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Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com  Get your race featured and exposed.  Contact Manuel@mybestruns.com or call 650-209-7820

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Dathan Ritzenhein rans 1:01:24 half marathon in New Orleans as he gets ready to run Boston in April

Dathan Ritzenhein topped the field at the Humana Rock 'n' Roll New Orleans Half Marathon in a time of 1 hours, 1 minute and 24 seconds to edge out Emmanuel Bett.

“I surprised myself, actually,” he told The Advocate. “(Runner-up Bett Emmanuel) led nearly 13 miles, basically someone I could hang off about 5-10 seconds most of the time, and then the last mile I threw in a big kick.”

The rest of the top five were: Tyler McCandless (1:03:48), Kenneth Foster (1:08:50) and Tyler Alverson (1:11:51).

Ritzenhein, a three-time Olympian dogged by injuries most of 2018, last ran competitively in November when he was 12th at the USATF 5K championship in New York. 

The 36-year-old Ritzenhein was forced to pull out of last year's Boston Marathon about a week before with inflammation in his right leg. In 2015, he finished seventh and was the top American finisher in his Boston Marathon debut.

Last year, Ritzenhein also warmed up for Boston by finishing second in March at the New York Half Marathon.

The 2019 Boston Marathon is April 15.

(02/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Camp Gladiator will be a new partner for the 28th annual Austin Marathon

The Austin Marathon will celebrate its 28th year running in the capital of Texas in 2019. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 30+ countries around the world. Having start and finish locations in the heart of downtown Austin puts participants and spectators near all the action and within walking distance of restaurants, hotels, and shops. Finishing with the picturesque Texas State Capitol as your backdrop is icing on the cake for the perfect running weekend destination.

One of the largest privately owned event production companies in the United States, welcomes Camp Gladiator (CG) as a supporting partner of the 2019 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon presented by Under Armour®. CG will have an expo presence, lead the pre-race warm-up for participants, and energize athletes throughout the last mile at their hype station. Austin Marathon weekend takes place February 15th - 17th.

"Camp Gladiator is excited to support the 20,000+ participants of the 2019 Austin Marathon," said Ally Davidson, co-CEO and founder, Camp Gladiator. "Our trainers will encourage runners as they traverse the city and we're honored to support this iconic Austin event."

(02/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Austin Marathon Weekend

Austin Marathon Weekend

The 2020 Austin Marathon will celebrate its 30th year running in the capital of Texas. The premier running event in the City of Austin annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 20+ countries around the world. With a downtown finish and within proximity of many downtown hotels and restaurants, the Austin Marathon is the perfect running weekend destination. Come...

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Western States 100 course record holder Jim Walmsley makes Hong Kong debut

Hong Kong is in peak trail-running season, and one of the world’s champion runners, Jim Walmsley, has flown in for a series of events that will test his legendary speed and stamina.

Walmsley has set records for running across the Grand Canyon, smashed the Western States record, earned back to back titles as Ultrarunner of the Year, and is the world’s top ranked runner on ITRA. Despite this, he sets new goals tirelessly.

He is visiting Hong Kong primarily to compete in the Fast 50 Miles Ultra trail run: a gruelling 80km dash along a single trail from Route Twisk to Shing Mun and around the Shing Mun Reservoir, with about 2,500 meters of elevation.

(02/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Neisha J. Vélez dominated the eighth edition of the Divas Half Marathon

Vélez won the Divas Half Marathon clocking 1:39:28. Behind her came Yaritza González and Mikaela Chandler, with times of 1:40:46 and 1:42:56, respectively.

The 5K was won by Sheyla Rosado, who finished the distance in 25:12 minutes.

In the Half Marathon Relay, the DoGa Forever team was the first to cross the finish line with a time of 1:37:43.

"We are pleased to see the enthusiasm generated by the Divas Half Marathon among riders, spectators and sponsors. Seeing women who before did not imagine being able to finish a race participating year after year makes us proud, it is an intense event and a very challenging route ", explained Marilia Juarbe, organizer of the race in Puerto Rico.

The Divas Half Marathon & 5k Series is a series of races for women.

(02/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Divas Half Marathon

Divas Half Marathon

The Divas Running series is the most fun and glam women's running series in the nation. This series is all about girl power. Get glam at one of our races while enjoying a great run in some of the country's best vacation destinations: Long Island, NY, San Juan, PR, San Francisco Bay, CA, Temecula, CA, DC's Wine Country, VA,...

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Michael Wardian finished running ten marathons in ten days on Saturday at a 2:55 avg pace and then Sunday ran a 17:01 5k race! Wow!

Michael Wardian is one of a kind.  Most people would think that running seven marathons in seven days on seven continents would be enough.  It was not enough for Michael.  

On Saturday, Wardian set the pending world record for completing 10 marathons in 10 days, with a cumulative time of 29 hours, 12 minutes, and 46 seconds.

That is an average of 2:55:17 per marathon. And it’s more than 43 minutes faster than the previous record (29 hours, 54 minutes, and 56 seconds), set by Brit Rik Vercoe in 2013.

Before heading off to do the seven in seven in seven, he called a running friend.  “I’d like to add three more. I think I can break the record,’” Michael told Chris Farley, owner of Pacers Running stores. So Farley mapped out an eight-loop, USATF-certified marathon course around Hains Point and invited D.C.’s enthusiastic running community to watch history in the making.

Wardian crossed a makeshift finish line on Hains Point on Saturday afternoon, completing his 10th marathon in as many days, with a time of 2 hours, 44 minutes, and 33 seconds (averaging 6:16 per mile). It was his fastest race of the entire journey.

“I’ve been trying to think of how to put it in context so that people can understand how difficult this is,” said Farley.  “If you did a 30-mile week, that’s a strong week for most runners.  Michael did close to that distance every day for 10 days straight.  He ran more than 262 miles in the last 10 days. And he finished the last 5K of a marathon in under six-minute pace. That’s insane.”

Wardian did all of this on just 20 hours of sleep over the past 10 days. While most of that deprivation can be attributed to his rigorous travel to all seven continents, he slept in his own bed, at his home in Arlington the past three nights. Apparently, that isn’t enough to get a full night’s sleep.

“Too excited,” he explained after the race. “I’m just ready to go.”

This is perhaps what makes Wardian most impressive. He is absolutely relentless.

While elite marathoners tend to do one or two key races in a year, Wardian doesn't hit the brakes. In the distance running community, he’s well known for his punishing race schedule of ultramarathons and marathons.

To successfully tackle an odyssey like this, Wardian kept a rigorous training schedule, which included finishing the one of the most difficult 100-mile courses in the world—the HURT 100—just last month.

“The training for each event just builds on itself,” he explains. “I ran the HURT 100 back in January, which was 27 straight hours of running.”

But Wardian’s training was only part of the equation. There were plenty of other challenges he’d have to face, including hydration and nutrition, travel logistics, and weather.

“During the seven marathons in seven continents in seven days, the most challenging part was staying on top of my nutrition,” says Wardian. “You’re really at the mercy of where you are and what food is in front of you.”

“I just eat whatever my body will tolerate,” he adds, noting that he did get sick during his marathon in Santiago, Chile.

But with such a tight travel schedule, it was just a matter of pushing through the tough parts, get enough calories to fuel his next run. For a vegetarian like Wardian, this can be doubly challenging. 

The weather also threw some curveballs at Wardian. “The temperature fluctuations were tough,” he says. “One day might be cold, and the next is hot. While usually your body gets the chance to acclimate to those conditions, this time it was just go-go-go.”

The very next day after finishing 10 marathons in ten days,  Wardian didn't sleep in or take a day off from running. But instead, he competed in the Love The Run You're With 5K with his vizsla, Rosie, near his home. 

Wardian finished ninth overall in 17:01 (a 5:28 per mile pace). The one-of-a-kind runner can!

(02/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan`s Eliud Ngetich wins the 2019 men’s Mercedes Marathon clocking 2:18:12

Eliud Ngetich from Kenya crossed the finish line Sunday morning to win the 2019 men’s Mercedes full Marathon.

He finished with a time of 2:18:12, that’s a Mercedes Marathon record. Negetich is 25. The previous course record was 2:18:48.

Ruth Kimutai won the women’s marathon clocking 2:45:48.

The race featured the deepest pool of elite talent since the 2004 Olympic Trials that were held in Birmingham.

A handful of men and women are trying to qualify for the Olympic Trials, which will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, in 2020.

(02/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Mercedes-Benz Marathon

Mercedes-Benz Marathon

The race is a Boston Marathon qualifier and attracts racers from across the nation and around the world. The race was founded in 2003 as a fundraising effort for The Bell Center, a program for developmentally-challenged children. Celebrating 18 years, we're Alabama's premier running weekend! Bring the family and stretch out your legs on Saturday with our Regions Superhero 5K...

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Eric Kiptanui of Kenya and Ethiopia’s Roza Dereje take the crown in Barcelona Half-Marathon

Eric Kiptanui and Roza Dereje raced to victories at the Dreams Mitja Marato Barcelona,  road race, on Sunday.

While the 21-year-old Dereje was an overwhelming winner ahead of her fellow Ethiopian Dibabe Kuma in the women’s race, Kiptanui took the top spot over Ethiopia’s Abebe Degefa after a thrilling sprint in the men’s.

The women’s race had been billed as a serious attack on the world record by the rising star Dereje. She came up short, but still clocked 1:06:01 to clip a full minute from her previous lifetime best. The Ethiopian came within 16 seconds off the national record set by Senbere Teferi in Ras Al Khaimah.

Paced throughout by her fellow Ethiopian Fekele Darsema, Dereje’s early rhythm proved too slow for the record assault, with the opening five kilometres covered in 15:37, some 15 seconds behind world record pace. By then only Kuma and Kenyan Lucy Cheruiyot remained with Dereje, with Kenya’s Sally Chepyego another 12 seconds back and her compatriot Celestine Chepchirchir a distant fifth, 48 seconds behind the leaders.

The following five kilometres section was covered slightly faster, with the leaders reaching the 10-kilometre point in 31:10 with Dereje at the front and Kuma, last year’s runner-up, tucked in behind. Chepyego travelled 24 seconds adrift.

Dereje found the required world-record pace (3:04/3:05/km) over the following kilometres to pass 15 kilometres in 46:51. Kuma couldn’t respond to that turn of speed, dropping some 30 metres behind with Chepyego now 1:16 behind Dereje.

Another 15:52 five kilometres split led the leader through 20 kilometres in 1:02:43, keeping prospects alive for a sub-1:06 performance. Dereje stepped up the pace in the waning stages but nonetheless just missed the barrier, clocking 1:06:01.

(02/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Barcelona Half Marathon

Barcelona Half Marathon

The half-marathon in Barcelona, also known as the Mitja Marató de Barcelona. It’s the second largest running event in Barcelona next to the Marathon. The route takes the runners from the Arc de Triomf, by the old town to the Plaça Catalunya. From there it goes down the famous Ramblas and along Avenida del Paral·lel. Then it goes through the...

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Jakob Ingebrigtsen broke the world U20 indoor 1500m record, clocking 3:36.21 at the Nordenkampen Indoor Match in Baerum, Norway

Jakob Ingebrigtsen closed his 2018 season by creating history with an unprecedented third successive U20 title at the SPAR European Cross Country Championships in Tilburg and he opened his 2019 account with yet another record-breaking performance.

