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Articles tagged #Wilson Kipsang
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The magical Kenyan Diet and training at altitute are two keys factors why Kenyan runners are having so much success

One unique and interesting thing about Kenyan runners is their daily diet.  A diet that gives them energy to run for a long time and fast.  Many wake up at 5am and eat something like a slice of bread or ugali with tea to provide energy.  Some prefer going for their morning run on an empty stomach but after training they take tea with rice or ugali. This is common in Kenya as well as drinking at least two glasses of tea in the morning. The most important meal of the day for many Kenyan runners is lunch.  Most eat a heavy amount of ugali, rice and beans/potatoes or stew depending on the athlete.  For example super stars like Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang, love ugali with traditional vegetables like spinach accompanied by milk called mursik (sour milk). Mursik is sour milk that taste so sweet.  It contains enough proteins to help build and repair muscles due to tearing during daily training and competition. With daily intake it helps the runner be more energetic, strong and more able to be tough. The Mursik Factor has been making headlines when an athlete wins a race or breaks a record because Mursik never disappoints. Mursik and ugali are both key. The ingredients of ugali itself is such a secret and many keep wondering where the energy of Kenyans comes from. Ugali is a carbohydrate but has amazing ingredients. Ugali is a type of cormeal porridge and is made from maize four.  It is cooked in boiling water or milk until it reaches a stiff or dough-like consistency. 100g of maize flour contains folates 0.6mg, vitamin A 0.5mg, vitamin B1 3.0mg, vitamin B2 2.0mg, vitamin B3 14.9mg, vitamin B6 2.0mg, vitamin B12 0.007mg, iron 21mg, and Zinc 33mg. In addition the roughage helps in digestion. On top of this energizer, the high altitude helps the body produce a lot of hemoglobin due to less oxygen giving runners an easy time to run fast in low altitude outside Kenya. This is the magical Kenyan diet that propel Kenyan runners like a space ship going into the universe.  How can you doubt anything that Eluid Kipchoge does to run a 2:01 marathon? (Wed 5) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Kenya's Daniel Wanjiru will face defending champion Geoffrey Kamworor at the New York City Marathon

Daniel Wanjiru and defending champion Geoffrey Kamworor are ready to battle it out at the 48th Annual New York Marathon on Sunday. Former London Marathon champion Daniel Wanjiru will face Kamworor and Festus Talam in what is expected to be a competitive race from the Ethiopian athletes. Ethiopia’s Tamirat Tola (2:04:06) leads his compatriots Lelisa Desisa (2:04:45) and Shura Kitata (2:04:49) in a bid to wrestle victory from the Kenyan contingent. Kamworor, who has been training in Kaptagat, clinched the title last year after clocking 2:10:53 three seconds ahead of Wilson Kipsang while Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa came in third with a time of 2:11:32. Wanjiru, who has been training in Kerugoya, will be making his debut in the race and is optimistic that he will run well and win. (Wed 31) ⚡AMP
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Amos Kipruto is considering either running the Xiamen or Tokyo marathon

