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Articles tagged #Steph Twell
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British Steph Twell has been having a great year and is set to race the Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon this weekend

The 29-year-old, Steph Twell has already improved both her half-marathon and 10km PBs in 2019 and is looking forward to testing herself at a race she describes as “a bit of an undiscovered gem."

The Olomouc Half Marathon is an IAAF Gold Label race and as a result it offers athletes the chance to gain points in the IAAF world rankings, while it is also the third race in the EuroHeroes Challenge series which was launched last year with the support of European Athletics and aims to celebrate and encourage athletes from the continent.

Twell is looking to be competitive at the front of a European-only field and also gain experience of racing in warm conditions, with temperatures set to be around 28°C when the race sets off at 7pm local time in Olomouc, a city situated 179 miles south east of the Czech Republic capital of Prague.

“It’s a new challenge for me to do a half-marathon at this time of year. I’m against a competitive field but one that I hope I can be quite close to the front of,” says Twell, who ran 71:33 when finishing second at The Vitality Big Half in March before getting close to that lifetime best when running 71:37 to win in Reading a week later.

“What was really important for me (in choosing to race in Olomouc) before the British Athletics selection policy came out for the Tokyo (Olympic Games) marathon, was really to try and sort out this confusion with the rankings system that I’m still trying to get my head around.

“It was a bit of an undiscovered gem, really, to have an IAAF Gold Label race at this time of year when maybe not everyone is targeting half-marathon. For me, it’s an opportunity to see where I can position myself and get as many points as possible to help support my opportunity to qualify for the Olympics. To come out here, in an IAAF ‘A’ race, I would love to try and get a podium place, if not a win, against some quality marathon runners.

“There’s that aspect for me personally trying to support myself as strategically as possible ahead of Tokyo,” adds the two-time Olympian. “But secondly, this concept (EuroHeroes) I just think is a fantastic concept. I have found it hard to be supported and to support myself bridging the gap to world-class athletics. I’ve been on the cusp for a long time but for me this year is about being more independent and trying to step up and improve in a new challenge over the roads.”

(06/21/2019) ⚡AMP
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Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon

Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon

The annual Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon takes place in the ancient capital of Moravia. More than 6,000 runners wend their way past Baroque architecture. An experience matched only by the warmth of the welcome runners receive here. Come to Olomouc and Enjoy the sensational atmosphere of running through a charming Baroque city in the heart of Moravia which is one...

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Running is What We Do is a unique new video series from My Best Runs publisher and lifetime runner Bob Anderson

As Global Running Day is approaching June 5 Bob Anderson, publisher and founder of My Best Runs has announced a new unique series of videos.  "The series called Running Is What We Do will be unique videos showing the world how important running is to us," says Bob Anderson.

The first in the series of short videos (2 to 8 minutes) was filmed in England at the Vitality London 10000.  Mo Farah won for the seventh time and Steph Twell won the woman's race.

"Of course it is always important to know who wins big races like this," says Bob.  "But there is so much more to know about this race.  Over 19,000 participants ran through central London Monday May 27.  The staging area was in Green Park, next to Buckingham Palace and we were right there."

Behind the scenes footage shows runners in the Park as they are getting ready to take off on their 10k journey through the city and after they finished.

The Vitality London 10000 was selected by My Best Runs as one of the Best 100 races in the World the last three years.  "In fact I think this might be the world's best 10K road race," says Bob after running it. 

"It has been on my bucket list for a couple of years and in March I decided to enter and travel from California to see if I could make the top three in the 70 plus division, since my training had been going well. 

"I had not run a race in England since 1966 and with over 415,000 people wanting to run the London Marathon (same group who puts on this race) I felt the race would be the perfect event to cover for our first video in our new series."

Part of racing is to make it to the podium in your age group, a goal that might have more meaning than the finishing medal. This was one of Bob's goals. He wanted to finish in the top three 70 plus. And he wanted to produce the first Running Is What We Do video.  Making it to the top three was more of a personal goal but it also added another story to cover.

