hard work, dedication and connections that any talented Kenyan can make their dream become a reality.  Thousands of Kenyans have the same dream. This is no different than the dream kids have in America of being a famous baseball, basketball or football player.... There is one thing, however that seem to be missing in Kenya.  The times run on Kenya soil are not that good compared to the times run by Kenyans outside the country.  Why is this?  In Part two we will address this situation.   (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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After 22 years, Cathi Remington, now a 56-year-old grandmother is running the Marine Corps Marathon

Cathi Remington, a 56-year-old grandmother who ran the marathon four times in the 1990s and finished under the 3 1/2-hour mark each time, is returning to the race. "There’s just something about the Marine Corps Marathon," Remington said. If you made a list of the things that 56-year-old Cathi Remington really, really loved, high up on it would be her country, the Marines and grueling races. And so it only makes sense that this grandmother from New Hampshire would look to satisfy that itch for competition by returning to the Marine Corps Marathon for the fifth time. Remington served in the Marines in the early and mid-1980s, and ran the race four times before — every year between 1993 and 1996. Her best finish came in 1995 when she ran the race in 3:14:40, a nearly 14-minute improvement from the year before. In fact, all four times she finished under the 3 1/2-hour mark. “I decided that at age 56 I wanted to get back into racing,” said Remington, who runs a bead shop in Hampton, New Hampshire. “So (22) years later, I’m coming back.” And coming back to this race as opposed to the famed Boston Marathon is a much bigger deal where she’s from. She notes with her heavy New England accent, “everyone loves Boston, and I do too, but for some reason there’s just something about the Marine Corps Marathon.” (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba has been added as the latest star to the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

The Ethiopian legend, Tirunesh has won three Olympic Games gold medals and five world titles on the track to add to the four world cross country championships victories as a senior. She is also the current 5000-metre world record holder. Tirunesh will now run the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2018 on Sunday, October 21. The ace is an obvious favorite to add the Delhi Half Marathon trophy to her packed cabinet of precious metal ware. In the wake of her third place at last month’s Berlin Marathon, her third run under 2:19 over the classic distance in the last 18 months, she will be chasing two half marathon marks in Delhi, win which comes with a check for $27,000. The Airtel Delhi Half Marathon course record stands at 66:54 since 2009 in the name of Kenya’s Mary Keitany. The presence of Tiruensh this year is posing a threat to the 9-year-old record. “After Berlin, I felt good about myself and felt I could still run fast over the half marathon despite the short recovery time. I didn’t achieve my aims completely in Berlin, although I certainly have to be pleased with my performance, because I went there to win and run faster than my time of 2:18:55 so there is no better race than the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon to make my return to racing. I am excited about coming to India and I look forward to make my presence felt,” said the 33-year-old Tirunesh. (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series added a half marathon in Beijing

The Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon Series® announced the addition the Rock ‘n’ Roll Beijing Half Marathon, which will make its debut on October 13, 2018. The new venue becomes the latest addition to the China event calendar with half marathon and 5K run distances. “With the host city of Beijing joining the international tour, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series will now feature an event in one the most globally recognizable locations in China,” said Jeff Edwards, General Manager of Operations for IRONMAN China. “To run in this historic setting will be an incredible experience for athletes and spectators alike.” The musically themed running series is known for Bringing Fun to the Run™ with live music and entertainment on the course. Runners will get the chance to take in the scenic Beijing Olympic Forest Park, with dedicated running paths accompanied with great spectator and volunteer support. The races start and finish adjacent to the Olympic Green, directly below the iconic Beijing Olympic Tower with the post-race concert stage in the Southern Garden of the Olympic Forest Park. Beijing, the capital city of China has no shortage of wonderful attractions and is home to some of the country's best-known historical destinations, including a section of the famous Great Wall of China. Beijing, one of China’s four ancient capitals, is an enchanting and fascinating city with a history of more than 3,000 years. Widely considered one of the most magnificent cities in the world, Beijing is the cultural, political, and historical center of China. (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Registration Opens for the 500 Festival Mini-Marathon 2019

The 500 Festival, a nonprofit organization providing life-enriching events and programs that celebrate the spirit and legacy of the Indianapolis 500®, today announced that registration has opened for the 2019 OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon. Set for Saturday, May 4, the 2019 OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon will mark the race’s 43rd running. Named one of “America’s Most Iconic Races” by Runners World, the OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon is one of the nation’s largest half marathons (for the past 20 years) and annually attracts participants from all 50 states and 15+ countries around the world. Known as The Greatest Spectacle in Running, the race starts and finishes in downtown Indianapolis and includes a lap around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, home of the Indy 500. The flat, fast course is packed with thousands of the nicest volunteers you’ll ever meet, 16 course aid stations and nearly 100 course entertainment acts. Now through October 31, participants can lock in the race’s lowest rate of $65. Prices will increase starting Nov. 1. “The OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon has become an incredible tradition to kick start the month of May in Indianapolis, and no city does a better job of hosting massive events than Indy,” said Bob Bryant, president and CEO of the 500 Festival. “This 13.1-mile course has so much history and iconic allure with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, but it’s the people and volunteers who come together to provide entertainment throughout the course, massive cheering sections and pit stations that make all the difference. We’re excited for the next edition of The Greatest Spectacle in Running.” (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Significant changes and new regulations for 2019 IAAF Label road races to improve the quality of events

