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Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com

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Clarksburg Country Run 2018 event was canceled due to the Camp Fire

First and foremost, we want to extend our thoughts and prayers to our neighbors in Butte County as they deal with the effects of the devastation from the fire. Our heartfelt thanks and gratitude is with all the first responders who have worked to keep people and animals safe. It is with great regret that we must announce the cancellation of Clarksburg Country Run. We consider a cancellation a last resort and this was not a decision we took lightly. We had hoped to host the event as planned, and leave the decision to participate up to each athlete. Unfortunately, conditions have continued to deteriorate, and the forecast for Sunday’s air quality has shifted from orange to red – unhealthy for all groups – and an AQI of 205. This is due to a predicted north wind which will blow in even more smoke. At this point, it would be unsafe for everyone to be outside in these conditions and we cannot, in good faith, ask our volunteers to be outside in such poor air quality. The health and safety of our participants, volunteers, and staff is our top priority. We understand this probably comes as a disappointment to you, as it does to us. Many community members have worked tirelessly to prepare for tomorrow, just as you have trained for weeks and months leading up to this weekend for your race. Food has been prepared, medals have been purchased, and awards are ready for winners. (Mon 12) ⚡AMP
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Francois Jarry wins the 43rd MVP Health Care Stockade-athon

The hill on Franklin Street turned into Mount Rushmore on Sunday. As in, there were four figures at the top, and Francois Jarry rushed a little bit more than the other three to the bottom. But just a bit. In a wild four-way sprint to the finish, the 24-year-old from Montreal barely outkicked Ben Fazio, Ryan Udvadia and Alex Benway to win the 43rd annual MVP Health Care Stockade-athon 15k with a time of 47:48. Only four seconds separated the lead group. Since the turn of the century, the average margin between first and fourth at the Stockade-athon had been 1:58, with Joshua McDougal, Sam Morse, Kieran O'Connor and Patrick Geoghan at the low end of the range, separated by 22 seconds in 2014. Jarry didn't hesitate when asked at what point he thought he had Sunday's race won: "Never." It was an honest answer, as Fazio clocked 47:49, Udvadia at 47:50 and Benway in 47:52. It was another 45 seconds back to Scott Mindel to round out the top five. (Mon 12) ⚡AMP
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Monterey Bay Half Marathon cancelled due to wildfire smoke in northern California rendered air quality unsafe

The Monterey Bay Half Marathon, scheduled to run Sunday November 11, was cancelled due to poor air quality from the Camp wildfire that started Thursday and which has seen thousands of northern California residents evacuated and 29 deaths. The 3K and 5K races went ahead Saturday as planned, but there was a shift in wind direction Saturday afternoon that brought smoke in from the northeast, decreasing visibility and rendering air quality unsafe for outdoor activity. California’s Monterey Bay Half Marathon is an out-and-back course along the rugged Pacific coast line that starts and finishes in downtown Monterey. The area is well known for its coastal road races and is also the site of the Big Sur International Marathon. This race attracts runners from all over the world.   (Mon 12) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan Felix Kimutai set a course record at the Istanbul Marathon on Sunday

Kenyan Felix Kimutai won the 40th Annual Istanbul Marathon men's race by breaking the course record on Sunday. JKimutai clocked 2:09:57.  A record number of runners of nearly 30,000 competed in the world's only intercontinental marathon in Istanbul on Sunday. The Vodafone 40th Istanbul Marathon started on the Asian side of Istanbul's July 15 Martyrs' Bridge, formerly known as the Bosphorus Bridge. The finish line is located in the historic Sultanahmet Square on the city's European side. This year's theme was: "Run Istanbul for a healthy future."  (Mon 12) ⚡AMP
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Brimin Kipkorir of Kenya won the 36th Athens Marathon

Brimin Kipkorir of Kenya won the 36th Athens Marathon in the third-fastest time ever, beating Ethiopia's Tesfa Wokneth by almost two minutes Sunday. Kipkorir broke away from the leading group after 25 kilometers to win the hilly course in 2 hours, 10 minutes, 56 seconds, 19 seconds off the course record set by compatriot Felix Kandie in 2014. Wokneth was second in 2:12:52. Ethiopian Asmeraw Mengistu was third in 2:13:20. Two other Kenyans rounded out the top five. Shelmith Muriuki of Kenya won the women's race -- and was 17th overall -- in a personal best of 2:36:46, beating fellow Kenya runner Rebby Koech (2:38:54) and Greece's Eleftheria Petroulaki (2:46:09). A record 18,750 runners started the race Sunday morning. (Mon 12) ⚡AMP
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Ruth Chepngetich runs the 7th fastest women’s marathon time of all times Sunday in Turkey

Kenya’s Ruth Chepngetich stormed to a Turkish all-comers record at the 40th Vodafone Istanbul Marathon on Sunday November 11, clocking 2:18:35 at this IAAF Gold Label Road Race.  With a 2:22 pace initially in mind to try breaking the 2:22:36 race record she set in her debut last year, Chepngetich surprised at Saturday’s technical meeting when the defending champion asked that intermediate times be calculated for a sub-2:19 run. Having noted those, the 24-year-old went in pursuit of exactly what she targeted. Leading from the gun, Chepngetich opened her bid with a 16:13 opening five kilometers, already four seconds ahead of her compatriot Margaret Agai, with Fatuma Sado of Ethiopia following behind closely. While Agai and Sado did not attempt to maintain the pace, Chepngetjch reached the 10K mark in 31:59. Agai was 30 seconds behind at that point, with Sado another 27 seconds adrift with Ethiopian Zerfie Limeneh on her shoulder. Chepngetich confidently passed the 15-kilometres marker in 48:15 before reaching the halfway in 1:08:22, ahead of world record pace. She increased the gap to nearly three minutes at 30K where she passed at 1:37:42, and cruised onwards to her 2:18:35 performance to end the day in a tie as the seventh fastest women’s marathoner of all-time. Agai was a distant second in 2:25:04 with Sado third in 2:31:05. (Sun 11) ⚡AMP
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Another look at the New York City Marathon from the pack of 52,812 runners

Seven mornings ago, my wife Jasmin and I joined thousands of others in Staten Island as a loud “BOOM!” erupted, signaling the start of the earth’s biggest 42K race: the New York City Marathon. Then, Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York” song blasted over the loud speakers. Our hearts trembled, legs shuffled, arms raised.By day’s end, there would be 52,812 of us who traversed the 42.195 km. distance — a world record for the most number of marathon finishers.From Staten Island, we climbed the 4.1-km.-long Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, descending into Brooklyn. After a dozen or so miles, we disembarked in Queens, alighted in Manhattan, passed through the Bronx before finishing in Central Park. In all, the NYC Marathon guided us along all of New York City’s five boroughs.The crowd and cheering were incredible. Imagine 2.5 million people coming out of their apartments to line the streets with posters that read, “You Run Better Than Our Govt. and Trump!” Children carried placards with signs that said, “Tap Here For Power!” Dozens of live bands scattered the route. Beer overflowed as partygoers high-fived us. Runners donned costumes, some with chicken-head attire and others dressed as Captain America. One marathoner was an amputee, painfully carrying one leg in front of the other. The weather last Nov. 4 was perfect. It rained for two straight days before the race and for two consecutive days after — but not on race day, when the sun shone brightly and the skies were light blue and the temperature a cool 12C degrees.Jasmin and I finished in six hours and 48 minutes. We had a good time. And by “good time,” I don’t mean a fast, good time; but “good time,” meaning we had a fascinating husband-and-wife bonding session touring America’s biggest city — a running experience that we will forever cherish. (Sun 11) ⚡AMP
by John Pages
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Joyciline Jepkosgei has picked the Honolulu Marathon for her debut

