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Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com  Get your race featured and exposed.  Contact Manuel@mybestruns.com or call 650-209-7820

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Prince Harry’s touching message for London Marathon runners for hitting the one billion pounds fundraising mark

The Duke of Sussex has thanked runners preparing to take part in the London Marathon, as total fundraising over the years hit £1 billion (1.3 billion US dollars). 

Prince Harry, who is awaiting the birth of his first child, branded the race, which takes place April 28, “an extraordinary force for good.”

The duke said in a video message tweeted by Virgin Money London Marathon that the funds had supported hundreds of charities around the world, helping those most in need.

“It is the biggest one-day fundraising event on the planet and helps hundreds of charities at home and abroad provide vital services to those that need them most,” he said. 

(04/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Flockbud is a new app designed to help you find training partners anytime, anywhere in the world

They say that birds of a feather flock together, and runners in particular love company. Flöckbud is a new location-based app for finding workout partners in any sport, anywhere in the world.

Whether you mostly work out alone but would occasionally welcome a running partner, or you travel for work and find it lonely running in other cities where you don’t know anyone, Flöckbud is for you.

They say that birds of a feather flock together, and runners in particular love company. Flöckbud is a new location-based app for finding workout partners in any sport, anywhere in the world.

Whether you mostly work out alone but would occasionally welcome a running partner, or you travel for work and find it lonely running in other cities where you don’t know anyone, Flöckbud is for you.

Flockbud is available for free on the App Store, or get it on Google Play.

(04/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan Alex Korio is focused on winning the Yangzhou International Half Marathon in China

Alex Korio may be one of the fastest entrant in Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon on Sunday, but the Kenyan feels victory will be more important than clocking a fast time.

The Kenyan has endured poor performance in the last three races failing to finish at Chicago Marathon and was 14th in Ras Al Khaimah in United Arab Emirates despite posting a fast time.

"I want to win, not fast time. I clocked 61:11 in Ras Al Khaimah but I finished 14. That time is fast, but what is important is to win the race," he said on Thursday in Nairobi.

Korio, 28, will team up with compatriot Shadrack Kimining, the third-place finisher last year, as the top contenders.

The 23-year-old Kenyan will not only enjoy the advantage of being familiar with the point-to-point course as it was his third straight year in Yangzhou, but also compete with great confidence after improving his personal best time to 59:42 two months ago.

"We train together and we are going to race in same city. But it will be an individual effort when we line up for the race. I also want to win as much as Korio wants to win," said Kimining.

With the absence of four-time defending champion Mosinet Geremew of Ethiopia, who set the course record of 59:52 in 2015, Bahrain's Abraham Cheroben, runner-up last year, is the strongest runner.

The 26-year-old will target nothing but the top place of the podium in his third consecutive appearance in Yangzhou.

Cheroben finished third in Yangzhou two years ago and set an Asian record of 58:40 in Copenhagen seven months later.

Last year he gained a second-place finish in Yangzhou and took the silver medal at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in Valencia.

The field also include Kenyan Wilfred Kimitei, who clocked 59:40 in last year's race as well as Berehanu Tsegu of Ethiopia.

(04/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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YANGZHOU JIANZHEN INTL  HALF

YANGZHOU JIANZHEN INTL HALF

The Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon takes place in April in Yangzhou, People’s Republic of China. The event is named in honor of Jianzhen, a Chinese monk from the city who propagated Buddhismin Japan in the 8th century. The event was first held in 2006 and grew exponentially in its first six years: it gained IAAF Silver Label Road Race...

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Marathon world record holder, Eliud Kipchoge, says he is relishing the prospect of facing Mo Farah again at london marathon

Kipchoge, who won his third London title in last year’s race, with Farah finishing third, then went on to set a stunning world record of two hours, one minute and 39 seconds at the Berlin Marathon in September – beating the previous best by over a minute.

Farah, meanwhile, went on to claim the Chicago Marathon in October in a European record time of 2hr 5min 11sec – and afterwards promised that he was “not afraid to keep turning up in the same field and testing Kipchoge”.

That wish has now been granted with the Kenyan, who was named the 2018 IAAF Athlete of the Year in December, having agreed to make his fourth appearance in London.

“I had a memorable 2018, winning the Virgin Money London Marathon and then setting a new world record at the Berlin marathon and I’m hoping that 2019 is just as good to me,”said Kipchoge.

“I am looking forward to racing Sir Mo Farah again. He is a great champion and proved in Chicago that he can win a major marathon so I relish the battle with him and also the many other great athletes that I’m sure will once again be on the start line in London.”

The top three from the 2018 podium will all be in London again this year with organisers confirming Ethiopia’s 22-year-old marathon star Shura Kitata, who was second to Kipchoge last year before finishing runner-up in the New York marathon in November, will race.

Hugh Brasher, event director of the race, said he was delighted to have set up a mouthwatering showdown between Kipchoge, who is unbeaten in London and also holds the course record of 2:03.05, and Britain’s greatest distance runner.

“There is no doubt that Eliud Kipchoge is the greatest marathon runner of all time,” he said “Since Sir Mo Farah won the Chicago Marathon in October, everyone has been talking about another head-to-head between Mo and Eliud and we are absolutely thrilled that this showdown will happen.

“We will see two absolute legends of distance running competing over 26.2 miles of roads in the greatest marathon in the world. I cannot wait until Sunday 28 April to see who comes out on top.”

(04/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Ethiopia’s Sutume Asefa going after the Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon title again

Ethiopia’s Sutume Asefa will return to the Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon on Sunday, aiming to retain the title she took from the 2017 edition of the IAAF Gold Label road race.

The 24-year-old landed a 1:10:30 victory at the scenic Chinese city two years ago after winning a duel against fellow Ethiopian Ababel Yeshaneh in the final kilometre.

After renewing her personal best to 1:07:54 with a victory in Milan last March, she failed to compete at her best level in Yangzhou last month and only finished ninth in 1:12:11.

While Asefa will be keen to bounce back and regain the top honours, she will meet great challenge in front of a loaded field.

Her compatriot Degitu Azimeraw could be the biggest threat. The 20-year-old showed great quality in just her first year in senior level, clocking 1:06:47 in her first international half marathon race last February and winning the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon with another sub-70-minute run last April.

Two months ago, she improved her PB to 1:06:07 to finish fourth at the RAK Half Marathon.

Pauline Kamulu is another woman to watch. The Kenyan achieved a career best of 1:06:56 when taking bronze at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships last year. The 24-year-old bettered 70 minutes for the fifth straight time in March when she clocked 1:08:34 at the Bahrain Night Half Marathon.

With the absence of four-time defending champion Mosinet Geremew of Ethiopia, who set the course record of 59:52 in 2015, Bahrain’s Abraham Cheroben, runner-up last year, is the highest returner with the fastest PB in the line-up.

The 26-year-old will target nothing but the top place of the podium in his third consecutive appearance in Yangzhou.

(04/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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YANGZHOU JIANZHEN INTL  HALF

YANGZHOU JIANZHEN INTL HALF

The Yangzhou Jianzhen International Half Marathon takes place in April in Yangzhou, People’s Republic of China. The event is named in honor of Jianzhen, a Chinese monk from the city who propagated Buddhismin Japan in the 8th century. The event was first held in 2006 and grew exponentially in its first six years: it gained IAAF Silver Label Road Race...

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Strong Kenyan runners will compete at Two Oceans marathon

The Kenyans are coming – and this time with real intent. And for the first time since 1988, Thompson Magawana’s Old Mutual Two Oceans record of 3 hours 3 min 44 sec, which has stood for 31 years, looks vulnerable.

Kenyans are not new to Two Oceans – John Wachira won way back in 2009 and 25-year-old Justin Kemboi Chesire came from nowhere to clinch victory last year, which was as unexpected as it was decisive.

But the anticipated full-on assault on the Two Oceans record from the best runners on the planet has been absent. Until now.

And in the 50th edition of the “World’s Most Beautiful Marathon”, where the elite field is sprinkled with talented debutants, the name of Abraham Kiprotich shines like a beacon. Running in the colours of France – Kiprotich opted to claim citizenship from that country after serving in the French Foreign Legion – the 33-year-old travels to Cape Town with impeccable marathoning credentials and is on a mission to finally bury Magawana’s record and claim the R1 million bonus on offer.

Kiprotich will be racing Oceans just five months after placing third in the Istanbul Marathon in 2:10:55 – just 20 seconds off Magawana’s marathon best at the time won Two Oceans in 1987 in 3:05:31 and a year later when he broke the record a second time.

But Kiprotich’s marathon life best of 2:08:33 is more than two minutes faster – set at the Daegu Marathon in Korea in April 2013, suggesting that the French Kenyan is the real deal in his quest for Two Oceans glory.

There is little doubting his pedigree – his older brother, Paul Kipkoech, won gold in the 10 000m at the 1987 World Championships when Kiprotich was just two years old.

The fact that Kiprotich will be part of a strong squad of athletes who have been training together in the Kenyan highlands is further evidence suggesting a winning time faster than Zimbabwean Marko Mambo’s 3:05:39 set in 2005 – the closest any athlete has come to Magawana’s magical mark. In a remarkable feat, Magawana ran solo from pillar to post in 1988 to claim the brand-new automobile on offer for the record, while Kiprotich will have the advantage of being able to bide his time in a lead pack likely to be dominated by Kenyans.

Chesire will defend his title with experienced Melly Kennedy (4th last year), Jess Gichuhi (10th) and late entry, 2 hr 15 min marathoner, Isaac Kiprorir, providing strong back-up and team support. 

“The record attempt is definitely on,” the Kenyans’ manager, Craig Fry, stated yesterday. “Our aim is to have a proper crack at the record.  We have planned their splits accordingly.  We’re going out for the record, rather than just playing safe and  banking on a win.”

(04/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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Two Oceans Marathon

Two Oceans Marathon

Cape Town’s most prestigious race, the 56km Old Mutual Two Oceans Ultra Marathon, takes athletes on a spectacular course around the Cape Peninsula. It is often voted the most breathtaking course in the world. The event is run under the auspices of the IAAF, Athletics South Africa (ASA) and Western Province Athletics (WPA). The Ultra Marathon celebrates its 50thanniversary in...

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Waganesh Mekasha will target the course record of the Yellow River Estuary International Marathon this Saturday

Organisers of the Yellow River Estuary International Marathon have assembled a deep field capable of breaking the men’s and women’s course records at the IAAF Gold Label road race in Dongying on saturday.

Waganesh Mekasha is a serious title contender and arguably the most in-form woman on the entry list. The rising Ethiopian achieved a big personal best of 2:22:45 to finish fourth at Dubai Marathon in January.

Since her first international marathon in Singapore in 2014, when she took the top honours in 2:46:54, the 27-year-old has improved her lifetime best each time in four races including her victories in Padua and Hengshui last year.

Should such momentum continue in the Chinese city of Dongying, Mekasha stands a good chance of breaking the course record of 2:24:45 set by two -time winner Letebrhan Haylay last year.

Caroline Cheptanui Kilel of Kenya is actually the fastest woman on paper, but her career best time of 2:22:34 was recorded back in 2013 when she took the victory in Frankfurt.

After clocking 2:27:39 to win the Daegu Marathon in 2016, the 38-year-old hasn’t bettered 2:30 since. She competed in Dongying last year and finished fifth in 2:34:39.

Fellow Kenyan Agnes Kiprop is also returning to the familiar course following her fourth-place finish in 2017.