Bob did reach his goal clocking 49:22 or 7:55/mile.  He had hoped to run a little faster but he started at the back of wave two being stuck in a toilet line.  By the time he got out he had three minutes to make it to the start. 

"I have been running races since 1962 and I even through there were tons of toilets, I made a quick wrong decision that cost me 25 minutes," says Bob.  "But at age 71 it seems like I need to go three or four times before racing.  It would have cost me more time if I had not made that stop.  I think as runners we all know what I am talking about."

He was stuck behind the pack and ran his first mile in 8:03.  And ran just under 25 minutes for 5k.  His last mile was 7:33.  So maybe he lost at least a minute.

Before and after the race he shot all the footage on his iPone 10 for this video.  He was able to cover the scene close-up and personal. His wife Catherine captured the race in over 1600 photos and several photos were used in the video.

"At the finish line I met Barrie Nicholls," says Bob.  "We talked about running and he told me he is an actor and I jumped on the opportunity for him to say a few words for our first video.

"I loved this race and I hope to return," says Bob.  "However for a race this size (over 19,000 runners) there is one thing they should change. They need more age-groups.  Making it to the podium is a big deal and for me right now at 71, 70 plus age-group is okay.  But for those 76, 88 or even 95 this age-group is too big. 

"We are all aging and we need all the encouragement we can get.  I am not even sure if they give out age-group awards or not (I have to check) but it is nice to make that top three."

The Running Is What We Do videos by My Best Runs will be showing all sides of the sport of running around the world.  "This series is not just about world-class races and elite runners but about all aspects of the sport we love, running."

If you have video footage you would like to share contact My Best Runs.

(05/29/2019) ⚡AMP
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London 10,000: Britons Mo Farah and Steph Twell win men's and women's titles

Sir Mo Farah and Steph Twell retained their British 10K road race titles at the Vitality London 10,000 this morning as thousands turned out to run through the sun-bathed streets of the British capital.

For Farah it was his seventh win in seven races on the famous central London course, while Twell took two seconds from her personal best to win the women’s crown for a second time just 24 hours after setting a world mile record for running hand-in-hand.

In the end Farah’s win was easy enough but the four-times Olympic champion was pushed hard by Rio Olympian Andy Butchart and former British Mile champion Nick Goolab before prevailing in 28:15.

“I really enjoyed it today,” said Farah, who was racing for the first time since finishing fifth in the Virgin Money London Marathon last month. “I love coming to London and particularly running on this course. It’s fantastic to win for a seventh time.

“The London Marathon is behind me now. I was a bit disappointed not to run quicker there but I have recovered well and was confident today.”

Goolab led the trio through halfway in 14:08 before he dropped back, but Butchart hung on until the last two kilometres, when Farah finally kicked away and put more than 100m between the pair.

“I knew Andy and Nick are both running well and I would have to keep my eyes on them,” said Farah. “We got rid of Nick, but Andy kept pushing and pushing and pushing.

“I thought, ‘When am I going to get rid of you?’ He did very well, but I was confident I could do it in the end. This is my race.”

Butchart may have failed to add to his victories here in 2016 and 2017, but the Scot was pleased enough to finish runner-up just 13 seconds behind, matching his personal best from 2016.

“I knew I would have to do the hard work,” said Butchart, who led for most of the first 5K. “But Mo was just chilling really. It’s really hard to lead a 10K and get away from someone like him.

“I wanted a good run and got that. It was only in the last 2K that he pulled away and I’m pleased to equal by PB. It shows I’m ready to run fast in the track.”

As for Twell, she set off at a pelt in the women’s race, running with a small group of male club runners as she established an unassailable lead that grew with every step.

On Sunday she and husband Joe Morwood had smashed the Guinness World Record for the fastest road mile holding hands, but that effort did little to dent her 10K title defence.

Twell passed halfway in 15:33 and eventually won by nearly 40 seconds from Stockport’s Jess Piasecki with Verity Ockenden of Swansea taking third.

“This is a great course and a great event,” said the two-time Olympian who stopped the clock at 31:55. “A personal best and a world record in one weekend can’t be bad.