Significant changes have been made to the regulations for IAAF Label road races starting in 2019 to improve the quality of events for the athletes who take part and the fans that follow them. An IAAF Label denotes high standards in event organization, full application of the IAAF competition rules, complete support from authorities for the event, a commitment by the organizer to the advancement of the sport, and concrete steps in the global fight against doping. Several changes have been made to the IAAF Label regulations for 2019, including the introduction of a 'Platinum Label', the use of IAAF World Rankings to determine an athlete's Label status, and allowing 5km races to apply for Labels. “This is a milestone for the IAAF and the global road racing community," said IAAF President Sebastian Coe. "It’s a stepping stone towards 2020, when we will have an even more coherent structure of races, with better defined tiers to guide fans and athletes, and with integrity measures that are proportionate to the level of the competition. In 2019 we will be reducing the pool of athletes who hold the coveted 'Gold Label Status' to ensure the highest-earning pros are subject to out-of-competition drug-testing . “I’d like to thank the AIU and Abbott World Marathon Majors for their guidance in this area, and stress that these changes are being introduced in cooperation with race and athlete representatives, who have been very supportive all the way. A more robust regulatory framework for athlete representatives is also in the making.” The 2019 regulations will apply to any road races seeking Label status for 2020. (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenyans Raymond Choge and Milliam Ebongon raced to victory at the 95th edition of the Kosice Peace Marathon on Sunday

Running in pleasant conditions, Choge outsprinted Ethiopian Aychew Bantie over the final 400 meters to take the four-second victory in 2:08:11, a personal best and the third best winning time in Kosice. Bantie’s 2:08:15 was also a lifetime best. Shumet Mengistu, another Ethiopian, was third in 2:08:50, also a lifetime best. Defending champion Reuben Kerio was fourth in 2:09:23 with Nicholas Korir, who was making his marathon debut, rounding out the top five in 2:11:33. “I wanted to be better than last year and I was also hoping for new personal best,” said Choge, who was fifth last year. “My goals were fulfilled, I must be satisfied.” The women’s race provided a surprise. It wasn’t Sheila Jerotich, the defending champion, was followed the fast tempo of set by male pacer Cyrus Kiplagat, but instead it was Ebongon, who debuted in the marathon last spring in Enschede where she ran alone. Here, running with the pacesetter, she reached the half in a promising 1:12:00. Jerotich tried to maintain contact but ultimately dropped back. Ebongon meanwhile was rewarded with a big personal best of 2:27:16 and a course record to secure the fifth Kenyan double at this race. (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Emily Sisson wins Reebok Boston 10K in record time but course was 380 meters short

Update: When we first reported this story it was thought that an American Record was set today in Boston as reported by the Boston Globe.  However, the course was 380 meters short, somehow the cones got moved just past the 5k mark. Most likely she still would have run sub 32. Emily Sisson separated herself from the competition early, at the Reebok Boston 10K for Women Monday afternoon. The 26-year-old from Rhode Island pulled away from Buze Diriba of Ethiopia at the 3-mile mark and held on to her lead down the stretch to claim victory in 30:39 — a comfortable 33 seconds ahead of the second-place Diriba. The time at first was thought to be an American record breaking the record set by Shalane Flanagan (30:52) in 2016 in the same event. But the course was short and the race director is trying to find out why cones were moved...The win is Sisson’s second in three years, as she also won in 2016 in 31:46. She becomes the first repeat winner since Huddle, who won the event four times, including three straight from 2008-10. Diriba’s time of 31:12 also broke the benchmark set by Huddle but was not good enough to beat Sisson. Formerly known as the Tufts Health Plan 10K for Women, the race is the largest all-woman running event in New England and has been a Columbus Day staple in Boston since 1977. Running through the Back Bay and into Cambridge, competitors make their way along the Charles River before finishing on Charles Street between the Public Garden and Boston Common. Other finishers: Diriba, Erin Clark of Arizona (32:19), Dylan Hassett of Rhode Island (32:28), and Holly Rees of the United Kingdom (32:46) rounded out the top five finishers in the open division.   (10/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jack Rayner of Australia and Uganda’s Juliet Chekwel win at the Cardiff Half Marathon

Rayner took pride of place as he beat off a Ugandan and Kenyan challenge in the race of his life to take the men’s title in a 1:01:01. That gave him a seven-second cushion over Fred Musobo, with a second Ugandan in third a further nine seconds back. Uganda took the team title with Australia second. In the women’s race, Uganda’s Juliet Chekwel took the title in 1:09:45 with Australia’s Celia Sullohern coming home in the silver medal position in a six-minute PB time of 1:11:04. Uganda won the team event and Australia second. “I knew it would be tough after looking at the start list because a lot of them had run 62, 61 and even 60 minutes," Rayner said. "I knew I was in at the deep end and I’d have to do something special to win." “I felt I could run a lot faster than my PB and I did that. It is just amazing and it makes the win even better than this is the first time they’ve held the Commonwealth Championships.” Looking down the list of competitors the night before the race, the 28-year-old Juliet Chekwel admitted she was unsure if she could win the title. But she dominated the race from the one-kilometre mark to win by a massive 79 seconds. (10/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Elisha Barno crosses the finish line to win the men's title at the Twin Cities Marathon on Sunday