The 39-year-old achieved her PB of 2:23:54 in 2011 and has maintained a high level of competitiveness, with her last victory coming two months ago in Hannover.

(04/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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Yellow River Estuary International Marathon

Yellow River Estuary International Marathon

Over 30,000 runners participate in the Yellow River Estuary International Marathon. The Yellow River Estuary International Marathon was first held in 2008 and has continued to grow in popularity every year. This IAAF Silver Label Road Race attracts over 6,000 runners in the marathon portion alone and another 24,000 participants run in the other events. The marathon takes place...

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Olympic silver medallist Francine Niyonsaba also has the hyperandrogenism condition that gives her high levels of naturally occurring testosterone

The woman who finished second behind Caster Semenya at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics says she also has a condition that gives her high levels of naturally occurring testosterone and would be affected if the IAAF implements its hormone policy.

Francine Niyonsaba of Burundi, an Olympic and world championships silver medallist in the 800 metres, said in an interview with the Olympic Channel that she has hyperandrogenism.

She says "I didn't choose to be born like this. What am I? I'm created by god. So, if someone has more questions about it, maybe they can ask god. I love myself. I will still be Francine. I will not change."

(04/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Emily Lipari is returning to defend her U.S. title at Grand Blue Mile in Des Moines

Grand Blue Mile race officials have announced preliminary fields for the 2019 USATF 1 Mile Road Championships set for Tuesday, April 23, in downtown Des Moines.

A world class group of elite Milers will headline the 10th edition, the first stop on the BBTM Grand Prix Tour 2019 presented by Running Warehouse.

In addition, approximately 3,500 participants from across the nation will compete among the recreational and amateur competitive divisions.

“We’re excited to continue the tradition of welcoming high-profile, high-caliber athletes to Grand Blue Mile in partnership with the Drake Relays,” said Chris Verlengia, Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s senior brand marketing manager and Grand Blue Mile co-race director.

“As Grand Blue Mile marks its tenth anniversary, being entrusted to host a fifth national championship in 10 years provides even more reason to celebrate the tremendous impact this special event has throughout central Iowa and beyond.”

This year’s race offers a top prize of $5000 each for the men’s & women’s national champions with the potential to earn an additional $2500 for setting a course record — currently 4.00.0 (Clayton Murphy, 2017) and 4:32.7 (Heathef Kampf, 2014), respectively.

Overall, $25,000 in prize money will be contested across the men’s & women’s USA Championship divisions.

In the women’s Open division, returning to defend her U.S. title is Emily Lipari as well as Heather Kampf, three-time Grand Blue Mile champion.

(04/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Grand Blue Mile

Grand Blue Mile

Your Race. Your Pace. Your Mile. The Grand Blue Mile was created by Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield and the Drake Relays to encourage healthy habits and empower positive change. Held annually since 2010, the Grand Blue Mile has hosted more than 30,000 participants from 26 states, six countries, and four continents. The annual event brings friends and families...

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Yuki Kawauchi's mom Mika ran 3:41:52 in Boston just one year after her son won it

2018 Boston champion Yuki Kawauchi’s mom, Mika Kawauchi, ran a 3:41:52 at Boston on Monday. This is her PR.  The 54-year-old easily ran a BQ for next year and got to do it in the same race as her son.

Mika is an accomplished middle distance runner, and according to a story in the New York Times last October, she was Yuki’s first coach. The B.A.A. invited her to race at Boston this year.

“We are excited to have her run this year,” says B.A.A. communications manager Chris Lotsbom, whom we reached by email, “and believe it is the first time a parent of a defending champion has competed in the same race their son/daughter was racing in as defending champion.”

What few people know is that the Kawauchi’s are a running family. Yuki’s brothers Koki and Yoshiki are both runners. Mika ran her first marathon at Gold Coast in Australia in 2016 at age 52, finishing in 3:53.

Yuki finished  in 17th place in Monday’s marathon in a time of 2:15:29 which was 25 seconds faster than his 2018 winning time of 2:15:54.

(04/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba has withdrawn from the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon for personal reasons

The three-time Olympic champion and current 5,000m world record holder was second in the 2017 Virgin Money London Marathon when she set a personal best (PB) of 2:17:56, making her the fifth fastest female marathon runner in history.

Dibaba, 33, is one of a handful of notable changes to the fields for the elite men and elite women races since they were first released at the end of January.

USA’s Allie Kiefer, who was seventh at last November’s TCS New York City Marathon, has withdrawn as has Denmark’s Anna Holm Jorgensen – the daughter of Henrik Jorgensen, the 1988 London Marathon champion who died earlier this year.

Swiss pair Maude Mathys and Martina Strahl have both also pulled out, as has Ireland’s Emma Mitchell and the British duo Eleanor Davis and Laura Graham.

In the elite men’s race, North American pair Chris Derrick (USA) and Cam Levins (CAN) are the biggest name withdrawals while Mikael Ekvall (SWE) and Matt Sharp (GBR) are both also no longer running.

(04/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Former Amsterdam Marathon winner Valentin Kipketer from Kenya Is going after a new course record in the Nagano Marathon on Sunday

"I have had to deal with injury concerns, but I have been in top fitness for the last three months. This has enabled me go through training well and I have cleared my training program," said Kipketer on Tuesday in Nairobi.

Kipketer will lead four other Kenyans in their tour of Japan and hopes with better preparations, she will be able to do well on her debut in Japan.

"I have been working on my speed in the last week. Hopefully, it will pay off in Nagano," she added.

Kenya's Beatrice Jepkemboi and Pauline Wangui will be leading women on the course eyeing to add the city's marathon to their collection.

Kipketer holds a fast time of 2:23:41 in Chicago 2016, but has not won a race in the last two years. She will have to be at her best game to beat home talent Hiroko Yoshitomi (2:30:09).

Ethiopia's challengers will be led by China's Nanjing Marathon champion Kebene Chala (2:30:49). Others are Tizita Terecha (2:31:45) and Meskerem Hunde (2:33:50).

"It is a strong line-up of veteran runners. But if you focus on the strength of your opponents, then you will be beaten in the mental battle. I want to look at my own preparations and focus on winning the race irrespective of who I will be running against," said Kipketer.

Former Lisbon Marathon champion Alfred Kering leads Kenya charge in the men's race. Kering, who is also a former bronze medalist from the Hengshui Lake Marathon in China is making a comeback after a poor season in 2018.

Kering's last marathon was in Lisbon in October, where he finished eighth in his title defense clocking 2:09:44.

"It has been tough for me, but I feel I have rested enough to challenge for the medals in Nagano," he said.

"I have no intentions of competing in the World Marathon championships owing to my poor run this season. But someday, I will represent Kenya in the Olympics."

(04/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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NAGANO MARATHON

NAGANO MARATHON

The Nagano Olympic Commemorative Marathon is an annual marathon road race which takes place in mid-April in Nagano, Japan. It is an IAAF Bronze Label Road Race competition. The Nagano Marathon has races for both elite and amateur runners. It is named in honour of the 1998 Winter Olympics which were held in Nagano. The course has a point-to-point style...

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Boston Marathon Race Director David McGillivray runs the course again for the 47th time after having triple by-pass heart surgery six months ago

Every year for 46 years David McGillivray had run the Boston Marathon course.  Since he is the race Director most have been run after the race had finished.  Six months ago David had triple by-pass heart surgery but that was not going to stop his streak of 47. 

“I started at 4pm and finished last again at 9:45pm...but I’m good with that...I just wanted to finish this one more that ever before...it didn’t matter the time.

“It definitely was my hardest one but perhaps my most meaningful one.  I’m glad I didn’t disappoint my heart surgeon after he said he would be disappointed if I couldn’t do this.  

“The weather was so unsettled – we had a little bit of everything.  Lesson learned, if we stay fit we can recover from surgery (triple bypass surgery for me 6 months ago) and get back out on the road...anything is possible.  

“I got a second chance.   I feel very good this morning, too.  Running with 15 friends (most ever) including my son, Luke and finishing my 47th Boston with little Jack Middlemiss, my heart warrior teammate made it all possible and very special.  

“Many thanks for all the kind words and well wishes.   It was a long day, especially with all the stress in the early morning with the thunderstorms and heavy rain but all ended up going well.  

“Congratulations to all the runners who competed and finished yesterday,” he said.  

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Crutch Runner, Ipeleng Khunou returns to take another stab at the Two Oceans Marathon

Ipeleng Khunou was born with an illness that impacts his balance but this has not held the inspirational athlete back and he will continue to defy the odds when he participates in the annual Two Oceans Marathon in Cape Town on Saturday.

The 31-year-old from Rustenburg competed and finished the 21 km half-marathon on crutches last year and is returning this year to raise awareness about his condition‚ and to also raise funds for children struggling with disabilities.

Known as ‘The Crutch Runner’‚ Khunou was born with a rare brain illness called septo-optic dysplasia which causes loss of balance and also affects eyesight. But he has not allowed this to hold him back.

He said the most important part of making this happen is not only staying committed to his training but also working with organisations that are aligned with his goals.

“I believe in running for a purpose and I want to work with companies that don’t just believe in me as an individual but support athletes and people from all kinds of backgrounds and abilities.

‘‘That’s why I joined the Nedbank Running Club. It is more than just a club‚ athletes of all kinds are welcome and supported.” he said.

Nedbank Running Club national manager‚ Nick Bester said: ‘‘Our purpose as Nedbank Running Club is providing a platform for all people interested in road running to participate regardless of their skill level.

‘‘We encourage our members to participate in our various regular running activities across the country. Ours is to ensure that all runners are supported in their quest to run their best race.

“Ipeleng is one of the people whose values are a great match with ours as a club‚ he runs to give back to the community and we are proud to support an athlete like him.”

Since his first Om Die Dam race‚ Khunou has run the Soweto Marathon‚ Ocal Global Journey for Change‚ Kronberg Marathon and the Nelson Mandela Remembrance 10K race.

He plans to finish the Two Oceans race again this year in his Nedbank Green‚ all for his fund-raising efforts.

“My dream is for the sports world to include a crutch-running category‚” he said.

‘‘I want to be able to compete in as many races as possible‚ continue to raise awareness and running for a purpose.

‘‘At the moment‚ I’m working on running my best time at the Two Oceans Marathon.”

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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Two Oceans Marathon

Two Oceans Marathon

Cape Town’s most prestigious race, the 56km Old Mutual Two Oceans Ultra Marathon, takes athletes on a spectacular course around the Cape Peninsula. It is often voted the most breathtaking course in the world. The event is run under the auspices of the IAAF, Athletics South Africa (ASA) and Western Province Athletics (WPA). The Ultra Marathon celebrates its 50thanniversary in...

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NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson runs Boston Marathon clocking 3:09:00

Monday morning, seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson ran a 3:09:08 marathon in Boston. The race car driver said on Instagram post-race that it was the most challenging thing he’d ever done.

This result really challenges those who say that race car drivers aren’t athletes.

The NASCAR champion told The Boston pre-race that he was looking to run under three hours. While he missed that mark, a 3:09 is an extremely impressive marathon debut, especially for a new runner.

Each year before the Daytona 500, one of NASCAR’s premier events, some drivers run the Daytona Beach half-marathon and often do well, but all-star driver Jimmie Johnson has always been a standout.

Johnson has previously competed in triathlons and half-marathons, but Boston was his first full.