Joyciline Jepkosgei has opted to run her first full marathon in Hawaii on December 9. the 24-year-old star will be among the elites at the 46th Honolulu Marathon, a race not as big as the six majors or other big city races like the Amsterdam, Paris, Frankfurt or Rotterdam marathons. But it’s the fourth largest marathon in USA after the New York, Chicago and Boston races. Organizers of the Honolulu Marathon, which enjoys a rich tradition and a long list of Kenyan winners, are besides themselves with the joy of hosting the fastest woman over 21 kilometers as she attacks double the distance for the first time. Keen observers in Iten have noted Jepkosgei’s change of routine in training, and speculation was rife that she was preparing for a major marathon. They were right, but none of them could hazard a guess that the Honolulu Marathon would be her choice. “The Honolulu Marathon is a good test to see how one can run in hot conditions,” said race president Jim Baraha. “We are excited about having Joyciline, a world record holder, in our race. She will have a great experience and learn a lot. “It’s a race that has developed a lot of champions and we have had a lot of success with Kenyans who help put us on the map. We will continue with that philosophy.” “We want Kenyan athletes not only because of how fast they run, but also because they are warm, hospitable, polite and treat everyone with respect. They are easy to work with,” (Sat 10) ⚡AMP
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Boaz Kipyego of Kenya won the Anthem Richmond Marathon clocking 2:20:44

Boaz Kipyego of Kenya and training currently in Austin Minnesota won the Anthem Richmond Marathon today Nov 10, while Bose Gemeda Asseta of Ethiopia took an early lead over Midlothian's Keira D'Amato and cruised to victory in the women's race. Kipyego finished in 2:20:44. Second was Lazarus Yego of Kenya. Suleman Abrar Shifa and Abu Kebede Diriba, both of Ethiopia, were third and fourth, respectively, followed by Will Christian of Chesapeake. Assetta finished in 2:39:04. D'Amata was second in 2:40:56. Kate Sanborn of West Point, N.Y., was third, followed by Emily Hulme of Easton, Pa., and Tesfaye Girma of Ethiopa.  Boaz Kipyego is also part of the Run The World Challenge 3 team and is battling for the lead spot having already posted 222.87 miles he has run and logged since Oct 29. (Sat 10) ⚡AMP
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A seven-strong Australian contingent is set to take on the Antarctica marathon on December 13th

Lawyer Justin Quill will take on a unique challenge in the coming months. He’s set to take part in the Antarctic Ice Marathon, which starts on December 13. Former footballer Campbell Brown and comedian Tommy Little will form part of a seven-strong Australian contingent heading over to Antarctica to compete in the event on ice. “It’s going to be five hours in minus 20 degrees. “It’ll be a great adventure for us but we’re also raising money for spinal injuries in Australia,” they said. (Sat 10) ⚡AMP
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Olympic Trails qualifier, Karen Bertasso hopes to run well in Sunday's MVP Healthcare Stockade-athon 15k

Karen Bertasso of Albany, New York blends her career as an orthopedic Physician Assistant with a marathon career training 70-80 miles per week. "It can be tough in the OR," she said. "You're operating on a lot of joint patients, so you're on your feet all day and it's physically exhausting." On Oct. 13, Bertasso ran an even paced Hartford Marathon clocking 2:43:46, which was a personal record.  She has run 20 marathons.  She was comfortably under the 2:45 standard to qualify for the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Marathon Trials. Since then, she has "indulged" herself by taking a break from training, but still should be one of the top women in Sunday's MVP Healthcare Stockade-athon 15k, a race she last ran in 2015. No matter what happens on Sunday, she already has her ultimate goal in the bank, and looks forward to the 2020 Olympic Trials to be held Feb. 29 in Atlanta. (Sat 10) ⚡AMP
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Ultra-marathon runner Jacqui Bell could be the youngest woman to run all four Racing The Planet ultra-marathons

Jacqui Bell is aiming to be the youngest female in the world to run the Four Deserts Grand Slam. The mission isn’t for the faint-hearted, with each desert race being a whopping 250km. Jacqui has run across three deserts so far, in Africa, South America and Asia. If that doesn’t sound tough enough, she finished each race in seven days with all her supplies on her back. “We carry all of our food, all our clothes for the week and everything on our back so we try and keep our bags as light as possible because we have to run with it,” says Jacqui. Next month, Jacqui heads off on the final leg of her challenge. This time, she’s taking on the coldest continent on earth – Antarctica. (Sat 10) ⚡AMP
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Theodore Strange stopped to help a fallen marathoner in New York saving her life

Dr. Strange heard someone screaming, “Help!” Strange was just coming off of the Queensboro Bridge when his instincts took over. He immediately went over to the voice and found a woman on the ground, unconscious. Her friend had been calling out for help. Strange acted quickly, asking a volunteer to lift the woman’s legs, suspecting that she had passed out due to the strain of running the marathon. “She was losing her color and she was foaming at the mouth,'' said Strange, who is vice chairman of primary care at Northwell Health and vice president of medical operations at Staten Island University Hospital in Prince’s Bay. He quickly checked her pulse, “and she didn’t have any,” he said. Strange, a doctor of internal and geriatric medicine, immediately began administering CPR. Within minutes, he received a defibrillator after asking for one when his chest compressions weren’t effective. “After two or three more shocks, she was breathing on her own,” Strange recalled. However, the woman still wasn’t conscious. She was transported to New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center just up the road and, as Strange was watching emergency responders load her into the ambulance, he made the decision to continue on with his race. Strange ended up finishing in 5 hours and 16 minutes, but his most meaningful moment, by far, came at mile 16. "People have been calling me a hero, but I was just doing what I was trained to do,” he said. “We have a saying in New York: ‘If you see something, say something.’ But my philosophy has always been, ‘If you see something, do something.’” As for the woman who went into cardiac arrest, she’s a 41-year-old Ironman finisher who went down on the course due to a blood clot in her artery. According to her family, she’s currently in stable condition. This was the 25th time Dr Strange ran the New York City Marathon. (Fri 9) ⚡AMP
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Mary Keitany has set her sights on breaking the world marathon record next year

Speaking on arrival in Kenya from the Big Apple yesterday, Mary Keitany said if she was to receive an invite to run in Berlin next year, she would attempt to break the record of 2:15:25 set by Britain’s Paula Radcliffe in 2003. “I’m confident with the right conditions and with my current form, I can break the world record or improve on my personal best time,” added Keitany. Keitany’s personal best in the marathon is 2:17:01, which is also all-women’s world record, set in London last year. Keitany, who clocked 2:22:48 to win her fourth crown in New York, missed the course record by 17 seconds and believes that if the Ethiopian rivals had kept pace, she would have smashed the course record. “I had no idea that I was 17 seconds outside the course record pace in New York. I think if the Ethiopian athletes had kept pace, we would have broken the course record,” she added. Keitany said she is delighted to have won the New York after under-performing in the last event due to illness. She said she will take a break to recover before resuming her training in the new year ahead of the 2019 season. “I will take a break to spend time with my family and start my preparations in the new year. I will work with my management team on where we will run next year,” added Keitany, who is also a three-time London marathon champion. (Fri 9) ⚡AMP
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Marius Kimutai and defending champion Ruth Chepngetich of Kenya will headline the Vodafone Istanbul Marathon