A familiar name finally claimed victory at Sunday's Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. After finishing as runner-up the past three years, Elisha Barno broke through and won the men's title with a time of 2 hours, 11 minutes, 58 seconds. Sinke Biyadgilgn won the women's marathon title with a time of 2:33:04. Race officials reported that more than 6,800 runners finished the 37th annual marathon, while a record 10,896 runners finished the accompanying 20th annual Medtronic TC 10 Mile race. Runners took to the two course on a cool, calm morning, with temperatures in the 40s. Barno, who is from Kenya and trains in New Mexico, also has won the past four Grandma's Marathons in Duluth. On Sunday he finished 14 seconds ahead of the second-place finisher, fellow Kenyan Boniface Kongin. Race officials reported that Barno took the lead at Mile 25. "I tried to push and I saw Boniface was very strong," Barno said in a post-race news release. "Boniface put on a surge and I was right with him. I feel very happy and feel like I want to cry — to be a champion is not easy." Biyadgilgn, of Ethiopia, won the women's marathon title with a time of 2:33:04. That's six seconds ahead of second-place finisher, Ethiopia's Serkalem Abrha. (10/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Natasha Wodak broke the course record for Women at 39th annual GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon

With nearly 8,000 athletes participating, the 39th annual GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon was another huge success in the capital city. The wet weather was more of a help for the runners than a disadvantage, cooling off the athletes as they tested their endurance in three different races. In the half marathon, Victoria’s Natasha Wodak broke the course record for females, finishing with a time of 1:11:45, breaking a record she set herself back in 2012. In the full marathon, all eyes were on Kenya’s Daniel Kipkoech, who has won the last four years in a row. The 31 year old, who now calls Lethbridge home, took home another victory on Sunday, his fifth consecutive win, tying the Victoria Marathon record for most wins and most consecutive wins. Kipkoech finished with a time of 2:22:39. (10/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Some runners at the Portland Marathon were delayed by as much as 22 minutes due to a train crossing the course

The Portland Marathon returned Sunday under a new name. It may be running into complications out of the gate though as some participants were delayed by a freight train downtown.  The race is under new management after it was initially canceled in April when the company Next Events disbanded. The group RunWithPaula Events and Portland Running Company founders Paula and Dave Harkin took over the marathon in June, rebranding it the “Portlandathon.”  The race got underway early Sunday morning, with runners in the full and half marathons competing on a similar out-and-back course as previous Portland Marathon routes. Videos posted on social media show dozens of runners waiting on Naito Parkway at the Steel Bridge as a freight train crosses the Willamette River -- a few miles from the finish line at SW Salmon.  The course is a qualifier for the Boston Marathon, and is approved by the USA Track and Field Association. However, finishing times for first and second place vary by 20 minutes, which could be attributed to the train delay. That delay could also impact qualifying times for the Boston Marathon. RunWithPaula Events tells KATU news that they reached out to Union Pacific when organizing the race to request that trains would not be running across the bridge during the race. Paula Harkin also tells KATU that the longest the delay could have been would be about 22 minutes. KATU News reached out to Union Pacific and they said, “Mechanical issues on a prior train resulted in a train crossing the tracks during the Portland Marathon. Unforeseen delays can affect Union Pacific’s efforts to accommodate community requests, and we apologize to those who were impacted by this situation.” (10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Chebii and Chelimo Win 18th Annual B.A.A. Half Marathon

The winners of the men's and women's 2018 B.A.A. Half Marathon are Daniel Chebii and Joan Chelimo respectively. Chebii, a Kenyan has run the half marathon twice and won the B.A.A. 10k twice, won the men's race in 1:03:08. "To be a champion is something very great," he said. "So I am happy to be in Boston." To prepare for the half marathon, Chebii ran 21, 25 and 30ks. He says he is happy to be back in shape. Chelimo, also from Kenya, won the women's race in 1:09:34. She said her three-year-old daughter Ariana motivates her to keep going. "When I get tired in the race I just think about her," Chelimo said. “She was the one who keeps me going, being a mother actually,” she said. “So I’m so happy “It’s so amazing to win again in Boston, as I say Boston is my legacy. All the time I come and win, so for today I just feel so good to win again in Boston,” Chelimo said (photo).  It was an especially close race for the women. Through most of it, there was a group of 5 to 6 women vying to win. According to officials, 6,530 runners from 40 states and nearly 90 countries participated in this year's event.Many of the runners are raising money for cancer research. The race's director, David McGillvray, says charity is central to this race. "It's a combination of raising the level of self-esteem and self-confidence of people.” (10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Brian Reynolds is a double amputee and Runs 3:03:23 at the Chicago Marathon

I am so proud of Brian Reynolds, he ran a new personal best, 3:03:22 at the Chicago Marathon this morning.  He is a double amputee and I think this is an American record.  We didn’t make his ultimate goal of going sub 3 however.  We battled Mother Nature all day, a fall(that was on me, I thought I was close enough, I was not) and some cramps but he never wavered and fought till the end. It was inspiring.  During the 22nd mile, though, Reynolds fell, suffering a concussion and knocking his time down significantly. Always one to finish what he started, 30-year-old Reynolds went on to finish.  Brian said, "Despite not reaching my goal today I have still run a personal record in every single one of my marathons," said Reynolds moments after the race. "Even on my worst day I have the motivation, determination and grit to dig deep and get to that finish line.” If you ever have a chance to guide I highly recommend it.  Not sure I will be hired again but if given the chance I am there.  Editor’s note: Michael Wardian is an international know marathoner and ultra marathoner.   (10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
by Michael Wardian
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Nearly 35,000 runners participated in the 34th annual Army Ten Miler this morning