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Tokyo Marathon silver medalist Bedan Karoki will compete in the Gifu Half Marathon on April 28 in Japan

Tokyo Marathon silver medalist Bedan Karoki believes he is on a good trajectory to dominate the road races and will hope to add the Gifu Half Marathon title to his collection on Sunday.

Karoki hopes to make the Kenya team to this year's World Championships in Doha, Qatar, but would prefer to run in the marathon, having failed on three occasions to win the 10,000m race.

"I have always had a fast-paced first phase of my marathon races, or even on track, but I am not strong in finishing," said Karoki on Tuesday. "I have the much-needed experience in marathon and track and I hope for a break this time around."

Karoki faces Jorum Okumbo and Japanese former marathon record-holder Yuta Shitara.

The fastest entrant in the women's race is Chepngetich's teammate Joan Chelimo, who clocked 65:04 to win in Prague last year.

However, Chepngetich is certain her strong preparations for the race will pay dividends, enabling her prevail and win gold over the 21km distance.

"I want to use the race as part of my preparation for the marathon," she said on Tuesday in Nairobi. "There are stronger and faster athletes in the race, but it will not be important on race day because how you run on that day is what is important. I hope to be successful."

Bahrain's Olympic marathon silver medalist Eunice Kirwa will also be staking her claim to the title in her bid to dominate the Asian road races.

Kirwa, who trains and lives in Eldoret and raced for Kenya until 2013, will have to be cautious of the challenge her former teammates will pose.

Also featuring will be world marathon champion Rose Chelimo of Bahrain and Japan's Miyuki Uehara.

Chelimo has had a poor season this year, finishing in position 41 at the World Half Marathon championships, and was eighth at the Tokyo Marathon in March.

However, a win on her return to Japan in Nagano will boost her credentials as she prepares to defend her crown at the 2019 World Championships in Doha this October.

"I did everything right in my preparations for the Tokyo Marathon, but I was not lucky enough to win," said Chelimo.

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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Gifu Half Marathon

Gifu Half Marathon

The Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon is an annual half marathon road running competition held in Gifu, Japan. First held in 2011, the race is also called the Naoko Takahashi Cup, named after Naoko Takashi, the retired local runner who won the marathon at the 2000 Sidney Olympics and broke the marathon world record in 2001, becoming the first woman to...

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Six-time winner Scott Wietecha won´t let injury get in the way from going for seventh straight Nashville marathon win

It's not as difficult to predict the winner of the 20th annual St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Nashville Marathon, which will take place two days later also downtown on the third day of the draft.

Six-time winner Scott Wietecha missed several key weeks of training with an injury but said he recovered just in time to go for his seventh consecutive win in the 26.2-mile race that winds its way through the city before finishing at Nissan Stadium.

Wietecha, 37, has been so dominant in the race that he won last year even after taking a late bathroom break.

His six wins have come by an average of more than nine minutes. 

But he has never missed as much training as he did this year after suffering tendinitis in his ankle. He had to stop running in the middle of December and didn't start back until the middle of February.

After starting back, Wietecha, who is the cross country coach at Beech, came down with the flu and then a stomach virus that cost him more training time.

"I've had five good weeks of training since all of that," Wietecha said. "I was actually in pretty good shape in the fall before the injury. I tried to do some cross training while I was hurt like underwater running at a local pool. It was helpful but it's not the same as running. So I'm still trying to catch up."

Catching up hasn't come as quickly for Wietecha as it did in the past.

"I don't know if it's age or whatever, but something I've noticed over the last few years is that it's a little bit tougher to come back," he said. "I feel like I can still get there, just not as quickly, and I have to be more careful with smaller things. I feel like if I have eight good weeks before the marathon I should be in a pretty good spot."

If he hadn't been injured Wietecha said he would be running a total of between 110-115 miles per week at this point. He is several miles under that.

"I'm still a little quite a bit behind of where I want to be," Wietecha said. "I'm hoping that I get to the day of the marathon and not be too far behind where I would've been pre-injury."

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Nashville Marathon & 1/2 Marathon

St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Nashville Marathon & 1/2 Marathon

The St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Nashville Marathon & 1/2 Marathon (formerly St. Jude Country Music Marathon & 1/2 Marathon) gives you the opportunity to enjoy an up close and personal tour of Music City, one of the New York Times’ top destinations in the world! Run through the Honky Tonks of Lower Broadway and take a musical tour through...

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Joan Benoit Samuelson and Gene Dykes clocked outstanding times at this year's Boston Marathon

There were many outstanding performances at the 2019 Boston Marathon.  Two that really stand out are: Forty years after her first win at the Boston Marathon, Joan Benoit Samuelson scored a victory of a more personal nature during Monday’s 123rd edition of the race.

The Cape Elizabeth native and Freeport resident met her stated goal of finishing the 2019 race within 40 minutes of her winning time in 1979, completing the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton to downtown Boston in an even 3 hours, 4 minutes while running much of the marathon with her daughter Abby (photo).

The effort not only enabled the 61-year-old Samuelson to place first in her age group (women 60-64) and 249th among all the women in the 30,000-runner field, but she also finished just 28 minutes and 45 seconds behind the 2:35:15 she ran to win Boston in her first-ever attempt at the distance as a college student four decades earlier.

“I did and I’m really happy about it,” Samuelson said during a postrace interview near the finish line with WBZ-TV.

“To have our daughter in this race with me meant a great deal to me. She’s as passionate about the sport as I am, and to be out there with everybody cheering us on and the weather backing off to maybe coming on a little too warm, I can’t complain,” she said.

On the men's side: 71-year-old Gene Dykes of Bala Cynwyd broke his own age-group record on Monday, posting the fastest course time for a 70-to-74-year-old at 2 hours, 58 minutes, 50 seconds.

Dykes set the previous course record for that age group in 2018 at age 70, posting a time of 3:16 in driving rain.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Desiree Linden put forth a strong effort but failed to defend her 2018 Boston Marathon title, fading from second place to finish the 26.2-mile course in fifth place clocking 2:27:00

“It was an honor to be back and I knew today was going to be a big test to defend but I had a blast out there,” Linden told NBC Sports Network. “Right around 18 (miles), I thought, ‘I think I’m done. Hang up the shoes, retire.' The Boston crowds are so phenomenal, they just kind of helped me regroup.”

Despite Linden joining the lead pack from the start and leading at times, it quickly became the chase pack as 28-year-old Ethiopian Worknesh Degefa separated from the group early and built about a 90 second lead before the 10 mile mark. Degefa won the race with a time of 2:23:30.

With much better racing conditions this year, 35-year-old Linden easily beat her championship time of 2 hours, 39 minutes, 54 seconds from a year ago.

Linden, who lives in Washington, Mich., put on a surge to take the lead of the chase pack with just over 10 miles to go, but the pack trailed Degefa by over two and a half minutes at that point. Linden and fellow American Jordan Hassay even moved into second and third-place, respectively, before Linden fell back from the pack. Hassay, 27, finished as the top American in third place with a time of 2:25:20.

“I think Jordan’s come here and done really well,” Linden said. “She’s in that third spot consistently and she’s going to have a breakthrough on this course. She’s going to make a name for herself. She is the future -- well, she is right now -- of American distance running. The future is bright.”

Linden went through the halfway mark at 1:13:09. Linden’s time has met the American Olympic qualifying standard. After claiming a $150,000 prize for winning last year, Linden will take home a $15,000 prize for fifth place this year.

What is next for Linden?

“Lunch right now, for sure,” Linden said. “Then, regroup ... You finish fifth and you go, ‘maybe there’s a little bit more.’”

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Ethiopian Worknesh Degefa took command of the elite women’s race by the 7 mile mark and built it to over two minutes by half way and held on to win as America's Jordan Hasay finished third

Worknesh Degefa, 29, built up a commanding lead and even through Kenya's Edna Kiplagat closed the gap in the last few miles Degefa went on the win clocking 2:23:31 at the 2019 Boston Marathon.  Edna Kiplegat of Kenya started to break away from the rest of the chase pack at about 30K, trying to run the Ethiopian leader down, but the gap was too wide. Edna Kiplagat finished 44 seconds back clocking 2:24:14.  Jordan Hasasy from the US finished third clocking 2:25:20.    

Going into the race Degefa was ready to run well.  This January in Dubai, Worknesh Degefa set an Ethiopian national marathon record with her 2:17:41 second place finish. With that result she became the fourth fastest women’s marathoner in history.

Historically a half marathon specialist, Degefa’s top ten half marathon times (2013-2016) were run with an average time of 67:30. Her personal best was recorded at the 2016 Prague Half Marathon where she finished second in 66:14. She earned the silver medal at the 2015 All African Games Half Marathon. Degefa made her debut in the marathon in 2017 with a win at the Dubai Marathon, which she says is her proudest accomplishment. 

Degefa trains in the Oromia region of Ethiopia in Arsi and Assela because of its altitude and good weather for training. Her coach is Gemedu Dedefo. Her favorite foods are rice and pasta and she enjoys traveling in Europe.

Jordan Hasay finished third again this year.  Choosing Boston to make her debut in 2017, Jordan Hasay ran 2:23:00 to finish third. She set an American women’s debut record by three minutes and recorded the fourth fastest time ever run in the race by an American woman behind Shalane Flanagan, Desiree Linden and Joan Benoit Samuelson.

After Boston, Hasay ran the Bank of America Chicago Marathon and once again finished third, but improved her time to 2:20:57, becoming the second fastest American woman marathoner of all time. Besides making the podium in both the Boston and Chicago Marathons, Hasay set a half marathon personal best time of 67:55 with her sixth-place finish at the 2017 Prague Half Marathon.

During the race she set a 15K personal best of 48:21 and a 20K personal best of 64:32. She also won the 2017 U.S. national titles in the 20K, 10 Mile and 15K. Hasay was injured during 2018, but after surgery on her foot has made a complete recovery.

Hasay has been running since she was 12 years old and grew up in Arroyo Grande, California. 

Last year's winner Desiree Linden finished fifth clocking 2:27:00.  The weather was not a factor this year unlike last year.  

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Lawrence Cherono wins the 2019 Boston Marathon Elite Men's race by two seconds

It was a sprint to the finish at this year's Boston Marathon.  A three-person race down the stretch on Boylston Street turned into a two-man, all-out sprint and Cherone of Kenya emerged in front of Lelisa Desisa.  Cheroono's time was 2:07:57, best time since 2011, while Desisa clocked a 2:07:59.  Kenneth Kipkemoi faded in the final 300 yards and placed thired in 2:08:06. 

Scott Fauble, in seventh, and Jared Ward, in eighth, were the top American finishers, crossing in 2:09.10 and 2:09.25, respectively.

Going into Boston Lawrence was the winner of six marathons and was the fastest man in the 2019 Boston Marathon field, Cherono brought both speed and strength to his Boston debut. His personal best was earned with a course record win at the 2018 Amsterdam Marathon (2:04:06). He also won the 2017 Amsterdam Marathon, the 2016 and 2017 Honolulu Marathon, the 2016 Prague Marathon and the 2015 Zurich Marathon. In his first Abbott World Marathon Majors event, he finished seventh at the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2:09:25.

Cherono’s coach is 2007 Boston Marathon runner-up James Kwambai. He says winning the Amsterdam Marathon in a course record time has been a career highlight.

Last year Geoffrey Kirui was intent on defending his Boston crown, but after pulling away from the front pack and leading many of the closing miles, he was caught by Yuki Kawauchi and had to settle for second in 2018.