The Xiamen marathon, the third biggest race in China after Beijing and Shanghai, will be staged on January 6 while Tokyo marathon is scheduled for February. However, Kipruto has already competed in Tokyo last year where he claimed the bronze medal. "I want to rest and hopefully return stronger and focus on my next race. Tokyo or Xiamen are very good races. I have not raced in China and this may be my time," said Kiruto on Thursday in Eldoret. In Berlin, Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge was the star focus after he clinched the gold in world record time of 2:01.39, which was almost five minutes faster than what Kipruto posted 2:06:20 in second place. But Kipruto believes he has what it takes to stage his own conquest and Xiamen marathon in China will be an attractive destination should his management team 2 Running Club get an incentive offer. "I have run the last two races without a win. I was third in Tokyo and second in Berlin. It is an improvement but I have a chance to ascend to the winner's podium in my next race," he said. Kipruto made his marathon debut back in 2016 and defied the odds to win the Rome Marathon. However, he was given a rude shock four months later when he finished in position 12 at the Amsterdam Marathon clocking 2:09:06. Last year, he returned stronger mentally and triumphed at the Seoul Marathon timed at 2:05:54. He returned to the Netherlands and was fifth at the Amsterdam Marathon in 2:05:43. "Next year I would love to go back to Berlin. I went there hoping to finish third, because we had tough runners in Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang. But I was happy to finish second. My management team are already working on a deal and we will see what happens," he said. (Mon 24) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge says he handles pain by smiling - Part two of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Two: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. He began his move into road running in 2012 when he clocked 59:25 for the half marathon.  In 2013 Eliud ran his first marathon when he won the Hamburg Marathon clocking 2:05:30, setting a new course record.  In 2016 he won the gold medal in the marathon at the Rio Olympics.  He has won 10 out of the 11 marathons he has run.  Wilson Kipsang beat him in 2013 in Berlin when setting the world record.  Eliud trains in Eldoret, the home of Champions.  His humbleness is seen when training with athletes.  Eliud keeps a low-profile and even does house chores in camp like washing toilets, utensils, cutting grass and cleaning the dining hall.  He uses public buses or bodaboda to travel despite having good cars.  He has earned a lot of prize, bonus and sponsorship money from running especially since he moved to the road.  However, money hasn't changed his character. He says, "An athlete with 50 million Kenyan shillings ($500,000US) in his bank account can brag, but a farmer who uses the same amount to plant wheat is not even noticed as he walks around town."  Eliud loves the simple life and when he travels he arrives without many people realizing it. He loves his Nike shoes and is comfortable with NN running and with his mentor and neighbor Patrick Sang. During the Nike project, he almost broke the two hour mark clocking 2:00:23 for the full Marathon.  Yes, the conditions were perfect and he was paced like in a time trial but his body ran the distance.  He puts in a lot of hardwork, discipline and good training.  He also eats a healthy diet.  Before he lined up to run the Berlin Marathon this was the kind of workouts he was doing. 8x1600 (recovery 1:30) + 10x400m (recovery 45 seconds) in Eldoret altitude 2200m (7200 feet) above sea level.  His 1600m times were:  4:35, 4:33, 4:32, 4:34, 4:33, 4:32, 4:33, 4:33. His 400m times were: 62, 63, 63, 62, 62, 62, 61, 62, 61, 60. He always does speedwork on the track wearing racing shoes with other fast athletes like Kamworor, Brimin kipruto and Conselsius.  "You can't train alone because you need others to push you higher to reach your best limit,"  Kipchoge told me last month at Kabarak university.  No marathoner has been more dominant in the marathon than Kipchoge. The 5'6" 115 pound Eliud has never sustained a serious injury because he listens to his body and eats a healthy diet.  Even the greatest runners have days when they have a strained muscle or an upset stomach kept them from winning but not Kipchoge.  He actually has a winning formula:  Motivation plus disipline equals consistency.  Pain, he says, is nothing more than a mind set so he distracts himself with other thoughts such as the joy of running and the finish line ahead, then the pain fades with a smile on his face. He has a habit of smiling whenever pain sets in. Tomorrow in part three of this series we look closer at Eliud’s healthy diet and at the day he broke the world Marathon record.  We talk about  the prize money and how Eliud wants to help others.   (Fri 21) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Eliud Kipchoge smashed the World Marathon Record clocking 2:01:39 in Berlin

33-year-old Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya smashed the world marathon record in Berlin today (September 16) clocking 2:01:39, breaking the record by over a minute.  According to Willie Korir reporting from Kenya, "the pace was so high.  Eliud started well and maintained 2:52-2:55/k pace.  Two of the pacers dropped at 14k.  Sammy Sitwara, Kipkemboe and Boit remained up to 25k.  Eliud was alone from 25k to the end.  It is a big celebration all over Kenya especially in Eliud's home town of Kapsabet and in Eldoret, home of Champions."  Amos Kipruto (2:06:23) passed Wilson Kipsang to place second and Wilson placed third (2:06:48).  Gladys Cherono set a course record clocking 2:18:11.  Second woman was Ruti Aga 2:18:34 and Trunesh Dibaba 2:18:55.  Kipchoge maintained his form well in the closing stages and crossed the finish line in 2:01:39, taking one minute and 18 seconds off the previous world record set four years ago by Dennis Kimetto. It is the largest single improvement on the marathon world record since Derek Clayton improved the mark by two minutes and 23 seconds in 1967. "I lack the words to describe how I feel," said Kipchoge. "It was really hard [during the last 17 kilometers] but I was truly prepared to run my own race. I had to focus on the work I had put in in Kenya and that is what helped push me. I’m really grateful to my coaching team, my management, the organisation." (Sun 16) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world. Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September. Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record. For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January. The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday. I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck. In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions.  The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13. The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched. Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km. (Sat 15) ⚡AMP
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Former marathon world record holder Patrick Makau of Kenya has announced his retirement from professional running