Roughly 35,000 people were up bright and early Sunday outside the Pentagon, ready to run the 34th annual Army Ten-Miler. The race draws people from all 50 states as well as those from other countries who want to run from the Pentagon into D.C. and back again. Runners took off promptly at 8 a.m. as a cannon fired in the distance. The last waves of runners were still waiting for their turn to start as the fastest elite runners made their way across the finish line. Frankline Tonui was this year’s winner, crossing the finish line in a time of 50:23. Right on the heels of the soldier stationed at Fort Sam Houston in Texas was Evans Kirwa, who is also stationed there. Seven seconds behind them, Girma Mecheso finished in third place. Susan Tonui was the fastest woman, finishing in 56:33. In second place was Julia Roman-Duval of Columbia, Maryland, at 57:17 and in third was Emily De La Bruyere who finished in 59:07.  Greg Mandeville, 64, of Cumberland, Rhode Island, told wtop why he has been running this for the last ten years. “The challenge, the course, the athletes, the city, everything,” he said when asked what he liked about this particular race. “This is one of my favorite races.” (10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Japan's Suguru Osako wins nearly one Million Dollars in placing third at the Chicago Marathon

Japan's Suguru Osako placed third at the 2018 Chicago Marathon clocking 2:05:50, a new national Japan record.  

This beats the record of 2:06:11. The Japanese Corporate Track and Field Federation (Project Exceed program) will pay him a 100-million-yen bonus ($879,465 U.S. dollars) for setting a new national record.  

Before the race Suguru Osako said, ““I want to try to break the national record, but the most important thing to me is to be competitive with the other runners.  I’ am really excited and proud to run with Mo and Galen. I’m going to enjoy the challenge.”” 

Osako trains in Oregon and is part of the Nike Oregon Project.  Osako was born May 23, 1991.  He won the 10,000 meters gold medal at the 2011 Summer Universiade in Shenzhen and holds the Asian junior record for the half marathon. Born in Machida, Tokyo, he attended Saku Chosei High School and began to establish himself nationally in 2010.  

Suguru Osako made his marathon debut at the 2017 Boston Marathon, landing on the podium in third in 2:10:28. At the time, he was the first Japanese man to finish among the top three since Seko won Boston in 1987.

He closed out 2017 with an impressive personal best and third place finish at the Fukuoka Marathon, 2:07:19.  He becomes the first Japanese man and just the second non-African-born runner to break 2:06. 

(10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah sets European Record to Win The Chicago Marathon

This was Great Britian's Sir Mo Farah's first marathon win in three attempts today October 7.  He looked smooth the whole way and took control of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon over the last few miles when he stepped up the pace to 4:35 per K.

The lead group had passed the half way mark in 1:03:03.  At the finish Mo Farah clocked 2:05:11 winning his first US marathon and setting a new European record.  (Breaking Sondre Nordstad Moen record of 2:05:48 set in Japan Dec 3, 2017.)   

24-year-old Brigid Kosgei from Kenya running her ninth marathon and second place finisher last year ran the last miles by herself to clock an outstanding 2:18:35, making her the 10th fastest women's marathon time ever. 

"I like the rain," Brigid said after winning. "I enjoy the rain and I swallowed the pain, no struggling," she said. Roza Dereje (Eth) was second cocking 2:21:18.  First American was Sarah Crouch finished sixth with 2:32:37.  

"Amazing to come across the finish first," Mo said after he finished.  Ethiopia's Mosinet Geremew Bayih finished second clocking 2:05:24.  Suguru Osako from Japan finished third in 2:05:50 setting a national Japan record winning 100 million yen (almost one million US dollars) in doing so. 

In fourth was Kenneth Kipkemoi from Kenya clocking 2:05:57.  Galen Rupp who fell off the pack at around 22 miles came back strong and finished fifth with 2:06:21 just 14 seconds off his PR.  Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi (Japan) finished 19th clocking 2:16:26, his 82nd sub 2:20 marathon. Mo, a  two-time Olympic champion in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, native of Great Britain finished third in the London Marathon earlier this year. 

The men’s field include three former champions and 11 racers who have registered times faster than 2:08.  In the end 11 men ran faster than 2:10, nine under 2:08.  The temperature was 58 degrees at the start with light to heavy rain most of the way. Of more impact were the north-northeast winds coming off Lake Michigan as runners headed north from the start.  

Mo is the most successful British track athlete in modern Olympic Games history, he was the 2012 and 2016 Olympic gold medalist in both the 5000m and 10,000m. Farah is the second athlete in modern Olympic Games history, after Lasse Virén, to win both the 5000m and 10,000m titles at successive Olympic Games. 

Mo moved from the track to the roads after the 2017 World Athletics Championships.  61-year-old Joan Samuelson clocked 3:12:13 not reaching her sub three hour goal. 

(10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Ethiopian Hagos Gebrhiwet was added to Delhi Half Mararthon Field

Dibaba’s compatriot and fellow Ethiopian Hagos Gebrhiwet has been added to the men’s elite field of the Delhi Half Marathon set for October 21. The winner of two World Championships 5000m medals and an Olympic bronze medal will head to Delhi in fine form for his half marathon debut. In his last race, at the IAAF Diamond League 5000m final in Brussels on 31 August, he ran 12:45.82 for second place and moved up to fifth on the world all-time list for the event.  Airtel Delhi Half Marathon (ADHM) is an annual half marathon foot-race held in New Delhi, India. Established in 2005, it is both an elite runner and mass participation event. It is an AIMS-certified course and is listed as a Gold Label Road Race by the IAAF.  The 2009 event attracted around 30k runners who competed in one of the four races.  The men's course record is fast.  Guye Adola (Eth) clocked 59:06 in 2014.  Mary Keitany (Ken) holds the women's record clocking 1:06:54 in 2009.  Both men's and women's races have been won by Kenya or Ethiopian's runners over the last ten years.  (10/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah has confirmed that he wants to be a competitor at the Tokyo´s Marathon 2020