Fresh from a month-long training stint at altitude in Dullstroom in South Africa, Ingebrigtsen won maximum points for Norway at the Nordenkampen on home soil in Baerum on Sunday (Feb 10), comfortably winning the 1500m in 3:36.21 against Sweden, Finland and a combined team from Denmark and Iceland.

Not only was his time a European lead with the Glasgow 2019 European Indoor Athletics Championships three weeks away, Ingebrigtsen also smashed his European indoor U20 record of 3:40.96 and older brother Henrik’s four year old national indoor record of 3:39.70.

Jakob’s time was also the second fastest ever by a junior indoors after world indoor champion Samuel Tefera from Ethiopia clocked 3:36.05 last year. This time could be a target for Jakob when he lines up at the PSD Bank Meeting in Dusseldorf on February 20.

Filip Ingebrigtsen was also in action yesterday and the recently crowned European cross country champion won the men’s 3000m in 7:49.73. All three Ingebrigtsens are targeting the European Indoor Championships but their racing schedules still haven’t been finalised.

There was another national record in the women’s 3000m as Karoline Bjerkeli Grovdal broke one of the longest standing marks on the books. Grovdal clocked a solo 8:44.68 to better Ingrid Kristiansen’s previous mark of 8:50.26 which had stood since 1985 - the year in which Kristiansen also set a world marathon record of 2:21:06.

(02/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Is there a time when an indoor track event should be stopped to help a fallen runner like Komey Campbell?

Is there a situation when a race on an indoor track should be stopped when a medical emergency happens to one of the runners?  

If something happens to a football player on the field, the game is stopped so full attention can be given to the fallen player.  There seems to be a protocol in place for such situations.  

If there is a medical situation at a road race, 911 is called and a medical team is there on the spot normally within minutes.  There is normally plenty of space on the road so the race does continue and the fallen runner is given full attention by the medical team.

Indoor track is a different situation.  The space is more cramped and unlike a road race, runners are passing the same spot every 29 to 35 seconds or so.  Being on an indoor track is like being on a busy freeway compared to being on a country road. 

On Saturday Feb 9 at the Millrose Games in New York City the pacer, Kemoy Campbell for the men’s 3000 went down early in the race.  

Larry Allen who was watching from the stands describe the scene.  “The 3000m pacer, a Jamaican 2016 Olympian at 5k went down very suddenly right past the apex of the first turn after about 1000m and landed just off the track surface on the infield. He was clearly unconscious when he landed,” wrote Larry in a text. 

“He was down for 23 minutes (by news reports) and never moved a muscle. It took at least 2-3 minutes before anyone administered any medical help and then according to my Doctor friend, watching the meet with me, the mouth to mouth resuscitation efforts aren’t the current protocol. 

“CPR was crucial and it was a couple of more minutes before it was administered and according to my friend (in real time) the only thing that could’ve really helped was a portable defibrillator and I learned that it must be administered within 5 minutes in order to assure oxygen supply to the brain is maintained.  

“It was 7-10 minutes before he was shocked. There were a series of different people that attempted to resuscitate him by cpr (& mouth to mouth) before (and after) his heart was shocked. 

“There is a major hospital (Columbia Presbyterian) right outside the armory on that side and it is ultimately where he was taken. News reports today indicate that he is in the ICU in a medically induced coma. 

“It was traumatizing to witness up close.  My friend wanted to climb down from the balcony to try and help but there was no real way for him to get down and the back up over the banked track and fence along the top.  He was and is tormented by his inability to be in a place to offer help,” Larry concluded. 

This article is not meant to bring blame to anyone or any organization.  In all the years I have been following track I can not recall a similar situation. I am sure no one would have ever dreamed that something like this would ever happen.  

This was a well conditioned athelete and a runner qualified to pace such an elite field.  It should not have happen but it did.

The scene was very distributing for all of us there Saturday afternoon at the Games.  In my thinking it just makes the performances after the event even more amazing.  It is hard to imagine that Yomif could have 100% blocked out the traumatic scene that had just unfolded.  But maybe since he does not speak English he did.  In any case he almost set a new world record for the mile just 20 or so minutes after Campbell was removed from the stadium.  It was an amazing race to witness up close and personal right at the finish line however there still was somewhat of a fog hanging inside the arena. 

There is a question that should be addressed.  Should the 3000m race have been stopped so full attention could have been given to the down runner?  As it was, runners kept flying past him for several critical minutes making it more challenging for medical personnel and equipment to be at his side.

We hope that Kemoy Campbell will be able to have a full recovery.  Our hearts go out to him and his family. 

(02/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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I used to dislike hills so much - Michael Anderson on Running File 5

I remember my first marathon (Big Sur) and the days before driving the course. It is a very hilly point to point course on hwy one in Northern California.

Flash forward I did finish in just over 4 hrs.  They have one hill called "hurricane hill" at the 13 mile mark, I remember getting to the top and saying "efff this, never again will hills be a challenge.”

After this race I realized how important hill training is to a training schedule. No matter what you cannot escape hills, they are all around me in my home town.  

I can hate them or learn to love them. I decided to love them and take them as mini accomplishments that need to be conquered. You grind it to the top and then look out over the views, it is very rewarding. I go heavy on hills on all my courses as most trail races are all about getting verticals it’s inevitable.

Hills and loving them!

I find the biggest hills near my house and run them regularly.   You might not think it is helping you because it seems slow but you need to run hills to handle them.  Just do them!  But don’t run hills more than twice weekly and put a day or two in between. 

I love to put my head down and take it one step at a time, sometimes if it’s a new hill I walk very steep sections and then know what the hard parts are and I can be better prepared on my next time up.

Take it as it comes and never say never.  The more you run hills the easier they will become. 

Michael Anderson on Running is a regular My Best Runs column. 

(02/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Michael Anderson
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Big Sur Marathon

Big Sur Marathon

The Big Sur Marathon follows the most beautiful coastline in the world and, for runners, one of the most challenging. The athletes who participate may draw inspiration from the spectacular views, but it takes major discipline to conquer the hills of Highway One on the way to the finish line. Named "Best Marathon in North America" by The Ultimate Guide...

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Suzy Seeley didn’t think she would ever run one marathon, let alone 256 of them

In 1994 Seeley was having lunch with her son in his elementary school, and happened to be wearing workout clothing. One of her son’s teachers saw her outfit and asked if she was going to sign up for the upcoming Houston Marathon.

“I wasn’t really a runner though, and I didn’t enjoy it,” Seeley said.

It turns out that she did enjoy running long distances though. She ran in the Houston Marathon, and she says she was hooked after that. She has now run the Houston marathon 25 times. 

Since then, she has run in a marathon in all 50 states, as well as on all of the continents, including Antarctica twice.

“Running is amazing. It’s been a huge blessing in my life,” Seeley said.

Running has even helped her get over her fear of flying. The first 100 or so marathons were all close by, and then she gradually started taking short flights. Once she got to 30 states, she figured that she might as well finish them all.

The same thing happened with the runs on each continent. A running friend had wanted to do Antarctica, and Seeley was hesitant at first, but she did it. That trip also included a run in South America, so she figured she should do the rest of the continents after that.

When asked if she had a favorite marathon, she said, “That is the hardest question ever.”

She did manage to list a few though, saying that she loved the World Marathon Majors, Boston Marathon, Houston Marathon, because it is in her backyard, and the Austin Marathon.

(02/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Chevron Houston Marathon

Chevron Houston Marathon

The Chevron Houston Marathon offers participants a unique running experience in America's fourth largest city. The fast, flat, scenic single-loop course has been ranked as the "fastest winter marathon" and "second fastest marathon overall" by Ultimate Guide To Marathons. Additionally, with more than 200,000 spectators annually, the Chevron Houston Marathon enjoys tremendous crowd support. Established in 1972, the Houston Marathon...

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Maine Woman with MS is running the grand slam of Ultra Running - Marathon Man Gary Allen File 4

Melissa Ossanna, of Bar Harbor, Maine, has big plans for 2019.  Not only will she be turning 50, she has registered for the “Grand Slam of Ultrarunning” (fondly called ‘The Slam’ by those who participate).  This involves running four of the fiveoldest 100-mile footraces in the US, scheduled from June through September. 

This is a laudable and often daunting goal for every runner who attempts it, but Ossanna has another challenge, she has Multiple Sclerosis.  She was diagnosed with the condition in her mid-20’s and struggled quite a bit with temporary blindness, weakness and numbness in her limbs, and severe fatigue, among other issues.  

In 2009, she was unable to stay awake all day at work and was forced to go on intermittent disability.   She thought this might be the beginning of the end of her ability to earn a living, and most importantly, to be able to stay active with her husband and young son. 

Ultimately, she learned that the fatigue was a result of MS-related sleep apnea, which is treatable.   As she started to sleep better, she got some energy back, and was able to return to work full time.  She also decided to take the advice of her neurologist and use this bit of extra vigor to start exercising.  For years, she had been too tired to even consider adding an exercise program to her schedule.  

Where many people would start with a couch to 5K program, an introduction to fitness at the YMCA or something else reasonable, Ossanna happened into town the day before the Mount Desert Island marathon in 2011, had a moment of regret that she wasn’t a marathon runner, and then decided she would become one.  She registered for the MDI marathon 2012 before she even owned running shoes.  

The year of training was a long one, starting with not even beingable to run 0.8 miles (the length of the road she lived on).  However, once marathon day arrived in October 2012, Ossanna was ready and had learned to love running.  

That one marathon led to another, which then led to a 50K, then a trail 50K, then a 50-mile trail race, and then a 100-mile race.    Ever since she started running, Ossanna has not had any notable MS exacerbations.  She attributes her continued health to her running habit, and she never plans to slow down if she can help it.

With her decision to run the Grand Slam this year, Ossanna decided she wanted to raise money for a charity that meant something to her.  She had raised money for the National MS Society in the past, and had considered doing that again, until she ran the Vermont 100 in 2018 and became familiar with Vermont Adaptive.  Vermont Adaptive helps people with disabilities get outside and do active things.  

Becoming active in the outdoors gave Ossanna her life back, and has prevented any permanent disability for her, and she wants to help others to “get outside and play”, regardless of any challenges they face.  

If you want to support Melissa and Vermont Adaptive click on the link.

Top photo: Melissa at the Javelina Jundred 100 miler in AZ

(Marathon Man Gary Allen is an exclusive My Best Runs column.  Gary is one of only a few who have run a sub three hour marathon over five decades and hopes to make it six soon.) 

(02/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gary Allen
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Yomif Kejelcha misses the world record for the indoor mile by one hundredth of a second

The 112th Millrose Game’s featured event was the NYRR Men’s Wanamaker Mile.  Yomif Kejelcha fell 0.008 seconds short of the indoor mile record, winning the Wanamaker Mile in 3 minutes, 48.46 seconds. 

Yomif was ready to run the first sub 3:48 indoor mile and he almost did it.  He ran even pace with his slowest 200m being 29.21 before running his final one in 28.33.  He was all alone the last few laps breaking the tape in 3:48.46.

The world Record is 3:48.45.  Kenya’s Edward Cheserek placed a distant second clocking 3:53:29 just ahead of USA’s Clayton Murphy 3:53:30.  Both Yomif and Clayton are part of the NIKE Oregon Project.  