Patrick Makau, 33, has lost his fight to gain fitness after persistent patella-tendon injury, forced him off training and competition since 2017. With doctors warning against him running, Makau has opted to throw in the towel. "With the age catching up, with persistent patella-tendon injury due to which I was forced to cancel competition in 2017 for both Boston and Berlin marathons, I know this is the right time to say it is enough," Makau said Thursday in Nairobi. The two time Berlin marathon champion is credited for reclaiming the world marathon record from the grip of Ethiopian Haile Gebreselassie in 2011 when he clocked 2:03:38 eclipsing the Ethiopian's time of 2:03:59. Gebreselassie had beaten Paul Tergat's record of 2:04:54 set in 2004. Wilson Kipsang improved Makau's record after two years to 2:03:23, but that has also been shuttered to 2:02:57 by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto, which is the current record. "I have had a wonderful career as an athlete. My life is defined by athletics, what I have today is because of the sport I love. Athletics has literally changed me, allowing me to grow and to make positive impact on lives of my family and our community," said Makau, the 2007 World Half Marathon champion. "For this I am truly grateful." However, Makau will not be taking a long walk away from athletics completely. To remain busy, he intends to help guide a new generation of young distance runners realize their dreams and develop their careers, especially from the southern part of Kenya where he comes from. "I want to coach some athletes who have no guides. I want to continue giving back to the community," he said. (Thu 13) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge is focused on only one thing as he gets ready for the Berlin Marathon Sunday

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya says he has a crazy dream to be the fastest man in history. He hopes will inspire his quest to shutter the world marathon record in Berlin on Sunday. Kipchoge, 33, will be racing in his 10th marathon since he graduated from the track back in 2012. The London champion has only one loss in his career back in 2013 against compatriot Wilson Kipsang. He has won in Hamburg, Chicago, London, Rio (Olympics) and Berlin. "It's only a crazy dream until you do it. Don't be the fastest runner in the world, but strive to be the fastest runner in history," said Kipchoge on Monday in Nairobi. Kipchoge will be running his fourth Berlin marathon on Sunday and has sounded out world marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto (2:02.57) saying he will be focused on lowering his personal best time, which is only eight seconds off the mark. "Don't ask if your dreams are crazy. Ask if they are crazy enough," he added. "In Berlin the focus will be to improve on my personal best time of 2:03.05. Last year the weather was not good but I managed strongly to finish the race," he said. (Mon 10) ⚡AMP
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Dennis Kimetto says Kenyan athletes have the strength and skills to run the fast Berlin Marathon course in under 2 hours and 50 seconds

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03.05) and New York marathon silver medalist Wilson Kipsang (2:03.13) will be the top Runners at the Berlin marathon on Sept 16 and Kimetto believes either athlete can run away with the world record. Kimetto's world record stands at 2:02:57. "First there is a race to be won and then the record. Kipchoge is the best so far but Kipsang has the ability to sprint and win if he has his tactics right. Both athletes are under pressure since they will all want to prove a point," said Makau on Thursday in Nairobi. Kipsang was forced to pull out of Berlin marathon last year under rainy and windy conditions after just 31km, citing stomach cramps. He recovered and a month later, and proved his critics wrong to secure silver in New York. "My training has gone on very well and I'm looking forward to a good run in Berlin. It has been an injury-free period for me since running in Tokyo although there has been lots of rain but that didn't stop me from achieving my dream," said Kipsang. Like Kipchoge, Kipsang will be running his fourth marathon in Berlin, having made his debut in 2013 running a world record time of 2:03:23 and has since followed it up with 2:03:13 for a second-place behind Kenenisa Bekele (2:03.03) in 2016. (Fri 7) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto says he has overcome his injury worries and hopes to make another comeback, this time running at the Shanghai Marathon in China in November

