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Articles tagged #Yuki Kawauchi
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Yuma Hattori wins the Fukuoka Marathon the first Japanese runner to win in 14 years

25-year-old Yuma Hattori from Japan PR for the marathon before today was 2:09:46.  On the other hand the favorite,Yemane Tsegay from Ethiopia had run much faster.  But it was Yuma’s race today has he won by over a minute clocking 2:07:27 at the 72nd annual Fukuoka Marathon held today Dec 2 in Japan.  Yemane finished second clocking 2:08:54. Yuma is the fifth Japanese runner to break 2:08 this year.  2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi finished tenth clocking 2:12:03 adding another sub 2:20 performance to his list of many.  Breaking away from Yemane Tsegay and Amanuel Mesel at 36 kilometers, Yuma Hattori cruised to victory. “It is close to the time I had hoped for,” said Hattori, whose performance elevated him to eighth on the Japanese all-time list. Mesel finished third with 2:09:45. The race progressed on an even pace with 15:00 five-kilometer segments through 25 kilometers.  The first casualty of the relatively fast even pace, considering the unseasonably warm weather was Vincent Kipruto, former World Championships silver medallist who fell behind before 5km. Yuki Kawauchi began to drift back after 11km and Kentaro Nakamoto after 15km and Ghebreslassie at 17. Both Kipruto and Ghebrselassie dropped out before reaching the midway point. Bedan Karoki finished his pacing duties at 25km; the two remaining pacesetters forged on but the tempo slowed to 15:36 over the next five kilometers, by far the slowest of the day. The leading pack of nine was reduced to three by 35 kilometers, with Hattori, Mesel and Tsegay reaching the mark in 1:46:12. But at the water station one kilometer later, Hattori broke away. “I did not feel like I made a move,” Hattori said. “It was more like my competitions dropped off, so I decided to go.”                   (Sat 1) ⚡AMP
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Yemane Tsegay of Ethiopia returns to regain the title he won in 2016 at the 72nd Fukuoka Marathon

Two years ago, Tsegay stopped Patrick Makau from winning a third straight title at this race. Last year he finished a distant 26th in 2:18:05, slowed by a sudden back problem that hit him after five kilometres. In May he won the Ottawa Marathon with 2:08:52, has a personal best of 2:04:48 set in Rotterdam in 2012 and took silver at the 2015 World Championships in Beijing. He trains with this year’s Chicago Marathon runner-up Mosinet Geremew and Shanghai winner Seifu Tura, boding well. The man who beat Tsegay in Beijing, Ghirmay Ghebreslassie, is also in the race. Ghebreslassie was fourth at the 2016 Olympic Games and won the New York City Marathon later that year. He set his personal best of 2:07:46 earlier that year, at the London Marathon. However, he’s failed to finish the last three marathons he started: New York, Dubai and London. He said he was hampered by injury in 2017 and early 2018, but is back on track now. “My training after London is going well,” he said. Vincent Kipruto, the runner-up at the 2011 World Championships, is also in the field. His best of 2:05:13 dates back to the 2010 Rotterdam Marathon, but more recently clocked 2:06:14 at the 2017 Berlin Marathon. Amanuel Mesel of Eritrea has run well here in the past, finishing fifth at both the 2016 and 2017 editions of the race. Although not an invited runner, Brett Robinson of Australia, a pace maker last year, is said to be in strong shape and ready for a fast performance in his debut over the distance.  2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi is also running and posted this on FB.  "I will run Fukuoka international open marathon Sunday. I ran this race 8 times( include 3 times of sub 2:10). I love this race and this city and people of Fukuoka. I believe I can end my bad flow of marathon since this summer," Yuki posted a few hours ago.  (Fri 30) ⚡AMP
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Even super heroes like Yuki Kawauchi need to let their body recover, less marathons for this Boston Champion

Yuki Kawauchi announced on Facebook today that, "I have decided to stop running marathons in America and Europe until next spring." This comes after running some tough marathons including the Venice Marathon where he had to run through ankle deep water.  Yuki continues, "I feel severe (tired) going to work (after a marathon) without recovery time (massage, hot spring, rest, etc.) after a long fight and jet lag."  He has to go into work soon after he arrives back in Japan and usually works until 9:15pm.  He posted, "It was no problem when I was younger." In the last year he mentioned the following races: January marathon in US was very cold like -17C (5F).  In March he vomited after he finished because of the hot conditions in Taiwan.   The conditions in Boston where he won were terrible (cold, wet and windy).  In May he ran a 71K race in Japan on a very tough course.  June was a hot marathon in Sweden. He ran in strong wind in two races in Japan and Italy.  He concluded, "I need to recover to be in perfect condition by next spring."  Gary Fanelli, former elite runner, reaction was similar of many, "Yes Yuki, you definitely need recovery...so please give that to yourself...and rest until you do feel 100%...which means, how you felt before you started a marathon." Bob Anderson says,"Yuki is a hero for many of us.  He has run in extreme conditions and have run well most of the time.  But now he needs recovery time.  Even super heroes need to let their body recover.  Yuki has made a wise decision." (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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National record holder Yuta Shitara and Yuki Kawauchi are running the Fukuoka Marathon