But this was not the only outstanding performance of the afternoon.  Germany’s Konstanze Klosterhalfen ran an outstanding 4:19.98 in the women’s Wanamaker mile.  USA’s Colleen Quigley placed second in 4:22.86.

Donavan Brazier wanted Johnny’s Gray’s indoor 800 American record of 1:45.00 set March 8, 1992.  He got it today as he clocked 1:44.41.  

There was over six hours of exciting races with many PR’s and meet records.   

(02/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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Nikki Han is the first woman to break 298km ultramarathon and she never thought about stopping

Nikki Han reached the end of the 298-kilometre Hong Kong Four Trails Ultra Challenge (HK4TUC) in 58 hours and 20 minutes on Friday night, becoming the first ever female “finisher”.

“I felt so good the whole way,” she said. “It isn’t a race. You don’t care about the people in front of you, you don’t care about the people behind you. You just run.”

The HK4TUC links all four of Hong Kong’s major trails – the MacLehose, Wilson, Hong Kong and Lantau Trails. There are no checkpoints or support allowed, but runners have help travelling between the trails. If you reach the end, marked by the postbox in Mui Wo on Lantau Island, in under 60 hours, you are a “finisher”. If you reach the end in under 75 hours, you are a “survivor”.

“I thought I could finish on the ferry over [to Lantau],” said Han, who lives in Discovery Bay. “I’ve done the LT70 before in 11 hours and I thought I could do it, even on tired legs. I pushed a little bit harder.”

Han took advice from Will Hayward, who was a survivor last year, and made sure she brushed her teeth throughout the run. “It just makes you feel so good and so much better,” she said.

Han said she did battle the urge to sleep at the start of the Wilson Trail. “But I never thought about stopping. It was awesome actually. Brutal, but awesome,” she said.

 

(02/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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Emily Lipari is set to race in NYRR women's Wanamaker Mile at Millrose Games

Emily Lipari isn’t intimidated by the bright lights of the Millrose Games. At this point, competing at the annual local jewel of the indoor track season is somewhat of a tradition. The former Roslyn High School standout has fond memories of running in high school events back when the meet was held at Madison Square Garden. Even last year, with the games fully staged at its current home — The Armory in Manhattan — Lipari competed in the 3,000 meters and placed ninth. But, this year, Lipari will step onto the track when the lights are brightest and the stakes are highest.

The 26-year-old, who now lives in Seattle, will return home to run in the NYRR women’s Wanamaker Mile at the 112th running of the games Saturday. The draw puts Lipari right in the center of the marquee women’s event of the meet.

“I was here 10 years ago and here I am still running, but at a different level,” Lipari said. “It’s a pretty special thing, because you have this amazing facility and this really nicely run meet that’s basically in my backyard.”

The Wanamaker Mile isn’t part of the vast preshow event that consists of high school, youth, and masters races. No, the Wanamaker Mile is the show.

“I had gotten into Wanamaker my first year out of school, but I decided not to do it because I wasn’t ready for the pace it was going to be going through at,” said Lipari, who graduated from Villanova in 2014. “But now, after four years of post-collegiate running under my belt, I finally feel ready for the type of field it’s going to be. I’m really excited.”

Lipari, whose personal best mile time is 4:31.68, according to the Millrose Games website, has no intention of being window dressing. The field is a good one, with defending champion Colleen Quigley and last year’s runner-up Kate Grace returning to replay a battle that went straight to the tape. But Lipari, ever the competitor, expects to be right in the mix.

“When you get into these big races, you don’t just want to be a participant there,” she said. “Everybody there is working hard and putting their heart and soul into the sport. I’m going in there with the hope of being top three. I don’t worry about the time too much because if you race well and place well, the time will come on its own.”

Lipari, a professional runner with an adidas sponsorship, competes for the Mission Athletic Club, based in San Diego.

(02/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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NYRR Millrose Games

NYRR Millrose Games

The NYRR Millrose Games,which began in 1908 as a small event sponsored by a local track club, has grown to become the most prestigious indoor track and field event in the United States. The NYRR Millrose Games meet is held in Manhattan’s Washington Heights at the New Balance Track & Field Center at the Armony, which boasts a state-of-the-art six-lane,...

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Edward Cheserek is a 17-time NCAA champion who struggles to obtain American citizenship

Edward Cheserek of Kenya is one of the most decorated track and field athlete in NCAA history, winning 17 national titles. The 5,000m runner competed for the University of Oregon on a student visa, but has not been able to obtain a green card since graduating in 2017, as he reportedly hasn’t proved himself against professional runners.

The New York Times reports that Cheserek is looking to obtain American citizenship. But until he obtains a green card The Times says that, “the clock cannot start ticking on the five years he has to wait before he can apply for United States citizenship. An act of Congress, could expedite that process, but not much else.”

Cheserek obtained a P1 visa in January of 2018 which allowed him to continue training in Flagstaff, Arizona for one year. His application to extend that visa is still under review. 

The runner will compete in the Wanamaker Mile on Saturday at the Millrose Games in New York City.

(02/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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NYRR Millrose Games

NYRR Millrose Games

The NYRR Millrose Games,which began in 1908 as a small event sponsored by a local track club, has grown to become the most prestigious indoor track and field event in the United States. The NYRR Millrose Games meet is held in Manhattan’s Washington Heights at the New Balance Track & Field Center at the Armony, which boasts a state-of-the-art six-lane,...

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Strong British field is set for The Vitality Big Half

Dewi Griffiths, Andy Vernon, Charlotte Purdue and Lily Patridge are among the runners joining Mo Farah in London next month.

A strong British field has bee named for The Vitality Big Half on Sunday, March 10, while two former winners of the London Marathon, Wilson Kipsang and Daniel Wanjiru, are also confirmed.

Mo Farah was previously announced for the second edition of the half marathon and among those joining him in the UK capital are Dewi Griffiths, Andy Vernon, Jonny Mellor, Charlotte Purdue, Lily Patridge and Steph Twell.

The race will once again double up as the British Half Marathon Championships and the strong domestic field should see competitive racing for the podium places.

Griffiths, who most recently ran 61:44 to finish eighth at the Chevron Houston Half Marathon last month, is among those who also have their eyes on the London Marathon in April.

Vernon and Mellor are also set to race at the London Marathon along with Irish international Mick Clohisey.

Tracy Barlow, Gemma Steel, Hayley Carruthers and Sonia Samuels are also confirmed to take part meaning the seven fastest British women over the half marathon distance in 2018 will all be toeing the start line on March 10.

Eight-time London Marathon champion David Weir leads the entries in the men’s wheelchair race while three-time Paralympic medallist Shelly Woods will be aiming for victory in the women’s wheelchair race while Derek Rae will compete in the ambulant category.

(02/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Vitality Big Half

The Vitality Big Half

Created by London Marathon Events Ltd, in partnership with Sported,The Vitality Big Half is a community running festival, taking place in London on Sunday 10 March 2019. This one-day event offers a host of running distances, from a challenging half marathon to a free one-mile course, as well as a family-friendly festival of food, music and activities. What’s happening? Take...

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Switzerland’s Julien Wanders made history this morning by setting a European record of 59:13 at the 2019 RAK Half Marathon

After Switzerland’s Julien Wanders made history this morning by setting a European record of 59:13 at the 2019 RAK Half Marathon, becoming the fastest non-African-born runner ever in the process. 

Swiss 22-year-old runs 59:13 to break Mo Farah’s mark as Stephen Kiprop and Senbere Teferi storm to success

Julien Wanders smashed Mo Farah’s European record, while Stephen Kiprop and Senbere Teferi secured thrilling sprint finish victories at another fast and exciting edition of the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon on Friday.

In an historic event which saw a total of 11 athletes break 60:00 – the most ever in a single race – Wanders clocked 59:13 to improve the 59:32 continental mark set by Britain’s 10-time global track champion Farah in Lisbon in 2015.

Such was the standard, that time only saw the Swiss 22-year-old finish fourth as Kenya’s 19-year-old Kiprop stormed to success, running a PB of 58:42 to deny Ethiopia’s Abadi Hadis in the closing stages.

 

(02/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Rak Half Marathon

Rak Half Marathon

The Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon is the 'world's fastest half marathon' because if you take the top 10 fastest times recorded in RAK for men (and the same for women) and find the average (for each) and then do the same with the top ten fastest recorded times across all races (you can reference the IAAF for this), the...

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The NYRR Millrose Games will always have its Irish air

Even if the list of competitors is not chock-a-block with Irish names there will always be an Irish air about the Millrose Games which are set for Saturday, February 9 at the Armory in Washington Heights, Manhattan.

For one thing the Meet Director this year, as he has been for a number of years now, is legendary Irish middle distance runner and Longford native, Ray Flynn.

“This is the 112th Millrose Games and the eighth Millrose meet at the Armory. It’s a big deal,” Flynn says.

A big deal indeed.

“And if there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s that the Armory is an incredible venue, especially for the kids,” Flynn said.

The New York Road Runners Millrose Games did indeed move, in 2012, from the much larger Madison Square Garden to the cozier confines of the uptown Armory.

The effect, however, was a positive in that the Armory is filled to the rafters with 5,000 cheering track and field fans. 400 extra seats have been squeezed in for Saturday’s meet.

One of those cheering will be, of course, Eamonn Coghlan, the “Chairman of the Boards.”

Coghlan and Flynn are but two Irish middle distance veterans who remind track fans of a golden era in Irish middle distance running, that being the 1980s.

Coghlan is the holder of seven Wanamaker Mile titles and holds, among many other titles and laurels, a World 5000 Meter championship gold medal.

Ray Flynn has 89 sub 4-minute miles under his belt and is both the Irish Mile Record holder (3:49.77) and Irish 1,500m Record holder (3:33.5). Both records were broken in the same race in 1982 in Oslo in the Bislett Games Dream Mile.

Flynn, was an All-American in track and field and cross country at East Tennessee State, where his team in 1975 captured the NCAA Track and Field Championship.

Now 62, Flynn currently works as an agent for track and field athletes and is based in Johnson City, Tennessee.

Millrose is unique in that Olympians, as well as other elite professional, college, high school and youth track and field competitors, line up for the various events.

This year, two lucky Sligo kids will get to rub shoulders with some of the best athletes in the world by racing in the “Fastest Kid on the Block” competition.

Alice Belo and Shane Haran will be representing their county and Ireland.

In Sligo, the Fastest Feet program is being used every year to introduce kids to sport, specifically athletics. The man backing the program is Galway’s Richard Donovan who is also behind the World Marathon Challenge, the North Pole Marathon, the Volcano Marathon and other epic global sporting events.

The Armory being indoors, Alice and Shane need not worry about a return of the Polar Vortex.

No fewer than 32 Olympians are included in this year’s Millrose roster. There are Irish names evident, but they belong to athletes from the U.S., Canada, Australia and indeed Antigua & Barbuda.

(02/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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NYRR Millrose Games

NYRR Millrose Games

The NYRR Millrose Games,which began in 1908 as a small event sponsored by a local track club, has grown to become the most prestigious indoor track and field event in the United States. The NYRR Millrose Games meet is held in Manhattan’s Washington Heights at the New Balance Track & Field Center at the Armony, which boasts a state-of-the-art six-lane,...