The Istanbul Marathon is celebrating its 40th birthday this year. As in previous years, the race starts on the Asian side of the city and finishes on the European side at the Hippodrome, one of the oldest race tracks in the world. The favorite to arrive first in the historical peninsula is Kimutai who can boast a 2:05:47 personal best, achieved in Rotterdam two years ago. Having finished his recent seven marathons well under 2:10, the Kenyan is also a candidate to break the 2:10:42 race record set by Kenyan Vincent Kiplagat in 2010, a performance that is also the Turkish all-comers record. Kimutai is likely to be challenged by Ethiopia’s Getu Feleke whose career best is 2:04:50 set at the 2012 Rotterdam Marathon. More recently, Feleke’s clocked 2:07:46 at the Frankfurt Marathon last year. However, 21-year-old Bahraini Abdi Ibrahim Abdo, who has a fresh PB of 2:08:32 from Rome this year, is expected to be a strong contender as well. The field also includes winners of the most recent two editions, 2017 champion Abraham Kiprotich of France and 2016 champion Evans Kiplagat of Azerbaijan. Last year’s runner-up Jacob Kendagor of Kenya also returns. Salah Eddine Bounasr of Morocco will be another athlete to watch. On the women’s side, race record holder Chepngetich returns to defend her title. The Kenyan was a surprise winner in her debut last year, smashing the previous record in 2:22:36. The 24-year-old finished second in 2:22:59 at the Paris Marathon earlier this year. Chepngetich may face tough competition from her compatriots Margaret Agai and Bornes Kitur, with lifetime bests of 2:23:28 and 2:24:19 respectively. The women’s race will also feature Merima Mohammed of Bahrain, and Diana Lobacevske of Lithuania, 17th in Rio Olympic Games. (Fri 9) ⚡AMP
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Even super heroes like Yuki Kawauchi need to let their body recover, less marathons for this Boston Champion

Yuki Kawauchi announced on Facebook today that, "I have decided to stop running marathons in America and Europe until next spring." This comes after running some tough marathons including the Venice Marathon where he had to run through ankle deep water.  Yuki continues, "I feel severe (tired) going to work (after a marathon) without recovery time (massage, hot spring, rest, etc.) after a long fight and jet lag."  He has to go into work soon after he arrives back in Japan and usually works until 9:15pm.  He posted, "It was no problem when I was younger." In the last year he mentioned the following races: January marathon in US was very cold like -17C (5F).  In March he vomited after he finished because of the hot conditions in Taiwan.   The conditions in Boston where he won were terrible (cold, wet and windy).  In May he ran a 71K race in Japan on a very tough course.  June was a hot marathon in Sweden. He ran in strong wind in two races in Japan and Italy.  He concluded, "I need to recover to be in perfect condition by next spring."  Gary Fanelli, former elite runner, reaction was similar of many, "Yes Yuki, you definitely need recovery...so please give that to yourself...and rest until you do feel 100%...which means, how you felt before you started a marathon." Bob Anderson says,"Yuki is a hero for many of us.  He has run in extreme conditions and have run well most of the time.  But now he needs recovery time.  Even super heroes need to let their body recover.  Yuki has made a wise decision." (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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The World´s most difficult physical challenges has to be the Kaihogyo thousand day marathon

One of the world's most difficult physical challenges is the Kaihogyo 1,000 day marathon. The marathon can only be carried out by Buddhists monks belonging to Japan's Tendai sect of Buddhism. It takes 1,000 days to complete spread out over seven years. The monks who complete the event are said to receive a better understanding of the universe. The kaihōgyō takes place on Mount Hei, which overlooks the ancient capital of Japan, Kyoto. The grueling, 1,000-day, seven year event, has a different regimen each year. For the first year, a monk must run 30K each day for 100 consecutive days. On top of this, they must still perform their regular temple duties, leaving very little time for sleep. Endo Mitsunaga, the most recent monk to complete the challenge, would wake up at a bit after midnight, lace up the straw sandals he was required to wear, and run up and down the mountain, stopping to pray at about 260 different shrines along the way. At 8 a.m., he would return and perform his duties at the temple. Each night, he slept about 4 and half hours. As Mitsunaga ran throughout the mountain, he would also pass by a number of unmarked graves. These, along with the knife at his side, were reminders of the seriousness of kaihōgyō. At the end of the first year — the first 100 days — a monk is permitted to withdraw from the challenge. If, however, they decide to embark on the 101st day of the marathon, they are no longer permitted to stop. If they fail, tradition demands that they take their own lives. Mount Hei is littered with the graves of monks who failed to meet the challenge; none, however, date from the later than the 19th century. If the monk chooses to continue, the next two years go on much like the first: 30 km per day for 100 consecutive days, praying at shrines throughout the mountain, and taking care of their duties at the temple. Then, for the fourth and fifth year, the monk must run 30 km per day for 200 consecutive days. Here, a little bit after the midpoint, comes perhaps the most difficult aspect of this practice. The insane mental and physical commitment that it takes to complete kaihōgyō puts it squarely among the most challenging tasks in the world. By year six they are running and walking 60K for 100 days and by year seven they have to cover 84K per day for 100 days.  In fact, it's so challenging, that only 46 monks have completed the challenge since 1885. (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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Age is only a number for 42-year-old Mark Kiptoo who clocked a 2:07:50 marathon

Kenya´s Mark Kiptoo clocked 2:07:50 at the Frankfurt Marathon October 28 setting a new world master´s record.  Kiptoo was formerly a 5000m specialist clocking 12:53.46 in August 2010.  He also ran 27:14 for 10,000m in June 2008.   He was the African champion in 2012, won the Stockholm Diamond League race in 2010, and was third at the Commonwealth Games in 2010 over 5000 meters. Kiptoo smashed the former master´s record by 48 seconds, finishing sixth overall at the Frankfurt Marathon.  The Kenyan returned to the scene of his marathon debut in 2013 were he finished one second behind the winner Vincent Kipruto clocking 2:06:16. The following year at age 38 he won the Frankfurt marathon clocking 2:06:49.  After setting the record Oct 28 he said, "For sure I want to keep pushing and believe I can still go faster. Today 2:05 – 2:06 was possible but the wind in the second part of the race made it hard. I was aware of the record but my goal was also to try to win the race. Once the leaders had got away I was still fighting for every position and it was nice that this assisted me to achieve the record.” (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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Laura Santurri wanted to take her life back so she started running