“My legs were fine after yesterday, but I think I felt it in my arms a bit. The bigger races always bring out the best in me, and this is one of the biggest and the best.

“Today was London in its full glory and the crowds were fantastic. I’m just delighted.”

The unheralded Piasecki was also pleased as she clinched the runner-up spot in her best time of 32:33, while Ockenden also took some well-known scalps from a race loaded with internationals as she pinched the last podium place in 32:39, a PB for her by nearly two minutes.

“I saw Steph go off and I knew that was too fast for me,” said Piasecki. “But I ran quite within myself until the last kilometre. That was tough but it was worth it to finish second.”

As an aside,  My Best Runs publisher and founder Bob Anderson placed third in the 70 plus division clocking 49:22.  “What a great event,” says Bob.  “This is for sure a Bucket List race.  It may only be 10k but it is worth traveling too.  Congrats to Mo and Steph, the winners today.”  (Third photo) Bob with Barrie Nicholls (65-year-old runner/actor from London) at the finish line. 

(05/27/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vitality London 10,000

Vitality London 10,000

The Vitality London 10,000 takes you past many landmark sites, including the London Eye, Buckingham Palace and the Bank of England – so you even get to do a bit of sightseeing along the way! You will run alongside elite runners and have coverage from the BBC, making this 10km one of the highest in profile of its kind. ...

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Hellen Obiri, Steph Twell, Andy Vernon and Stanley Biwott are among the big names racing the Great Manchester 10km on Sunday

The Simplyhealth Great Manchester Run returns on Sunday, with a number of top elite athletes set to battle for titles ahead of the 30,000-strong mass race.

Kenya’s world 5000m and recent world cross country champion Hellen Obiri is making her debut at the event and will be faced with a field containing Ethiopia’s Tokyo marathon winner Ruta Aga, while two-time world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat also features, as does Ireland’s Fionnula McCormack.

A healthy British contingent is headed by Steph Twell, who won the Brighton 10km in 31:58 last month, and she is joined by Mhairi Maclennan, Jenny Nesbitt and Aly Dixon, who was recently named part of Britain’s IAU 50km World Championships team for the event in Romania in September.

Ugandan world cross silver medallist Jacob Kiplimo is fastest in the men’s field with a personal best of 26:41, though he will be facing the likes of Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa, Boston Marathon runner-up this year, and Kenya’s 2015 New York marathon winner Stanley Biwott.

Mo Farah is not defending the title he won last year but the British presence will feature Nick Goolab, a man on form and the fastest Briton over 10km so far this year after breaking the course record with a run of 28:22 when winning in Brighton.

He will be joined by compatriots Emile Cairess, Ieuan Thomas and Dan Studley.

(05/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Great Manchester Run

Great Manchester Run

The Great Manchester Run, established in 2003, is an annual 10 kilometer run through Greater Manchester and is the largest 10K in Europe. Usually held in mid-May, it is the third-largest mass participation running event in the United Kingdom behind the Great North Run and the London Marathon. It is part of the Great Runs series of road races in...

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Sir Mo Farah is set to return to the Vitality London 10,000

Sir Mo Farah is set to return to the Vitality London 10,000 hoping to defend his British 10K title on the spectacular course, which starts on The Mall and finishes in front of Buckingham Palace.

This will be Farah's seventh appearance at London’s top rated 10K. He has an unbeaten record with wins from 2009 to 2013 inclusive plus 2018. He set the course record (27:44) in 2010 and was exactly two minutes slower in his latest victory.  

Last year there were 14,475 finishers and this is expected to increase to a record 17,000 for next month's race that passes iconic London landmarks such as Admiralty Arch, Nelson’s Column, St Paul’s Cathedral, Mansion House, Bank of England, Old Bailey, Somerset House, Big Ben, Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey. 

“I really enjoy running the 10k distance and look forward to returning to the Vitality London 10,000 again this year," says Mo Farah. 

"The course is spectacular and the London crowds are fantastic, lining the streets and cheering everyone the whole way round”.