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Marine Corps Marathon introduces the MCM50K

The Marine Corps Marathon Organization (MCMO) introduces the MCM50K and enters into the realm of ultras for the first time in the event’s 44 year history. The 50-kilometer run will take place on the same day as the Marine Corps Marathon (MCM), Oct. 27.

This new event diversifies the MCM Weekend experience with more distance options to #RunWithTheMarines. This new distance joins the 10K and 26.2-miles for individuals to run with purpose and finish with pride.

The MCM50K is a fantastic urban ultra that showcases the nation’s capital and Arlington, VA with all of the same on-course amenities as the MCM. This new event appeals to first-time ultra runners with the draw of a paved course and offers seasoned ultra runners a new perspective and patriotic run.

Starting on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. and including portions of the MCM10K course, the MCM50K merges with the MCM course and follows the field of MCM participants. Runners must maintain an 11:30 minute pace-per-mile through mile 14 on Rock Creek Parkway. For the remaining 17 miles, MCM50K participants may run at a 14 minute pace-per-mile. Ultimately, the MCM50K will arrive at a joint finish at the iconic U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, VA.

(02/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marine Corps Marathon

Marine Corps Marathon

Recognized for impeccable organization on a scenic course managed by the US Marines in Arlington, VA and the nation's capital, the Marine Corps Marathon is one of the largest marathons in the US and the world. Known as 'the best marathon for beginners,' the MCM is largest marathon in the world that doesn't offer prize money, earning its nickname, “The...

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The Rak Half Marathon was amazingly fast as 11 men clocked times under an hour

Kenya's 19-year-old Stephen Kiprop won the Ras Al Khaimah (RAK) half marathon on Friday in a course record-equalling 58 minutes and 42 seconds, the fastest time ever recorded by a teenager.

Ethiopians Abadi Hadis and Fikadu Haftu completed the podium and Switzerland's Julien Wanders was fourth in a time of 59:13, a Swiss national record.  This also beats Mo Farah’s European record of 59:32. 

Hadis led Kiprop until the final 50 meters of the race before the young Kenyan powered past him to finish two seconds ahead.  

The race lived up to its billing of being the world's fastest half marathon as 11 men finished inside an hour, the first time it has happened in half-marathon history.  Five women finished under 1:06:30 which makes RAK the fastest women’s race ever too.

Kenya’s Stephen Kiprop continued where he left off last year by winning the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon on Friday Feb 8 in an equal course record of 58:42, moving to joint sixth on the world all-time list. In a close women’s race, Senbere Teferi won in 1:05:45, the fastest debut half marathon time in history, with just one second separating the top three finishers.

The men’s field got off to a steady start with a large lead group passing through five kilometres in 14:13 and 10 kilometres in 28:10. 15 men were still in the front pack at that stage, all operating well within the required schedule for a sub-60-minute finish.

The pace continued to increase, though, and by 15 kilometres – reached in 41:48 – Kiprop and Ethiopia’s Abadi Hadis had broken away from the rest of the pack. Ethiopia’s Fikadu Haftu, Switzerland’s Julien Wanders and Kenya’s Morris Gachanga formed a chase trio about eight seconds adrift of the leaders.

Hadis and Kiprop gradually increased their lead in the closing stages. After passing 20 kilometres in 55:46, it became clear they could challenge Bedan Karoki’s course record of 58:42 set last year. Haftu and Wanders, meanwhile, had dropped Gachanga by this point and were 17 seconds behind the lead duo with a larger chasing pack not too far behind.

Kiprop, still just 19 years of age, proved to have the stronger finish and outkicked Hadis to win in 58:42, the fastest time in history by a teenager. It was another big step forward for Kiprop, who first broke through last year when winning the Venloop Half Marathon in 59:44 on his debut at the distance. He went on to win the Usti Nad Labem Half Marathon in 59:41 and reduced his PB to 59:21 when finishing fifth in Valencia.

In the women's race, Ethiopia's Senbere Teferi won in 1:05:45, ahead of compatriots Netsanet Gudeta and Zeineba Yimer, with only one second separating all three runners.

Teferi also set a record for the fastest debut time in a half marathon.

There were 2423 men finishers and 755 women.  

(02/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Rak Half Marathon

Rak Half Marathon

The Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon is the 'world's fastest half marathon' because if you take the top 10 fastest times recorded in RAK for men (and the same for women) and find the average (for each) and then do the same with the top ten fastest recorded times across all races (you can reference the IAAF for this), the...

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Julien Wanders from Switzerland, has set his sights to achieve new world records

The Swiss 22-year-old races Friday’s Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon and has Mo Farah’s 59:32 in his sights

“We don’t set any limits,” says Switzerland’s Julien Wanders when asked about his training set-up in Kenya. “I have a great group around me, they push me further. The mentality of the team is very nice.”

That no-limits mindset, together with lots of hard work under the guidance of his long-time coach Marco Jäger, seems to be serving the 22-year-old very well and is the reason he’s not ruling out the possibility of achieving an impressive fourth European record-breaking performance in 12 months in Ras Al Khaimah on Friday.

Since setting a European under-23 half-marathon record of 60:09 in Barcelona last February, Wanders has gone on to break and then improve the outright European 10km marks – first with 27:32 in Durban in October and then 27:25 in Paris on December 30.

Now he is getting ready to form part of another stacked field for the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon, where a total of 13 sub-60:00 athletes will toe the start line. Wanders has Mo Farah’s 59:32 continental mark, set in Lisbon in 2015, in his sights and says he feels in even better shape than he did in Paris just over five weeks ago.

“Yes, it is possible,” he says when asked about the possibility of breaking the European record during his trip to the northernmost emirate of the United Arab Emirates.

“We don’t know about the weather so if it’s good weather I think it is really possible but I am not obsessed with it – I want to go and try to win the race, that is my main goal.

“I never put a time in my mind. I have something (times in his head) that I don’t want and something that would be my dream and also I want to go for a good position.”

Is sub-59:30 the dream?

“Maybe my dream is further!” he smiles. “Who knows!

“Since Paris I have trained very well and I haven’t had any problems. I think I am in better shape than in Paris so I am looking forward to racing on Friday.”

On being part of such a strong field, Wanders adds: “It is very motivating. I am very happy that they invited me here. I am number 17 in the start list! So I don’t have a lot of pressure, I just want to enjoy being with these guys and trying to beat them.”

(02/07/2019) ⚡AMP
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Rak Half Marathon

Rak Half Marathon

The Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon is the 'world's fastest half marathon' because if you take the top 10 fastest times recorded in RAK for men (and the same for women) and find the average (for each) and then do the same with the top ten fastest recorded times across all races (you can reference the IAAF for this), the...

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British runner Susannah Gill has won the women’s title at the World Marathon Challenge after completing seven marathons in seven days, battling diverse conditions across seven continents

Gill finished a grueling 295-kilometer (183 miles) challenge in a world record time of 24 hours, 19 minutes and nine seconds, burning up to 5,000 calories a day.

The 34-year-old, who started the remarkable journey with the first round in Antarctica on Jan. 31, ran the final race in Miami on Wednesday in 3:26:24.

“It was a crazy ambition that I wanted to do. The challenge seemed absolutely irresistible to me,” Gill told BBC.

“Ten years ago, I just wanted to get fit and run the London Marathon. Now, marathon running has literally taken me around the world.”

American Mike Wardian claimed the men’s title with a total time of 20:49:30 for seven races.

Competitors gathered for the event in Cape Town on Jan. 29 before traveling to Nova, Antarctica for the first round, where Gill finished second in temperatures as low as -35 degrees Celsius.

Gill won the next race in Cape Town before battling Australian summer temperatures of around 35 degrees Celsius in Perth to extend her winning run.

Four more victories in Dubai, Madrid, Santiago and Miami capped an incredible week for Gill in which she also spent more than 63 hours flying over 88,500km across the globe.

(02/07/2019) ⚡AMP
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World Marathon Challenge

World Marathon Challenge

The World Marathon Challenge ® is a logistical and physical challenge to run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days. Competitors must run the standard 42.2 km marathon distance in Antarctica, Africa, Australia, Asia, Europe, South America and North America within 168 hours, or seven days. The clock starts when the first marathon begins in Antarctica. ...

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Marathoner runner Sylvia Kibet from Kenya, opens a second petrol station

Former world 5,000m silver medallist Sylvia Kibet on Tuesday launched another investment, Belio Highway petrol station along Eldoret-Iten Highway.

This is the second petrol station after the first one, which is in Iten town was branded National Oil.

The athlete, together with her husband, Erastus Limo said they decided to invest their money with retirement looming.

“We decided to open another investment in Iten because I’m almost retiring and this will be our income apart from the one in Iten town. We have been building the petrol station slowly and I’m happy we have finally opened it for business,” Kibet told Nation Sport.

She urged the athletes, who are still active, to always invest their money for future days.

“When my husband got a persistent injury, he decided to concentrate on the first petrol station and it was good we had already invested. That is why I would like to urge the upcoming athletes to always think ahead and use the money they win wisely,” added Kibet.

Kibet is also the 2008 Olympics 5,000m bronze medallist and 2010 Commonwealth Games silver medallist.

She has since shifted to marathon races and is optimistic of a good season.

“I have shifted to the road races and marathon but so far I have not done well in the races. I’m also still fresh from maternity leave and I hope in the remaining years before I retire, I will conquer the world,” added Kibet.

(02/07/2019) ⚡AMP
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Michael Wardian wins the World Marathon Challenge777 for the second time

Just like that the World Marathon Challenge777 is over. I finished day 7-Miami in 2:53:04-1st overall and an average time under 3 hours for the seven marathons on seven continents over seven days. Today I even ran a negative split.

I can’t even begin to explain how lucky I feel to have had this experience. Thanks to everyone at the WMC, the other athletes, crew, & all the family & friends that cheered us on. It is so incredible to watch everyone grow and discover what they are capable of.

Also huge thanks to the security person in Santiago that found my passport. That would have made things difficult. 

(Editors note: Michael Wardian wins again.  He didn’t break his world record he set in 2017 but averaging again under three hours is amazing.  And he is planning on doing three more marathons in DC over the next three days.  He will also be logging in his miles into RTW4 starting March 1.)

(02/07/2019) ⚡AMP
by Michael Wardian
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World Marathon Challenge

World Marathon Challenge

The World Marathon Challenge ® is a logistical and physical challenge to run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days. Competitors must run the standard 42.2 km marathon distance in Antarctica, Africa, Australia, Asia, Europe, South America and North America within 168 hours, or seven days. The clock starts when the first marathon begins in Antarctica. ...

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The Run The World Challenge will motivate you to run more miles...RTW4 starts March 1 with an exciting new format

The Run The World Global Challenge (RTW) is a world-wide celebration of running.  Lifetime runner, Runner's World magazine and My Best Runs founder, Bob Anderson (71) created the event to help further spread the word about the benefits of running. The first RTW Challenge started July 4.  

On March 1 the RTW4 Challenge will start with some changes to make the event even more fun and challenging. 

"Since I started running in 1962 I have been telling people about the sport I love," says Bob Anderson  "I am proud to say I have reached a lot of people but the task is never done.  Run The World is my current project and the feedback from around the world has been very positive."  

Lize Dumon from South Africa posted this on the Run The World Feed January 5. "Possibly my last run for RTW3.  Might do a small one to bring me close enough to 200 miles. Been a priviledge to be a part of all three Run The World Challenges.  I have made loads of friends and learned a lot."  Lize is putting together two South African 14 people teams for RTW4.