Director of Health Sciences, Laura Santurri began running with her father as a means to feel closer to him. However, running began to evolve into something more. Running became a means of dealing with health problems, including suffering from interstitial cystitis, and to raise money for charities that she believes in strongly. “I was feeling pretty crummy as a result of living with that condition, and feeling pretty poorly,” Santurri said. “I wound up trying a new treatment and it gave me some pain relief. When that happened, I made the decision that I really wanted to take my life back.” Santurri decided to start running. She began by running short distances, such as one mile, and gradually pushed herself to run longer races. The feeling of crossing a finish line made her feel more confident," she said. “Once I started doing races and crossing finish lines, and getting addictive, that finish line felt really good,” Santurri said. “My background is in public health and I do a lot of work with health behavior theory. Self-efficacy is a big construct that you find in most health behavior theories. We can really explain a portion of why people do what they do based on their own confidence and their ability to do those things. The more finish lines I would cross, the more self-efficacy and self-confidence I had.”  Over the last 13 years, Santurri has participated in multiple marathons and ultra-marathons. She has made it a tradition to participate in a series called Trial 100, and she plans to run in it again next year.  (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono named AIMS Best Marathoners for 2018

The AIMS athletes’ nomination committee has decided that for this year (October 2017 to September 2018) Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono were the outstanding candidates for the awards based on their performances over the past 12 months. Kipchoge is undefeated in the marathon in 2018, winning in London and Berlin. His victory in Berlin was in a world record of 2:01:39, taking 78 seconds off the previous record – the biggest single improvement on the world record for more than 50 years. Cherono won the Berlin Marathon in a world-leading time of 2:18:11. She finished fourth at the London Marathon earlier in the year in 2:24:10. The achievements of the two Kenyan athletes will receive global recognition during the AIMS ‘Best Marathon Runner’ Awards Gala in Athens, Greece on November 9. (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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Larry Allen was at the 35K mark of the New York City Marthon and here is what he observed

This year's TCS New York City Marthon was terrific. We were at 35k. It was a perfect day, 53 degrees, no humidity and no wind. Mary Keitany was in full flight and incredibly strong.  I read later that she ran 15:19 from 35k to 40k.  That is a tough section with a mile long uphill on 5th Ave from 110th to the park entrance at 90th and two more hills in the park. Her time for that 5k was faster than the winning time in the pro elite 5k race the day before. Her 1:06:50 for the 2nd half was astonishing. Shalane and Molly looked great at 35k too and they ran close to 1:10 for the 2nd half in their own right. I thought both might make the podium as Cheryiot didn’t look as strong, found out later she was running with a bad hamstring. The men’s race was anything but decided when they came by us. I thought Desisa looked like he was hanging on and I thought Kamworor looked most in command. I saw later that he made a tactical error and ran a very fast mile from 23-24 which is mostly uphill in 4:29 and then slowed in the next mile (which is much less hilly) to 4:45 and that’s where Desisa struck. So inspiring to watch the professionals but I have to say that watching the 52,000+ in the mass field is always deeply moving. We live right on the course so it is a big day in our year. I have such vivid and fond memories of running the race first in 1979 and last in 2011 and countless thousands of training miles on and around the course too.  (Editor's note: Larry has been runinng for 50 years.  He was inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame in 2016.  He is an artist and lives in Manhattan and Fairfield County.  He is doing the Run The World Challenge for the third time.) (Wed 7) ⚡AMP
by Larry Allen
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Olympic silver medallist Feyisa Lilesa had been in exile in the US since making this anti-government gesture

The Ethiopian had been in exile in the USA since making an anti-government gesture while crossing the finish line of the marathon and clinching the silver medal at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. But after Feyisa Lilesa recent return to Ethiopia following the election of a new reformist government, the 28-year-old – who won half marathons in New York and Bogota during his exile in the USA – has returned to training and set his sights on once again competing at the highest level of distance running, starting with his first appearance at the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon since finishing fourth in 2015. “It has been a difficult time for Feyisa but we are delighted he has chosen to compete in the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon, which is the only IAAF Gold Label race in the Middle East,” said event director Peter Connerton. “Although his training regime was disrupted while in exile, he has a personal best of 2:04:52 to his name as well as being an Olympic silver medallist, finishing second to current world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge, and a World Championships bronze medal winner. “Now that he is home in Ethiopia and training in familiar surroundings, we look forward to seeing him back to his best when we stage the 20th anniversary of the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon. (Wed 7) ⚡AMP
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University of Virginia President Jim Ryan is running the Anthem Richmond Marathon on Saturday in support of Madison House

The Anthem Richmond Marathon is an annual marathon held in Richmond, Virginia, USA. It was established in 1978 and has been run every year since. Jim Ryan, University of Virginia president and others are running the Marathon to support the student volunteer center, Madison House. Madison House operates as an independent nonprofit volunteer center for UVA students, raise funds for its programs and the work volunteers do within the Charlottesville and surrounding community. “Running a marathon can be a solitary pursuit, so over the past few years I’ve tried to make it about more than just me,” Jim Ryun said. “In the past I’ve run for teachers, but this time I’ll be running to support Madison House, which does incredible work helping students serve the community."   Nearly 4,300 UVA students volunteered more than 106,000 hours in the community last year through Madison House programs. Madison House will place student volunteers along the marathon route. (Wed 7) ⚡AMP
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Jenny Whitaker says her bout with Cancer sent her into a depression but running half marathons got her back on track

Following a yearlong course of treatment, one that had her going in every three weeks for a full year of “an infusion of some kind of chemical,” it also sent her into a depression. “I found myself kind of framing every decision I made like ‘What if I don’t make it?’ … and it really just started messing with my head so I just needed to set a really big, audacious goal.” That goal — one she came up with last November — is why the Bozeman, Montana, resident will travel to Las Vegas this month to race in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon. It will be her 11th half-marathon of the year as she nears the completion of her goal — one half-marathon per month for each month of 2018. Whitaker said she has been a runner for 20 years, but not too seriously until the past few years. She had been racing more and started doing half-marathons, posting her best time in September 2016. Two weeks after that half-marathon, her husband, Rich, found a lump near her ribs. Four months after a mammogram had come back clean, Whitaker was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer at 44 that took a year of treatment and wrapped up in October 2017. (Wed 7) ⚡AMP
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Bill Mitchell began running in his early 60s, has run 157 marathons and says hot chocolate and wine gums is his secret to success

73-year-old Bill Mitchell has run 157 marathons – including 23 ultra-marathons – says a daily cup of hot chocolate and wine gums are the secret of his success. (Wine gums are sweets and contain no alcohol). Bill Mitchell began running in his early 60s and says that he is now the fittest he has ever been. And it’s no surprise to hear that when you discover the former merchant navy officer from Derbyshire UK, has run the infamous Marathon des Sables – a six-day, 250km endurance test where temperatures often exceed 50C (122F) an astonishing three times. Bill says,"A lot of people resign themselves to old age. I always say to people you’re never too old to do anything. The bottom line is anyone can do it as long as they’ve got the desire." Bill said he found his second ultra-marathon easier than his first – and credits his unusual diet plan. He added, "I drink hot chocolate every day. It is delicious. I also carried a small bag of wine gums with me."  Mitchell also follows a strict diet – that includes eating oily fish and avoiding meat, cream and butter – to ensure that is fit and healthy.  Mitchell began running in April 2008 and his hobby has now led him and his wife Linda, 68, across the globe. (Wed 7) ⚡AMP
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Pete Kostelnick finished a nearly 5,400-mile Alaska-To-Florida Run