Kimetto wants to set a new all-time best mark in China as he seeks his first win in marathon since 2016. Speaking in Iten, Kimetto, 35, warned his rivals that it will take more than their skills to improve on his world mark. "I am in right frame and shape to return to marathon running. Shanghai in my next stop in Nov," Kimetto told Xinhua on Thursday in Iten. Compatriots Wilson Kipsang (2:03:13) and Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03:05) like patient vultures have been circling the carcass that has been his world record for the last three years. The two will be in Berlin next week eyeing shutter the record but Kimetto is sitting pretty saying the record is safe. "It depends on their strategy. They are the fastest in the last two years and it depends on their pace makers. If they go past the 30km mark in under one hour and 27 minutes, then they will be able to break the record. But it is fast running and needs a lot of endurance," he warned. Kimetto, who has not finished a marathon since London in 2016, suffered another unhappy day in Vienna, Austria in April when he aggravated his calf muscle injury. He has been in and out of hospital in Germany and hopes when he returns to Hamburg next week for review, he will be given the all clear signal. "I am going for a review in Germany next week. I have just cleared my long run now and am resting. There has not been any pain my leg and I believe it is clear sign I am getting back to my best form," he said. "I will be running in Shanghai in November and I want to check with the doctors to be certain I am ready for the race. If Kipchoge and Kipsang fail to break the record, I want to tell them I will be back next year and will run even faster. But for now, winning Shanghai Marathon is my main concern," said Kimetto. (Fri 7) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Geoffrey Kamworor will return to the New York City Marathon on Nov. 4th in hopes of defending his title from last year

Kenya's Geoffrey Kamworor will return to the New York City Marathon on Nov. 4th in hopes of defending his title from last year, New York Road Runners announced on Tuesday. “Racing once more in the TCS New York City Marathon means so much to me," Kamworor said in a statement. "It is my favorite race, and although thousands of miles separate my training base in Kaptagat, Kenya to New York, the event feels like home. I say that because of the friendly nature of the event, the terrific organization and also because of the warmth I feel from the many thousands of supporters lining the route.” The 25-year-old captured his first World Marathon Major victory with a 2:10:53 win that included a 4-minute, 31-second split for the 25th mile. He finished just three seconds ahead of compatriot and former world record holder Wilson Kipsang. (Tue 14) ⚡AMP
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Wilson kipsang, Eliud Kipchoge and Zersenay Tadese will face off at BMW Berlin Marathon

Wilson Kipsang is a strong contender.  Now 36, the Kenyan set his world record time of 2:03:23 in 2013 in Berlin. Kipchoge and Kipsang lined up last year with the target of breaking 2:03 as a key objective but such hopes were dashed by steady rain throughout. Kipchoge won in difficult conditions clocking 2:03:32 while Kipsang dropped out do to stomach issues. Another runner to be taken into consideration is Zersenay Tadese of Eritrea, five times a winner of the world half marathon title as well as world record holder for the distance. Eliud Kipchoge has a strong claim to be the greatest marathon runner of all time. He is the reigning Olympic champion, having won the title in Rio in 2016, three times a winner in London (2015, 16 and 18), twice winner of the BMW Berlin Marathon title as well as winner of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2014. He finished runner-up in Berlin in 2013 when Wilson Kipsang broke the world record. He broke into new territory in May last year when running 2:00:25 for the marathon distance, achieved on the Formula One circuit of Monza in Italy though substitute pacemakers made the time ineligible as a record. In Berlin on September 16 Eliud Kipchoge is keen to show what he can do in regular competition and under hopefully favorable weather conditions: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on Berlin. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.”  With good weather conditions the world record could fall Berlin.   (Thu 5) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge seeking again to challenge the world record at Berlin Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge will race the Berlin Marathon for the fourth time on Sept. 16, seeking again to challenge the world record on the world’s fastest record-eligible course, according to event organizers. Kipchoge, a 33-year-old Kenyan Olympic champion, won Berlin in 2015 and 2017 and was second in 2013, his only defeat in 10 career marathons. Kipchoge’s personal best of 2:03:05, set at the 2016 London Marathon, is eight seconds shy of Dennis Kimetto‘s world record from the 2014 Berlin Marathon. Kipchoge’s two Berlin wins came in 2:04:00 in 2015 (with his soles flapping out from the back of his shoes) and 2:03:32 last year in rain and humidity. Fellow Kenyan Wilson Kipsang, who lowered the world record at the 2013 Berlin Marathon and has run four sub-2:04s, is also in the Berlin field. As is Eritrean Zersenay Tadese, the half-marathon world-record holder whose marathon personal best is 2:10:41, though he ran 2:06:51 in Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon attempt not run under record-eligible conditions where Kipchoge famously clocked 2:00:25 last year. (Mon 11) ⚡AMP
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Wilson Kipsang is going after sub 59 minutes at Gothenburg Half Marathon