Already 260 Run The World runners have run and logged 85,876 miles (as of Feb 5, 2019) since July 4th in 56 different countries. In the little country of Palau alone, teams there have already run and logged 5,648 miles (photo 2 of some of the Palau RTW1 team headed up by Aaron Salvador).  Aaron is putting together two teams of 14 for RTW4.

"Run The World Challenge is a great motivator," says Bob.  "I was running 20 miles a week before Run The World. I now have been averaging 32 miles weekly and I am much better shape because of it.  There are many such stories among the 260 runners who have already participated."  

The first team that started July 4 finished in 36 days 23 hours and 13 minutes (the current world record). Two other teams starting August 29 and October 29 also completed the goal of circling the world.

How does it work? Participants run or walk and then log in those miles (k’s) on their free My Best Runs (MBR) account. The goal is for the team (now group of teams) to log enough miles (k's) to circle the world within 30 days.

The process of running/walking and then logging in miles (k's), making a comment (optional) and posting a photo (optional) is the basic program.  A team member logs into their My Best Runs account to log in the miles they run or walk.

One major change is RTW4 will end 30 days after starting.  "It is hoped one of our three groups of teams will reach our goal within this time frame but if not the group of teams that have logged the most miles win.  All teams within the three groups will also be competing against each other," says Bob.  

All runners will be part of a 14 person team.  The teams have many interesting themes like: Team one will be for runners 70 plus. Team 9 is for those men and women who have or are in the Military. Team 10 and 11 are for Elite Runners.  Team 21 is for India's citizens.  Team 23 are for runners living in Canada. Team 34 are for those runners who have completed at least one 100 mile race.  Team 37 are for runners who have lost 50 or more pounds and are currently running. Team 42 are for runners who have run at least 50 races in one year. (Click the link for the full list of the 42 team.)  

Runers will pick the team of their choice as long as it is not full.  There are 14 different teams (with a maximum of 14 runners per team) making up a group.  

One unique aspect of RTW4 is that one person can be on one team, two or three teams.  BUT the teams have to be in different groups.

When you run, let say five miles, these same miles only need to be entered once and they will be credited for all your teams. 

Registration is now open. "It was hard to pick just one team per group," says Michael Anderson who has done all RTW Challenges. "I could have signed up for several different teams but I decided on Team 30 having fnished at least one Boston Marathon, Team 25 West USA because I live in Bend, Oregon and Team 4 age 40-49.  Can't wait to do this again.  It has really motivated me to run a lot more. Bring it on."

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Global Challenge 365

Run The World Global Challenge 365

Run The World Global Challenge is a world wide celebration of running. Participants run or walk and then log in those miles (k’s) on their My Best Runs Account. There have already been five different challenges. Three (RTW1, RTW2 and RTW3) were challenges where each team logged enough miles to circle the world which is 24,901 miles. The best time...

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William Sawyer who founded the JFK 50 Miler and who ran it at age 75 has died at 90

Buzz Sawyer enjoyed keeping score. In the game of life, it’s safe to say he finished a winner. Sawyer, a former world-ranked distance runner who founded the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon in Washington County, died Sunday. He was 90.

“He’s never going to be forgotten,” said Mike Spinnler, the JFK 50 race director since 1993, when he took over for Sawyer. “He’s like Red Auerbach with the Celtics or Paul Brown with the Browns. I don’t care how many centuries the JFK goes on, he’s always going to be synonymous with it. It doesn’t exist without him.”

On March 30, 1963, Sawyer answered President John F. Kennedy’s call for Americans to be more physically fit. He and 10 young men from his Cumberland Valley Athletic Club set out to cover 50 miles on foot. The route consisted of the rugged Appalachian Trail, the flat C&O Canal towpath and rolling country roads — almost identical to the course used every year since.

Of the 11 starters in 1963, four finished, including Sawyer. They completed the trek together in 13 hours and 10 minutes.

The next year, there were 16 starters and seven finishers, and the event continued to grow. Similar JFK challenge events across the country faded away.

“Buzz was not that different than guys all over the country who organized JFK 50 events in the spring of 1963,” Spinnler said. “What made him different was that after Kennedy was assassinated, he kept holding the event to memorialize Kennedy. While all the other events disappeared, his continued on his back for 30 years. … I know for a fact that he lost money out of his own pocket to keep that race alive for decades. He just had such passion for it.”

Sawyer was a regular participant in the JFK 50 in his event’s early years. In 1970, at age 41, he finished fifth overall in a personal-best time of 8 hours and 53 minutes in a field of 274 runners and hikers.

But that was his last finish as the event’s director. The JFK was becoming so big that he had to devote all of his energy to managing it on race day.

By 1972, there were more than 1,000 participants. In 1973, the JFK had a starting field of 1,724 — the largest of any foot race in the U.S. that year and nearly 200 more than the Boston Marathon.

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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British runner Tina Muir has announced she will race this year’s Boston Marathon, but as a fast amateur rather than an elite

Muir was a professional runner and Olympic hopeful who finished fifth at the 2016 London Marathon, and who recently published a book about her nine-year battle with amenorrhea. She has returned to the running world after taking two years off to recover her health and have a baby, winning the Walt Disney World Half-Marathon on January 13.

Muir’s time at Disney was six minutes off her personal best, and according to Women’s Running, she does not plan on racing with the elites at Boston. Nonetheless, Muir reports being “at peace” after all that she has been through over the past 10 years, struggling with amenorrhea and then leaving the sport to get healthy, culminating in the birth of her daughter one year ago.

“I understand that some people are driven by goals,” she told the magazine, “but for me at this point, I have too many other things going on in my life with my business, my baby, maintaining relationships with family and friends. I don’t have the mental or physical capacity to train at the level I want. I’d rather be out there enjoying it and still running hard, but not having that same pressure that I would as an elite.”

“I understand that some people are driven by goals,” she told the magazine, “but for me at this point, I have too many other things going on in my life with my business, my baby, maintaining relationships with family and friends. I don’t have the mental or physical capacity to train at the level I want. I’d rather be out there enjoying it and still running hard, but not having that same pressure that I would as an elite.”

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Mary Keitany, Vivian Cheruiyot And Tirunesh Dibaba will battle at the London Marathon

The defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot and the current TCS New York City Marathon champion Mary Keitany return to the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2019.

They join their compatriots Gladys Cherono (2018 BMW Berlin Marathon champion) and Brigid Kosgei (2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon champion) meaning the winners of the last four Abbott World Marathon Majors will be on the Start Line in London on Sunday 28 April.

Cheruiyot, who is also the reigning Olympic 5000m champion and the runner-up behind Keitany at last November’s TCS New York City Marathon, said: “It was a great moment for me winning last year’s Virgin Money London Marathon and I am very much looking forward to returning in April.

“The line-up for this year’s race is, once again, incredibly strong so I know I will need to be at my very best to repeat last year’s victory but it is a challenge that I’m really looking forward to. I will be ready.”

Also confirmed to run are the Ethiopian trio of Tirunesh Dibaba,  the three-time Olympic champion on the track and third fastest woman of all time, who finished second in London and won Chicago in 2017, Tadelech Bekele, who finished third in London last year, and 21-year-old Roza Dereje, second in Chicago and winner of the Dubai Marathon in 2018.

Cherono, Kosgei and Keitany top the current Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York. Dereje and Cheruiyot are on 16 points apiece following their second places in Chicago and New York respectively. The Series XII title could be decided in London.

The Abbott World Marathon Majors series adds up points for the best finishes in the world’s six best marathons. Series XII started at the 2018 BMW Berlin Marathon and will finish at the same race in 2019, taking in the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, 2018 TCS New York City Marathon, 2019 Tokyo Marathon, 2019 Boston Marathon and the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

Hugh Brasher, Event Director, said: “This is a truly amazing women’s field which features the five best women marathon runners in the world last year. The stage is set for a fascinating race on Sunday 28 April.

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Shelby Houlihan won the USATF Cross-Country Championships and is becoming one of the most dominant American runners

Shelby Houlihan won the USATF Cross-Country Championships on Saturday, beating one of the deepest fields in recent history. Houlihan bested American half-marathon record-holder Molly Huddle, American steeplechase record-holder Courtney Frerichs and 2016 NCAA XC champion Karissa Schweizer. Saturday was the longest race of the 5,000m record-holder’s life so far, and her first cross-country race since 2014. Even more impressive, Houlihan closed in a 3:02 kilometer.

The Bowerman Track Club runner or Shelbo800 as she’s known on Instagram, is a name you should remember. This 800m runner turned distance phenom has won the USATF 1,500m, 5,000m and 10K cross-country races–and done that in the space of less than one year. She also set a new American 5,000m record this past summer at Heusden. 

The runner’s Instagram handle has also become a bit of a joke in the running community. Houlihan was an 800m runner in college at Arizona State University, with a personal best of 2:01.12 from 2014. What was once a time she was very proud of has now become one of her weaker personal bests. She’s now run a shocking 3:57.34 for the 1,500m and 14:34.45 in the 5,000m. 

Second place on Saturday went to Huddle, who’s preparing for the London marathon this April and third place went to Marielle Hall. 

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Julian Smith, the director of the Cooper River Bridge Run since 1994, has to resign due to brain cancer

Julian Smith, the director of the Cooper River Bridge Run since 1994 and driving force behind making it one of the largest 10K races in the country, has resigned less than three months before the 2019 event.

Smith, 67, announced last year he is battling brain cancer.

Mike Seekings, a Charleston city councilman and vice chairman of the Cooper River Bridge Run Board of Directors, will serve as interim director for this year’s race, which is slated for April 6.

“Julian is a force of nature and his leadership will be missed by the entire Bridge Run family and community as he moves on to the next phase of his life and the inevitable challenges it will bring,” the board wrote in a release.

Seekings said Wednesday that preparations for the 2019 run are well under way. It will run smoothly, he said, thanks to Smith’s 24 years of leadership.

“He’s always made sure his staff was ready to step up,”  Seekings said of Smith, his friend for almost 30 years. “We still have some work to do, but we have a very capable team so it should be pretty seamless.”

But the board will be working with heavy hearts and fond memories of how Smith has influenced the storied Charleston event for nearly a quarter century.

(02/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Cooper River Bridge Run

Cooper River Bridge Run

The Cooper River Bridge Run provides a world-class 10-K foot race held in Charleston, S. Carolina. The race promotes continuous physical activity and a healthy lifestyle through education and opportunity. On Sunday morning, April 2, 1978, the starting gun was fired for the First COOPER RIVER BRIDGE RUN and the race began. Even at that time it was successful beyond...

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Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei who won gold twice at the Commonweath Games is ready to win more medals for his country

Joshua Cheptegei, who had a good season last year, told Nation Sport that he will take part in the Uganda cross country trials in Tororo, Uganda hoping to clinch a ticket to this World Cross Country champions in Aarhus, Denmark on March 30.

“I hope the team that will be selected will be strong. We will go for medals which and hope to clinch the overall title currently held by Kenyans,” he said.

The Ugandan said that he is eyeing a podium finish in Denmark after he harrowingly capitulated in Kampala in 2017.

“I have not prepared adequately but by the time we get closer to the competition, I will be in good form and I hope to win a medal for my country.”