An ultramarathon runner has finished a nearly 5,400-mile (8,690-kilometer) diagonal, cross-continental run that began in Alaska and ended in Florida. 31-year-old Pete Kostelnick from Ohio started July 31 at Anchor Point on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula, running without a support vehicle to Florida. Pushing supplies in a three-wheel jogging stroller, he averaged some 55 miles per day. In 2016, Kostelnick ran 3,067 miles (4,935 kilometers) from San Francisco to New York City in 42.25 days. He said he hoped his feat would inspire others to chase their wildest dreams. He added some people have compared him to Forrest Gump, the primary character in the 1994 film by the same name, where Gump ran cross-country several times. (Tue 6) ⚡AMP
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Running legend Amby Burfoot is going to run his 56th consecutive Manchester Road Race

Running legend and nine-time champion Amby Burfoot is expected to run in the Manchester Road Race for a record 56th consecutive time on Thanksgiving Day, race officials announced this week. Burfoot, the 1968 Boston Marathon champion, won the 4.748-mile road race in Manchester nine times between 1968 and 1977. Burfoot competed in Manchester for the first time in 1963 as a 17-year-old high school senior, and he hasn't missed a Thanksgiving morning on Main Street since then. The retired Runner's World magazine editor already holds the MRR record for most consecutive runs at 55. "Amby Burfoot running in our road race is as much of a Thanksgiving Day tradition in Manchester as turkey and pumpkin pie," said Dr. Tris Carta, president of the Manchester Road Race Committee. "We are delighted that he's with us again this year, and we deeply appreciate his long standing devotion to the race." (Tue 6) ⚡AMP
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Hannah Gavios a runner left paralysed, Completes TCS New York City Marathon

Two years ago Hannah Gavios fractured her spine after falling 150ft as she attempted to escape from a sex attacker. (See previous story.) Incredibly, yesterday, she chose to 'crutch' the entire 26.2 miles of the New York City Marathon. The 25-year-old achieved the near-impossible in 11 hours, completing the feat shortly after 8pm. What an accomplishment. Although many of the runners had finished long before Hannah, she was still greeted by a huge crowd waiting for her at the finish line. "I didn't expect this many people. It just shows my city has my back. "My city is awesome, waiting for me here - I don't know how long everyone waited for me - it just means so much to me that you guys stayed,” she said. (Tue 6) ⚡AMP
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Buze Diriba of Ethiopia is set to defend her title at Manchester Road Race

Buze Diriba of Ethiopia will defend the Manchester Road Race title she captured with a record-setting time last Thanksgiving. Race officials this week announced today that Diriba, 24, has entered the 2018 MRR. She edged Molly Huddle at the finish line last year to win in 23:57. Her time beat the course record of 23:59 set by the late Emilie Mondor of Canada in 2003. Joining her in the 2018 field will be former winners Diane Nukuri and Emily Sisson. Nukuri, an Olympic runner from Burundi, captured back-to-back road race championships in 2014 and 2015. Sisson, who was an All-American competitor at Providence College, won the 2016 MRR. The 82nd Manchester Road Race will take place at 10 a.m. on Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 22 of this year). The race starts and finishes on Main Street in Manchester, in front of St. James Church. (Tue 6) ⚡AMP
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South African's Karkloof 100 miler has been selected as a qualifying race for Western States 2020

The Karkloof100 is a 100 Mile Endurance Race, one of only a few such races in South Africa and only one of two 100-milers in KwaZulu-Natal. The Karkloof, renowned for its indigenous forests, wetlands and grasslands is an ideal setting for the extreme challenge that aims to push the boundaries of Trail Running in South Africa by attracting top class, local and international field to compete over what is considered the ultimate distance in trail running. The organizers are very excited because the race is now going to be a qualifying race by Western States 100.  John Redinger, President, Western States 100, wrote, “We are pleased to inform you that 2019 Karkloof 100 has been selected as a qualifying race for the 2020 Western States 100. Runners who complete the race within your time limit will qualify to enter a lottery where the runners for Western States will be selected. The qualifying period for the 2020 Western States will be from November 5, 2018 through November 3, 2019. The lottery will be held on December 7, 2019 and the race itself will be run on June 27-28, 2020.”  (Mon 5) ⚡AMP
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Milaw breaks course record at Marathon Des Alpes Maritimes clocking 2:07:26

Ethiopia’s Abrha Milaw and Nurit Shimels claimed the titles at the Marathon des Alpes Maritimes, an IAAF Bronze Label road race held between the French southern cities of Nice and Cannes on Sunday. In the men’s race, a group of six –Milaw, Kenyans Nixon Kurgat, Benad Too, Ronald Kurgat, Ben Sowinko as well as Berhane Tsegaye of Eritrea – hit the first 10-kilometer checkpoint in 30:25, suggesting a possible finish time of about 2:08. At the halfway point, reached by the leaders in about 1:03:45, Ronald Kurgat and Tsegaye trailed behind by 1:34. At this point, only Milaw, Nixon Kurgat and Too were still in contention for the victory.  Milaw took command of the race at the 30 kilometers point clocking 1:31:10. His opponents started to drift back as Kurgat was 13 seconds back, and Too 19 seconds adrift. The gap continued to increase over the remaining kilometers. By the 40-kilometer mark, hit in 2:00:45, Milaw’s lead grew to 2:27 over Kurgat and 3:17 over Too. He didn’t fade in the waning stages, crossing the line in 2:07:26, 1:14 faster than the previous course record of 2:08:40 set by Kenya’s Lukas Kanda in 2008. The 30 year-old Ethiopian, who improved his personal best by 20 seconds, notched his second career win over the distance following a success in Stockholm last year. Kurgat, who was the fastest man of the field with a PB of 2:07:11, held on for second in 2:10:41, as his compatriot Too rounded the podium clocking 2:11:56. (Mon 5) ⚡AMP
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The five-time track Olympian Bernard Lagat finished 18th in 2:17:20 at his New York City Marathon debut

Bernard Lagat, 43, thought marathon runners were crazy. Even for a decorated runner who has excelled at ‘long distance’ on the track, the thought of 26.2 miles was daunting. But now that he’s tried one, he’s hoping to develop an addiction – the good kind, of course - the one that most marathon runners seem to have. “They say once you run one marathon, you come back and run again. It’s addictive,” Lagat, a five-time Olympian and American track superstar, said. Lagat finished 18th in two hours, 17 minutes, 20 seconds at the New York City Marathon Sunday morning.  It was his first marathon and he finished 11:21 behind winner Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia. “Oh man, it was something out there,” Lagat said. “It was fun. I’ve never been in such an environment like that before. I enjoyed it. The fans were amazing on the road. It’s one of those things where I didn’t even know going in that I would experience something like that today. It was really awesome.” Lagat came up a bit short of his stated goal – breaking Meb Keflezighi’s American masters record of 2:12:21 – but he says they’ll be other chances. This won’t be a one-time thing for Lagat. “I hope I can come back to New York once more,” Lagat, who won a silver medal in the 1,500 meters at the 2004 Athens Olympics, said. (Mon 5) ⚡AMP
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South Arrican’s Irvette Van Zyl breaks the course record at the Soweto Marathon