This year at 20 miles Geoffrey was leading clocking 1:38:37 but in the end he faded to fifth about a minute behind the winner.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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For the first time in 27 years, a local runner has taken the top overall spot in the Vancouver Sun Run

Burnaby runner Justin Kent had the top time in the men’s 10K race, finishing in 29:30, followed by Calgary’s Trevor Hofbauer just a fraction of a second behind.

Natasha Wodak of North Vancouver topped the women’s category with a race time of 32:38. The 2016 Olympian has previously won the women’s category in the 2012 and 2013 Sun Runs.

“It’s beyond words. I’ve dreamed about this. I grew up in Vancouver. It’s always been such an iconic event. I’m speechless,” Kent said at the finish line.

The last local to win the race was Paul Williams in 1992.

“I can’t believe it’s happening. You dream of moments like this, it puts everything in perspective, all the hard work. I can’t thank my family and coach enough,” said Kent.

It’s the first time Kent has ever competed in the Sun Run, saying he is more of a track runner and that the event had previously not lined up with his race schedule.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vancouver Sun Run

Vancouver Sun Run

The Vancouver Sun Run has been Canada's largest 10K road race since its inception in 1985. Founded by former Canadian Olympians Dr. Doug and Diane Clement along with Dr. Jack Taunton, the run's purpose was to promote the benefits of running to improve health and fitness as well as support elite amateur athletics. The first run attracted 3,200 participants. Through...

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A 10-year-old fifth-grader, Esperansa Morales won the women's division of the 10-mile Pear Blossom Run

In one of the most remarkable stories in the 43-year history of the Pear Blossom Run, Morales, a 10-year-old fifth-grader from Klamath Falls, won the women's division of the 10-mile race Saturday in front of Medford City Hall.

Although documentation of the ages of all previous winners wasn't readily available, there's little question Esperansa Morales is the youngest women's victor.

“That's crazy,” said Desiree Piter, the 28-year-old runner-up who captured the women's 5K last year before entering the 10-mile for the first time in seven years in the event. “She's super fast. She's got a lot of potential. I'm really proud of her.”

Morales' father, Sergio, himself a renowned distance runner in the Klamath Basin and a coach and constant training partner of his daughter's, was no less impressed.

As he often does, Sergio raced alongside Esperansa.

“Yeah, that’s incredible, right,” he said, referring to her winning the Pear Blossom at such a young age. “We didn’t expect that. That’s a big surprise.”

It was a performance for the ages.

Morales, who attends Mills Elementary School and will celebrate her birthday May 31, completed the slightly revamped course in 1:03:24 which is 6:21/mile.   

The last time she ran a 10-mile race was last year, when she was the first entrant as young as 9 to finish Pear Blossom’s marquee race, collecting that age-group record with a time of 1:14:59.

“I do remember there were a lot of people (running) around me,” she said.

Not so this time for the youngster with Olympic dreams.

Morales set out to break the 10-14 age-group mark. She did so by 7 1/2 minutes.

Winning the race was sweet, sweet icing on the cake.

“It’s a great honor, to be honest,” she said.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Pear Blossom Run

Pear Blossom Run

This race run by YMCA starts at City Hall and goes through the town of Medford, OR. The first Pear Blossom Run held in 1977 was won by Frank Shorter, Olympic Gold and Silver Medalist. Thanks to Zellah and Jerry Swartsley who founded and led the Pear Blossom Run for the first 35 years. The race grew from 546...

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A cancer survivor Pete Alsop will be showing that age is no obstacle by taking on the London Marathon in his eighties for Cancer Research UK

Pete Alsop will be 83 when he puts on his trainers for his first marathon attempt later this month. The 82-year-old, who had prostate cancer, is taking on the challenge in memory of his wife, Val, who died from bowel cancer.

The octogenarian is a familiar sight pounding the pavements in St Neots, power walking three times a week. Residents in his retirement complex have pledged support, but Pete is paying the first £3,000 himself to say 'thank you' to the charity.

On April 28 he will tackle the Virgin Money London Marathon. And he's urging other runners, with a confirmed place, to raise money for Cancer Research UK too.

Pete said: “On my 80th birthday I decided I wanted to do something special and I walked 25 miles – but the London Marathon will be my first full marathon. I really wanted to walk it for my Val and in memory of my mother and nan. But I also wanted to do it as a 'thank you' to Cancer Research UK.”

It's something he could not have imagined doing more than 22 years ago, when he sat watching a news item on TV about prostate cancer. His wife suggested he went for a check.

Pete said: “I knew a normal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was anything below four, but my reading was six, so the doctor decided to keep a close eye on it.”

He received his cancer diagnosis later that year in 1997.

Around that time, the couple moved to a retirement home in St Neots. Twelve years later, Val began to get stomach pains and was diagnosed with bowel cancer, which had spread to her liver. Despite deciding against surgery and chemotherapy, Val lived for a further two years.

Pete said: “Val died on March 18, 2008, and it still gets me to talk about it. Not many people were as fortunate as we were to have such a happy marriage; we were married for 47 years.”

He continued to get his PSA level checked. When the levels kept going up, Pete had injections into his stomach every three months for five years, followed by radiotherapy seven years ago. His reading went down to zero and he is now in remission.

Pete then joined a local cancer support group – Acorn – and started fundraising by doing walks for charity.

Pete said: “Since then I've done eight or nine sponsored walks of up to 10 miles – but I started to add another 10 miles on top.

“I would like to help other people who have had cancer and share my view with them that you need a positive attitude, a determination to get fit – and to decide you are going to get over it.

“I have known a lot of men who have had cancer and just decided to die, whereas my belief is that with all the research going on, you have a chance – and you have got to take it.”

Danielle Glavin, Cancer Research UK's spokesperson for the East of England, said: “We are so grateful to Pete for taking on this challenge for us at the age of 82. We wish him all the best with his training and also on the day of the marathon.

“It's thanks to the support of amazing people like Pete that we're able to continue our research into kinder and more effective treatments for cancer. A great deal of progress has been made, but there's still so much work to do.

“Anyone who already has a place in the Virgin Money London Marathon can still join our team of runners. Or if a marathon is one step too far, why not try one of our other runs or sporting events instead and get involved to help support vital cancer research.”

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
by Daniel Mansfield
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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The weather is going to be so much better we hope than last year for the Boston Marathon unlike the previous forecast

While the weather will not be as dismal as what runners faced in 2018, unsettled conditions will still provide less-than-ideal conditions for the 123rd Boston Marathon on Monday.

The dry weather that dominated the Boston area on Sunday is not expected to last into Patriots' Day.

The same storm unleashing a severe weather outbreak across the South will cause a band of rain and a thunderstorm to sweep through Boston just prior to the start of the race on Monday morning.

The rain can fall heavy at times, and there can be a period of stronger winds that may rip away any banners that are not fully secured. Runners and spectators setting up before the race may have to find shelter for a time if a thunderstorm accompanies the rain.

Hundreds of thousands of spectators are set to cheer on the 30,000 runners of the 123rd Boston Marathon.

(04/14/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Meet Cactus the dog who just ran one of the world’s toughest races, the Marathon des Sables

A dog has become the first canine to cross the finishing line at one of the world’s toughest ultra marathons.

The hound, nicknamed Cactus, wandered onto the course on day two of the Marathon des Sables in Morocco.

He began following competitors in the 251-kilometre, six-day endurance race in the sweltering Sahara Desert.

‘Cactus’ finished the second stage, then the third and fourth. Organisers tweeted on Friday to say he had crossed the finishing line.

Runners welcomed their four-legged competitor and cheered him on as he trudged with them on his self-inflicted jaunt. He also rested with them and ate and drank in their company.

Owner Karen Hadfield took to social media to say that he is a nomad dog and regularly runs 40-km a day in the area.

Pictures emerged on Saturday of organisers and competitors bidding ‘Cactus’ farewell as Karen came to collect him.

(04/14/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marathon Des Sables

Marathon Des Sables

The Marathon des Sables is ranked by the Discovery Channel as the toughest footrace on earth. Known simply as the MdS, the race is a gruelling multi-stage adventure through a formidable landscape in one of the world’s most inhospitable climates - the Sahara desert. The rules require you to be self-sufficient, to carry with you on your back everything except...

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Ethiopian runners Gelete Burka and Abrha Milaw win 2019 Paris Marathon

Ethiopian’s Gelete Burka (women’s race) and Abrha Milaw (men’s race) won the 43rd edition of the Paris Marathon on Sunday, leading a record 60,000 participants to the finish line through the French capital.

Milaw clocked 2:07:05, while Burka was the fastest woman with 2:22:47. Kenyan Paul Lonyangata, a two-time Paris Marathon winner finished third clocking 2:07:29. 

Runners from around the world set off from the Champs-Élysées at 8am on a cold (2°C) and cloudless Sunday morning in Paris. This year’s course ran east through the French capital to the Bois de Vincennes, around that vast forested park, and then west again through the heart of the city, along the Seine on the Right Bank, past the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower, and through the Bois de Boulogne. Two landmarks, the Opéra Garnier and the Place Vendôme, were added to the 2019 route.

Over 250,000 spectators lined the marathon’s route and 3,000 volunteers helped things run smoothly.

Women made up a record 27 percent of those signed up for the 2019 race.

Among the elite women running, one athlete won a late battle to take part. France’s Clémence Calvin, the European marathon silver medallist, was provisionally suspended by the French anti-doping agency (AFLD) on Wednesday for allegedly obstructing a doping test in Morocco last month. The 28-year-old has denied the allegations. France’s top administrative court, the Council of State, issued an emergency ruling late on Friday that lifted her provisional ban.

Calvin crossed the finish line in fourth place on Sunday with a time of 2:23:41 to set a new French record for the distance, pending official validation.

(04/14/2019) ⚡AMP
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Schneider Electric Paris Marathon

Schneider Electric Paris Marathon

The Schneider Electric Marathon de Paris offers a unique opportunity to make the city yours by participating in one of the most prestigious races over the legendary 42.195 km distance. The Schneider Electric Marathon de Paris is now one of the biggest marathons in the world, as much for the size of its field as the performances of its runners....

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Blind marathon runner Yoko Aoki hopes to represent Japan at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

A decade ago, Yoko Aoki would never have been able to imagine the current life she has.

Without any major sports experience, her day-to-day lifestyle used to be far from that of an average athlete. Now she runs long distances every day, supported by a team that allows her to compete in blind marathon races with the hope of representing Japan at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics. 

“My life has changed a lot. I never expected this,” the 42-year-old Aoki said. “I don’t think I’ve changed. But I can do a lot of different things that I couldn’t do before because I have a goal I want to achieve.”

Aoki’s vision was impaired by an injury she suffered after graduating from high school. She attended a vocational training school and learned how to use computers while training to walk again. Aoki said she has no problems in her daily life, including working in an office.

One day, her co-worker told her about a blind marathon club, which opened the gate for her to become a para athlete.

“I just wanted to run or walk with an assistant as exercise,” Aoki said. “I could not run or walk by myself, but I could easily find a person to escort me by joining the club.”

Since then, blind marathons have become a major part of her life, and four years ago the Japan Blind Marathon Association chose Aoki to receive special training. She clocked her career-best 3 hours, 13 minutes and 36 seconds at the Hofu Yomiuri Marathon in Yamaguchi Prefecture last December, recording the all-time third-best race in a Japanese women’s blind marathon.