Kenya's former world marathon record-holder Wilson Kipsang will have his first competitive race after almost three months when he takes part in the Gothenburg Half Marathon on May 19. Kipsang, 34, had to let his Tokyo Marathon title go without much fight after he developed problems just 15 kilometers into the race back in February. However, he has recovered from his injury and will be trying to gauge himself against some of the fastest half marathon runners in the Swedish race on Saturday. "During my last race, I really wanted to go fast, but after suffering from stomach problems just days before the race, I didn't have the power to run a decent race. I'm still disappointed, I was really ready for it," said Kipsang on Tuesday from Iten, Kenya. The former world marathon record holder (2:03:23) and Olympic bronze medalist believes he has the strength to challenge his personal best time of 58:59 when he lines up in Gothenburg, the second-largest city in Sweden. "I have done well since pulling out of Tokyo Marathon and will be keen to test my limits again," he said. Kipsang will be out to use the race in Gothenburg as part of his preparations before the latter half of the year, where he is expected to race in Berlin, Chicago or New York.  Kipsang faces a strong line-up including Kenyan teammates Leonard Langat (59:18) Peter Kirui (59:22), Albert Kangogo (59:25), Richard Mengich (59:35) and Ethiopia's Abera Kuma (60:19). Former world 10,000m champion Ibrahim Jeilan, who has a best time of 61:47 will also compete. The women's race features Kenya's Joyce Chepkirui (66:19) and top Ethiopians Sutume Asefa (67:54 PB), Meseret Tola (68:09 PB) and Shure Demise (68:53 PB). Chepkirui, who was fourth in her last race in Istanbul in April, has said she is gunning for a fast time as she seeks to return to top form. (Tue 15) ⚡AMP
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Kipsang said doping will ruin the country’s athletics glory if proper education is not conducted

Reports of three-time world champion and 2008 Olympic gold medalist Asbel Kiprop (photo) failing doping test is very concerning.  It is a menace that can only be spoken in low tones in training camps. Kiprop, on Wednesday denied the allegations of testing positive for blood-boosting drug erythropoietin (EPO), saying there was an error in his sample taken at a competition in late 2017. But even amid the denial, the allegations have re-opened debate over doping. A Moi University Sports lecturer and Iten-based athletics trainer, Byron Kipchumba, said the doping incidents are raising in magnitude, adding that some managers are to blame. Kipchumba said most Kenyan elite runners are likely to fall victim since they are managed by foreign managers and companies that are not closely monitored by Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya.  Two weeks ago, former world marathon record holder Wilson Kipsang said athletes lack adequate training on which drugs to use and which to avoid, often falling prey to greedy managers, who end up ruining their athletics careers. During an doping seminar spearheaded by the Adak in Iten, Kipsang said doping will ruin the country’s athletics glory if proper education is not conducted. He said Kenyan athletes always comply with anti-doping rules (Fri 4) ⚡AMP
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The all-time best marathoner in the world is Eliud Kipchoge and here’s why

The debate over who is the greatest marathon runner has been answered emphatically by Kenyan Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge. He does’t hold the official world record but he did run 2:00:25 in the special Marathon NIKE sponsored. The 33-year-old said on Monday after returning home in Kenya that he will not celebrate his win in London, the third in as many attempts, but rather will focus on the fact that his victory has inspired many to carry on in his footsteps. Despite missing the world marathon record by 80 seconds because of the hot weather conditions, Kipchoge remained cool. "I can't complain about the weather, it was the same for all 40,000 competitors. I don't think I will celebrate this performance, I have celebrated by inspiring many people," he said. It was Kipchoge's eighth marathon. He started his marathon career with a win in Hamburg, Germany in 2013 and lost his only race in Berlin the same year to Wilson Kipsang, who set a world record of 2:03:23. Kipchoge went on to win in Rotterdam and Chicago in 2014, London and Berlin in 2015, London and Rio Olympics in 2016 and last year he won in Monza in 2:00:25 under special conditions and Berlin in 2:03:32, missing the Dennis Kimetto world record (2:02:57) by just 35 seconds. "His record speaks for itself," says Bob Anderson. "He is the greatest Marathoner of all-time." (Tue 24) ⚡AMP
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Wilson Kipsang speaks up why many Kenyan Runners are moving to other countries