Queen of South African distance running Irvette van Zyl conquered the Old Mutual Soweto Marathon in style, claiming back-to-back titles and posting a new course record yesterday. Van Zyl broke the foreign stranglehold on last year's race and kept it in South African hands just five months after giving birth. She won the race in a time of two hours, 33 minutes and 43 seconds, chopping two minutes and 19 seconds off the previous record Ethiopian Meseret Mengistu Biruin set in 2014. The Olympic marathoner won bronze in 2016 before winning gold last year, becoming the first South African female winner since René Kalmer in 2009. “I didn't think I would actually run the record today because last night I was thinking about it and thought that's a bit fast,” Van Zyl said. “Having a baby five months ago and breaking the record is reaching too far out and I worked out the last two days I could do it but I thought maybe my watch was wrong.” Ethiopian Sintayehu Legese Yinesu won his fourth Soweto Marathon title, winning the men's race in 2:19:10. (Mon 5) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Michael Kunyuga clinched the Hangzhou Marathon in China

He upset a quality field to clock 2:10:37, just four seconds shy of the course record set by Azmeraw Bekele of Ethiopia last year. Running under cool and wet conditions, a crowded leading group paced the race in the early stages. When they hit the 30-kilometer mark in 1:33:03, the leaders were cut to only 10 men. After another three kilometers, Kenya’s Douglass Kimeli first pulled away but was soon caught up by Kunyuga. After a five-kilometre see-saw battle between Kimeli and Kunyuga, the latter finally pulled clear after 38 kilometers. The 31-year-old was well on track to assault on the course record when he passed 39 kilometers in 2:00:53. But it seemed his target was only on the victory, as Kunyuga slowed down in front of the finish line, waving hands to celebrate his win instead of pushing ahead. Kunyuga’s winning mark is 21 seconds slower than his career best time set from his second-place finish in Hannover seven months ago. But it’s already the third title claimed by the efficient Kenyan, who debuted over the classic distance just last year and was competing in his fourth ever international road race. (Mon 5) ⚡AMP
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Two time Boston Marathon winner Lelisa Desisa out sprinted everyone to win the New York City Marathon in 2:05:59

Lelisa Desisa from Ethiopia clocked 2:05:59 winning the New York City marathon this morning. He was third last year clocking 2:11:23. His PR is 2:04:45 set in Dubai in 2013. Lelisa was the Boston Marathon winner in 2013 and 2015. His win at the 2013 Dubai Marathon was his first marathon. Battling Lelisa to the end was 22-year-old Shura Kitata who clocked 2:06:01 for second place. The Ethiopian was second at the 2018 London marathon clocking his PR of 2:04:49. Last year's champion Geoffrey Kamworor just could not keep up the pace with these two as he finished third in 2:06:26. The 25-year-old Kenyan winning time last year was 2:10:53 but this year's weather was nearly perfect for marathoning.  Four Americans placed in the top ten.  In 6th place Jared Ward clocked 2:12:24 and Scott Fauble placed 7th clocking 2:12:28.   (Sun 4) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Mary Keitany pulled off her fourth New York City Marathon win crushing the field

Kenya's Mary Keitany opened up a lead after a 4:54 mile at the 20 mile mark.  The 36-year-old with a PR of 2:17:01 while winning the 2017 London Marathon was in control.  Mary won three consecutive TCS New York City Marathons from 2014 to 2016.  In 2016 her 3:34 margin of victory was the greatest in the women's race since 1980.  Last year she was runner-up to Shalane Flanagan clocking 2:27:54.  Today Shalane Flanagan was about a quarter mile back with six miles to go holding on to fifth place.  Molly Huddle (USA) was close behind.  At 35K Mary projected finish time was just 50 seconds off the course record.  The course record of 2:22:31 was set in 2003. Shalane Flanagan moved up to fourth at 35k with Molly in 5th.   Meanwhile Mary Keitany continued pulling further ahead clipping off 5:05 miles.  35-year-old Vivian Cheruiyot who won the 2018 London Marathon (2:18:31) upped her pace to 5:21/mile making a move on Ethiopian's Rahma Tusa who was second at 23 miles.  Mary crossed the finish line first clocking 2:22:48 crushing the field. Vivian Cheruityot was second in 2:26:02.  America’s Shalane Flanagan finished third in 2:26:22 and Molly Huddle was fourth in 2:26:44.  Rahma Tusa faded to fifth clocking 2:27:13.   2018 Boston marathon winner Desiree Linden placed 6th clocking 2:27:51.  Allie Kieffe (US) places 7th clocking 2:28:12.   (Sun 4) ⚡AMP
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Can Geoffrey Kamworor become only the second male runner in 20 years to win consecutive New York Marathon titles

Geoffrey Kamworor, 25-year-old Kenyan, won last year’s New York City Marathon by three seconds, is back in New York aiming to become only the second male runner in the past two decades, and the seventh in the 48-year history of the race, to win consecutive titles. He knows the field, stacked with other Olympians and major marathon winners, will be gunning for him. Kamworor has a secret weapon though: his training partner. Six days a week for most of the year, he runs stride for stride in Kenya with Eliud Kipchoge, the world-record holder in the marathon and the greatest marathoner ever. In many ways, the runners have a mentor-protégé relationship. Kipchoge is older by eight years and has already made the progression from the track to road racing and marathons.    (Sat 3) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia’s Azmeraw Bekele will be looking to claim victory at Hangzou Marathon on Sunday

Ethiopia’s Azmeraw Bekele will be looking to claim back-to-back victories and challenge his own course record at the Hangzhou Marathon, an IAAF Silver Label road race. Last year, the 32-year-old emerged triumphant from a three-man battle in the final kilometer to take the top honors in 2:10:33 in what was his first appearance at the scenic city in southeastern China, beating the previous course record set by countryman Bejigan Regasa Mndaye in 2016 by 49 seconds. Although he has not run in any race at any distance since that victory, Bekele is still seen as one of the top favorites to continue the record-breaking streak in Hangzhou, thanks to his 2:07:12 personal best achieved at the 2014 Dubai Marathon, which made him the fastest man among the entrants. However, he will also be facing a strong challenge from a clutch of Kenyan sub-2:10 runners on Sunday with the biggest threat being the 31-year-old Edwin Kibet Koech. Since his marathon debut in 2014, Koech has remained consistent. He registering his career best time of 2:08:17 three years ago from his fifth place finish in Eindhoven and went on to won at the 2016 Linz Marathon in 2:09:06. His most recent performance was staged at the Dalian International Marathon six month ago, as he broke the course record with a winning mark of 2:09:44. Kenya’s Geoffrey Ronoh, who will turn 36 on Monday , will also toe the line with high spirits. The 2:09:29 performer has yet to run in any marathon in the current season but collected two half marathon titles in August and September respectively. Ronoh’s compatriot Evans Sambu is another man to watch. Following his victories in China’s Taiyuan and Shenzhen in 2016, the 25-year-old broke the 2:10 barrier for the first time last October when he clocked a career best mark of 2:09:05 to finished fifth in Gongju. However, Sambu has been struggling to find his best form in 2018, finishing seventh in Dongying and Taiyuan with a lackluster season best mark of 2:17:39. (Sat 3) ⚡AMP
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A woman paralyzed escaping an attacker is running New York Marathon to inspire others