The International Paralympic Committee defines three categories of blind marathon according to the severity of impairment: T11 (very low visual acuity and/or no light perception), T12 (0.03 or lower eyesight and/or a visual field radius of less than 5 degrees) and T13 (from 0.04 to 0.1 eyesight and/or a visual field of less than 20 degrees radius). For T11 and T12, to which Aoki belongs, blind marathoners must be accompanied by an escort runner.

During a race, the pair hold opposite ends of a meter-long rope as the escort runner helps to set the pace and shares information on upcoming obstacles and the status of other runners.

“The most important thing for the escort runner is caring about the runner’s safety,” said Yoshihide Fukuhara, the head coach of Aoki’s Team OYO (the initial “O” refers to the first character of Aoki’s maiden name, Otokozawa, and “YO” is from her first name), who himself is also a blind marathon runner.

“The escort runner’s vision has to synchronize with the runner’s mind. Good escort runners provide the necessary information and know when to spurt.”

Aoki, however, claims anybody can become an escort runner. According to Fukuhara, a blind marathoner will use several different escort runners between starting their daily practice and taking part in competitive races.

For example, Aoki runs about 10 kilometers every morning with a rotating set of running partners. For daily training, escort runners do not require the ability to run a marathon.

“What I want from them is that they want to run with me at daily practice. I have about 15 running partners to support my daily practice. They are all volunteers,” said Aoki. “Of course, we need fast and experienced guides in the competition, but for daily practice, the priority is people who can come to my house and run with me early in the morning.”

A blind athlete can have up to two guides in a race. Exchanging is allowed once, at either the 10-, 20- or 30-km point. If the escort runner retires at any point during the race, the blind runner is also disqualified.

Any rule violation by the escort runner, such as doping, results in the disqualification of the blind athlete. Escort runners are not allowed to help their blind athlete, even when they fall down, or to cross the finish line first.

(04/13/2019) ⚡AMP
by HIROSHI IKEZAWA
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Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organizedthe Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, from July 24 to August 9, 2020. The Games in 1964 radically transformed the country. According to the organizersof the event in 2020, the Games of the XXXII Olympiad of the modern era will be “the most innovative ever organized,...

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Kenyan Monicah Ngige took the victory honors at the B.A.A. 5K women’s clocking 15:16

The women’s title went to Kenyan Monicah Ngige, who earned her second road win in as many weeks after claiming the Cooper River Bridge Run in South Carolina last week.

Though Ngige trailed Violah Lagat by 20 meters at the two-mile mark (9:41 for Lagat), she made up that deficit and then some over the final 1.1 miles, coasting to victory in 15:16, 13 seconds ahead of runner-up Lagat.

Two-time Olympian Kim Conley finished as the top American in fourth, running 15:36.

(04/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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B.A.A. 5K

B.A.A. 5K

The B.A.A. 5K began in 2009, and became an instant hit among runners from far and wide. Viewed by many as the “calm before the storm,” the Sunday of Marathon weekend traditionally was for shopping, loading up on carbohydrates at the pasta dinner, and most importantly- resting. But now, runners of shorter distances, and even a few marathoners looking for...

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Emma Knight says she wanted to fight the disease with everything she had and her care was second to none is running the Brighton 10k

Emma Knight found a lump in her chest last year and visited the doctors to have it checked.

The 44-year-old said: “About four weeks later I was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer.

“I have two daughters, so the worst part of receiving that news is thinking of the impact it will have on my children.

“It’s heartbreaking and a really frightening thought.”

Emma decided she wanted to fight the disease with everything she had.

She said: “I knew if I let my head go to a bad place then I couldn’t expect my body to recover.

“I also knew I had to have a clear head to explain this to my children. That this would be difficult but I would be OK.

“They know enough to make the link between cancer and death. I wanted them to see that I was strong and that wasn’t always the case.”

Emma, who lives in Hanover, England with daughters Georgie and Nancy, began to write down her feelings in a blog online called Queen Emma Knight and said it “became a type of therapy.”

“It is very honest. I talk about everything very bluntly,” she said.  

“Somebody told me reading it was like white water rafting, I go from swearing to sharing my emotions, talking about getting a positive outcome from a pretty grim situation.

“People began reading it all over the world. It created quite a community and people I didn’t know were giving such positive feedback.

“One woman direct messaged me and said the blog was like somebody else was articulating exactly how she was feeling. Before that she felt like she had lost her voice, and I had given it back.”

Emma received 19 weeks of chemotherapy treatment at the Sussex Cancer Centre in Brighton and said her care was second to none.

So tomorrow she will be leading the charge as part of Knights Army, a team of 24 friends and family members who Emma says will be “running, jogging, walking and crawling” the Brighton 10K to raise money for the Sussex Cancer Fund.

She said that she is not going to win it, but is “celebrating the fact that my body is able to achieve this after the serious beating it’s taken.”

(04/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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Brighton Marathon

Brighton Marathon

The Brighton Marathon is one of the UK’s favourite marathons. With stunning coastal scenery in one of the country’s most energetic cities, this is the perfect race for runners with all different levels of experience. The fast and beautiful course of the Brighton Marathon makes this a ‘must do’on any runners list. Come and experience it for yourself over 26.2...

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Ben True, Justyn Knight and Ben Flanagan, Two three and four at B.A.A 5K

Justyn Knight was third Saturday at the B.A.A 5K in a time of 13:46. He was third in a very respectable field, losing to Hagos Gebrhiwet of Ethiopia (13:42) who’s an Olympic bronze medallist in the 5,000m and Ben True, one of the best American distance athletes on the roads.

True was sixth at the 2015 World Championships in the 5,000m.

After what Knight describes as a lack-lustre indoor season, he’s had a very solid opener. Knight only ran one race in the 2019 indoor season and says he wasn’t in his ideal race shape through the winter.

“My indoor season was what everyone saw, I was out of shape. I knew I wasn’t as fit as I would’ve like to be, but I still wanted to race and see where I was at relative to my fellow competitors. I wasn’t ready to run fast then, but I feel I’m in a completely different spot now.”

Training partner Ben Flanagan was fourth in Saturday’s race just behind Justyn in 13:49. Flanagan and Knight train together with the Reebok Boston Track Club. Knight’s next race will be Payton Jordan on May 2 in Palo Alto, California.

(04/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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B.A.A. 5K

B.A.A. 5K

The B.A.A. 5K began in 2009, and became an instant hit among runners from far and wide. Viewed by many as the “calm before the storm,” the Sunday of Marathon weekend traditionally was for shopping, loading up on carbohydrates at the pasta dinner, and most importantly- resting. But now, runners of shorter distances, and even a few marathoners looking for...

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Because of wet and cool weather forecasted the Boston Marathon organizers are making some changes

The Boston Marathon are making changes to the scheduled start times for runners.

The Boston Athletic Association said it is planning for conditions similar to last year's race. StormTeam 5 meteorologists is forecasting rain and temperatures below 50 degrees at the starting line in Hopkinton.

Runners assigned to the fourth wave will start their race immediately after those in the third wave. Originally, a 25 minute gap was scheduled between those two waves.

Under the new plan, Wave 3 will start at 10:50 a.m. and Wave 4 will follow immediately afterward.

BAA organizers said the goal is to reduce the amount of time runners spend waiting in the Athletes' Village prior to starting the race.

Additionally, the BAA said it is adding additional medical aid capacity along the course, adding things like walls and heaters to tents and distributing ponchos to volunteers.

"Our race history has shown that the forecasted conditions will cause unique challenges for athletes whose participation requires specific equipment that limits contact with the ground.

“This includes participants in the wheelchair division, handcycle program, duo program, and runners competing with prosthesis. Eligible athletes who elect deferral will receive a complimentary entry into the 2020 Boston Marathon. For those athletes, qualifying standards will be waived if a deferment is selected," the BAA wrote in a statement.

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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After years of struggling with the aftermath of the 1999 Columbine shooting, Laura Hall and Sarah Bush have used running as a method to overcome the anxiety, and now are set for Boston

It was a regular school day. Laura Green, a 14-year-old freshman, threw on a powder-blue tank top, a matching cardigan, a khaki skirt and a pair of Doc Martens. She had two weeks left in the school year at Columbine High. After months of cold days, the sun was finally out. Her town, Littleton, Colorado, looked bright and majestic.

As she sat down in the passenger seat of the car her older sister, Sarah Green, 16, was driving on April 20, 1999, Laura thought to herself, "It's going to be a good day."

Three hours after they left their house. That's all it took for their lives to change forever when one of the school's janitors yelled, "Run, somebody is shooting." Laura dropped her pizza and sprinted up the stairs from the cafeteria. She stood shoulder to shoulder with 40 other kids in the choir office. She fixed her eyes on the ceiling, hoping the space above them might help her breathe through the intense claustrophobia. They had barricaded the door with two desks and a cabinet.

During the same time, Sarah was taking a math test. She dropped her pen in fear when baseball coach Robin Ortiz slammed the door open and told them to "get the hell out; somebody is shooting." She ran out the main entrance and stopped only when she found some classmates in the field across from the school. She watched as the SWAT team members arrived 47 minutes later and positioned themselves behind their vehicle just as bullets began to fly toward them.

Chaos ensued, and it wasn't until four hours later that the SWAT team kicked down the door of the choir office and ordered the kids to place their hands on their heads and walk out in a single file.

They were taken out through the back entrance, the glass windows shot in, the doors unhinged. With her hands on her head, Laura had to step over the dead body of a classmate she had grown up with since second grade. She was hyperventilating, and tears poured down her face.

That was 20 years ago. The 1999 Columbine High School shooting, in which 12 students and one teacher were killed, changed the Green sisters' lives forever, robbing them of a normal high school experience, of being able to sleep in their own rooms at night, of feeling safe at school. But through the uncertainty of it all, they found one thing -- one common thing -- that saved them. Running.

Running gave them a sense of purpose and focus -- it gave them a chance to slowly heal. On Monday, Laura and Sarah will tackle their ultimate goal and compete in the Boston Marathon.

Training together for Boston has been special for Sarah and Laura. They ran the Orcas Island 32-miler together in February, finishing hand-in-hand. When Laura needed a water break, Sarah waited for her, and when Sarah needed to catch a breath, Laura held her hand as they slowed down. They found an emotional release, a sense of accomplishment, especially after a long race.

Finishing the Boston Marathon together a few days before the 20th anniversary of the April 20, 1999, shooting would be their way of showing the world that it's possible for survivors to move forward and find a sense of serenity after a life-altering event. Not to mention tackling one of the toughest and most prestigious marathons in the world.

"When we see the famous Citgo sign, we know we will only have 1 mile left," said Laura, referring to the iconic image near the end of the Boston Marathon.

"And I asked Sarah, 'How am I supposed to keep it together?' She said, 'You won't, you just have to allow yourself to cry.'"

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
by Aishwarya Kumar
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Kylie Osborn is running the Brighton Marathon this weekend to raise money for a charity in memory of her daughter

Kylie Osborn is taking on the marathon on Sunday to raise money for Darcie’s Wish, a charity she set up to support bereaved parents after her own daughter died at 20 weeks.

“Darcie’s Wish was formed in 2014 when our daughter Darcie passed away from Edwards’ syndrome while I was pregnant,” explained Kylie.

“It is now a registered charity and has raised more than £25,000 to help support the maternity unit at Lister Hospital.”

Kylie will be running with five others, and each mile of Sunday’s marathon will be dedicated to a different angel baby – whose names will be on the back of each running top.

Mile 26 will be in memory of Darcie.

Edwards syndrome, is a chromosomal condition associated with abnormalities in many parts of the body. Babies have slow growth before birth and a low birth weight. Affected babies may have heart defects and abnormalities of other organs that develop before birth.