Cheptegei is still recovering after being involved in a bad road accident in December. “I was hit by a vehicle which was joining the road and it caused some internal injuries which affected my training and performance.”

He is also eyeing the Diamond League races this season after he was kept out of action last season by injuries. He has planned to participate in various races as a build up for World Championships  set for Doha, Qatar in October.

 “Diamond League races are good to gauge one’s fitness and I will take part in various races to improve my personal best in the long distance races like  3,000m and 5,000m.”

The athlete trains in Kapchorua at an altitude of 1,900 metres above sea level in eastern Uganda under NN Running Team which comprises 12 athletes.

In 2018, he started the season well with a double win in 5,000m and 10,000m during the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia.

(02/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian Yomif Kejelcha will attempt to break the mile world record at Millrose Games

Yomif Kejelcha, the 21-year-old Ethiopian middle distance runner, is attempting the world record in the Wanamaker mile on Saturday, February 9 at the Millrose Games at the Armoury Track in New York City. 

The Nike Oregon Project athlete announced on Friday that he believes he’s capable of a 3:48 mile, and that the field of men he’s racing against can help him get there. The record is currently 3:48.45 and held by Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco. Last year Edward Cheserek, who is also in Saturday’s field, ran the second fastest indoor mile mark in history, hitting 3:49.44 at the Valentine Invitational in Boston. 

Clayton Murphy, who just set the world record for the 800m on an indoor flat track will also be running Saturday. Murphy, who also trains with the Nike Oregon Project, ran a 1:45.92 on Saturday at JDL Fast Track in North Carolina. American Ajee Wilson also set an indoor flat-track world record yesterday, running a 1:59.26 800m at the same meet. 

My Best Runs will be there to cover the action.

(02/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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NYRR Millrose Games

NYRR Millrose Games

The NYRR Millrose Games,which began in 1908 as a small event sponsored by a local track club, has grown to become the most prestigious indoor track and field event in the United States. The NYRR Millrose Games meet is held in Manhattan’s Washington Heights at the New Balance Track & Field Center at the Armony, which boasts a state-of-the-art six-lane,...

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Japan’s Suguru Osako ran an impressive 1:03:00 half-marathon to break the course record at the Surf City Half Marathon

Osako, who holds the Japanese National Record for the marathon of 2:05:50, ran a majority of the race with his training partner Tetsuya Yoroizaka. The duo put the hammer down from the beginning, clocking a 4:50 opening mile and hitting 14:24 at 5k. Both athletes finished with identical times, which were more than 7 minutes ahead of third place finisher Patrick Hearn (1:10:48) from Irvine.

 “It was really good today, a nice tough course, super flat but a little windy,” said Osako, who split the 10-K mark in 29:43. “My goal today was a solid effort at marathon pace and it helped to have some many runners out there cheering for me. I really like this city and today’s crowd was really good.”

Despite recently overcoming an IT band injury, Saguro, 27, who used the Surf City Half Marathon as a tune-up for next month’s Tokyo Marathon, was optimistic about his preparation for the March 3 race.

“My training is going well, I am up in Flagstaff right now, I’ve been training good for the past 3 weeks and we have 4 weeks left from today,” added Saguro, who admitted there is a “little pressure” competing in Tokyo for the first time as a national record holder. “I’m going into the race that I’m a challenger, and I‘m going to enjoy the challenge of running with (Kenenisa) Bekele and the other great athletes running in Toyko.”

(02/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Surf City USA

Surf City USA

The Surf City USA Marathon and Half-Marathon attracts more than 20,000 runners from around the world. The exclusive oceanfront course runs along the Pacific Coast Highway (which is more like a street than a highway in this area), past the Huntington Beach Pier and the famous Southern California surfing beaches. Weekend highlights include many Super Bowl parties, the three-day Active...

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Sineard Diver improved her 40 Plus world record at Marugame Half Marathon clocking 1:08:55

Betsy Saina pulled away from Ayuko Suzuki in the final kilometer of the Marugame Half Marathon to successfully defend her title at the IAAF Silver Label road race in 1:07:49 on Sunday Feb 3.

Abdi Nageeye, meanwhile, caught front-running Simon Kariuki just before the 20-kilometer point and went on to win in 1:00:24, taking 46 seconds off the Dutch record set 20 years ago by Greg van Hest.

Saina and Suzuki ran together, passing five kilometers in 16:02, 10 kilometers in 32:06 and 15 kilometers in 48:15. They were still together at 20 kilometers, reached in 1:04:25, but Saina then made her move and pulled away from Suzuki to win in 1:07:49, smashing her previous best of 1:09:17 set in Marugame last year.

The Kenyan became the fifth woman to win back-to-back Marugame Half Marathon titles, joining Eunice Kirwa (2016 and 2017), Tiki Gelana (2012 and 2013), Kayoko Fukushi (2006, 2007 and 2011) and Yasuko Hashimoto (2003 and 2004). Her time is also the third fastest time in Marugame.

Despite missing out on victory, Suzuki was still pleased with her 1:07:55 half marathon debut.

“I am bit disappointed to be out kicked at the end of the race, but it was good that I was able to keep the steady pace all the way,” said Suzuki.

41-year-old Sinead Diver finished third in 1:08:55, improving her own world W40 best by 25 seconds. Charlotte Purdue was fourth in 1:09:46, her first sub-70-minute performance. Mao Ichiyama, who will be running the Tokyo Marathon in four weeks, was sixth in 1:10:49, about a minute shy of her PR.

Before Diver, American marathon record holder Deena Kastor held the record at 1:09:37. 

The lead group in the men’s race went through five kilometers in 14:16 and then Japan-based Kenyan Simon Kariuki pulled away from the pack. He went through 10 kilometres in 28:24, about 20 seconds ahead of the chase pack, and managed to maintain that lead up to 15 kilometres, which he reached in 42:46.

Nageeye then started to reel in Kariuki and took the lead just before 20 kilometres, which he passed in 57:18. The 29-year-old continued to pull away from his competitors in the closing stages to win in 1:00:24, improving his PB by one minute and 44 seconds.

Kariuki finished second in 1:00:43, a PR by 42 seconds. Australia’s Jack Rayner was third in 1:01:36, while fourth-placed Takato Suzuki was the first Japanese finisher, just ahead of Masao Kizu, both credited with PRs of 1:01:45.

(02/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon

Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon

The Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon is an annual road running competition which takes place in early February in Marugame, Japan. It currently holds IAAF Silver Label Road Race status and the professional races attract over 1000 entries each year, and hosted by the Sankei Shimbun, Sankei Sports, Okayama Broadcasting, BS Fuji. The race in Marugame was first held in 1947...

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Super Bowl Sunday 10K/5k still a hit after 41 years

Thousands of runners came out early Sunday morning as the weekend’s downpours took a break. It was just long enough for the 41st annual Redondo Beach Super Bowl 10K/5K, the brainchild of the late developer Les Guthrie.

Guthrie thought it would be a great way to market the harbor and pier area. The run proved to be an instant hit, drawing thousands of runners each year.

The run included three races: a 5 kilometer, 10 kilometer, and the Baby Buggy 10 kilometer for those will small children. With the cool, wet weather, runners were thankful organizers brought back the long-sleeved T-shirts.

The scenery-packed route led runners through south Redondo Beach, taking them past the the larger-than-life Wyland whale mural featured on the AES power plant, King Harbor, and by local shops dotting the Riviera Village. With competitive runners, casual, or fans just looking to exert some energy before the big game, the race was a perfect opportunity to boost endorphins.

Like past iterations, the family event encouraged runners to dress up for a chance to win the costume contest.

27-year-old Omar Gonzalez came in first clocking 32:19.  First female was 25-year-old Grace Graham-Zamudio clocking 36:45.  

(02/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Super Bowl Sunday 10K and 5K Run/Walk

Super Bowl Sunday 10K and 5K Run/Walk

Join more than 8,000 race enthusiasts at Southern California's greatest Super Bowl Celebration! The Redondo Beach Super Bowl Sunday 10K/5K Run/Walk is a great way to celebrate the biggest day in sports and enjoy the picturesque sites of Redondo Beach: the Pacific Ocean, the historic Redondo Beach Pier, the Marina in King Harbor, the Wyland whale mural, ocean breezes, fresh...

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Happy Course Hunting - Michael Anderson on running File 4

So many times I will be out on a run and spot some path and decide to just take it. This is my way of charting new courses and see where it takes me. Sometimes the path I take leads to a dead end which results in backtracking but most of the time it leads me to a whole new area that I have never been before and some awesome connector to something else.

On Thursday’s run I found such a path which lead me to a huge amount of other trails that are single track. It makes me so excited to explore the area and see what additional course I can chart out.

What I love about running is just this, the Exploration of the area, getting the lay of the land on foot that you will never experience driving a car. I just love it.  Another bonus of running

Good indications to check out a path

A dirt road that seems to be a connector between two major roadways

A golf course path, but be careful 

A Bike path, most cities have them

A hidden trail off the path, this will usually lead somewhere so be prepared that it doesn't twist you around

Happy Course hunting

(Editor’s note: Michael Anderson on running is a regular column covering common sense advice by a lifetime runner.  He has run the Boston, Big Sur, San Francisco and Seattle Marathons and has been running most of his life.)

(02/03/2019) ⚡AMP
by Michael Anderson
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Bolt Champagne - Jamaican Sprint Legend Partners With South Africa's Mumm To Create Own Champagne Brand

While Jamaica’s icon of track and field, Usain Bolt, is leaving his career in sport behind and delving into the field of business, the glitz and glamour that followed him through each successful stage of his record-breaking path as an athlete shows no sign of abating. This was evident in South Africa where he launched his new signature champagne Mumm Olympe Rosé last Thursday at a press conference in South Africa.

Bolt was in South Africa as one of the co-hosts of Sun Met, an illustrious and acclaimed horse-racing event known as Africa’s richest race day. The famous show is not just focused on horse racing but has become a gathering place for socialites, popular personalities and fashionistas. This was the perfect occasion to unveil this new champagne.

Mumm’s brand manager Etienne Cassuto, said, "We are excited to unveil the fruit of a two-year collaboration with nine time Olympic gold medalists Usain Bolt, a champagne embodying the excellence of our craftsmanship and values of our chief entertainment officer. Mumm Olympe Rosé is a unique and innovative champagne created for your daring celebrations."

 “In Jamaica we do this naturally,” Bolt said, “we mix cognac with champagne, and it’s something that I enjoy. So when we sat down in the first meeting and we were trying to figure out what direction we wanted to go with the bottle and with the drink I mentioned it and asked ‘is it possible?’ and they said ‘yes’. So for me that was something I was happy about and when you taste it you’ll taste the cognac and together it’s very nice, trust me.”

Created by the renowned English designer Ross Lovegrove for Mumm Grand Cordon, the bottle of Mumm Olympe Rosé is described as a technical feat.

"Its slender neck lends to the aromatic development of the wine, and its harmonious lines are accentuated by the iconic red sash set directly in the glass," the champagne producer said in a media release.

Together with Bolt, Mumm said it is "dedicated to exploring unprecedented ways of celebrating with their fans and Mumm Olympe Rosé is on its way to becoming emblematic".

(02/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Will The Singapore Marathon Be The Next Abbottt World Marathon Majors?