Hannah Gavios isn’t letting anything get in the way of her finishing the New York Marathon, not even an attack that left her partially paralyzed.  Gavios, 25, said she is going to complete the marathon on crutches after having survived being pushed off a cliff while on vacation in Thailand. In 2016, she was heading back to her hotel when she became lost. Gavios said someone approached her and started harassing her, so she ran. Eventually she found herself on a cliff trying to escape the person who would not leave her alone. She fell 150 feet and broke her back. After she was rescued, Gavios started her long recovery process. She said she believes she can fully recover but it will take a lot of hard work. She is adding 26.2 miles onto her extensive recovery. Gavios is partaking in the New York Marathon to help raise money for spinal cord injury research. “This year I am crutching the marathon, but soon you’ll see me running it,” she said. (Sat 3) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan-born American runner Paul Chelimo wins his first USA road title this morning in New York

The 2018 USATF 5K Championships for men and women was part of the Abbott Dash to the Finish 5K held this morning in New York City and produced by the New York Road Runners.  The race featured Team USA Olympians and national record-holders vying for $60,000 in prize money and the title of USA champion.  The first place man and woman won $12,000 and the title.  In addition to the elites, thousands of others took to the street the day before the NY City Marathon.  Paul Chelimo and Shadrack Kipchirchir battled to the end both clocking 13:45 with Paul breaking the tape first.  Stanley Kebenei was eight seconds back.  Emily Sisson pulled ahead in the women's race clocking 15:38.  Erike Kemp was second in 15:50 followed by Amy Cragg (15:54) and Kim Conley (16:01).  Paul is a Kenyan-born American runner.  He was the 2016 Olympic Silver medalist at 5000m.  He said after the race, "Wow, so excited to have won my first USA road title alongside my best friend, brother and training partner."   (Sat 3) ⚡AMP
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America’s Tim Ritchie is hoping to run well in the New York City Marathon on Sunday

Tim Ritchie signed with Saucony and started his professional career on the track before moving into road racing in 2014. Ritchie raced 5Ks, 10Ks and half marathons. “That was my inroads into being a professional runner,” Ritchie said. “I didn’t quite have the credentials when I graduated to sign a contract or be competing in the elite field in New York. I had to earn my way in.” Ritchie spent a year as a volunteer assistant with the Yale cross country team, while working with McKirdy Trained coaching services. He won the USATF Marathon National Championship last December at the California International Marathon in Sacramento. Ritchie moved up from 18th at the halfway mark with a blistering finish to claim the title in 2 hours, 11 minutes, 56 seconds. “There’s much more of a need for patience and self control in the early miles. I try to break the race up into stages, and keep reminding myself that I have what it takes.” Tim was hired to be the head track coach at UMass which started in June. “It’s a new life and a new adjustment, trying to find that balance,” Ritchie said. “It takes some discipline, time management, patience both on my part and my athletes have been truly patient and supportive of me, as well.” UMass finished sixth in the men’s race at last weekend’s Atlantic 10 Championships and 13th in the women’s team competition. “I’ve found it impressive how quickly he was able to gain the trust of the team,” UMass senior Michael Famiglietti said. “He’s still an athlete himself out there competing.”  Ritchie’s buildup for the New York Marathon has not been perfect. He’s had to adjust his schedule to full-time coaching and contend with injuries and illness, too. “I’m in a good rhythm now. From a running standpoint, being out in western Mass has been awesome for me,” Ritchie said. “This training environment is phenomenal when it comes to trails, dirt roads, hills’ it’s a beautiful place to go for a run every day.” The men’s New York elite field is stacked with nine Olympians and three major marathon champions from 2017. Ritchie doesn’t harbor hopes of winning. He understands the landscape of elite distance running right now and is focused on his own best race. “I want to get the most I can out of myself and run with pride,” Tim said.   (Fri 2) ⚡AMP
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Mark Sullivan is running the Philadelphia Marathon for the 25th consecutive year

Mark Sullivan is one of only two runners who has participated in every Philadelphia Marathon since 1994. He’ll be competing for the 25th consecutive year. The 56-year-old graphic designer and running coach has completed 176 marathons — more than 4,600 miles — since 1986, including 32 consecutive Boston Marathons, but never set out to make it a goal. “If races ceased to exist, I’d still be a runner,” said Sullivan. “It’s not about the challenge. I just like it.” He did ran track in high school but he didn’t take up running seriously until after college. Working as a technical illustrator early in his career, Sullivan found himself sitting at a desk all day and felt he wasn’t getting enough exercise on the occasional hikes and tennis matches he played with his wife, Robin. “I needed to get out and the cheapest thing to do was run,” he said. Sullivan discovered the outdoor exercise was useful in his work by helping him tap into his technical and creative side. “If I was out running, I could come back (to the home office) and be more productive,” he said. It began with a three-mile loop around his Freeburg neighborhood until “one day I just went and ran six miles,” Sullivan recalled. The outings kept getting longer and by 1985 Sullivan began entering local 5K and 10K races. In addition to running marathons, he’s participated in several ultras too.  (Fri 2) ⚡AMP
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Organizers are expecting a record number of runners at this year's Istanbul Marathon

The 40th Vodafone Istanbul Marathon, the world's only transcontinental race, will be held on Nov. 11. "We are seeing a lot more interest compared to last year. The registration for the 10-kilometer and the 15-kilometer events are already closed. We are expecting a record number of runners this year," Vodafone Turkey Deputy CEO Hasan Suel told Anadolu Agency on Wednesday. "The Istanbul Marathon attracts a great deal of attention from foreign and Turkish runners," he said. "This is the only marathon in the world where the runners cross two continents. The runners also run to see the world. This marathon also gives the participants a chance to see the city." The marathon will start on the Asian side of Istanbul's July 15 Martyrs Bridge, formerly known as the Bosporus Bridge. The finish line will be at the historic Sultanahmet Square on the city's European side. Recalling this year's motto "Run Istanbul for a Healthy Future," Suel said, "Running has become much more popular in Turkey." Around 30,000 runners including 3,500 foreigners from more than 100 countries will take part in the marathon. The event features the marathon, 15K, 10K and 8K.  (Fri 2) ⚡AMP
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Only two American woman have won the New York City Marathon, Miki Gorman was the first in 1977.

Miki Gorman was the first woman to finish the New York City Marathon in 1977, and it took 40 years until another American woman took the title. Miki Gorman was sitting alone at a corner table of a Magic Pan restaurant in Manhattan on Oct. 23, 1976, when her food arrived: not one, but two large crepes stuffed with mushroom and spinach souffle. A couple sitting nearby gawked at her. Gorman, at 5 feet tall or so, weighed only 90 pounds, and the plates of food covered her table. “I’m running the New York City Marathon tomorrow!” she told them. “And I’m going to win.” And so she did, the first woman to cross the finish line the next day. Even more, she won again the following year. No other American woman would take the title for the next four decades. “We’ve gone so long without winning, I can’t believe it,” Gorman told The Washington Post in 2004, long after her retirement in 1982. “My win was a lifetime ago.” Gorman was not around to see Shalane Flanagan’s 2017 victory; she died on Sept. 19, 2015, at 80, in Bellingham, Wash. The cause was metastasized lung cancer, her daughter, Danielle Nagel, said. Despite Gorman’s accomplishments, news of her death was not widely reported at the time. No word of it reached The New York Times. If it had, readers would have learned of record-breaking achievements that landed her in several halls of fame. One feat, in 1978, was a world best for a woman in the half marathon, at 1:15:58. She also won the Boston Marathon in the women’s category in 1974 and 1977, the latter victory coming, remarkably, the same year that she won in New York. She is the only woman known to have won both races twice. “She ran everything, from track races and really quick stuff all the way to these 100-mile races,” said George Hirsch, chairman of New York Road Runners. “There’s no one that I know of to this day who has that kind of a range and excelled in them all.” (Fri 2) ⚡AMP
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America’s Molly Huddle just might be the one to beat at this year’s New York City Marathon