The women's race could well be more exciting than the men's event as so many of our female athletes are currently in superb form at the distance. Last year's winner and British champion was Steph Twell (Aldershot, Farnham & District) in 32:34 but she recently improved her best to 31:57 in taking the Brighton Marathon 10K.

(04/23/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vitality London 10,000

Vitality London 10,000

The Vitality London 10,000 takes you past many landmark sites, including the London Eye, Buckingham Palace and the Bank of England – so you even get to do a bit of sightseeing along the way! You will run alongside elite runners and have coverage from the BBC, making this 10km one of the highest in profile of its kind. ...

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Mo Farah retained the Vitality Big Half title as he outkicked Bashir Abdi of Belgium and Daniel Wanjiru of Kenya to take the win in a thrilling sprint finish

Farah, the 2018 Chicago Marathon champion, clocked a time of 61 minutes and 14 seconds, which proved too much for training partner Abdi and former London Marathon champion Daniel Wanjiru.

Abdi was second in 61:16 and Wanjiru third in 61:17.

Farah said: "The conditions weren't great today so I'm pleased to win, although it would have been nice to run a bit faster and really test myself. I'm happy with the win and with how my preparations are going ahead of the London Marathon in April.

"The London Marathon is still quite a long way away but I'm happy with my progress and it was nice to be able to race today."

The women's race was won by last year's champion Charlotte Purdue in 70:38, with Steph Twell second in 71:33 and Charlotte Arter third in 71:44.

(03/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Vitality Big Half

The Vitality Big Half

Created by London Marathon Events Ltd, in partnership with Sported,The Vitality Big Half is a community running festival, taking place in London on Sunday 10 March 2019. This one-day event offers a host of running distances, from a challenging half marathon to a free one-mile course, as well as a family-friendly festival of food, music and activities. What’s happening? Take...

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London winners Daniel Wanjiru and Wilson Kipsang will give Farah a tough race in the Vitality big half next month

The Vitality London Big Half on Sunday, March 10, which serves as a tune-up race for the Virgin Money London Marathon, is shaping up as a fine event as defending champion Sir Mo Farah takes on 2017 London Marathon champion Daniel Wanjiru and two-time London Marathon champion and former marathon world record-holder Wilson Kipsang

Farah won last year in 1:01:40, just three seconds ahead of Wanjiru, who finished in second place. The Vitality Big Half doubles as the British Half-Marathon Championships and will feature a number of strong British elites besides Farah.

All three of last year’s female podium finishers, Charlotte Purdue, Lily Partridge and Charlotte Arter are returning also. 

The women’s race sees all three of last year’s podium finishers returning. Charlotte Purdue was last year’s winner, running 1:10:29 in cold conditions, while runner-up Lily Partridge and third-placed Charlotte Arter are also back. In addition, Steph Twell will be making her debut in the event, plus Tracy Barlow, Gemma Steel and Sonia Samuels.

(02/21/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Vitality Big Half

The Vitality Big Half

Created by London Marathon Events Ltd, in partnership with Sported,The Vitality Big Half is a community running festival, taking place in London on Sunday 10 March 2019. This one-day event offers a host of running distances, from a challenging half marathon to a free one-mile course, as well as a family-friendly festival of food, music and activities. What’s happening? Take...

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Strong British field is set for The Vitality Big Half

Dewi Griffiths, Andy Vernon, Charlotte Purdue and Lily Patridge are among the runners joining Mo Farah in London next month.

A strong British field has bee named for The Vitality Big Half on Sunday, March 10, while two former winners of the London Marathon, Wilson Kipsang and Daniel Wanjiru, are also confirmed.

Mo Farah was previously announced for the second edition of the half marathon and among those joining him in the UK capital are Dewi Griffiths, Andy Vernon, Jonny Mellor, Charlotte Purdue, Lily Patridge and Steph Twell.

The race will once again double up as the British Half Marathon Championships and the strong domestic field should see competitive racing for the podium places.

Griffiths, who most recently ran 61:44 to finish eighth at the Chevron Houston Half Marathon last month, is among those who also have their eyes on the London Marathon in April.

Vernon and Mellor are also set to race at the London Marathon along with Irish international Mick Clohisey.