Singapore, no matter how you put it, no matter when you run—day or night, January or July—is hot and humid. And that is of course not ideal to aim for a marathon PB or break a world record, right?

Maybe so, but the island city-state may soon become an Abbott World Marathon Majors (AbbottWMM) course alongside Boston, Chicago, New York, Tokyo, Berlin and London. In coordination with the Chinese private conglomerate Wanda Group last year, the AbbottWMM agreed to a 10-year strategic partnership to potentially develop three new events to add to the series. As part of this agreement, they were tasked with identifying current races that met the requirements of potential inclusion in the series.

“The World Marathon Majors is a very European and U.S.-centric organization. In order to expand and truly create the global series that they want, they need to expand in areas where they do not yet have a presence, such as Asia,” said Ironman Managing Director for Asia Geoff Meyer.

So why the Singapore Marathon? For starters, it’s one of the most well-organized urban destinations and is extremely clean and safe. The international hub is also easy to reach from anywhere in the world (albeit a long flight from the U.S. and Europe) and has a great public transportation system so travelers can effortlessly navigate its neighborhoods.

“What the World Marathon Majors wants is a truly global city, with all the amenities: hotels, an international airport and all the other modern city infrastructures,” says Meyer.

There is still much to be considered before dubbing Singapore the next AbbottWMM city in 2020. “Singapore is a great international destination with a passion for sports and it has seen a huge increase in the popularity of running over the last few years,” says Tim Hadzima, Executive Director for the AbbottWMM. “But there are still areas that need to be improved for the Singapore Marathon to reach our requirements.”

Aside from the expected long-term procedure, as well as the strict set of criteria to be met for any new marathon, what really seems to be the main issue right now is the lack of local government support. 

“Singapore works very much on this ideology: Singapore for Singaporeans. All of New York City, or London for that matter, basically shuts down for the marathon. There are pros and cons for the local people on a race day like this,” says Meyer. “But Singapore works on a different level. Every single complaint, or inconvenience to a Singaporean resident, is taken very seriously.”

“We’re not going to be a Berlin or London that is basically about world records—and I don’t think we want to be—it’s too hot, too humid from that perspective,” Meyer continues. “We’ve increased the prize money from $160K up to nearly $500K this year. So we’re serious about bringing the world’s best.”

Only time will tell if we’ll soon be adding Singapore to our list of majors to compete at, but with so much in the air currently, we’re not holding our breath for a decision just yet. Would you race in Singapore in December with temperatures around 85-90 degrees F and 100 percent humidity to get a seventh AbbottWMM medal?

(02/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopians were the big winners at the Lagos City Marathon today

Ethiopians took home 100,000 US dollars each as winners of 2019 Lagos Marathon, 2nd and 3rd take 40,000 and 30,000 dollars. Ethiopians Suntayahu Legese and Dinke Meseret won the 2019 Lagos City Marathon held on Saturday, February 2.

Since the inception of the annual marathon festival no Nigerian has emerged winner. Legese beat all competition to win in a time of 02:17:28. Two Kenyans made the podium in second and third place.

Joshua Kipkorir and William Yegon finished on the podium with 02:21:11 of 02:18:16 and 02:19:04 to pick up huge cash amounts in the competition sanctioned by the governing body IAAF.

For females, Meseret beat all competition to win with clocking 02:48:02. 

In second place was Alemnesh Herepa with a time of 02:49:05 and Kebena Chala in third with a time of 02:49:09.

(02/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Access Bank Lagos City Marathon

Access Bank Lagos City Marathon

“The IAAF and AIMS have a special interest in the Access Bank Lagos City Marathon so if you see their top officials at the third edition, don’t be surprised. Lagos is one of the few marathons in the world that got an IAAF Label after just two editions. This is a rare feat. The event had over 50,000 runners at...

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Olympian Meb Keflezighi will participate in Tallahassee Half Marathon this weekend

On its merit, the Tallahassee Marathon, Half Marathon and relay race are noteworthy events that attract competitors. 

This year, the 45th edition of the city's marquee long-distance meet elevates its status with the participation of Olympian Meb Keflezighi

The San Diego native will participate in the half marathon Sunday morning.

Keflezighi has traveled across the globe throughout his athletic career.

He competed in the 2004 Summer Olympics (silver medalists) and 2012 Summer Olympics. Keflezighi also raced in the New York City Marathon in 2004 (second place), 2005 (third place) and 2009 (first place). The famed runner ran the Boston Marathon twice. He took third in 2006 and first in 2014.

This weekend marks his first-ever trip to Tallahassee.

"I'm excited to partake in the Tallahassee half marathon and run through the city," Keflezighi said.

"People will be surprised to see me next to them. I will tell them stories about New York, Boston and the Olympic games. It's going to be fun. It's all about accomplishing your goals and I'm there to support them. The people here love the sport and I'm happy to be here and enjoy the journey with them."

(02/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Tokyo Olympics Likely to Feature Morning Track and Field Finals to Meet Demands of U.S. Broadcasting

On Jan. 29 it was learned that final discussions are underway for staging some track and field individual event finals at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics during morning sessions. Road events such as the men's and women's marathons and race walks are already scheduled to be held in the morning in order to deal with the expected hot conditions, but an additional seven or eight individual events are now also likely to see their finals held at the New National Stadium during the morning Japan time.

According to a source involved in the talks, the plan is under discussion by the IOC and IAAF. As will be the case with swimming, the morning sessions will allow an American television network that has paid large sums for broadcast rights to the IOC to show the events during primetime in the United States. A Japanese official involved in the situation commented, "We expect to see a good balance struck between jumps, throws and track." Events with competitive American athletes such as the triple jump and shot put are likely candidates.

If preliminary rounds are uniformly held during morning sessions and finals during afternoon sessions there is bound to be a difference in attendance and viewership between the two. In terms of the planned 68,000-seat capacity of the New National Stadium, for Japan as well there are merits to holding some morning finals. There was also precedent at the 2016 Rio Olympics, where events including the women's 10000 m had finals held during the morning.

High-profile events such as the men's 4x100 m relay and 4x400 m relay are planned for afternoon sessions as usual. "We will be watching the outcome of the talks between the IOC and IAAF closely," said the source.

(02/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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The king of the trails, Rene Villalobos is a 59-year-old plumber with 350 ultras under his belt

Rene Villalobos is less than halfway through the 2016 Rocky Raccoon 100 in Huntsville State Park, Texas, when the pain in his back returns. A year earlier, he had fallen on a patch of black ice late at night during Arkansas’ Run LOVit 100K and slipped a disk. The doctors told him he wouldn’t be able to run long distance anymore but, well, here he was.

He grimaces as pain shoots up his back. Soon the sun will sink beneath the canopy of oak trees and sweet gums overhead and out of sight. Villalobos uses a few unprintable words to gripe to his “friend” Sal (James Salvador), an Italian ultrarunner who encouraged Villalobos to quit dropping the F-bomb on long miserable runs and find the joy in running.

“Look at this and this and this,” he would tell Villalobos, pointing at the scenery. “And don’t worry about anything else. Enjoy it! This is all a gift.”

Salvador had passed away nearly 10 years prior, in April 2002, during a low-risk planned surgery. He and Villalobos had been running together for 20 years by that time, and were planning to run several ultras together in the coming weeks. Instead, Villalobos found himself and his sister, Clara, with Salvador’s family as the priest read his last rites.

Villalobos says he’s “not really too much into superstition.” He doesn’t have pre-race rituals or lucky socks. But he does have a lot of running buddies like Salvador who have passed away over the years, and he still communicates with them.

“That’s probably about the weirdest thing I do,” he says. “I always say, ‘Well, I’m going to take my angels for a run today.’”

Rene Villalobos, 59, of Fort Worth, Texas, is not your typical runner-looking dude. He has dark skin, bronzed by hours in the sun, salt-and-pepper hair and a goatee to match; until a few years ago, he weighed over 200 pounds and possessed a hefty paunch.

But looks may be deceiving in his case. Villalobos has run over 350 ultras, and over 150 100-milers. At one point, he ran nine 100-mile races in nine weeks. Counting unofficial races, by August 14, 2018 Villalobos says he had run 1,117 marathons. On the Mega Marathon List, he is ranked number five, with 1000 official marathon finishes. Let those stats sink in.

“Trying to explain Rene is almost as difficult as trying to explain trail running,” says Joe Prusaitis, the former longtime owner and race director of Tejas Trails, a collection of respected Texas races that includes Rocky Raccoon. Prusaitis has a long history of racing with and hosting Villalobos at races. “And I think the more you understand trail running, the more you would understand Rene.”

While not a household name or podium contender, Villalobos epitomizes a passionate approach to trail running. His training weeks might make even the pros blanch especially because, for over 30 years, he worked digging ditches and fixing pipes as a plumber, often in 110-degree Texas heat, before going on his weekday runs.

Things changed in 2004 when he got a job as Master Inspector for his hometown of Fort Worth. While he appreciates the air conditioning, being what he calls a “blue-collar runner” makes him proud, and he still does plumbing jobs for friends on the side.

At the 2016 Rocky Raccoon volunteers and spectators caught sight of a Hispanic guy using a thick stick as a cane, moving slowly into the clearing. He’s obviously struggling—his stride is off, and he’s using the stick only halfway into the race. But he doesn’t stop. Villalobos hobbles back into the woods for his third lap, and, when he emerges again, he goes right on for the fourth.

Volunteers watch with concern and hope. The finish line looks increasingly like a ghost town as people pack up and go home.

In the woods, Villalobos repeatedly thumps the stick beside him like a third leg, occasionally griping to Sal, when no one else is around. He shuffles down the singletrack, over little wooden bridges, through brush and pine needles and endless roots as the sun rises.

“Pine trees and roots, that’s all it is,” Villalobos says. “What happens is you do four laps, and on the last lap all the roots have grown a foot.”

When he exits toward the finish for the last time, he is hunched over his stick, barely taking steps. He looks like he’s aged several years in a single night. In the miles since the last aid station, he’s fallen 20 minutes behind the cut-off time.

But he has “finished.” Racers and volunteers have tears in their eyes as he crosses the line. He doesn’t get an official finish time, but the race organizers give him a finisher’s belt, “because they said I was tough,” Villalobos says.

“When he sets out to do something, he just finishes it,” Villalobos’s running buddy Gerardo (Gerry) Ramirez says. “We’ve been through some races, in snow, like knee-deep snow, races where we’re drenched in mud; we’ve been hailed on, but I’ve learned not to give up because of him.”

(02/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bananas are as beneficial as sports drinks!

A study conducted by researchers at Appalachian State University’s Human Performance Lab concluded that bananas may be a better option for endurance athletes to consume during exercise than traditional sports drinks.

Bananas have long been a favorite source of energy for endurance and recreational athletes. Bananas are a rich source of potassium and other nutrients, and are easy for cyclists, runners or hikers to carry.

Research conducted at Appalachian State University’s Human Performance Lab in the Kannapolis-based North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) has revealed additional benefits.

“We wanted to see which was more beneficial when consumed during intense cycling — bananas or a carbohydrate sports drink,” said Dr. David C. Nieman, director of the human performance lab and a member of the College of Health Sciences faculty at Appalachian.

“We found that not only was performance the same whether bananas or sports drinks were consumed, there were several advantages to consuming bananas".