A top Kenyan athlete has opened up on why many of his colleagues have been opting to change nationality and represent other countries in global sporting events. According to Wilson Kipsang, the former world record holder in the marathon, Kenyan athletes are moving to other countries due to lack of motivation by the government. "It’s so unfortunate that the government of Kenya does not motivate their athletes and yet they expect results," said Kipsang in Iten, Kenya on Tuesday. He further said some of the allowances allocated to athletes who represent the nation on international events are always not sufficient. “If Kenya wants results then they should make athletes happy by motivating them," noted Kipsang. The bronze medallist in the marathon at the 2012 Summer Olympics further regretted government's delay in paying athletes are being underpaid. “Winning a Gold medal for Kenya could cost a million shillings ($10,000US) only which is so little compared to other countries where a Gold medal can cost up to Sh50 million ($500,000US)," said Kipsang. He called for concerted efforts between the government and other sports stakeholders so as more investment is put in developing and motivating athletes and other sportsmen and women. (Fri 20) ⚡AMP
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Wilson Kipsang did run the Tokushima Marathon and in fact won it Sunday

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang won the 2018 Tokushima Marathon Mar. 25 that took place in the city of Tokushima, Japan. 12,400 people took part. Invited elite athlete Wilson Kipsang (Kenya), the 2012 London Olympics bronze medalist, won in 2:19:35. Local runner Takumi Matsumoto was 2nd. Kipsang's time was just over four minutes off the course record of 2:15:25 set by Yuki Kawauchi in 2014. Kipsang is in the process of establishing a fund to support improvement of the living environment and education of children in his home country and is taking part in activities to support that end. (Mon 26) ⚡AMP
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World record holder Dennis Kimetto is going to run the Vienna City Marathon

The 34-year-old Kenyan’s decision is a coup for the Vienna race, held on the same day as the London Marathon which usually draws the sport’s biggest names. Dennis Kimetto will be the first world record holder to take part in the Vienna race, which began in 1984, and his inclusion is part of director Wolfgang Konrad’s strategy to raise the international profile of the event. “While our motto is ’35 years of theatre of emotions’ we now have a sort of leading actor for this: an athlete who has extraordinary capabilities and who will be in the focus,” Konrad said in a statement. Kimetto smashed the world record in 2014, clocking two hours, two minutes 57 seconds at the Berlin Marathon to shave 26 seconds off the record set by compatriot Wilson Kipsang in 2013. (Tue 20) ⚡AMP
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Wilson Kipsang will not be running the Tokushima Marathon afterall

We were informed from Japan Running News that Wilson Kipsang was running the Tokushima Marathon and we published that information. Today they posted the following: “Management for Kipsang states that he is only appearing at Tokushima as a guest and will not run, but the language used in the article reporting the official announcement is as translated above, that Kipsang is one of three Kenyan invited athletes as opposed to a guest runner.” So he is not running. But being in great shape he should run a marathon soon. A strong field has been confirmed for this marathon and it should produce solid performances. (Sat 3) ⚡AMP
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What happened with Wilson Kipsang on Sunday at Tokyo Marathon

Former Olympic bronze medalist Wilson Kipsang of Kenya said Sunday stomach problems forced him to stop midway through the Tokyo marathon course on Sunday. Speaking moments after he dropped out of the race with only 15km done, the former world record holder said, "I really wanted to go fast, but after suffering from stomach problems the last two days before the race, I didn't have the power to run a decent race today." In the absence of Kipsang, Kenyan Dickson Chumba was the strongest as he recaptured the title he last won in 2014, timing 2:05:30. However, the hero of the day was Yuta Shitara of Japan, who was second clocking a national record time of 2:06:11. He improved the mark after 16 years and got 1 million U.S. dollar bonus for it. (Tue 27) ⚡AMP
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Dickson Chumba wins the Tokyo Marathon again...six Japanese Runners under 2:09

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba (the 2014 Tokyo and 2015 Chicago champion) opened a nice gap as they approach 38km and went on to win in 2:05:29. At 40k Japan’s Yuta Shitara takes another swig from his festive bottle and grits his teeth as he hunts down and passes Amos Kipruto. This is a man on a mission! Yuta Shitara did not let up and accomplished the following: 1. Ran a Japanese marathon record of 2:06:11 2. Finished 2nd in the Tokyo Marathon (highest finish ever by a Japanese man at a World Marathon Major) 3. Won 100 million yen for setting the NR. That's $936,000US...Wilson Kipsang dropped out at 15k...Amy Cragg finished third in the women’s race taking five minutes off her PR. (2:21:42). Ethiopian’s Birhane Dibaba won the female race in 2:19:51...This year’s race was the biggest field ever with 35,500 starters. (Sat 24) ⚡AMP
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Adidas looks to break the 2-hour marathon barrier with the Adizero Sub2