Tracy Barlow, Gemma Steel, Hayley Carruthers and Sonia Samuels are also confirmed to take part meaning the seven fastest British women over the half marathon distance in 2018 will all be toeing the start line on March 10.

Eight-time London Marathon champion David Weir leads the entries in the men’s wheelchair race while three-time Paralympic medallist Shelly Woods will be aiming for victory in the women’s wheelchair race while Derek Rae will compete in the ambulant category.

(02/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Vitality Big Half

The Vitality Big Half

Created by London Marathon Events Ltd, in partnership with Sported,The Vitality Big Half is a community running festival, taking place in London on Sunday 10 March 2019. This one-day event offers a host of running distances, from a challenging half marathon to a free one-mile course, as well as a family-friendly festival of food, music and activities. What’s happening? Take...

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British runner Jo Pavey hopes to make the Olympic Team for the sixth time

British runner Jo Pavey is targeting a record-equalling sixth Olympic Games next year, when she will be 46.

That would match javelin thrower Tessa Sanderson's six Olympic appearances by a British track and field athlete.

Pavey was the oldest woman to win a European Championships gold when claiming the 10,000m title in 2014 aged 40, just 11 months after giving birth.

"I forget how old I am. I'm not complacent but I will attempt to make my sixth Olympics," she told BBC Sport.

Pavey made her first Olympic appearance at Sydney in 2000, has qualified for the British team at every Games since, and now wants to earn a place on the British team for Tokyo 2020.

"I need to get a good qualifying time this year, and really want to start racing in early spring, but I enjoy the challenge," she said.

"It's a difficult task, I'm totally aware of that, but something that's fun to try. I love the ups and downs of the journey."

The mother-of-two hopes to win a place in the 10,000m at the 2019 World Championships in Doha in September en route to going for the Games in Japan.

She entered the 2017 London Marathon with a view to qualifying for the marathon at that year's World Championships in London but had to drop out at 16 miles and then saw her bid to qualify at 10,000m ended by injury.

In 2018, she finished third at the Vitality London 10,000 behind fellow Briton Steph Twell.

(01/26/2019) ⚡AMP
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Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organizedthe Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, from July 24 to August 9, 2020. The Games in 1964 radically transformed the country. According to the organizersof the event in 2020, the Games of the XXXII Olympiad of the modern era will be “the most innovative ever organized,...

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British Olympian Steph Twell, is set to make marathon debut in Valencia

British Olympian Steph Twell, who has been making a move to the roads after a fine career in cross country and track, will compete at the Valencia Marathon on December 2. Twell is now coached by Geoff Wightman and will take the step into the unknown after a strong seventh place finish at the Commonwealth Half Marathon in October. “At this stage of my career it just feels right to finally step up and challenge myself over the marathon distance,” says the 29 year-old, who currently training in America. “I’ve always had ambitions to see how I can fare over 26.2 miles. “Since becoming five times British 5000m champion on the track, I feel now would be a great time to dip my feet in the water to see if I can also have similar success on the roads.” For the Scottish athlete it will also be the realisation of long-held ambition fed by admiration for the likes of Paula Radcliffe. “Ever since winning the London Mini Marathon, having Paula Radcliffe as one of my early role models as well as always being able to cope with a healthy volume of training, I have had hopes to one day turn to this event and become a marathoner myself,” she says. (11/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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On her debut Eilish McColgan won the Great South Run

Eilish McColgan followed in her mother's footsteps to win the Great South Run on her debut in the event. The 27-year-old, running competitively over 10 miles (16km) for the first time, clocked a time of 54:43 to take victory, beating Steph Twell and reigning champion Gemma Steel. McColgan's mother Liz won the event twice - in 1995 and 1997. In the men's race, Chris Thompson became the first athlete to win the event for a third time. Thompson also beat his previous best time, the 37-year-old finishing in 46:56. McColgan said: "I'm so happy. That was such a strange experience. I didn't know what to expect and to be honest that was probably what helped in a way. "My mum said to me 'Don't look at your watch, don't look at times, just be competitive and race the other girls', and that's what I did today. (10/22/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah says it was nice running alongside club runners at London 10,000m