Mo Farah, Britain’s most successful athlete, will have one more crack at winning another Olympic title after confirming his intention to compete in the Tokyo 2020 marathon. Farah, a four-time Olympic and six-time world champion on the track, had tiptoed around the subject of ever representing his country again after moving to full-time road racing last year. However, speaking ahead of his third career marathon in Chicago on Sunday, Farah confirmed he had made his mind up about donning a British vest at the 2019 World Championships and 2020 Olympics, when he will be 37. “I am definitely going,” he said. “As long as my body can hold up, I am definitely going to Tokyo. I know from my training that I am definitely capable of getting a medal. I don’t know what the color is going to be, but I want to continue through 2020. (10/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Leesa Drake is living proof that no matter how fast or how far someone runs, nobody can outrun a cancer diagnosis is running Chicago

Leesa Drake has completed 102 marathons over the last 25 years.  Running this year's Chicago Marathon will be a special day for her after she received a life-threatening cancer diagnosis last year.  "I did as many as 17 marathons in one year," said Drake.  After turning 50 last year, Drake prepped for yet another marathon. Then she was diagnosed with breast cancer in the Spring of 2017.  Ethan Hixson, a physician assistant, delivered the news to Drake.  He was amazed at her positive attitude.  "She just took it in stride and was determined to beat it," said Hixson.  Drake had her sights set on completing the Chicago Marathon last October, but first she had to go through surgery.  She elected to have both breasts removed. Then came chemotherapy and radiation. She experienced nausea, fatigue and hair loss."I was like well, I'll keep doing what I can as long as I can and see how I tolerate the treatment," Drake said.  The medical team was aware of Drake's dedication to running, so they advised her to stay hydrated and take in enough calories to keep her energy levels up.   "We encouraged her to continue to train but be aware that she may be more tired than usual. She may not run as fast as she used to run," said Dr. Nora Hansen, surgeon.  Last year, in the middle of treatment, Drake completed the marathon.  "It was a very social marathon for me. I had friends who hopped in and ran stretches," said Drake.  She was declared cancer-free last December. The 2018 Chicago Marathon will be her first as a survivor. (10/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Fast times are expected again in Eindhoven and the race director wants his race to be the most innovative marathon in the world

The Eindhoven Marathon is an annual marathon held in the city of Eindhoven, Netherlands.  The first race was held in 1990.  Every year since 2003 the winning time has been under 2:10.  The men's course record was set by Dickson Chumba (Ken) in 2012 when he clocked 2:05:46.  The year before Georgina Rono (Ken) set the woman's record (2:24:33).   Last year Felix Kiptoo Kirwa (Ken) set his PR of 2:06:13 in Eindhoven and will be back. The Ethiopian Deriba Robi will also be running.  Robi already clocked 2:05:58 in 2015 on the fast Eindhoven course. That year the victory went to Kenyan Stephen Chebogut 2:05:52. In 2011 and 2016, Robi also chose Eindhoven as his fall marathon.  Belay Asefa from Ethiopia ran his best marathon time 2:07:10 four years ago in Hamburg will also be running. On a good day the course record can be broken.  Besides the elite racing up front the race director wants his race to be special.  "A marathon is a marathon, it is 42,195 km long, there are a start and a finish, a course and runners," Edgar de Veer says. "Seems very simple but there is a lot to innovate."  At least that’s what Edgar de Veer, organizer of the Eindhoven Marathon, thinks. “We have the ambition to become the most innovative marathon in the world.”  This is how the idea of Switchsprinter.com, a system that allows participants to hear voice messages from family via an earbud, came about.  Prior to the marathon, people can record messages and if the participant is having a hard time, such a recorded message will be heard.   (10/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Six Ideas to help you Get Ready for Your First Ultra Marathon

An ultra marathon is defined as anything longer than a marathon, although many ultra runners would argue the distance starts at 50K.  Here are six ideas to help you get ready for your first Ultra. 1) Do Back to back long runs, estimate your time for finishing the ultra and build up to running those total hours over two days. You want to run the full distance (combining back-to-back days) at least three or four times before the race. 2) Practice your nutrition during training and find out what works best for you. Start drinking before you get thirsty. 3) Practice running efficiently, with as little wasted motion as possible. Try to keep your head as still as possible and raise your feet as little as necessary. However, if the trail is extremely technical, it may be necessary to raise your feet quite a bit to avoid stumbling and tripping. Try to always run quietly. 4) Find socks, clothes and shoes that you love for training and racing. You want to be comfortable.   5) Train on the terrain you'll be racing. If it's a hilly technical trail, train on hilly technical trails. If it's a flat ultra on pavement, train on that at least some of the time. Do a 10K tempo run once a week at a faster pace. Run hills once a week to get strong. 6) If you need them, take recovery days. A typical week could be: Monday - Off Tuesday - 10K tempo Wednesday - Off Thursday - 1 hour hill workout Friday - Off Saturday - 3 hour long run Sunday - 3 hour long run (or a four hour and two hour, or five hour and one hour) Let's say your ultra is at the end of June. You want to be able to run your distance, over two days, by the end of April. Give yourself time to work up to that.   Be sure to enter early, many of the best ultras sell out fast.  One Ultra coming up is the Thailand Ultramarathon set for Nov 17th.  (10/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Just having their healthy boy back is something that can never be repaid but Sarah Byrne would at least like to try