The best year in Japanese men’s marathon history is drawing to a close, and with it the chances for them to qualify for the new MGC Race 2020 Olympic trials are running out. The Dec. 2nd Fukuoka International Marathon features one of the best Japanese fields ever assembled, with ten Japanese men under 2:10 since 2016. Half marathon national record holder Yuta Shitara, 2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi, 2017 Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon winner Kentaro Nakamoto, Hayato Sonoda and Yoshiki Takenouchi, make up the list of those already qualified for the MGC Race, Shitara running a marathon for the first time since his now-former national record 2:06:11 in Tokyo in February and Kawauchi hoping to turn things back around after a string of bad races since Boston. Those with a realistic chance of qualifying off the two-race average include 2017 Gold Coast Marathon winner Takuya Noguchi, who missed it by seconds at this year’s Gold Coast, recent sub-2:10 men Kohei Ogino, Yuma Hattori and Jo Fukuda, and a trio who finished together just over the 2:10 mark in Tokyo this year, Asuka Tanaka, Hiroki Yamagishi and Daichi Kamino. There’s a good number of others on the list who ran well in 2015 and 2016 and will be hoping to get back on board in Fukuoka, including sub-2:10 teammates Takuya Fukatsu, Fumihiro Maruyama and Satoru Sasaki , and given the depth of Japanese men’s marathoning and the tendency for dark horses to post seemingly out-of-nowhere breakthroughs like Taku Fujimoto, earlier this month in Chicago there’s almost no limit to who else could have their day. Twins Hiroshi and Takashi Ichida would make a lot of people happy if they finally broke through in Fukuoka. Both 100 km world record holder Nao Kazami, and 100 km silver medalist Takehiko Gyoba, are also in the race. It being a nominally international marathon, Fukuoka also has its usual small contingent of overseas runners perfectly positioned to pace the Japanese men to times in the 2:07 to 2:08 range and to lend a little shine to the race with their medals. 2011 world championships silver medalist Vincent Kipruto tops the list with a 2:06:14 in Berlin last year, with 2015 world champion Ghirmay Ghebreslassie and past Fukuoka champ Yemane Tsegay. (Tue 30) ⚡AMP
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Runners were forced to wade through ankle-deep water at the Venice marathon, Yuki Kawauchi finished seventh, in 2:27:40

Venice Marathon runners were left wading through ankles-deep water after high tides flooded the course.   Competitors were undeterred by the tricky conditions for the marathon on Sunday with water inches deep in some places. Witnesses described the conditions as “insane” and some suggested it had turned the marathon into a swim.   One runner Andrew Chessell joked that he "should have hired a gondola". The flooding was caused by acqua alta, which is the high tide from the Northern Adriatic Sea.    Despite the difficult conditions, Mekuant Ayenew Gebre of Ethiopia managed to pull off the win today, finishing in 2:13:22. The Ethiopian runner entered the race with a 2:09:00 personal best from the Prague Marathon in 2017. Second place went to Kenyan plumber Gilbert Kipleting Chumba in 2:13:49, and third place to Stephen Kiplimo in 2:13:56. Yuki Kawauchi of Japan finished seventh, in 2:27:40 in the diffult conditions.  This was Kawauchi’s 87th marathon of his career, and 10th marathon race this year but not a sub 2:20 he had wanted.    (Mon 29) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi felt ashamed of his performance in Chicago but has arrived in Venice with one thing in mind

2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi arrived in Venice, Italy today.  He wrote on Facebook, " I arrived in Venice today.This city is so beautiful. I will run Venice Marathon on Sunday. This will be first race in Italy for me. I heard venetian tiramisu is very delicious.I am looking forward to eat tiramisu after race since it is my most favorite cake. I want to run good race."  On October 20 he ran a 20k race clocking 1:00:48, good enough for second place.  Yuki was very disappointed in his performance at the Chicago Marathon.  Afterwards he called his 2:16:26 19th place finish an embarrassment.  He said he was ashamed and hung his head.  This was his 82nd sub-2:20 marathon. He has run more sub-2:10 marathons since 2011 than the entire running population of the United States put together.  He averages about 11 marathons per year while most of his rivals run two.  He said before the Chicago Marathon that his goal was to destroy the status quo, to show people a different way to approach running and life.  Earlier this month he posted, "I come to win (the Venice Marathon) and I can not wait to do it because, in addition to running, I would like to taste Italian cuisine... Food and marathon will make this weekend unforgettable," says Yuki.    (Thu 25) ⚡AMP
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America's Tyler McCandless and Japan's Yuki Kawauchi encounter at the Chicago Marathon

After running miles 3-15 alone at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, I caught up to reigning Boston Marathon champ Yuki Kawauchi. When I caught him I said, “come on Yuki, stay with me” and he tapped my side. I looked back a minute later and he was right on my tail and I said “good” to him. He stayed there until about mile 21 when he tried to push past me. We went back and forth over the last few miles multiple times. Once, he slipped on a turn, nearly fell and looked concerned, I said to Yuki “you’re okay, you’re good.” The rain and wind picked up and neither of us were running near where our goals were. But, we pushed each other to the best we could on ”off” days. We were both struggling, yet with 300m to go he found another gear and blew me away. There no doubt he found that gear from mental toughness and I’ve learned something from it. Moral of the story: even if you’re day isn’t what you envisioned and trained for, NEVER give up because you’ll gain indispensable experience and inspiration from it!  I ran 2:16:37, 20th overall and 7th American.  I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have faster goals, but Sunday was a real test of character and I’m proud of how I competed. It was wet, rainy and windy, and I got stuck with nobody around for the majority of the race until dueling it with Yuki Kawauchi over the last several miles. I went through halfway in 1:06:36 and simply had to be gritty and fight for every second over the second half of the race. Having a less ...than ideal weather day, and simply not having my best day out there, but toughing it out to finish with my third best marathon time is something I’m proud of.  Editors note: Yuki Kawauchi finished 19th in 2:19:26 his 82 marathon under 2:20. Tyler is sponsored by Altra Running and rabbit.  media@TrackTy (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
by Tyler McCandless
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Mo Farah sets European Record to Win The Chicago Marathon