Great Britain’s Olympic legend Sir Mo Farah won the biggest ever Vitality London 10,000 today, while Steph Twell took her first victory in the women’s race. Farah treated the enthusiastic London crowds, who had turned out in the thousands to watch the race.  Mo outsprinted young British runners Richard Allen (29:48) and Matthew Sharp (29:50) in the final 500m to take his sixth Vitality London 10,000 victory, and the British road 10k title, on his first appearance at the race since 2013. Twell also dominated in the women’s race, finishing in 32:34, almost half a minute ahead of Gemma Steel (33:00), while 2017 champion Jo Pavey completed the podium with her third-place finish in a time of 33:12.  Vitality ambassadors Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill and Lord Sebastian Coe set the masses on their way as more than 14,000 runners crossed the starting line on The Mall to make this the biggest Vitality London 10,000 in 11 editions.  As they headed along The Mall and through Admiralty Arch in bright sunshine, Farah looked supremely comfortable as a group of six runners – which included Richard Allen, Jonathan Mellor, Mohamud Aadan, Matthew Sharp and Abdulle Abdishakur – ticked off the first few kilometers of the race. But once the group had passed the halfway point, just after the Bank of England, Farah started to increase the pace and dropping first one then two runners to reduce group to four, then to three, until Allen and Sharp were the only two men able to stay with the four-time Olympic gold medallist. With 800m to go, Farah moved up a gear to move into the lead, making the final turn into Spur Road and on to the Finish Line alone, to the delight of the crowds who had turned out in huge numbers to cheer their hero to victory in 29:44. “The pace was nice and comfortable and I really enjoyed the race,” Farah said afterwards. “I was happy with the win, which is the most important thing, but it was nice to be able to run alongside club runners who look up to you. “It’s good to forget about who you are – and what you have achieved – and just enjoy the moment, which is what I did out there. (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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British marathon champion will return to the streets of London

Lily Partridge, who ran a personal best 2:29:44 to finish eighth overall and first British woman at the Virgin Money London Marathon in April, is set to get back to racing at the Vitality London 10000 on May 28. The 27-year-old will not be the only British marathon champion competing, with Mo Farah already confirmed for the last Monday of May bank holiday race. Partridge’s, who clocked her 10k PB of 33:27 at the 2016 event, will face Aldershot, Farnham and District club-mate Steph Twell before looking ahead to the Berlin hosted European Championships in August. “The Vitality London 10000 is great because it does bring together a range of athletes,” said Partridge. “Some people like Steph come into it in track shape and it can be fast and then there are us girls who come into it off the back of a marathon and we have to ease ourselves into it a bit more. (05/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Vitality London 10000 shaping up to be a fast event at the end of the month

Lily Partridge, who ran a personal best 2:29:44 to finish eighth overall and first British woman at the Virgin Money London Marathon in April, is set to get back to racing at the Vitality London 10000 on May 28. The 27-year-old will not be the only British marathon champion competing, with Mo Farah already confirmed for the last Monday of May bank holiday race. Partridge’s, who clocked her 10k PB of 33:27 at the 2016 event, will face Aldershot, Farnham and District club-mate Steph Twell before looking ahead to the Berlin hosted European Championships in August. “The Vitality London 10000 is great because it does bring together a range of athletes,” said Partridge. “Some people like Steph come into it in track shape and it can be fast and then there are us girls who come into it off the back of a marathon and we have to ease ourselves into it a bit more.  The Vitality London 10,000 starts and finishes in St James’s Park and uses Green Park as its assembly area. The race starts on The Mall and finishes on Spur Road opposite Buckingham Palace. Runners follow a clockwise route around the City of Westminster and the City of London. The course passes many of London’s famous sights including Admiralty Arch, Nelson’s Column, St Paul’s Cathedral, Mansion House, the Bank of England, the Old Bailey, Somerset House, Big Ben, the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey.  The race also features the British 10K Championships Men and Women. (05/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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