Thousands of children in the United States are diagnosed with some form of cancer each year.  There is a lot of research dedicated to the disease with a goal of finding a cure. Sarah Byrne had seen the emotionally devastating toll such a diagnosis can take on a family — but never could she imagine it happening in her family. Then, just two years after her and husband Seamus welcomed their second boy, Cian, into the world, they were given that news that no parent wants to hear: "Your son has cancer." "For us, it was kind of a mixed experience," said Byrne. "We had a former classmate and friend of ours have a son pass away from cancer, and then months later our son had it. So for us it was like, 'This is reality, this is happening to us.' During the process we met some amazing other families, many of which lost their children. It was very difficult." Thankfully, this story has a happy ending. Thanks to the tremendous treatment and tender compassion from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Cian, now six years old, has fully recovered. That dedication and around the clock care their son received is something Sarah and her family will never forget.  Just having their healthy boy back is something that can never be repaid — but Byrne would at least like to try. That's why she decided to run this Sunday's Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) Half Marathon in an effort to raise money for the foundation that saved her son's life. (10/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Adam Gorlitsky sold T-shirts that said I Got Legs is going to run the Portland Marathon

This weekend the Portland marathon kicks off a new era with a new name—the Portlandathon. Thousands of people will participate and among them, is Adam Gorlitsky. His goal? Improving the lives of the disabled community one step at a time. Gorlitsky flew into Portland from South Carolina to walk the half marathon, even though he’s paralyzed from the waist down. “It's going to be an awesome day,” he said. “I used to run track and cross country in high school.” That was before a car accident in 2005 turned him into a paraplegic. Gorlitsky never thought he'd race again until a doctor's appointment two years ago and new technology that changed everything-- the robotic exoskeleton. “Honestly, from the second I stood up I was like, ‘I gotta do road races!’,” Gorlitsky said. To help afford the $85,000 exoskeleton, Gorlitsky sold T-shirts that said: “I Got Legs." Last year, he turned that slogan into a non-profit with the same name. “Our mission is to improve the lives of the disabled community,” Gorlitsky said. (10/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Former African champion Davis Kiplangat will lead this year's Singelloop Utrecht 10km road race

Former African junior 10,000m champion Davis Kiplangat will lead a huge East African contingent to this year's Singelloop Utrecht 10km road race in Netherlands on Oct. 7. Kiplangat, seventh at the World Indoor Championships in the 3,000m race, has failed to showcase the huge potential he exhibited as a junior and moving up to the road race will help him rekindle his career, which had been plighted with injuries. "I want to see how I will react to the road race in Netherlands," Kiplangat told Xinhua on Thursday. "I still want to excel in the track and I know the competition there is stiff. That is what makes me train hard and target victory in each race I take up." The former world junior silver medalist will be joined by Dutch favorite Khalid Choukoud, who has run 28:44 on the roads. Kenya's Albert Rop, who was 13th at the World Half-marathon Championships this year, will be a strong threat. Ugandan junior Kevin Kibet, Uganda's Joel Ayeko and Eritrea's Kokob Gebru will also be present for the 68th edition of this event, where the current world best was set in 2010. Another sub-29 runner from the home nation will be Roy Hoornweg. "This caliber of races has top athletes and I seek to run my own race and see how fast I can go. But Kiplangat will be a good motivation to me," said Rop. The Dutch will have hopes of a home win in the women's race, thanks to the appearance of Maureen Koster, who was eighth over 5,000m at the European Championships this year and has run 32:15 on the road. (10/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Everything you need to know about the 2018 Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is happening this Sunday October 8...Galen Rupp who lives in Oregon won the 2017 race clocking 2:09:20, will return to battle four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah of Great Britain.

The two have raced against each other 22 times, with Farah winning 21 times...Mo Farah has been training over 120 miles per week and has only one thing on his mind, to win...There are five men in the field with faster personal records than Rupp, who clocked his 2:06:07 PR winning the Prague Marathon on May 6... among the other elite men in the field include two-time world champion Abel Kirui, Geoffrey Kirui, reigning world champion and 2017 Boston Marathon winner, and four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah, Rupp's former training partner...Plus Mosinet Geremew (2:04:00 personal best) and Birhanu Legese (2:04:15), both of Ethiopia, also lead the international field...

In the field of approximately 45,000 runners Sunday, 47 percent will be women...The top American women include Laura Thweatt, Sarah Crouch, Taylor Ward, Katie Matthews and Gwen Jorgensen leading the pack.

Joan Benoit Samuelson, 61, who won the 1984 Olympics gold medal and Chicago in 1985, also will be running, and her goal is to break three hours.  No woman over 60 has ever run that fast...

Top elite women include Roza Dereje and Birhane Dibaba of Ethiopia; Brigid Kosgei of Kenya; and fellow Kenyan and two-time champion Florence Kiplagat...

Chicago is one of the flattest and fastest marathons in the world. The only thing that gets in the way of more fast times is sometimes hot weather...The weather forecast for this year is 60 degrees with humidity at 75%.  Not ideal but it has been worse...

Four world marathon records have been set in Chicago. Dennis Kimetto of Kenya holds the Chicago Marathon men’s record with a time of 2:03:45 set in 2013. Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain set the women’s record in 2002 with a time of 2:17:18...

Yuki Kawauchi, from Japan, holds a record for running 79 marathons in less than 2:20. In April, he won the Boston Marathon in 2:15:58. He has won 30 marathons in his career with a personal best of 2:08:14. He has competed in 20 marathons so far in 2018 and is running...

The female and male Chicago winners each get $100,000. The total purse distributed among all the money winners is $803,500. There are bonuses for course records: $75,000 for men and women...