This was Great Britian's Sir Mo Farah's first marathon win in three attempts today October 7.  He looked smooth the whole way and took control of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon over the last few miles when he stepped up the pace to 4:35. The lead group had passed the half way mark in 1:03:03.  At the finish Mo Farah clocked 2:05:11 winning his first US marathon and setting a new European record.  (Breaking Sondre Nordstad Moen record of 2:05:48 set in Japan Dec 3, 2017.)   24-year-old Brigid Kosgei from Kenya running her ninth marathon and second place finisher last year ran the last miles by herself to clock an outstanding 2:18:35, making her the 10th fastest women's marathon time ever. "I like the rain," Brigid said after winning. "I enjoy the rain and I swallowed the pain, no struggling," she said. Roza Dereje (Eth) was second cocking 2:21:18.  First American was Sarah Crouch finished sixth with 2:32:37.  "Amazing to come across the finish first," Mo said after he finished.  Ethiopia's Mosinet Geremew Bayih finished second clocking 2:05:24.  Suguru Osako from Japan finished third in 2:05:50 setting a national Japan record winning 100 million yen (almost one million US dollars) in doing so.  In fourth was Kenneth Kipkemoi from Kenya clocking 2:05:57.  Galen Rupp who fell off the pack at around 22 miles came back strong and finished fifth with 2:06:21 just 14 seconds off his PR.  Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi (Japan) finished 19th clocking 2:16:26, his 82nd sub 2:20 marathon. Mo, a  two-time Olympic champion in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, native of Great Britain finished third in the London Marathon earlier this year.  The men’s field include three former champions and 11 racers who have registered times faster than 2:08.  In the end 11 men ran faster than 2:10, nine under 2:08.  The temperature was 58 degrees at the start with light to heavy rain most of the way. Of more impact were the north-northeast winds coming off Lake Michigan as runners headed north from the start.  Mo is the most successful British track athlete in modern Olympic Games history, he was the 2012 and 2016 Olympic gold medalist in both the 5000m and 10,000m. Farah is the second athlete in modern Olympic Games history, after Lasse Virén, to win both the 5000m and 10,000m titles at successive Olympic Games. Mo moved from the track to the roads after the 2017 World Athletics Championships.  61-year-old Joan Samuelson clocked 3:12:13 not reaching her sub three hour goal.  (Sun 7) ⚡AMP
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Everything you need to know about the 2018 Chicago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is happening this Sunday October 8...Galen Rupp who lives in Oregon won the 2017 race clocking 2:09:20, will return to battle four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah of Great Britain. The two have raced against each other 22 times, with Farah winning 21 times...Mo Farah has been training over 120 miles per week and has only one thing on his mind, to win...There are five men in the field with faster personal records than Rupp, who clocked his 2:06:07 PR winning the Prague Marathon on May 6... among the other elite men in the field include two-time world champion Abel Kirui, Geoffrey Kirui, reigning world champion and 2017 Boston Marathon winner, and four-time Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah, Rupp's former training partner...Plus Mosinet Geremew (2:04:00 personal best) and Birhanu Legese (2:04:15), both of Ethiopia, also lead the international field...In the field of approximately 45,000 runners Sunday, 47 percent will be women...The top American women include Laura Thweatt, Sarah Crouch, Taylor Ward, Katie Matthews and Gwen Jorgensen leading the pack. Joan Benoit Samuelson, 61, who won the 1984 Olympics gold medal and Chicago in 1985, also will be running, and her goal is to break three hours.  No woman over 60 has ever run that fast...Top elite women include Roza Dereje and Birhane Dibaba of Ethiopia; Brigid Kosgei of Kenya; and fellow Kenyan and two-time champion Florence Kiplagat...Chicago is one of the flattest and fastest marathons in the world. The only thing that gets in the way of more fast times is sometimes hot weather...The weather forecast for this year is 60 degrees with humidity at 75%.  Not ideal but it has been worse...Four world marathon records have been set in Chicago. Dennis Kimetto of Kenya holds the Chicago Marathon men’s record with a time of 2:03:45 set in 2013. Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain set the women’s record in 2002 with a time of 2:17:18...Yuki Kawauchi, from Japan, holds a record for running 79 marathons in less than 2:20. In April, he won the Boston Marathon in 2:15:58. He has won 30 marathons in his career with a personal best of 2:08:14. He has competed in 20 marathons so far in 2018 and is running...The female and male Chicago winners each get $100,000. The total purse distributed among all the money winners is $803,500. There are bonuses for course records: $75,000 for men and women...Twenty-three percent of the field are from outside the US. The largest group is from Mexico, with 2,225 runners. Then: Canada (1,777), United Kingdom (1,741), China (1,347), Brazil (1,209), Germany (566), Hong Kong (481), Costa Rica (471) and Italy (453)... Rupp's 2017 victory was his first in a marathon major. He said it compares to his two Olympic medals, silver in the 10,000 meters in 2012, and marathon bronze in 2016. "Nothing can really replace the Olympics," he told Oregon Live. "But winning a major in Chicago, a city I love, was right up there."... Rupp said he is fully recovered from nagging Achilles and ankle problems that complicated his buildup. "I'm feeling good," he said. "I've been healthy the last five or six weeks."...Rupp's father grew up in Maywood, Illinois and Galen spent a lot of time in the Chicago area during his childhood. "I'm so excited to be returning to Chicago to defend my title," Rupp said. "I couldn't be more thrilled to be heading back to the Windy City."  First wave start time is 7:30am Central Time on Sunday. (Thu 4) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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It is not like the 2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi to run a bad time even in tough conditions

It is not like Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi to run a bad marathon time.   He has run more sub 2:12 and sub 2:19 Marathons than anyone in the world.  He handled the terrible weather in Boston to win that Marathon.  So what happened today?  Here is what Yuki posted on Facebook.  “I ran the Northeast Wakkanai Peace marathon today,”  Yuki wrote. The course is point to point like Boston and there was a very strong headwind.  He was running alone in the lead through 36k. “Suddenly I got cramps into both legs and both hands at 38km.  Nevertheless I didn't walk. But I slowed down,” he wrote.  He was passed by one of Japanese corporate runner at 40km. “My finish time was my worst time (2:24:55).  I am sorry and shamed for my fans and  local people.  So I promised to run this race next year again. I promised to make course record and win for my fans and  local people. Next marathon is Bank of America Chicago marathon on October 7,” he posted.  He says he will not run a full Marathon until Chicago so he can concentrate on running well there.  Sounds like a good plan.   (Sun 2) ⚡AMP
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What has Yuki Kawauchi been up too? He has been winning the last two weekends but times have been slow