Due to the presence of several life-threatening medical problems, many babies die before birth or within their first month. Five to 10 percent of babies with this condition live past their first year.

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Brighton Marathon

Brighton Marathon

The Brighton Marathon is one of the UK’s favourite marathons. With stunning coastal scenery in one of the country’s most energetic cities, this is the perfect race for runners with all different levels of experience. The fast and beautiful course of the Brighton Marathon makes this a ‘must do’on any runners list. Come and experience it for yourself over 26.2...

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Two-time Schneider Electric Paris Marathon winner Paul Lonyangata will seek a record third consecutive victory this weekend

The 26-year-old Kenyan set his lifetime best of 2:06:10 when winning in the French capital two years ago. He came close to that mark last year when he retained his title in 2:06:25, the second-fastest time of his career.

He hasn’t raced since then, however, and he picked up a slight injury last week when he slipped and fell in training, but he insisted that it shouldn’t affect his ability to compete on Sunday.

Lonyangata faces a tough challenge, though, as he will line up against fellow Kenyans Augustine Choge, Hillary Kipsambu, Ishmael Bushendich and Barselius Kipyego, plus a duo of Ethiopian men with sub-2:05 PRs: Asefa Mengistu and Yemane Tsegay.

Choge, one of the most versatile distance runners in the world over the past decade, has won global medals indoors, outdoors and at cross country. The 32-year-old has moved to the roads in recent years and clocked 59:26 for the half marathon in 2017. His marathon debut in Chicago last year ended with a DNF but he is aiming for a better result in Paris.

With a best of 2:04:06, Mengistu is the fastest man in the field. A past winner in Seoul, Cape Town and Bloemfontein, he set his PR when placing fourth in Dubai in 2018. He finished third in Dubai this year and came close to his best with 2:04:24.

Tsegay’s PR of 2:04:48 dates back to 2012, but the 34-year-old is still highly competitive and won in Ottawa last year. More recently he finished runner-up in Fukuoka four months ago.

Nicolas Navarro, the second-fastest marathon runner in France last year, leads the domestic charge and will aim to improve on his PR of 2:12:39.

Almost all of the leading contenders in the women’s race set their PRs in 2018, so will be heading to the French capital in good form.

Gelete Burka – who, like Choge, has won global medals across a range of distances – is the most decorated athlete in the field. Winner of the 2006 world cross-country short course title and 2008 world indoor 1500m title, the 33-year-old Ethiopian finally conquered the marathon distance in 2018, clocking a PR of 2:20:45 in Dubai and then going on to win in Ottawa in 2:22:17, the first marathon victory of her career.

Kenyan athletes have won the past three women’s races at the Paris Marathon and 2014 world half marathon bronze medallist Sally Chepyego leads their charge this year. The experienced 33-year-old set her marathon PR of 2:23:15 when finishing second in Ljubljana last year.

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Schneider Electric Paris Marathon

Schneider Electric Paris Marathon

The Schneider Electric Marathon de Paris offers a unique opportunity to make the city yours by participating in one of the most prestigious races over the legendary 42.195 km distance. The Schneider Electric Marathon de Paris is now one of the biggest marathons in the world, as much for the size of its field as the performances of its runners....

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Kenya's veteran road runner Mathew Kisorio and Bornes Kitur will lead the elite group at the Prague Marathon

Kenya's Mathew Kisorio, who ran his best time of 2:04:53 in finishing third in Valencia last year, could challenge the Prague Marathon course record of 2:05:39.

"I am in top form and will first seek to shake off the opposition and secure the victory, then see if I can run faster time. The course record is not hard to challenge, I will take it in my strides," said Kisorio.

Morocco's El Mahjoub Dazz, who was just behind Kisorio in Valencia in 2:05:26 and Kenya's Amos Kipruto, who has a best time of 2:06:23, could also challenge.

Kisorio's brother Peter Kimeli Some, a former Paris marathon champion, Yego Solomon Kirwa and Paul Maina are others to watch for.

European runners are led by Oleksandr Sitkovskyy, who has run 2:09:11.

In the women's race, Kenya's Bornes Kitur is back to defend her title, which she won when she ran her best time of 2:24:19.

However, she must give her best show in order to beat Israel and European 10,000m champion Lonah Salpeter who is two seconds quicker than Kitur.

Salpeter, who switched from Kenya to Israel after marriage, had pitched camp in Iten to train.

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
Mathew Kisorio
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Prague Marathon

Prague Marathon

The Volkswagen Prague International Marathon is considered by many, to be one of the top 10 marathons and invariably contains a number of high profile runners. Winding through the streets of one of Europe's most beautiful cities it is a spectacular race. And with a mainly flat course there is the chance for a personal best. Since its inception in...

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Deborah James is running the Vitality London 10k to prove she is not dead yet

BBC presenter Deborah James, aka the Bowel Babe, has revealed that she won't stop running despite having stage 4 bowel cancer - because it proves she's "not dead yet." 

The 37-year-old, from London, who was diagnosed with the disease in 2016 and has undergone countless rounds of gruelling treatment and operations, says she even got out her running shoes just before an operation despite being "nil by mouth" and gagging for water to "feel alive." 

Stripping down to her underwear as part of a new campaign to encourage others to get active and raise money for charity, the deputy head, who's taking part in the Vitality London 10k on May 27th, says she hopes others will see "If I can do it, so can they."  

She told her 61,000 followers: "I run (when my dodgy ankle allows!) because it makes me feel alive. 

"I have even run to have an operation (it’s the whole “not dead yet mentality!”), although that was a bit silly when you are nil by mouth and gagging for water!' James wrote on Instagram.

She added, "You know I have really rubbish days when I don’t want to do anything, but in the days I feel well I try to get my trainers on and do what my body allows me to do - then I push it a bit more and hope I don’t break my ankle again! If I can do it when I have stage four cancer, then anyone can do it!'

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vitality London 10,000

Vitality London 10,000

The Vitality London 10,000 takes you past many landmark sites, including the London Eye, Buckingham Palace and the Bank of England – so you even get to do a bit of sightseeing along the way! You will run alongside elite runners and have coverage from the BBC, making this 10km one of the highest in profile of its kind. ...

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Kellyn Taylor, the seventh-fastest USA marathon woman will run her next marathon at the Volkswagen Prague Marathon

Kellyn Taylor, the seventh-fastest USA marathon woman under all conditions with a 2:24:29 personal best, will run her next marathon at the Volkswagen Prague Marathon on Sunday, May 5, her HOKA Northern Arizona Elite coach Ben Rosario told Race Results Weekly.

Taylor, 32, who finished fourth at the 2016 USA Olympic Trials in the 10,000m and sixth in the marathon, sees running on Prague’s flat, fast course as an opportunity to lower her personal best and get a 2020 Tokyo Olympic qualifying mark (sub-2:29:30).  She last ran the 42.195-kilometer distance at Grandma’s Marathon last June in Duluth, Minn., where she clocked her personal best.  The mark was also an event record.

“After a season off of marathoning, I think Prague is the perfect fit for my next go at 26.2,” Taylor said through a statement. “The field looks fantastic and I’m heading there to compete with the best in search of a win and a new PR.”

Under Rosario’s training, Taylor has moved solidly into the first tier of American marathon women.  She made a very good debut at the Chevron Houston Marathon in 2015 clocking 2:28:40 before finishing sixth at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Los Angeles in hot conditions (2:32:49).  In 2017 she finished 13th at London (2:28:51), 8th at New York (2:29:56) and was the ninth-ranked American marathon woman for 2017 by Track & Field News.  Nearly a year ago, Taylor was unable to finish the 2018 Boston Marathon, held in heavy rain and near-freezing temperatures, but bounced back with her fast run at Grandma’s less than two months later.  Taking last fall off, she will be running Prague on fresh legs.

“Kellyn wanted to try and build on her performance last year at Grandma’s by picking a race where she could battle for the win against a great field and have the opportunity to run a fast time as a result,” coach Rosario told Race Results Weekly in an e-mail.

In Prague, Taylor will face a quality field, including Ethiopia’s Amane Beriso (2:20:48 PB) and Mamitu Daska (2:21:59 PB), Kenya’s Bornes Jepkirui Kitur (2:24:19 PB), and Israel’s Lonah Chemtai Salpeter (2:24:17 PB).

The Volkswagen Prague Marathon is an IAAF Gold Label road race.  Under the new IAAF qualification system for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, a top-5 finish in a Gold Label marathon shall be counted as an Olympic Games qualifying mark regardless of the time.  Nonetheless, Taylor is hoping to run fast.

“Her training has, without a doubt, been as good as ever over the last few weeks and I am excited to see what she can do on the streets of Prague,” concluded Rosario.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
by David Monti
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Prague Marathon

Prague Marathon

The Volkswagen Prague International Marathon is considered by many, to be one of the top 10 marathons and invariably contains a number of high profile runners. Winding through the streets of one of Europe's most beautiful cities it is a spectacular race. And with a mainly flat course there is the chance for a personal best. Since its inception in...

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76-year-old Benny Meier is blind, but it doesn’t keep him from competing in the Oklahoma City National Memorial Marathon

Benny Meier has a secret weapon. Her name is Frances Williams.

When Benny runs, Frances is his guide.  Frances uses her eyes and Benny provides the inspiration for this dynamic running duo.

"She's been a person who has been my guide, my right-hand person,” Benny says. “I just really appreciate what she's done for me to take her time to guide a blind person for all these many years."

Benny began losing his vision at age 11 and so many things have changed for him since then.  Simple things like different shades of colors.

When they run together, he has questions.  “Sometimes I ask Frances what is fuchsia? Or what is bone color or what is plum red,” Benny told us. “There are just so many colors I never saw when I was young.”

For what Frances has done for him as a running partner and friend, Benny nominated her for Pay It Forward. Frances is an art teacher at Piedmont Middle School and when we surprised her there with the 400 dollar cash reward, provided by Nova Kay of First Fidelity Bank.

Frances teared up in a smile and said in an emotional jest, “Benny what have you done?!

Benny told Frances, “I just really appreciate the time you've taken to guide this old blind guy for many years."

After a hug Frances told Benny, “You've been a best friend and we've been running together for 16 years and I hope we have another 16."

It doesn't matter where they finish in the Memorial half-marathon later this month, because in the event called friendship, Benny Meier and Frances Williams are both Gold Medal winners.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon

Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon

The Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon is about more than running, it is about celebrating life. This is the spirit in which the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon was conceptualized by two Oklahoma businessmen who, while on a morning run, created the outline for this inspiring event. A group of volunteer chairmen and some Memorial staff, lead a volunteer corps to carry...

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Mika Kawauchi the mom of Yuki Kawauchi is going to be running the Boston Marathon this year

The JapanRunningNews.com site reports that Boston Marathon defending champion Yuki Kawauchi’s mother, Mika Kawauchi, is also running the Boston Marathon this year. She will start in Wave four.

Mika is an accomplished middle distance runner, and according to a story in the New York Times last October, she was Yuki’s first coach.

The B.A.A. invited her to race at Boston this year. “We are excited to have her run this year,” says B.A.A. communications manager Chris Lotsbom, whom we reached by email today, “and believe it is the first time a parent of a defending champion has competed in the same race their son/daughter was racing in as defending champion.”

What few people know is that the Kawauchis are a running family. Yuki’s brothers Koki and Yoshiki are both runners. Mika ran her first marathon at Gold Coast in Australia in 2016 at age 52, finishing in 3:53.