The bananas provided the cyclists with antioxidants not found in sports drinks as well as a greater nutritional boost, including fiber, potassium and Vitamin B6, the study showed. In addition, bananas have a healthier blend of sugars than sports drinks.

For the study, trained cyclists consumed either a cup of carbohydrate drink or half a banana every 15 minutes during a 75-kilometer simulated road race lasting 2.5 to 3 hours. Blood samples taken from the cyclists before and after the exercise were analyzed at the NCRC Metabolomics Laboratory for more than 100 metabolites — molecules associated with metabolism.

“Bananas come prepackaged with fiber, nutrients and antioxidants,” said Nieman, adding the research translates to any exercise.

“The mode of exercise is not the issue. There are a lot of athletes who don’t like the thought of drinking carbohydrate sports drinks, which are essentially flavored sugar water,” . “This type of research shows that you can have healthier carbohydrate sources before and after exercise that will support athletic performance just as well as a sports drink".

(02/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Excitement is building as the Glasgow hosted European Indoor Championships fast approaches

There is now only one month to go until some of the world’s leading athletes descend on Glasgow for the European Athletics Indoor Championships.

The event will take place over three days (March 1-3), returns to Glasgow next month for the first time since 1990 and there will be 650 athletes from more than 45 nations setting their sights on glory.

The Scottish city continues to build on its reputation as a world-class sporting destination, and today at the Emirates Arena, Andy Butchart was in attendance to share their feelings ahead of the championships.

The competition will be the second major European event held in Glasgow within twelve months after a hugely successful inaugural European Championships last August. Glasgow continues to receive global recognition for this reputation with a coveted top five ranking as a sporting destination.

British 5000m runner Butchart has turned in some superb performances at the highest level in sport, most notably, at the Olympic Games in 2016 and at the IAAF World Championships in 2017.

The Stirling-born runner will have his sights set on clinching success in front of a home crowd next month as he comes off a major injury which meant the 27-year-old was forced to rule himself out of last year’s Commonwealth Games.

Glasgow 2019 will present a real opportunity for him to run to victory in front of a home crowd. 

“The Emirates Arena will be the place to be in early March,” said Butchart. “I’ll put on a good show along with the other Scottish athletes and give the crowd something to cheer about. Super excited to get on the track and race in front of a home crowd.”

(02/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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European Athletics Indoor Championships

European Athletics Indoor Championships

The 2019 European Athletics Indoor Championships is coming to Glasgow, March 1-3. Witness six sessions of action-packed sport over three days of intense competition in the intimate Emirates Arena as some of the best athletes in the world compete for prestigious European titles. Don’t miss the opportunity to witness this thrilling event and get closer to the action. Glasgow’s Emirates...

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Little Rock marathon will be hosting DC Wonder Woman 5K/10K

Wonder Women, Wonder Men and Wonder Children will race through downtown Little Rock dressed as superheroes May 11 when the DC Wonder Woman 5K and 10K arrive in Arkansas.

Featuring costumes for all racers and a party atmosphere, the new footraces are part of the DC Wonder Woman Run Series, a joint project of California-based promoter SON Events and Warner Bros. Consumer Products on behalf of DC.

Little Rock Parks and Recreation’s Little Rock Marathon team is bringing the series to Clinton Presidential Park.

In 2018, its first year, the series of five races in California drew more than 10,000 participants, according to a news release. This year, the organizers are booking 10 events in cities across the nation and Canada.

Geneva Lamm, co-executive director of the marathon, said the marathon team is partnering with the series in Little Rock. "We are setting it all up and we'll be running it and creating the fun. We are part of the organizing body of the event."

For its work, the marathon will receive a $10,000 fee and possibly a bit more, Lamm said Thursday.

She and marathon co-director Gina Pharis attended a Wonder Woman 5K/10K in Los Angeles in November "to see is this something we want to bring to Little Rock."

(02/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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Little Rock Marathon

Little Rock Marathon

The mission of the Little Rock Marathon is provide a premier event open to athletes of all abilities, while promoting a healthy lifestyle through running and walking and raising money for Little Rock Parks & Recreation. Since inception in 2003, more than $1,093,000 has been donated to Little Rock Parks & Recreation. Little Rock Marathon Race Weekend is held the...

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Defending champions will face a strong field at Lagos City Marathon

Almenesh Herpha and Abraham Kiprotich, the 2018 Access Bank Lagos City Marathon winners, will line up against formidable opposition when they defend their titles at the IAAF Bronze Label road race on Saturday.

Herpha pulled off a surprise victory 12 months ago, winning in 2:38:25 to finish just 33 seconds shy of the course record. But despite reducing her PB to 2:33:20 later in the year in Beirut, there will be 14 other women with faster PBs on the start line on Saturday.

With a lifetime best of 2:20:59 set when finishing runner-up at the 2017 Paris Marathon, Agnes Jeruto is the fastest woman in the field. The Kenyan contested just one marathon last year, clocking 2:27:46 to finish third at the Gold Coast Marathon and has reached the podium in her eight most recent marathons.

Georgina Rono finished just shy of the Lagos podium last year, running 2:39:44. A 2:21:39 performer at her best, the Kenyan ended 2018 on a high by winning the Riga Marathon in 2:28:22.

Caroline Kilel, the 2011 Boston Marathon champion, set her PB of 2:22:34 back in 2013. Although she hasn’t been close to that in recent years, her 2018 season’s best of 2:31:29 suggests the 37-year-old Kenyan will still be competitive on Saturday.

Janet Rono won the Daegu Marathon just 10 months ago in 2:28:01, less than two minutes shy of her PB. The Kenyan has contested 19 marathons to date, nine of which were completed within 2:30.

Emily Samoei’s PB of 2:26:52, set in 2012, remains her only sub-2:30 performance to date, but she will be motivated to improve on her fifth-place finish from last year’s Lagos Marathon.

Mestawot Tadese has represented Ethiopia in the 1500m at the Olympic Games and World Championships. Now a marathon runner, she has a lifetime best of 2:31:38 and could contest for a podium finish on Saturday.

In the men’s race, five of the top six finishers from last year return to Lagos, including defending champion Abraham Kiprotich of France.

Kiprotich has won three out of his past four marathons, ending 2018 with a season’s best of 2:10:55. The 33-year-old set his lifetime best of 2:08:33 when winning the 2013 Daegu Marathon. He may not need to replicate that time on Saturday, but he may need to improve upon his course record of 2:15:04 if he wants to hold on to his title.

Having finished a close second in 2017 and 2018, Ronny Kiboss will be highly motivated for Saturday’s race. The Kenyan’s 2:12:17 PB dates back to his marathon debut in 2014, but he is likely capable of a quicker time on a faster course.

Benjamin Bitok and Joseph Kyengo Munywoki, who finished third and fourth respectively in 2018, also return to the Nigerian capital. Bitok’s PB of 2:09:13 was set at the 2017 Rome Marathon, while Munywoki’s best of 2:10:21 came when winning in Dresden three years ago.

(02/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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Access Bank Lagos City Marathon

Access Bank Lagos City Marathon

“The IAAF and AIMS have a special interest in the Access Bank Lagos City Marathon so if you see their top officials at the third edition, don’t be surprised. Lagos is one of the few marathons in the world that got an IAAF Label after just two editions. This is a rare feat. The event had over 50,000 runners at...

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Michael Wardian won the Antarctica Marathon the first of seven marathons to be run on seven continents over the next seven days

Michael Wardian, 44, of Arlington, Va. has won the first of seven marathons in the World Marathon Challenge in Antarctica today. Wardian, who won the challenge in 2017 and who holds the record for the fastest average time (2:45:57), finished today in 3:16:43. Running conditions are described as “quite challenging,” though the temperature is only -2 C, considerably warmer than many parts of North America.

Petr Vabrousek of the Czech Republic finished second, in 3:39:02, and Arno Van Triest of the Netherlands was third, in 3:49:55.

Among the women, Kristina Schou Madsen of Denmark finished first, in 3:47:41. Susannah Gill of Great Britain was second, in 3:53:55 and Stephanie Gicquel third, in 4:05:11.

The most recent update mentioned the temperature was becoming cooler, and the remaining participants have been on the course for more than five hours.

The group of 40 participants gathered in Cape Town, South Africa earlier this week to prepare for the challenge. They will return there for their second marathon, which starts tomorrow at 8:00 a.m. local time.

 

(01/31/2019) ⚡AMP
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World Marathon Challenge

World Marathon Challenge

The World Marathon Challenge ® is a logistical and physical challenge to run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days. Competitors must run the standard 42.2 km marathon distance in Antarctica, Africa, Australia, Asia, Europe, South America and North America within 168 hours, or seven days. The clock starts when the first marathon begins in Antarctica. ...

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17-year-old Calix Fattmann of Ozark Missouri, is the youngest person ever to run 100 marathons

On New Year’s Day, Calix Fattmann of Ozark, Missouri ran his 100th marathon. Which is not so unusual, except that Calix Fattmann is 17 years old. That’s right–the teenager from Ozark, Missouri, who is not yet old enough to vote (or drink) has already crossed the finish line of 100 marathons.

We admit we were skeptical at first. But his stats check out. Calix is not fast–he finished his 99th marathon on December 29, 2018 in 5:25:12–which may be why he’s been able to run very frequent marathons (occasionally as often as every few days) since he was practically in diapers.

Calix was inspired to run by his dad, Ken Fattmann, 63, who is himself a marathoner and triathlete, and who used to take little Calix with him to play by the track while he did his workouts. 

The Guinness organization confirmed that they have received Calix’s application for the title of Youngest Runner to Complete 100 Marathons (Male). There are strict guidelines on how record attempts must be documented, and the process of reviewing the application can take up to several months. If he is successful, Calix will be the first holder of this record. 

(01/31/2019) ⚡AMP
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German's Richard Ringer will make his half marathon debut February 3rd in Marugame Japan

Richard Ringer wants to be careful and not commit to a time - and yet his minimum goal would be to move into the top eight on the German half marathon leaderboard.

Germany's best long-distance runner of the past few years will be at the starting line at Japan's Marugame Half Marathon on February 3rd.

Marugame is about two and a half hours drive from Kobe. Richard Ringer's new Japanese outfitter, has their headquarters in Kobe.

In the field are several runners with best times of 61 minutes. "The British Callum Hawkins won here in 2017 in exactly 60 minutes. My training has been good and there's nothing to scare me off," said the 10,000-meter European Cup winner, who also wants to test the trip to the Far East for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

He has been training in Kenya and Portugal.  "The change in training has been good for my body. Longer stretches, lower intensities, and spiked runs - a welcome change."  And the most important thing: "I trained very well, it was really great here." Although he was not spared from colds and small training breaks he thinks he is back to its previous level.

Richard can keep up with the best on the road.  In October at the Frankfurt Marathon he was a pacemaker for Arne Gabius for about 30 kilometers and in mid-November in Nijmegen (Netherlands) he clocked 43:40 minutes over 15 kilometers.  He looks confidently on his half marathon debut: "I have prepared well and must not hide," he clarifies.

(01/31/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon

Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon

The Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon is an annual road running competition which takes place in early February in Marugame, Japan. It currently holds IAAF Silver Label Road Race status and the professional races attract over 1000 entries each year, and hosted by the Sankei Shimbun, Sankei Sports, Okayama Broadcasting, BS Fuji. The race in Marugame was first held in 1947...

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