Last weekend (August 22) at the second annual Nemuro Seaside Half Marathon he won clocking 1:06:39.  The participating runners traversing the extremity Japan's northeastern coast. 1053 people were entered in the event's half marathon, 10 km, 5 km, 3 km and 1 km divisions, an increase from last year. Every finisher received an entire hanasaki crab, the seasonal local specialty giving more than enough motivation to spur them on to the finish line. In the day's main race, the half marathon, 417 people were entered. Lining up alongside guest runner Yuki Kawauchi.  From views of the Pacific Ocean the runners passed through a pastoral dairy farmland scene and on to the panorama of the Sea of Okhotsk in the second half before a finish line in the heart of the town. Yuki posted this on FB. “I went to NEMURO last weekend. Nemuro is most east city of JAPAN.   I had run half marathon of "Nemuro seaside marathon".   Nemuro is cool condition(16〜22℃).   Course is tough,but views are nice. Runner can see Pacific ocean and Sea of Okhotsk.   And Runner can eat "TEPPO-JIL(traditional Japanese miso soup of the crab)" and drink milk after finish.   My finish time is 1:06'39. It isn't the good time. But I could do good training and enjoy race.   My next race is International marathon of Mobil New caledonia . My target time is 2:13:59.  Yuki posted this a few hours ago.  I ran International marathon of Mobil New caledonia today. My time was 2:18:18 today.   Today's race I was all alone. 2nd runner was 2:29.   Although my  time was bad , I was happy because a memory 10 years ago was revived.   I will challenge to break course record next year.   I believe I can do it.” (Sun 26) ⚡AMP
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Being mentally tough Can Be The Difference between Reaching your Goal or Not

Mental toughness is key for racing any distance from 5km to 160km. One prime example of being mentally tough would be the feat that Yuki Kawauchi pulled off in Boston. While others let the terrible weather beat them down, Yuki stayed focused, made up 90 seconds over the last few miles and won the 2018 Boston Marathon.  World class runners have to be mentally tough but so do all of us, if we want to reach a tough goal.  A 5 km requires the ability to go outside your comfort zone for a significant amount of time. In the longer races, it’s battling the bodies desire to quit when you’ve got hours behind you and hours ahead of you. Whether you’re trying to hit a new distance or a new speed, being mentally tough can be the difference between reaching your goal or not.  Consider these three points and then put them to practice. 1. A theory (Central Governor Theory) by Tim Naokes is based on the idea that the mind will try and shut your body down before it does damage to itself, so we feel fatigue. We know it as the edge of our comfort zone. It’s usually the time we stop and walk, but in reality, we can push far past that long before we hurt ourselves. When we feel discomfort, we change it. Rarely are we in a situation where we are at our limit. When translated into running, this means that when we get to the point where it starts to hurt we tend to want to slow down or stop to walk immediately. We want to get comfortable again. Being mentally tough means recognizing this, and deciding you don’t have to listen. This takes practice. 2.  Visualization is a common performance tool in running.  We are told to mentally see ourselves running well, feeling strong, and having the race of our lives. The key, however, is to also practice the worst parts. See yourself at mile 20 of a marathon, when the pain really starts to set in and you know you have a reasonable distance left. Think about suffering up a hill, and see yourself pushing past that and keeping the pace. Make it a habit. 3. Positive thoughts and self- talk. “whether you think you can or you can't, you’re right.” Don’t just think that you can not do it, know that you can. Once the race starts, keep up the positivity speak to yourself positively. It’s that simple.  (Sun 12) ⚡AMP
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Galen Rupp will battle strong international field at Chicago Marathon

Last August, when the elite international fields for the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon were announced, it looked like the men’s race was being set up for a Galen Rupp victory. The men’s field initially featured only two men who had ever broken 2:08 in a recognized marathon and one of them, Dennis Kimetto, hadn’t run a good marathon in over two years. Rupp did indeed become the first American-born winner of the race in 35 years, but he had to defeat a quality field to do it. After several additions to the field, by the time race day came around, the race featured seven men who had broken 2:07 in the marathon plus Zersenay Tadese. Well Friday, Chicago released its full international field for the 2018 race and it is a quality field.  Mo Farah had been confirmed earlier.  If Rupp is going to repeat as champion, he’s going to have to earn it as the Chicago field features five men who have broken 2:06, nine men who have broken 2:07, and 11 who have broken 2:11. Perhaps more importantly than PRs is the fact that many of the men in the field have displayed great recent form. The race features six guys who have won a significant marathon this year: the 2018 Dubai champ, the 2018 Tokyo champ, the 2018 Rotterdam champ, the 2018 Prague champ, the 2018 Paris champ, and the 2018 Boston champ: Geremew, Dickson Chumba, Kenneth Kipkemoi, Galen Rupp, Paul Lonyangata, and Yuki Kawauchi respectively. (Sun 12) ⚡AMP
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Alexi Pappas gets set to make her marathon debut at Chicago Marathon

Following the previous announcement of defending champion Galen Rupp, Britain’s marathon record holder Mo Farah, Jordan Hasay and surprise Boston Marathon 2018 winner Yuki Kawauchi, organisers have announced further stars who will take on the Bank of America Chicago Marathon on Sunday, October 7. Among the athletes revealed for the 41st edition of the race are past champions Abel Kirui and Dickson Chumba, 2017 runner-up Brigid Kosgei and two-time podium finisher Birhane Dibaba, while Olympian Alexi Pappas will make an exciting marathon debut. “I’ve broken tape in Chicago, paced the 26.2, I’m coming back this October to chase what I dream to do: my MARATHON DEBUT! I’ll see you on the startline. You bravies, you.” (Fri 10) ⚡AMP
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Past champions Abel Kirui and Dickson Chumba join the elite field at this year's Chigago Marathon

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that several international running stars are joining the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon elite athlete competition. Past champions Abel Kirui (KEN) and Dickson Chumba (KEN) are confirmed, and 2017 runner-up Brigid Kosgei (KEN) and two-time podium finisher Birhane Dibaba (ETH) stand out among the women. They will join previously announced global sensations Galen Rupp (US), Mo Farah (GBR), Yuki Kawauchi (JPN) and Suguru Osako (JPN). This year’s elite field includes 11 men who have run 2:07 or faster and nine women (including three Americans) who have run 2:25 or faster. Moreover, it features five of the top eight men who placed on top of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XI leaderboard and two of the top seven women. “We have put together an exciting elite field, and it should be a fast race to the top of the podium,” said Bank of America Chicago Marathon Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski. “This year’s elite field is a collection of some of the best international and American athletes running on the global stage today. We are confident that they will continue the great tradition of memorable and record setting performances in Chicago.” Dickson Chumba set his personal best, 2:04:32, in Chicago in 2014 when he finished third on a historic day that witnessed three of the top five times ever run in Chicago (Chumba is the fifth fastest runner in Chicago’s history). He came back to win in 2015 and while he tried to defend his title in 2016, he came up three seconds short, finishing second to Abel Kirui. Since he embarked on his marathon career in 2010, he has finished 17 marathons and he boasts an impressive record: five wins, five runner-ups and four third place finishes. He lines up this fall after opening his 2018 season with his second win at the Tokyo Marathon. His time, 2:05:30, was the second fastest winning time in Tokyo’s history.  (Thu 9) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi wins his seventh Kushiro Shitsugen 30K

Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi, winner of this year’s Boston Marathon, won the 46th running of the Kushiro Shitsugen 30K on Sunday. His time was 1:34:34, and it was Kawauchi’s seventh win at this event. His nearest rival was Yoshiki Koizumi, who finished in 1:35:05, and finishing in third place was Hiroki Kai, in 1:35:51. Kawauchi skipped this race last year to prepare for the 2017 IAAF World Championships in London, where he finished ninth, in 2:12:19. Geoffrey Kirui was the winner of that event, as well as last year’s Boston Marathon, and it was Kirui who Kawauchi defeated at Boston this year, in torrential rain and driving wind. (Mon 30) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi confirms another marathon and says he wants to match up races to his desire to travel the world

Yuki Kawauchi has confirmed another marathon.  He will run the 33rd annual Huawei Venice marathon October 28.  One of Yuki’s goals is to run 100 marathons under 2:20 and he wants to do that or better in Venice.  He just ran his 80th Sub 2:20 in Australia.  Kawauchi is much loved in the running community for not only winning Boston but in challenging weather conditions, but because he embodies that ideal of an athlete who makes running his hobby.  The marathon runner of the "next door" or the "citizen runner" as many say. He plays extravagantly, as when he ran a half marathon disguised as a Panda or in moccasins, a jacket and a tie. But Kawauchi is above all the man of the records. He is the only athlete in history to have run two marathons in 2:09 within 14 days.  He ran two 2:08 marathons within 42 days.  And he is the only one to have raced for 26 times under 2:12' and 78 times under 2:20.  Since the beginning of this year has already run five marathons (winning four), 11 half marathons, 2 ultras and by the end of 2018 he has plans of running five more marathons including Venice.  "The Venice Marathon has an important double meaning," says Yuki, "my first Italian marathon and my first time in Italy and in Venice. I come to win and I can not wait to do it because, in addition to running, I would like to taste Italian cuisine and your tiramisu that I love. Food and marathon will make this weekend unforgettable. My dream is to run 100 marathons under 2:20." continues Kawauchi, "but what matters most to me is to match races to my desire to travel and get to know the world." (Wed 4) ⚡AMP
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What happend to Yuki Kawauchi? He did run his 80th sub 2:20 marathon at the Gold Coast!

It was hot and humid at the Gold Coast Marathon (Australia) July 1.  It was 65 degrees with 100% humidity.  Not the best conditions for running a marathon.  Yuki Kawauchi said,  "I could not run well."  He finished 9th clocking 2:14:50.  (Kenneth Mungara won clocking 2:09:49, Kenta Murayama second 2:09:50 and Jo Fukuda third 2:09:52.)  Yuki posted on Facebook, "But, I achieved my 80th time of sub 2:20 at this race."    "The Australian people were kind to me," Yuki says. (Photo: Yuki with fan/marathoner Dion Finocchiaro.  Dion ran 2:24:36 a PR for him.  Maybe meeting Yuki gave him that extra push?) Yuki's next marathon is going to be the New Caledonia International Marathon August 26.  Their site says, "This is an Olympic-level world-class marathon as runners battle for victory along a spectacularly scenic route winding around Noumea's bays."  Yuki posted on Facebook, "This race is my important memorial marathon.Because this race was my first oversea race. If I didn't run this race 10 years ago, I might not run oversea races like now.   I want to build a course record."  Where is this marathon?  Their site says, "Surrounded by the vast expanse of the South Pacific, New Caledonia, with a surface area of 18,564 km², lies to the east of Australia and south of the thousands of islands and archipelagos making up Melanesia and Micronesia."        (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi may face rain at the Gold Coast Marathon but nothing like Boston

This Sunday, Yuki Kawauchi is likely to face the rain again as he competes in the 40th edition of Australian’s Gold Coast marathon, an IAAF Gold Label event. But nothing like what runners experienced in Boston with the biting winds and slippery roads. Mild and relatively still weather is forecast for race morning. It will be warm – with the temperature tipped to rise to just over 68F (20C) but nothing like as hot as the Commonwealth marathoners experienced. Kawauchi will be competing in his seventh straight Gold Coast marathon and chasing his second victory. His only win came in 2013, but he has three more podium finishes and has never finished outside the top eight. Kawauchi will need to be on his A-game, however, as two other recent winners are in this year’s line-up – last year’s victor, Takuya Noguchi and race record holder and two-time winner Kenneth Mungara. Actually, there are at least five former winners starting in this 40th edition of the race – Eric Sigmont, winner of the inaugural race in 1979, and 1990 Commonwealth Games 5000 metres champion Andrew Lloyd, who won in 1980, are also in the field. (Fri 29) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi will be facing Mo farah and Gallen Rupp at Chicago Marathon men elite field

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that reigning Boston Marathon champion and “citizen runner” Yuki Kawauchi and 2016 Olympian and Nike Oregon Project runner Suguru Osako will join the elite competition as they both seek to become the first Chicago Marathon champion from Japan since Toshihiko Seko took the crown in 1986. "I'm really happy to have the chance to race in the Bank of America Chicago Marathon and the Abbott World Marathon Majors," Kawauchi said. "I'm looking forward to running the same race where Toshinari Takaoka set the former national record and so many other great Japanese athletes have run well. My results in the other American Abbott World Marathon Majors races, Boston and New York, were pretty good, and I'll do everything I can to line up in Chicago ready to produce good results there too." “Yuki and Suguru are exciting additions to our elite field,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “Yuki has taken an unconventional path to marathon stardom; there’s no other elite runner competing today like him. And Suguru is young in his marathon career with a real chance at breaking the Japanese national record in Chicago.” Before becoming the 2018 Boston Marathon champion amidst freezing temperatures and pouring rain where he said, “for me, these are the best conditions possible,” Kawauchi gained global renown for his prolific racing schedule. He holds the record for the most marathons run under 2:20 (79), he boasts a PR of 2:08:14, he has won more than 30 career marathons and he finished 12 marathons in 2017 alone. He has raced more than 20 times in 2018, including running the Kuki Half Marathon dressed in a panda suit and setting a course record at the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71K ultramarathon in May. He won there by 30 minutes.   (Mon 18) ⚡AMP
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Sweden's Larsson wins the Stockholm marathon while Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi finished 4th