Yuki runs the Gold Coast every year and has stood on the podium four times. (He has an ongoing rivalry with Kenyan runner Kenneth Mungara, who holds the course record and Australian all-comers record of 2:08:42, set in 2015).

The four Kawauchis all raced at the Gold Coast together last year, Mika and Yoshiki running the Southern Cross University 10K, and Koki the half-marathon. Mika finished in 46:27, for eighth in her age group. 

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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An army veteran who is suffering from sight loss is planning on running the London marathon with a white cane

Steven Waterson says running was a 'coping mechanism' after he suffered a brain hemorrhage.

Steven Waterson began to lose his vision after operations following two brain hemorrhages and other health problems.

However the 46-year-old is still a keen runner and his next challenge will be the London marathon.  The former army chef has received support from the charity Scottish War Blinded after losing his left field of vision following surgery, and reduced vision on his right.

In 2014, Steven ran part of the Queen's Baton relay in Midlothian for the Commonwealth Games.  Steven says, "There’s always something positive you can take out of a race.

“I was intrigued by marathons – every year I’d watch London and I knew one day I’d get to one.”  After a brain haemorrhage in 2003, Steven was found to have arteriovenous malformation – where high pressure arteries are connected to low pressure veins, risking rupture.

As well as sight loss,  Steven also suffered paralysis on his left side.  Steven said running was “a coping mechanism” after his first bleed.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Egyptian woman Manal Rostom, and first Nike Hijab model and coach is set for London Marathon

As the countdown for the 2019 London Marathon gets underway, international charity Penny Appeal has announced that the Egyptian mountaineer and marathon runner, Manal Rostom, will be running this year’s London Marathon for the charity.

Rostom is widely recognised as Nike’s first Hijab model and coach, but is also the first Egyptian woman to summit two out of the seven highest summits in the world.

On the running side of things, Rostom has completed five sprint triathlons, run over 13 half marathons, various full marathons and even one 50K solo run.

She is the first Egyptian woman to run the length of the Great Wall of China Marathon, and her mission is to be the first Egyptian to run all the World’s Six Major Marathons.

The Penny Appeal is an international humanitarian charity, which provides a range of life-saving solutions in over 30 crisis hit countries. Manal said, “So very proud to be running for Penny Appeal this year, for a good cause.

This is my first London marathon, I hope that we can make a big difference by raising funds to support the Dig Deep campaign, I also want young Muslim women in Britain to realise they can do anything they want in life as long as they believe in themselves.”

Haroon Mota, who is Head of Challenges at Penny Appeal said, “We are proud to have such an inspirational woman running with us.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Don't spend any energy worrying about the weather for this year's Boston Marathon says Marathon Man Gary Allen File 5

You can’t control the weather. Don’t spend any energy worrying about it. Instead prepare for anything and everything for this year's Boston Marathon.  

1. Wear lots of throw away clothes to the start. Layers rule. Make sure your outer layer is a green trash bag to keep you dry. Hours of waiting to start being cold and miserable is not good.

2. Carry your race shoes and wear some old beaters to tromp around in the mud at athletes village. Change into your dry kicks in the corrals and toss your old shoes.

3. Bring some Mylar blankets to wrap up in and sit on in the corrals.

4. Don’t over dress for the actual race. If it’s raining you will be weighted down by sopping wet not needed gear. Remember the faster you run the more heat you generate and you can’t run fast if you have 15 lbs of soaked gear on.

5. Hat and gloves are key. Race singlet will work just fine, maybe arm sleeves. If below 40 I sometimes would wear two singlets.

6. If windy use the people around you to draft. In the infamous nor’easter in 2007 we had gusts of 30 mph right in our faces all damn day. I tucked in whenever I could conserving energy and would pop out when the gusts subsided. I ran 2:55:17 good for 9th OA AG.

7. Start with a 12 oz Poland spring water bottle in your hand and skip the congested mile 2 and 4 water stops. I found in big urban marathons I’d drink 6oz at mile 2 and then finish it at mile 4 but most importantly I skipped the crowded chaos of those first 2 stops.

8. Don’t follow the crowds. If village is insane you don’t need to go there. The hopkinton green right at the start is a fantastic place to wait. Plenty of Porto’s and you can head straight to your corrals when called. Lots of big trees to help shield you from weather.

9. Have fun and even if Mother Nature kicks you in the face Smile and yell, “yo bitch, BRING IT....IS THAT ALL YOU GOT!”

From Marathon Man Gary Allen who has run many Boston Marathons over many years. 

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gary Allen
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John Hancock 2019 Boston Marathon US Elite Open Team

Featured video: 2019 Boston Marathon John Hancock U.S. Elite Open Team for Monday April 15.

Abdi Abdirahman, a four-time Olympian, placed sixth at the 2017 Boston Marathon. He is a multiple national champion in the 10,000m, 10K, 10-mile and half marathon. 

Shadrack Biwott finished third this year in Boston. Last year, he was second American and fourth overall. Biwott placed fifth at the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon in a personal best time of 2:12:01.

Aaron Braun, 13th at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, is a versatile road runner. Braun is a national champion in the 12K and was top American at the 2015 Houston Marathon.

Sarah Crouch has finished top-ten three times at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, including this year where she was top American and ninth overall. She is a past champion of the Tallahassee Marathon and finished 11th at the 2016 Boston Marathon.

Jeffrey Eggleston has raced on three IAAF World Championships Marathon teams, placing as high as 13th in 2018. He has won the Pittsburgh, Woodlands, Lima and San Diego Marathons and has been runner-up in Brisbane, Pittsburgh and at Twin Cities.

Scott Fauble was the second American and seventh overall at the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon. Fauble placed fourth in the 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Trials and represented the United States at the 2017 IAAF World Cross Country Championships.  

Lindsay Flanagan, the 2015 Pan American silver medalist in the marathon, finished 11th at the 2017 Boston Marathon and set her personal best of 2:29:25 at the Frankfurt Marathon this year.  

Sara Hall is the tenth fastest U.S. women’s marathoner of all time having set her 2:26:20 mark at the 2018 Ottawa Marathon. Hall has earned national titles in the marathon, 20K, 10-mile, mile and cross country. She is married to Ryan Hall, who is a John Hancock Elite Athlete Ambassador and holds the American course record of 2:04:58 at the Boston Marathon. 

Jordan Hasay set an American debut record of 2:23:00 with her third-place finish in Boston in 2017. She then ran the second fastest marathon of all time by a U.S. woman at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, where she placed third in 2:20:57. Hasay is an 18-time All American and a national champion at 15K and 20K.  

Elkanah Kibet, a member of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, has had two top-ten finishes at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon. At the 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon, Kibet finished top American and 16th overall. He was 8th in Boston in 2018.

Desiree Linden, a two-time Olympian, returns to Boston as defending champion. A top-five finisher in eight Abbott World Marathon Majors, additional accomplishments include placing seventh at the 2016 Olympic Games Marathon, tenth at the 2009 IAAF World Championships Marathon, second at the 2012 and 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and second in the 10,000m at the 2015 Pan American Games. In addition to her 2018 win in Boston, she placed second in 2011.

Timothy Ritchie, the 2017 U.S. National Marathon champion, ran for the U.S. at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships where he placed 23th. Ritchie is the head men’s cross country coach at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Dathan Ritzenhein is the fourth fastest U.S. marathoner of all time with a 2:07:47 personal best. Career highlights for the three-time Olympian include finishing ninth at the 2008 Olympic Marathon, winning the bronze medal at the 2009 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and finishing 13th at the 2012 Olympic Games 10,000m. 

Sarah Sellers ran through freezing rain and torrential wind this year to finish second behind Des Linden. In her 2017 marathon debut, Sellers won the Huntsville Marathon. In New York this year she finished 18th.

Brian Shrader is a versatile runner on the track and roads. He made his half marathon debut in Boston this year at the B.A.A. Half Marathon, running 1:05:26. He also made his marathon debut in 2018, running 2:13:31 at the USA Championships in Sacramento.  

Becky Wade, a champion of the California International Marathon, finished 11th at the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon and tenth at the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon. 

Jared Ward placed third at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and followed with a sixth-place finish at the Olympic Marathon in Rio de Janeiro, less than a minute and a half out of medal contention. In 2017 Ward was tenth at the Boston Marathon and this year, he finished top American and sixth overall at the TCS New York City Marathon. 

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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The current weather forecast for the Boston Marathon is similar to last year but things can change by Monday

For the second year in a row, rain and wind could lead to sloppy conditions for the Boston Marathon next Monday, Patriots' Day.

Hundreds of thousands of spectators will cheer on 30,000 runners along the course from Hopkinton, Massachusetts, to downtown Boston.

During last year's marathon, over 1.50 inches of rain and chilly conditions led to a downright raw and miserable race with slower times than previous years.  Many elite runners had to drop out due to the weather.

Those participating in this year's event should make sure they have waterproof gear at the ready, as there is the potential for similar conditions to unfold.

"As a storm moves toward the area next Monday, soggy conditions are in store for the Boston Marathon," said AccuWeather Meteorologist Ryan Adamson.

Depending on the exact speed of the storm, the rain could pester the area for much of the day, affecting all waves of runners. The water on painted surfaces, such as pedestrian and motor vehicle lines, can make for slippery conditions for the runners.

The rain could be heavy enough to cause ponding of water on the course, like what occurred in 2018.

Timing is everything. The storm looks to bring Beantown its worst between sunrise and noon. The first batch of marathon runners departs Hopkinton at 9:02 a.m., with the remaining participants setting off in waves through 11:15 a.m. A chilly rain is possible and, if downpours develop, a half to three-quarters of an inch of water could fall by early afternoon.

As the race is six days away, however, the specifics of this forecast could change.

The official forecast is calling for temperatures around 50 degrees, though it’s likely an easterly wind off the water — coupled with cold air draining down from the north — could knock Boston back into the low to mid-40s.

The atmosphere can be fickle this time of year in southern New England. On Monday, New York City warmed to 78, while Hartford — a mere 100 miles away — held steady at 43 degrees.

Past Boston Marathons have seen all sorts of wild weather. In 2017, Logan Airport peaked at a balmy 75 degrees — just a day after a record-setting 86 degrees. But in 2015, temperatures struggled to hit 50, and 0.61 inches of rain fell. And if you’re looking for variety, try 2014 — the race began in the 30s, flirting with 70 in the afternoon.

Eric Fisher is the chief meteorologist at WBZ-TV in Boston, and has run the marathon a number of times. He said the rain predicted to drench this year’s race could be dangerous to runners.

“Heavy rain like last year can be tough,” he said in a message. “There were quite a few cases of hypothermia on the course.”

If the rain clears out sooner though, that could be good news for runners. Most athletes would prefer a cooler day over the summerlike weather that’s baked the course in years past.

“After a winter of cold training, the ideal day for runners is mostly cloudy and somewhere close to 50 degrees,” Fisher said. “That’s actually a pretty standard day for Boston in mid-April.” The average high this time of year is around 56 or 57 degrees.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Matthew Cappucci
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Sara Sellers placed second at the 2018 Boston Marathon and is ready to run it again on Monday

When Sarah Sellers rises at 4 a.m., it’s not to sip coffee slowly in the still of the morning or head off to an early shift at the Tucson hospital where she works as a nurse anesthetist. Instead, Sellers hits the blaring alarm and gets out her shoes to tackle another early morning run.