Twenty-three percent of the field are from outside the US. The largest group is from Mexico, with 2,225 runners. Then: Canada (1,777), United Kingdom (1,741), China (1,347), Brazil (1,209), Germany (566), Hong Kong (481), Costa Rica (471) and Italy (453)...

Rupp's 2017 victory was his first in a marathon major. He said it compares to his two Olympic medals, silver in the 10,000 meters in 2012, and marathon bronze in 2016. "Nothing can really replace the Olympics," he told Oregon Live. "But winning a major in Chicago, a city I love, was right up there."...

Rupp said he is fully recovered from nagging Achilles and ankle problems that complicated his buildup. "I'm feeling good," he said. "I've been healthy the last five or six weeks."...Rupp's father grew up in Maywood, Illinois and Galen spent a lot of time in the Chicago area during his childhood. 

"I'm so excited to be returning to Chicago to defend my title," Rupp said. "I couldn't be more thrilled to be heading back to the Windy City."  First wave start time is 7:30am Central Time on Sunday.

(10/04/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Kenyans Betsy Saina and Wilson Chebet are the latest entries for the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

The addition of these top flight athletes completes the event's elite entries, ensuring that a high quality field will once again be on the start line beside the River Main on the last Sunday in October for the 37th edition of Germany's oldest marathon. Twelve men on the start list boast sub-2:10 personal bests while 10 women have broken 2:25. With a strong personal best of 2:05:27, Chebet is now the fastest on the Frankfurt start list as unfortunately Guye Adola of Ethiopia had to withdraw due to a health issue. The 33-year-old Kenyan, who achieved a hat-trick of wins at the Amsterdam Marathon from 2011 to 2013, is aiming to regain top form on Frankfurt’s fast course after a period short of his best. One of Chebet’s rivals is Ethiopia’s Kelkile Gezahegn, who has a PB of 2:05:56 and was second in Frankfurt last year. As previously announced, a woman with a personal best of sub-2:20 will be on the start line for the first time in Frankfurt, with the presence of the 2015 world champion Mare Dibaba. The Ethiopian showed good form last Sunday in winning the Glasgow Half Marathon in 1:09:15 and has a marathon best of 2:19:52. Although a group of world-class Ethiopians with personal bests under 2:22 will pose a strong challenge, Saina should also be a contender. The 30-year-old finished fifth in the 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Games and in April this year achieved her marathon breakthrough with victory in Paris in 2:22:56. Her target is now to break 2:20. Given good conditions, the women’s course record of 2:21:01, set by Ethiopian Meselech Melkamu in 2012, should come under pressure. (10/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tsegaye Mekonnen from Ethiopia, is set to compete at Toronto Marathon

Tsegaye Mekonnen’s marathon debut four years ago stunned running aficionados across the world as the Ethiopian youngster won the Dubai Marathon in 2:04:32, the fastest time in history by an U20 athlete. Still only 23 years old, Mekonnen has confirmed he will race the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon on October 21, thereby earning the distinction of being the fastest entrant to ever run this IAAF Gold Label event. “It’s been going well and I feel like I am in a good shape right now,” said Mekonnen. “Toronto is a big race and I’ve been preparing for it. I have spent three months in my build-up and so I hope to run a good race. “I’ve been running at a high altitude – between 2,500-3,000m – so that I could adapt myself to tough conditions and I’ve been running 180-200km (100-120 miles) per week.” Since his breakthrough performance four years ago, Mekonnen has shown flashes of brilliance such as his third-place finish at the 2016 Dubai Marathon in 2:04:46 and a 2:07:26 victory at the 2017 Hamburg Marathon. In a country where children grow up celebrating the success of Ethiopian legends such as Derartu Tulu, Haile Gebrselassie, Tirunesh Dibaba and Kenenisa Bekele, he was exposed to running very early and earned a place on Ethiopia’s team for the IAAF World Junior Championships Barcelona 2012. He finished fifth in the 5000m final there, but, unlike others who would develop their track potential, Mekonnen quickly switched to road racing. "To my knowledge there were not many track races in that time and I couldn't find the right people to bring me to those races,” he remembers. “So, I made the decision to compete in the road races. Demadonna Management encouraged me to become a marathon runner and it was the right decision for me, looking back now. Mekonnen is fully aware he will face strong competition in Toronto, including Philemon Rono, the two-time defending champion, New Zealand’s Jake Robertson and 2012 Olympic champion Stephen Kiprotich of Uganda, among others. He edged Kiprotich in Hamburg by a mere five seconds. (10/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sandy Bodecker One of the most influential behind-the-scenes figures in the sports world has died at the age of 66

One of the most influential behind-the-scenes figures in the sports world, Sandy Bodecker, has died at the age of 66. Bodecker was Nike’s V.P. of Special Projects, the most famously special to runners being 2017’s Breaking2, which also led to the creation of the Vaporfly and Zoom Fly shoes. Though media reports were not specific, Bodecker had battled cancer in the past. According to Nike, Bodecker was obsessed with the marathon’s 2-hour barrier, so much so that he had 1:59:59 tattooed on his left wrist. “The sub-two-hour marathon is the last big, once-in-a-generation barrier,” he said at the time. “It will impact the way runners view distance running and human potential forever.” The athlete who came the closest, Eliud Kipchoge, paid tribute to his friend in a tweet. Bodecker had been with Nike for more than 35 years. He started as a shoe wear-test co-ordinator and was deeply involved in football and action sports before becoming the brand’s first head of global design. (10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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My Best Runs helped tell the world about the photo finish at the 2018 Illinois Marathon

The top two finishers at last year's Illinois Marathon were both clocked at 2:21:03.  The finish line judges gave the win to 22-year-old Tesfaalem Mehari and 39-year-old Wilson Chemweno second. 