“Today I felt the spectators helped me pull out something extra over and over again. It was absolutely fantastic,” Mikaela Larsson told Sweden’s SVT broadcaster. “I’m tired but terribly happy. I hadn’t expected this beforehand.” At the 30km mark, Larsson spurted ahead of her Ethiopian rival Beju Bekelu, building a lead of three minutes and 27 seconds by the finishing line. In the run-up to the start, many had feared that the 27C temperatures would mean runner collapsing from heat exhaustion, but the arrival of clouds just before the start made the contest slightly cooler than expected. Kenyan Lawi Kiptui won the men’s competition with a dramatic finish which saw him overtake and power ahead of his Ethiopian rival Bazu Worku. “It was an extremely hot race,” Kiptui told SVT. “I focused on nothing but winning.” Boston Marathon winner Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi finished fourth nearly 10 minutes behind the winner.  (Sat 2) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi is set to Run the Stockholm Marathon, weather forecast says Hot

This will be the 40th annual ASICS Stockholm Marathon and 7,000 runners from more than 100 countries have registered.  Racing this year will be Boston Marathon's winner Yuki Kawauchi who we know can handle extreme weather conditions.  Also, Fred Grönwall will be racing who is the Swedes' favorite.  It is predicted to be a warm day for marathoning and addressing this there will be 19 fluid and energy stations and at least 15 showers along the route.  The organizers have said they will keep the weather forecast in sight to be able to put in extra efforts if necessary.  The marathon will finish in the beautiful stadium built for the 1912 Olympic Games. The Olympic Stadium has been the site of numerous memorable athletic performances, with no less than 83 world records in track and field. There is no other arena anywhere in the world that comes close to that number. The 1912 Stockholm Olympic Stadium is truly a classic venue for athletics.   (Thu 31) ⚡AMP
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Is Yuki Kawauchi's secret weapon doing long distance runs at a slow pace? He ran 44 mile race Sunday

2018 Boston Marathon winner, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi, won the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71K ultramarathon in Nagano, Japan Sunday May 20, taking more than six minutes off the course record in the process. His winning time was 4:41:55 (6:23/mile for 44.1 miles).  He won by more than half an hour.  According to Japan Running News, Kawauchi is training for the Stockholm marathon, which is June 2.  Yuki finished sixth place there last year. This was the longest race of Kawauchi’s career so far. Kawauchi is famously unusual in his incorporation of over-distance training at a slow pace into his training, something few world-major elites do. Some believe it’s his secret weapon, though others are skeptical of its value in marathon training.   (Mon 21) ⚡AMP
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How the Abbott World Marathon Majors $820,00 was dished out

Series XI of the Abbott World Marathon Majors concluded in dramatic fashion Sunday (April 22) at the London Marathon with a double win for Kenya. In the elite men’s series, Eliud Kipchoge destroyed the best men’s field ever assembled to take his third consecutive AWMM title, while his compatriot Mary Keitany destroyed herself in her bid to break the mixed-race women’s world record, failing in that quest but picking up the AWMM win as a consolation. Series XI kicked off at last year’s London Marathon with a new one-year format featuring a rotating start and finish for each of the six annual series races. A new prize structure was also introduced for Series XI, with prize money awarded to the top three men and women in both the open and wheelchair series, rather than just individual winner. The Series XI champions receive US$250,00 each with US$50,000 going to second and $25,000 to third, while the top wheelchair racers will get $50,000 each, with $25,000 and $10,000 going to second and third respectively. Kipchoge claimed his Series XI crown in stunning style, taking 25 points for his London win yesterday to add to the 25 he earned for his Berlin Marathon victory last year. After the disappointment of coming fifth in yesterday’s London Marathon, Keitany also took her third Abbott World Marathon Majors title thanks to the 25 points she earned in London last year and her second place in New York last November. Geoffrey Kirui with 41 points placed second. Yuki Kawauchi with his Boston win placed third with 25 points. For women Tirunesh Dibaba placed second with 41 points and Brigid Kosgei placed third with 32 points. Wheelchair winners were Marcel Hug and Manuela Schar with 100 points each. (Tue 24) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi is going to turn Pro and leave his day job

Yuki Kawauchi runs a lot of races and in fact placed 12th at the Gifu Half Marathon on Sunday clocking 1:04:35. Not bad for the runner who just won this year’s Boston Marathon six days ago. He has been racing despite having to train around his full-time work as a civil servant. He is finally going to quit his day job and turn professional. “I want to join races around the globe,” the 31-year-old runner told reporters at Narita Airport upon his return from the United States. “I have less than 10 years left to run to the best of my ability. I don’t want to have any regrets when I die.” Kawauchi said he would leave his job with the Saitama government in March 2019, the end of the fiscal year. He said he had hinted to his close friends that he wanted to quit work and become a full-time athlete, but the $150,000 (15.9 million yen) in prize money for winning the April 16 Boston Marathon cemented his decision. “I will become a professional runner, and I will use (the prize money) as a support fund for my training,” he said. Top-level runners in Japan are usually funded through corporate sponsorships or are hired by companies to join their corporate sports teams. As a civil servant, Kawauchi has had no sponsors. And although he can receive prize money, he cannot accept fees from race organizers even if he is invited as a guest runner. (Sun 22) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon's Champion Yuki Kawauchi is already Racing again on Sunday

The three most recent winners of the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon will clash on Sunday. Earlier this week Kawauchi became the first Japanese runner to win the Boston Marathon in 31 years. In a gripping race held in harsh conditions, Kawauchi put in numerous surges with his final effort proving decisive. He crossed the finish line in 2:15:58 to beat world champion Geoffrey Kirui by more than two minutes. It was Kawauchi’s fifth consecutive marathon victory – all of which have been achieved in a four-month time span – but his record at the half marathon isn’t quite as strong. He has contested the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon on five previous occasions but is yet to finish inside the top 10. But his performance on Monday once again showed that distance-running fans should always expect the unexpected from Kawauchi. The 31-year-old currently works 40 hours a week as a civil servant, but he recently announced that he will leave his job and turn professional next year. “I need to change my environment (to move up to another level),” he said. “I have not improved my personal best for five years. I want to see my true potential as a runner. I am determined to compete against the best in the world. (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
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Another look at the 2018 Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi

Yuki Kawauchi’s improbable victory at the Boston Marathon on Monday is the crowning glory in the career of an amateur Japanese runner who has defied every convention in modern athletics and taken the road less travelled to make his mark. The 31-year-old from Saitama, who becomes the first Japanese man to win the Boston Marathon since Toshihiko Seko in 1987, holds down a full-time job working at a local school, and trains without the aid of a coach or sponsorship. And he has competed in more than 80 marathons. After splashing across the finish line through wind and rain ahead of defending champion Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya on Monday, Kawauchi was in no doubt he surprised a few people. “I don’t think there was a single person in Boston who thought I would win this today,” he said with a smile. “In the marathon you never know what could happen.” (editor’s note: we did think that Yuki was the best runner in the field winning other races in extreme weather conditions. This being posted Sunday on MBR.) Many of Kawauchi’s marathon wins have come in awful weather and he said being battered by wind and rain in Boston played right into his hands. “I think the conditions were instrumental in being able to win …” he added. He has won his last five marathons, including four in 2018 alone, and ran 12 last year. Kenya’s reigning Olympic champion Eluid Kipchoge by comparison ran only two. “I love to run races,” said Kawauchi. “Races gives me the opportunity to travel and in a more practical sense, because I train by myself if I didn’t put in a lot of races I wouldn’t be able to put in the same quality.” (Wed 18) ⚡AMP
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Unlike most professional runners, this year’s Boston Marathon champion has a full time job in Japan

Boston Marathon 2018 champion, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi has run many races in challenging weather conditions both hot and cold. He holds the world record for sub-2:20 marathons with 79 now. Unlike many professional runners he has a full time job. He works in the administration office of a high school. “This year the high school is celebrating its 100th anniversary, so I’ve been quite busy writing the commemorative magazine for that,’’ he said. And of all the marathons he has run and of all the places this sport has taken him, it was here, these spectators and avid Boston fans, that left an impression on him. “It’s the best crowd support I’ve had anywhere in the world,’’ he said. “Thank you, Boston.’’ (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
Boston Marathon, Yuki Kawauchi
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Japan's Yuki Kawauchi was 91 seconds behind at 35K, then he made an unbelievable move to win Boston

It looked like last year's Boston Marathon winner, Geoffrey Kirui, was going to win again but he may not have realized how tough of a runner Japan's Yuki Kawauchi really is in challenging weather conditions. Kirui had taken command at 30K opening up a 28 second lead on a pack of three behind including Japan's Yuki Kawauchi who lead the pack through the half marathon mark. At this point Shadrack Biwott was the first American as Galen Rupp was not handling the weather well. Geoffrey stayed in control, hitting 35K in 1:50:49 after a 15:51 5K split. Yuki was 91 seconds back. Then Yuki made an unbelievable move (running a 5:08 mile) and overtook Kirui and never looked back. Two America's were in the top four with just a mile to go (Biwott and Pennel) and stayed that way to the finish. Yuki crossed the finish line first in 2:15:54 beating last year’s champion by over three minutes. Yuki became the first Japanese runner to win since 1987. Geoffrey finished second in 2:18:21, Biwot third in 2:18:32 and Pennel fourth in 2:18:57. In the end there were six American's in the top ten. Tenth place being almost 12 minutes behind the winner. Kawauchi said through an interpreter after the windy, rainy race that "it was the best conditions possible" for him. (Mon 16) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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One elite Boston Marathon runner, Yuki Kawauchi handles extreme weather well

Maybe the one elite runner in the Boston Marathon field that has performed the best in extreme weather conditions is Japan's Yuki Kawauchi. He is running his first Boston. He was one of just three runners in the Marshfield Road Runner's 37th New Year's Day Marathon. He was attempting to break the world record of 75 sub 2:20 marathons he co-held with Doug Kurtis which he did. It was very cold and windy. The temperature was 4 degrees and he ran 2:18:59. Colder than what is predicted for Monday. Most Runners would not have run on News Year Day but it didn’t stop Yuki. The 31-year-old, who has won more than 30 international marathons, has a best of 2:08:14. What will the weather be like race morning? As of late Sunday morning, Boston was just a couple of degrees above freezing, and it won’t be much better early Monday. Should be a little warmer but most likely there will be rain and wind. How will this play out? We will know in 24 hours. (Sun 15) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Wilson Kipsang did run the Tokushima Marathon and in fact won it Sunday

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang won the 2018 Tokushima Marathon Mar. 25 that took place in the city of Tokushima, Japan. 12,400 people took part. Invited elite athlete Wilson Kipsang (Kenya), the 2012 London Olympics bronze medalist, won in 2:19:35. Local runner Takumi Matsumoto was 2nd. Kipsang's time was just over four minutes off the course record of 2:15:25 set by Yuki Kawauchi in 2014. Kipsang is in the process of establishing a fund to support improvement of the living environment and education of children in his home country and is taking part in activities to support that end. (Mon 26) ⚡AMP
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Japan’s Citizen Runner, Yuki Kawauchi was officially recognized by Guinness

Japanese marathon runner Yuki Kawauchi received a certificate from Guinness World Records in his hometown on Sunday recognizing him for completing the most number of marathons in under 2 hours and 20 minutes. "I'm very happy but this is still a passing point," said Kawauchi, known as the "public servant runner," who has achieved 78 sub-2:20 marathons. "I'm now aiming to reach 100 (sub-2:20s) to be called the hard-bitten Kawauchi." Yuki, a 2:08 marathoner is known for his unconventional approach to elite distance running. Yesterday he ran a marathon in a Panda suit in his home town. This is not the first time he raced in costume. He ran the 2015 Japan’s Kuki Half Marathon in 1:06:42 while wearing a business suit. Kawauchi is a hero to many in Japan because of his decision not to accept corporate sponsorship for his running. Instead, he works 40 hours per week. (Sun 25) ⚡AMP
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Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi is very versatile winning marathons in both Cold and Hot conditions