Sellers is preparing for her second appearance in the Boston Marathon after a long love affair with running. The 27-year-old started in middle school with her parents on the trails behind their house in Ogden, Utah, and went on to run in college for Weber State from 2009–13.

For someone who has spent most of her life running, qualifying for the Boston Marathon came easy. But competing among the elites was another task all together. In 2018, Sellers arrived on the starting line in Hopkinton as a relatively unknown runner and had only competed in one marathon, in Huntsville, Utah, in Sept. 2017. She won her debut in 2:44:27—nearly 15 minutes ahead of the next woman.

“In some ways last year it was really nice to be totally naïve and do my own thing and not have anyone besides a few family members and my coach interested in how I did,” Sellers says.

The conditions at the 2018 Boston Marathon were anything but ideal. At the start of the race temperatures hovered around 37 degrees. A torrential downpour, which amounted to over a half inch of rain, soaked runners for the entirety of the race. The worst part, according to Sellers, who compared running in the heavy rains to being in a car wash, was the strong headwinds that reached up to 35 miles per hour. More than 2,500 runners visited medical tents during the race and 1,123 participants did not finish.

When Sellers crossed the finish line in 2:44:04 as the second runner in the women’s division behind two-time Olympian Desiree Linden, who became the first American woman to win the race in 33 years, her anonymity to the general public quickly vanished. Suddenly, the media was clamoring to talk to Sellers, who was in a state of disbelief over her second-place finish. “Who is Sarah Sellers?” started popping on search engines, running message boards and social media. The reality sank in after she found her husband, Blake, and he confirmed that the result was no fluke.

“It was the mixture of excitement and almost this daunting feeling,” Seller says. “It was a little bit scary because I knew it was going to be a big deal but I also asked myself ‘What did I just do?’”

Before April 16, 2018, not many people would’ve cared that Sellers ran track and cross country in middle school and high school before joining the teams at Weber State in her hometown. She was a nine-time Big Sky conference champion during her college career and was voted the university’s 2012 Female Athlete of the Year. After she was diagnosed with a stress fracture in the navicular bone in her foot during her senior year, Sellers didn’t know if she would be able to run again, because that specific bone doesn’t get much blood supply, which makes it hard to heal. She never finished her final year of NCAA eligibility at Weber State.

She went a couple of years without being able to run or could run very little,” says Paul Pilkington, Sellers’s coach at Weber State. “She wasn’t training a lot when in grad school but I think that helped her get healthy again. It’s the whole thing of ‘Hey I may never be able to run again’ that makes her appreciate it a lot.”

Sellers eventually did start running again as a graduate student at Barry University in Florida. She decided to target the 2018 Boston Marathon after her brother, Ryan, signed up. She earned her Boston qualifier in Huntsville and then reached out to Pilkington and asked him to help her train for the marathon.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Jenna West
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Kenya´s Daniel Kipkoech will try to maintain Kenyan dominance at Vancouver Sun Run this weekend

Kenyans won the men’s division of The Vancouver Sun Run an amazing 16 of 21 times from 1994 through 2014.

If it’s going to happen in 2019 at the popular 10K event, it will be up to Daniel Kipkoech, the Kenyan-born runner who spends a good part of the year in Lethbridge, Alta. He’s the only Kenyan in the men’s field this year, with 2013 and 2014 winner Paul Kimugul, who was 10th last year, opting not to return.

Kipkoech, 32, has been a frequent presence in B.C. distance races in recent years, winning the BMO Vancouver Marathon in 2016 and 2017 and the GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon for five consecutive years from 2014 through 2018.

He’s also won the Times Colonist 10K in Victoria twice and finished second, third and seventh in The Vancouver Sun Run. But somehow, he’s never been a winner of the Sun Run, one of the largest road races in North America.

“The Vancouver community is why I come back every year,” Kipkoech said after winning the 2017 marathon. “They’re so cheerful, loving and welcoming. It’s a beautiful place, especially the people.”

Americans have won three of the past four Sun Runs and Jerrell Mock of Fort Collins, Ariz., figures to be a favorite this year based on his 28:07 clocking in winning last July’s Deseret News 10K in Salt Lake City.

But there’s also a strong contingent of Canadians in the field, led by Geoff Martinson of Vancouver and Albertans Trevor Hofbauer, the 2018 Canadian half-marathon champion, and Matt Travaglini, who was third in last year’s Sun Run in 29:49, just 35 seconds behind winner Brendan Gregg.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vancouver Sun Run

Vancouver Sun Run

The Vancouver Sun Run has been Canada's largest 10K road race since its inception in 1985. Founded by former Canadian Olympians Dr. Doug and Diane Clement along with Dr. Jack Taunton, the run's purpose was to promote the benefits of running to improve health and fitness as well as support elite amateur athletics. The first run attracted 3,200 participants. Through...

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Phoenix resident Jerry Swartsley has run 555 races, the Pear Blossom Run will be number 556

Not many people can say they’ve run in over 100 races, few can say they’ve been in 300. For one local runner though, try running over 500.

He’s a modest man who’s been in hundreds of races – 555 to be exact. But with all those miles, Phoenix resident Jerry Swartsley still can’t quite put a finger on why.

“I don’t know the answer to that,” he said. “It’s just been kind of a lifestyle, part of my life, like brushing your teeth. Just something you do.”

That lifestyle has been going strong since Jerry’s first race on April 10, 1969. Since then, he’s run 29 marathons, over 72,000 miles and burned through dozens of shoes.

Jerry even has a stack of journals he’s kept from every race he’s ever recorded providing insight to a wealth of history that’s taken him across the country.

With such a passion for running, Jerry has done quite a bit of work encouraging others to do the same. In the fall of 1969, he started Oregon’s first running club, the Southern Oregon Sizzlers, now known as the Southern Oregon Runners.

Then in 1977, he and his wife Zellah started the Pear Blossom Run which they still participate in every year. But with all that work, Jerry laughs about some of his more controversial achievements.

“I ran the Golden Gate Marathon in San Francisco and they ran out of water,” he said with a chuckle. “Eventually to make a long story short, I got banned from the race.”

Besides some humorous missteps (Jerry says he later cleared things up with organizers with the marathon) Jerry is prepared to make it 556 races with next weekends Pear Blossom Run.

He hopes to keep adding to the miles he’s run with maybe one day running so many he could reach the moon.

“That’s a ways off,” he said with a laugh though.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Pear Blossom Run

Pear Blossom Run

This race run by YMCA starts at City Hall and goes through the town of Medford, OR. The first Pear Blossom Run held in 1977 was won by Frank Shorter, Olympic Gold and Silver Medalist. Thanks to Zellah and Jerry Swartsley who founded and led the Pear Blossom Run for the first 35 years. The race grew from 546...

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Ben Flanagan and Justyn Knight will be facing a very deep field at the B.A.A 5K race on Saturday

Ben Flanagan and Justyn Knight will both race the B.A.A 5K on Saturday. They will face a very deep field including World Championship top six finisher Ben True and 2019 USATF Indoor 2-mile champion Drew Hunter.

Both Flanagan and Knight run for the Reebok Boston Track Club out of Charlottesville, Virginia.

We asked Flanagan and Knight how they thought they would do if on Saturday they were told they had to run a marathon instead of a 5K. Flanagan joked that, “I mean, I could finish it.” He continued, “I think I would try and run around 5:30 miles for as long as possible.

I would hope to finish around the 2:30’s. It’s so hard to say.” Flanagan hasn’t done a long run longer than 14 miles recently and says that the marathon is a distance he really respects. “It would be impossible to go out there and do a good job without months of preparation.”

Knight took a slightly more aggressive approach saying he would aim for high teens or low twenties. “Oh my gosh, I mean I hope that I’d run between 2:18 or 2:20 but I don’t even know what a minute means in the context of a marathon.”

Knight only ran one race in the 2019 indoor season and says he wasn’t in his ideal race shape through the winter. “My indoor season was what everyone saw, I was out of shape. I knew I wasn’t as fit as I would’ve like to be, but I still wanted to race and see where I was at relative to my fellow competitors. I wasn’t ready to run fast then, but I feel I’m in a completely different spot now.” Knight says he always races to win and that’s the mindset he has heading into the weekend.

Both runners are starting their 2019 outdoor seasons with the World Championships in mind. Neither Flanagan or Knight are certain of which distance they would ideally qualify at, but they know they’d like to be there.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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B.A.A. 5K

B.A.A. 5K

The B.A.A. 5K began in 2009, and became an instant hit among runners from far and wide. Viewed by many as the “calm before the storm,” the Sunday of Marathon weekend traditionally was for shopping, loading up on carbohydrates at the pasta dinner, and most importantly- resting. But now, runners of shorter distances, and even a few marathoners looking for...

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This year's Boston Marathon will be Beofra Butler's 100th marathon and her sixth Boston.

It all started when she was stationed in Virginia 12 years ago. That's when Chief Warrant Officer Beofra Butler saw everyone training for the Marine Corps Marathon and decided to give the marathon a try.

As a Soldier, running was already a part of her daily life and physical fitness routine. She had ran several other shorter races to include the Army 10-miler and a few half marathons, so the challenge of a full marathon appealed to her. She wasn't even afraid of the dreaded "wall" that everyone told her she would hit around mile 20 when her body would start shutting down as energy stores ran low and fatigue set in.

"I had never experienced the wall and was feeling pretty great," recalled Butler. "I saw the mile markers for mile 19, then mile 20, then 21. I was feeling good and thinking to myself that maybe I avoided the wall. Then at mile 22, everything from my waist down locked up -- it felt like I really did hit a wall. My muscles were in knots, my toes were cramping and every time I took a step it just hurt.

"A lady tapped her on the shoulder and encouraged her to move off to the side and stretch before resuming the race."I wanted to cry," she said. "I knew it was just four more miles. I wobbled to the finish along with a bunch of other people doing the exact same thing.

"After the race later that night, with ice bags on her legs and a computer on her lap, Butler signed up for her next marathon. "I just had to do it again for myself so I could figure out how to do it without pain," she said.Butler ran her second marathon during a deployment, followed by another and another and another.

She's preparing to run her 100th marathon in Boston on April 15. The race will be her sixth Boston Marathon and she says that it is fitting because it's her favorite event."There's something special about running in Boston," she said. "It's the only race you have to qualify for to get in and after working so hard to be a part of it, you really enjoy the moment when you get there.

The support of the crowd is amazing and it's just a great place to be."She got there by figuring out how to avoid that wall of pain."For the most part, I don't hit a wall anymore," Butler said. "Now I know what that feels like and I never want to feel it again.

"How does she do it? The way anyone in the Army does anything -- with an abbreviation. According to Butler, the key to running a successful marathon comes down to the 3P's: pacing, patience and practice. She says that you need to control your pace throughout the entire marathon and exercise patience as those around you start out fast or crowd the track.

To refine your pacing and patience, you need to practice."It comes down to having time on your feet," said Butler. "You have to put in the time and stay positive.

"Her time comes from running at least five days a week. She averages 10 miles a day with Saturdays being her long run day of anywhere from 13 to 20 miles. She does speed work on Wednesdays, often bringing others along with her to help them train to meet their goals. 

Butler says that running is wonderful because you can do it wherever you are and with no special equipment. For those aspiring to run in races of any distance, she said that it's important to find a training plan.

"Training is a part of learning yourself," she said. "It helps you become more comfortable when you're out there. You need to trust your training and just enjoy the moment." 

(04/09/2019) ⚡AMP
by Eve Meinhardt
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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