My Best Runs helped tell the world about this exciting finish.  My Best Runs published the leader board results just as soon as they were official. 

Race director Jan Seeley had decided to have the Illinois Marathon featured and followed by My Best Runs (MBR) months before.  

"We only feature the best, most interesting and unique races," says MRB founder Bob Anderson, "the Illinois marathon is the type of race we want to share with our over 600,000 unique annual visitors." 

MBR is supported by races.  "Jan recently signed up for another year and we appreciate her support along with our many other race directors," says Manuel Juarez, MBR sales manager.  

MBR was started by lifetime runner Bob Anderson, the founder and publisher of Runner's World Magazine (from 1966 to 1984).  Bob, now 70, is still running 35 miles weekly and racing at sub 8 pace.  

"My Best Runs is for runners who love races," says Bob Anderson. "We are helping race directors publicize their race, and our website helps visitors find races from around the world without having to spend hours searching the Internet.  It is now in one place. This is much more than just a race listing," says Lisa Wall, MBR social media director. 

MBR features Photos, Videos, Course Maps, registration link, Leader Board Results, prize money, race write ups, background info, current race stats and promote discount codes if you do this. "Our editorial team will put this all together for you and post your results as soon as they are official, keeping your race updated every step of the way," says Michael Anderson, media director. 

As news becomes available, your race will also be featured in our column Running News Daily and in our weekly newsletter.  "We want to tell more people around the world about your race," says Bob.  Contact Manuel Juarez for more details at 650-209-7820 or write manuel@mybestruns.com 

"We appreciate your support. This is a win-win situation and we can have your race up within 24 hours at a reasonable cost," says Jamie Sanchez, MBR content manager.

(10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Abdi Nageeye, Michel Butter and Kenenisa Bekele will compete for the national title at the TCS Amsterdam Marathon on October 21

Especially the arrival of Nageeye (Photo) is striking. He started this year in two marathons (Boston and European Championships in Berlin), but says he has recovered well. Last year Nageeye ran to the title in a Dutch record of 2.08.16. Butter said due to pains for the European Championships in Berlin and therefore wanted to run an autumn marathon. He does not aim at a sharp time, but wants to enter into the fight with favorite Nageeye. Nageeye and Butter have been the best marathon runners in the country for years. Racedirector Cees Pronk is therefore pleased that the two opt for the capital. ,, I am proud that both gentlemen have chosen Amsterdam again, they feel at home here. "Earlier, the arrival of the Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele was already announced. The world record holder on the 5000 and 10,000 meters and man with the impressive personal record on the 2.03.03 marathon will get competition from Lawrence Cherono, who won the Amsterdam last year. (10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Valencia Trinidad Alfonso race earns its fifth IAAF label for road races in the Spanish city

In a year in which it hosted the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships, Valencia has confirmed its strategic concept as a ‘city of running’ by earning its fifth IAAF label for road races in the Spanish city. The IAAF certifies the standard of the world’s best road races with gold, silver and bronze labels, which take into account various sport and organisational aspects of the events. Achieving bronze labels for the 10-kilometre Valencia Ibercaja Race and the 15-kilometre Valencia Banco Mediolanum Night Race in June has brought the number of IAAF labels held by the city’s races to five. The two latest IAAF labels come in addition to the bronze label held by the 10-kilometre Valencia Trinidad Alfonso Race and the gold labels held by both the Valencia-Trinidad Alfonso EDP Marathon and Half-Marathon since 2016. With five label road races in total, no other city in the world holds so many international distinctions. “The journey started with the Valencia Half-Marathon and Marathon being the first road races in Spain to be awarded an IAAF gold label,” said Paco Borao, President of SD Correcaminos running club. “They are now joined by other IAAF label events in the city, further strengthening Valencia’s positioning as a top world destination for road-running.” The awarding of the two new IAAF labels was achieved thanks to the support of Fundación Trinidad Alfonso. The foundation backed Valencia’s ‘The Running City’ brand and helped in getting the Spanish Athletics Federation to include the two races in its national calendar. (10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympic Champion Joan Benoit- Samuelson now 61 wants to break the world 60 plus record at Chicago Marathon

Now, 61-year-old Joan Benoit-Samuelson is returning to the site of a past victory with a new goal.

Samuelson won the Chicago Marathon in 1985, in a then-American record of 2:21:21, still the fifth-fastest U.S. time on record. This year, race organizers said she hopes to break the world record for the 60–64 age group, 3:01:30, set by New Zealand’s Bernie Portenski in 2010. 

If she succeeds in conquering a new category this year, the victory would likely feel extra sweet. Circumstances have kept her from Chicago’s streets on several of her recent attempts.

In 2015, she aimed to run within 30 minutes of her winning time 30 years prior, but she was forced to drop out the day before due to a stomach bug. Last year, she set a goal of running the first sub-3 ever by a woman older than 60, but a knee injury intervened.

Once again, she withdrew four days before the race.  Joan was the first-ever women's Olympic Games marathon champion, winning the Gold medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

Benoit Samuelson still holds the fastest times for an American woman at the Chicago Marathon and the Olympic Marathon.  Her time at the Boston Marathon was the fastest time by an American woman at that race for 28 years. She was inducted into the Maine Women's Hall of Fame in 2000.

(10/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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