Yuki Kawauchi won the New Taipei City Wan Jin Shi Marathon, an IAAF Silver Label road race, on Sunday. It was 75 degrees and 85% humidity so running a good time became less important than winning. However, Yuki clocked 2:14:12, identical to the time he ran in this race two years ago, but this time he was the first across the line. Yuki lead from the gun, opening with a nine-second lead after five kilometers, he extended it to 37 seconds at the 10K point before reaching the midway point in 1:04:44, more than two minutes clear of his nearest pursuer, Kenyan Johnstone Maiyo. Maiyo made up some of that ground in the second half, but couldn't challenge Kawauchi, who went on to win by 28 seconds. Maiyo clocked 2:14:40 in second with Aredom Degefa of Ethiopia third in 2:14:54. The heat and high humidity slowed everyone down the second half. Normally Yuki runs negative splits but not Sunday. "I was the runner-up in 2016, so this time I really wanted to win the title,” said Kawauchi, who clocked his 2:08:14 lifetime best in Seoul in 2013. (Sun 18) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi targeting course record in New Taipei City and his 27th sub 2:12

When Yuki Kawauchi last raced the New Taipei City Wan Jin Shi Marathon, it took a course record to beat him. That was two years ago. The prolific racer from Japan will return to the IAAF Silver Label road race seeking not only victory but an improvement on the course record on Sunday (18). The 31-year-old, who has won more than 30 international marathons, has a best of 2:08:14. In New Taipei City in 2016 he was beaten by Kenya’s William Chebor, who clocked a course record of 2:13:05 to Kawauchi’s 2:14:12. Since then, Kawauchi has gone on to win several other marathons and place ninth at last year’s World Championships. This will be his third marathon of the year, following victories in Massachusetts in January and Kitakyushu last month. (Sat 17) ⚡AMP
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After seven week break Kawauchi runs another sub 2:12 marathon - his 26th

After a seven-week break from the marathon, Yuki Kawauchi scored his third-straight marathon win, second-straight course record and came just shy of a third-straight negative split as he ran a completely solo 2:11:46 to take almost six minutes off the Kitakyushu Marathon course record. Following up on negative split wins at December's Hofu Yomiuri Marathon and January's Marshfield New Year's Day Marathon, the latter a course record by half an hour, Kawauchi was on his own in Kitakyushu the whole way. After a 1:05:51 split at halfway he slowed slightly finishing the second half in 1:05:55. Along with the course record, Kawauchi extended his record for most career sub-2:12 marathons to 26 as he continues to prepare for the Boston Marathon. (Tue 20) ⚡AMP
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Kawauchi Outruns 103 Teams to Win Yashio Isshu Ekiden

2017 London World Championships marathon 9th-placer Yuki Kawauchi gave local club and high school runners something to remember when he ran Sunday's Yashio Shinai Isshu Ekiden solo against 103 six-runner teams. Kawauchi spent most of the 20.0 km race in 2nd, briefly taking the lead at the end of the 3.9 km Second Stage before falling behind after a Third Stage course record run by Kotaro Minowa. Kawauchi's final time of 1:01:03 was just 35 seconds off the overall ekiden course record. (Mon 22) ⚡AMP
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Nakamoto and Kawauchi to Run Boston

Japan's Yuki Kawauchi (Saitama Pref. Gov't) and Kentaro Nakamoto (Yasukawa Denki) will run the 2018 Boston Marathon as part of the John Hancock Elite Athlete Team. Kawauchi holds world records for everything from most career sub-2:12 marathons to most sub-2:20, while Nakamoto is Japan's best championships marathoner of modern times with four top 10 finishes at the Olympics and World Championships. (Fri 12) ⚡AMP
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Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi’s stats Puts Him at the top of the World

MBR FAST FACTS: Yuki Kawauchi is in a category of his own. As of January 1, he has run the most sub-2:20 marathons of anyone, ever—76. He’s also run the most sub-2:12 marathons of anyone, ever—25. Kawauchi has run more sub-2:10 marathons since 2011 than the whole USA put together. Kawauchi’s best time for 2017—2:09:18—was two seconds faster than the fastest marathon of the year by any U.S. man, which would be Galen Rupp (2:09:20 in Chicago). Rupp ran two marathons in 2017. Kawauchi ran 12. (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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The Courage of Yuki Kawauchi Is Beyond Words

MBR PHOTO OF THE WEEK: Japan's Yuki Kawauchi was one of just three runners in the Marshfield Road Runner's 37th New Year's Day Marathon. He was attempting to break the world record of 75 sub 2:20 marathons he co-held with Doug Kurtis. He hit the half way point in 1:10:29. The temperature was 4 degrees. “When I saw the time I thought it’s not happening today,” said Kawauchi. But he does not give up and he kept pushing to finish in 2:18:59 on the certified course. From New England Runner. (Wed 3) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi Sets Record For The Most Sub 2:20 marathons

Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi did it. He finished the Marshfield Road Runners Marathon in 2:18:59. Setting a world record for the most sub 2:20 marathons. He did this on a very cold day, like 10 degrees. He is a real champion. (Mon 1) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi Is Going For Sub 2:20 Marathon Record

Japanese runner Yuki Kawauchi will be running the 2018 Boston Marathon, and hopes to improve on a world record that afternoon. On New Year’s Day, he will to attempt to break the world record for most sub-2:20 marathons ever run. Currently he is the co-record holder with American Doug Kurtis, each having run 75 marathons under 2:20. “I can think of nothing better than breaking the record in Marshfield on New Year’s Day and then improving that record in Boston on Patriots’ Day,” said Kawauchi. (Thu 21) ⚡AMP
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Japan's Yuki Kawauchi Ran Four Marathons in 40 Days

The major marathon season has been over for more than a month but that doesn’t mean that Japanese marathoning sensation Yuki Kawauchi will stop. He’s run four marathons in the past 40 days (he did 12 in 2017) and clocked his third-fastest of the year this past weekend with a 2:10:03 at a marathon in Hofu. That comes just two weeks after he ran 2:10:53 at the Fukuoka Marathon. From some photos from the race, you can see just how much he wanted to crack 2:10 in the last few kilometers. (Tue 19) ⚡AMP
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