When you’re running 26.2 miles, every last ounce of weight you’re carrying counts. And now, Adidas is finding ways to reduce that load. The athletic company believes that the secret to breaking the two hour barrier when it comes to the marathon is in a shoe. Specifically, the Adizero Sub2. Designed in conjunction with some of the most talented distance runners in the world, this sneaker boasts Adidas’ new Boost Lite midsole. Most importantly, however, the Adizero Sub2 is said to be the “most advanced, fast and lightweight running shoe ever created by Adidas.” A key collaborator in Adidas’ quest to empower the sub-two-hour marathon race has been Wilson Kipsang. The Kenyan athlete won the bronze medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics, and ran the fastest race held in Japan at last year’s Tokyo Marathon with a time of 2:03:58. (Sat 24) ⚡AMP
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Some bold predictions at the Tokyo Marathon press conference Friday

After stepping up to the big leagues last year with course records in the 2:03 and 2:19 range, the Tokyo Marathon hopes to go one better this year. Men's course record setter Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) is back, stepping up from a 2:03:50 prediction for Tokyo in January to a 2:02:50 world record prediction at Friday's pre-race press conference. The top-ranked woman is Ruti Aga (Ethiopia), coming in hot off a 1:06:39 win last month in Houston and turning heads at the press conference with a boldly mumbled 2:18:00 prediction. Alongside Aga's brash 2:18:00 prediction, Amy Cragg (USA) said she hoped to run 2:22:59 with the caveat that while she'd like to run a fast time her priority would be placing in the top three. (Fri 23) ⚡AMP
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Kipsang's brother will be one of his pacemakers on Sunday

"I missed out on the world record narrowly last year (Tokyo Marathon) and I want to see if I can be able to achieve that time on Sunday with my pacemakers," Wilson Kipsang said Monday before his departure to Japan. Interestingly, Kipsang’s brother, Noah Kiprotich will be among the pacemakers for Sunday’s race. Kiprotich, who has been training alongside Kipsang, is optimistic that he will be able to help his brother lower the course record. “I’m privileged to be among the top cream of pacemakers in Tokyo and our mission is to help my brother lower the course record and if possible break the world record time,” he said, after a training session with Kipsang. Kiprotich, 29, has been participating in road races and has a personal best of 60:25 achieved at last year’s Udine Half marathon triumph in Italy. (Wed 21) ⚡AMP
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Kipsang looking at running a flying fast time at Tokyo Marathon

Kenyan's Wilson Kipsang said on Friday he is confident he is going to retain his title and improve on the course record he set in his victory last year at the Tokyo Marathon. Organizers have also said the course has been changed and is flatter and faster. "Don't be surprised if the world record went down in Tokyo. I have my eyes on the target. Winning Tokyo Marathon in a flying fast time," Wilson Kipsang said. His main competition is Tesfaye Abera from Ethiopia whose best time is 2:04:24 and Feyisa Lilesa, the Olympic marathon silver medalist and Dickson Chumba. (Sat 17) ⚡AMP
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Kipsang is focused on setting a new World Marathon Record in Tokyo Feb 25

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang is excited, focused and ready to set a world record at the Tokyo Marathon on Feb 25. This will be Kipsang second attempt at the Japanese premier marathon competition. He has intensified his training in Kericho, Kenya, running at high altitude and is hopeful that hard work will bear fruits. He knows his rivals will be on a similar mission in April at the London Marathon. "I surprised everyone when I almost won the New York marathon in Nov. last year. Well, this year I will just go ahead and do it in Tokyo," Kipsang said on Tuesday from Kericho. Last year, Kipsang missed the world record (2:02:57) but still ran the fastest time ever on Japanese soil to win in 2:03:58. "I will run fast and let the rest fall in place," he added. (Wed 7) ⚡AMP
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Wilson Kipsang Has Confirmed That He Will Be Running Tokyo Marathon

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang, former marathon world record holder, has confirmed according to Japan Running News, that he will be running the 2018 Tokyo Marathon Feb 25. Last year he stormed to victory in 2:03:58, the fastest marathon time ever run in Japan. He was hoping to break the world record. We are sure he will be going after it again in Feb. (Sun 21) ⚡AMP
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