Last year Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Desiree Linden followed with a victory in April at the Boston Marathon, the first American woman to win in 33 years. Those achievements motivate Molly Huddle, who finished third at the 2016 NYC Marathon in her debut after a successful middle-distance career. "We have a very talented group of women marathoners," Huddle said. The 34-year-old from upstate New York is among that group. At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Huddle broke Flanagan's 10,000-meter American record from the 2008 Beijing Games. In January, Huddle broke Deena Kastor's 2006 American record at the Houston Half Marathon. Kastor, who won bronze in the marathon at the 2004 Athens Olympics, watched Huddle surpass her record in Texas. "Some of the other American women already have the accolades under their belt," Kastor said. "Molly is coming in a little more hungry. So I think we'll see something special out of her on Sunday." Huddle recently trained for two months in Arizona in the high altitude of Flagstaff and Scottsdale. She lives and trains in Providence, Rhode Island, where her longtime coach Ray Treacy is the track coach at Providence College.  The 5-foot-4 Huddle called it a "confidence boost" to finish on the podium in her first marathon. Defending champion Flanagan and Linden are in the field Sunday, along with Kenyans Mary Keitany and Vivian Cheruiyot. Last year, Flanagan brought it home to a cheering crowd against a fading Keitany. "She really captivated everybody watching, the two million people on the streets, those of us glued to our televisions or here at the finish line to welcome her at Central Park," Kastor said. "It was an extraordinary performance." Kastor thinks Huddle has a good chance on Sunday. Huddle aims to make the U.S. team for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. "Molly has such a great range and she's pushing it into the marathon," said Kastor.  "She could really make the team in whatever event she chooses — 5K, 10K and marathon." Huddle attributes the surge of American women in the marathon to watching the likes of Kastor, Flanagan and others perform at international levels.  She says "once you see it is possible" it helps "shift your subconscious." "It's raised the bar," Huddle said. "It's more encouraging than anything."  (Thu 1) ⚡AMP
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Can Shalane Flanagan do it again two years in a row at the New York Marathon

Last year at the New York Marathon, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman to win in 40 years, clocking 2:26:53. On Sunday, the 37 year-old will once again face three-time champion Mary Keitany who she dethroned from the top podium spot, along with London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot and Boston Marathon champion Des Linden.  Flanagan has a personal best of 2:21:14, while Kenya’s Keitany clocked a women’s only world record of 2:17:01 to win the 2017 edition of the London Marathon.  A couple of days ago Shalane posted this on FB. "Who is your biggest fan? I say, be your own biggest fan.  Self belief is powerful."  (Thu 1) ⚡AMP
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Battalion Chief Joe Downey is running the New York Marathon in honor of his father

FDNY Battalion Chief Joe Downey is usually the first one to suit up when the alarm sounds and sirens wail, but at the TCS New York City Marathon approaches, his off-the-clock time is spent focusing on training and preparation. Downey said it's a way for him to stay active, competitive, and challenge himself. This year, for his sixth marathon, Downey will be joined by his two nieces, Nicolette and Gina Tortorici. They call themselves "Team Moved Me" to honor his father, Deputy Chief Ray Downey, Sr., who died at the World Trade Center on 9/11. Downey said he looks forward to running in his father's memory, along with his nieces. "For the run or life in general, in the fire house, I'm always thinking about his values, his character," Downey said. "I'm looking forward to running in his memory, in a way, with my nieces." The chief ran his first marathon with his father in 1981, and that being athletic and competitive was in his father's nature. The elder Downey even led the department's hockey team when he was alive, and his active lifestyle was an example to his son. "We watched him skate, we watched him run marathons," he said. "So he instilled that in us, to follow his way." Though Downey hopes that his own daughter, Carlee, will join him in running a marathon one day, it's his own running that speaks to him the loudest. (Thu 1) ⚡AMP
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President Cyril Ramaphosa will take part in the soweto Marathon in South Africa

President Cyril Ramaphosa will take part in the 2018 Old Mutual Soweto Marathon that starts and finish at the iconic FNB Stadium on Sunday. The president will line up alongside the strong field of some 30,000 athletes‚ who will be pounding through the streets of the historic township. “Yes I can confirm that President Cyril Ramaphosa will be running," said race director Danny Blumberg at a media briefing at FNB Stadium on Thursday. Blumberg said Ramaphosa will join the runners as a normal South African but withheld the race that the head of state will be running. “I think we are going to leave it as a surprise as to what distance he will be running‚” said Blumberg. The main race will start at 6am‚ followed by the 21‚1km at 6.30am while the casual runners resume at 7am. The 30,000 strong field is expected to crisscross the streets of the historic township in the energy-sapping route‚ more than half of which is hilly. It is forecast to be hot and humid on Sunday but race director Blumberg said there will be water points and more than one million water sachets that will be provided to the runners. (Thu 1) ⚡AMP
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Seoul marathon champion Sylvester Teimet of Kenya hopes for victory at Hangzhou marathon

Former Seoul marathon champion Sylvester Teimet of Kenya on Wednesday vowed to beat defending champion Azmeraw Molalign Bekele of Ethiopia in this Sunday's Hangzhou Marathon in China. Teimet, 34, who settled for fourth spot in last year's race, clocking 2:10:59, holds one of the fastest personal best times among the elites who will be racing in Hangzhou, an IAAF bronze level road race. The Kenyan holds a personal best time of 2:06:49, which he set when winning the Seoul Marathon in 2010. During his 11-year-long career, the experienced Kenyan has also collected titles in Shanghai and Gyeongju. He set the course record in Shanghai International Marathon of 2:09:01 in 2012 before compatriot Paul Lonyangata improved it to 2:07:14 in 2015. Sunday's race in Hangzhou will be his third in China this year, after he placed seventh at the Yellow River Estuary International Marathon in Dongying in May and second at the Taiyuan Marathon in early September. "I love running in China. I have rested enough and believe I have the strength to go for the win in my third marathon this year. There are several top names to expect, but I always focus on my own strength and strategy to win the race," Teimet said in Nairobi. (Thu 1) ⚡AMP
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When Tsepo Mathibelle won the Soweto Marathon last year it changed his life, he wants to repeat

2017 Soweto Marathon winner Tsepo Mathibelle is back in the country and ready to defend his Old Mutual Soweto Marathon title. His win last year was one of the highlights of his career clocking 2:19.50. On Sunday, the target is on his back with numerous rivals gunning for the title. "So far things are going the way I want them to in terms of my physical and mental readiness," Mathibelle said. "I have made a few changes in my training program.  This marathon requires a bit of speed to be able to break away at the 20km mark." He said his victory in 2017 and the R220000 ($15,190US) prize money changed his life in a number of ways and did enhance his training. "I was able to buy a car and am now able to travel to faraway places to train at high altitude. So, I am better prepared this year... before I used to struggle," he said. The 27-year-old will dedicate this year's race to his father, Molefi, who passed away earlier this month. (Thu 1) ⚡AMP
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