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Shawn Quigley man who collapsed after finishing a half-marathon has received his marathon medal in the hospital

A Halifax man who collapsed shortly and had to be revived after finishing a half-marathon on Sunday, has received his marathon medal in hospital.

Shawn Quigley finished the Blue Nose Marathon on Sunday, but collapsed shortly after crossing the finish line.

Quigley credits bystanders for saving his life by performing CPR on him for 10 minutes before he was rushed to the hospital.

The Blue Nose Marathon mascot and the executive director of the marathon, Sherri Robbins, visited Quigley in hospital on Wednesday, to deliver flowers and the medal.

(06/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan runner Felix Kirwa has been suspended for nine months

Kenyan long-distance runner Felix Kirwa has been suspended for nine months after testing positive for the banned stimulant strychnine, which is commonly known as rat poison.

The Athletics Integrity Unit, which has banned the runner from competition until November 14, also stripped Kirwa of his second place at the 2018 Singapore Marathon.

The 23-year-old insists that the banned substance accidentally entered his body through herbal medicines which he consumed for therapeutic reasons.

The AIU said the athlete violated anti-doping ruling as "he did not exercise utmost caution to ensure that he did not use a prohibited substance."

Strychnine is a strong performance enhancement stimulant which helps athletes to increase running stamina and boost endurance over long distances.

However, the banned drug has serious side effects, including restlessness and muscle spasms.

Kirwa is the brother of 2016 Olympic women’s marathon silver medalist Eunice Kirwa, who represented Bahrain at the Games. She was also provisionally suspended last month after failing a drug test.

(06/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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Running is how I understand myself and my approach to life says sports editor Matthew Futterman

Matthew Futterman, the deputy sports editor at The Times, crossing the finish line at the Hamptons Marathon 

I have run nearly every day since I was a teenager. Was I 15 or 16 when it started? I’m not sure. I don’t really remember who I was before I became a runner.

Running is how I understand myself and my approach to life — as a marathoner (23 and counting) and as a writer, which are sort of the same thing.

I’m the deputy sports editor at The Times, which means I mostly help guide our coverage and work closely with reporters, trying to instill a concept nearly every runner embraces: that we can be better tomorrow than we were yesterday. While I manage plenty of articles about traditional stick-and-ball sports, I am particularly drawn to ones about international and endurance sports, including running.

I occasionally assign those to myself, especially articles about runners who aren’t very famous, though in running success and fame and egomania don’t correlate the way they do in other sports, which may be why I like covering it.

Running serves so many purposes for me. It’s a way to stay fit, yes, and a way to wage the unwinnable battle against aging. If I can keep lowering my personal record in the marathon, which I got down to 3:15.58 in 2017, then I’m not getting older, right? If each year I can qualify for the Boston Marathon, then maybe I have cheated death just a little bit more.

I play that existential game with numbers, tracking my splits on my GPS watch. But more often than not, as I run my mind drifts to my other obsession: writing. I often joke that I do my best writing when I am running, only I’m not kidding.

On a typical day, I am up around 6 or so, and I will spend an hour or 90 minutes writing and thinking before heading over to Central Park for my usual jaunt of seven and a half to 10 miles, depending on how I feel. Only occasionally am I joined by a comrade or two, even though running is now an immensely social activity.

I am most often alone, sorting through my thoughts, trying to find the words that flow so much more easily when I am in motion than when I am staring at a screen. There is a mystical quality to running that brings your mind to places it otherwise would not go.

(06/12/2019) ⚡AMP
by Matthew Futterman
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Selemon Barega is going to defend his two-mile title at the Prefontaine Classic at Stanford and Yomif added to mile field

Ethiopia’s Selemon Barega will return to the Prefontaine Classic to defend his two-mile title at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Stanford on 30 June.

Barega, the 2016 world U20 champion, won the 2018 Diamond League 5000m title in 12:43.02, a time bettered only by the last three world record setters – two of whom ran before he was born.

Already this year, the 19-year-old has finished fifth at the World Cross Country Championships, first over 10,000m at the Ethiopian Championships and has recorded a season’s best of 12:53.04 for 5000m.

Olympic silver medallist Paul Chelimo finished second to Barega in the two-mile race at last year’s Prefontaine Classic. He may have one eye on the North American best of 8:07.07 set by Matt Tegenkamp in 2007.

Asian champion Birhanu Balew was the only athlete to beat Barega on the IAAF Diamond League circuit last year. The Bahraini runner, who finished third in this event at last year’s Pre Classic, will be looking to get the better of Barega once again.

Abadi Hadis, the 2017 world cross-country bronze medallist, recently came close to his 5000m PB with 12:56.48 in Rome. The versatile Ethiopian also equalled his half marathon PB of 58:44 earlier this year.

Olympic bronze medallist Hagos Gebrhiwet will be contesting the distance for the first time. The Ethiopian has finished third over 5000m in Shanghai and Rome so far this year and second over 10,000m in Stockholm.

World cross-country champion Joshua Cheptegei and fellow Ugandan Jacob Kiplimo are also in the field. Kiplimo finished 11th in this race last year, setting a national record of 8:25.17 – a time that should be within range for both men this time round.

Mo Ahmed, who last week lowered the Canadian 5000m record to 12:58.16, was also in last year’s Pre Classic two-mile race, finishing fourth.

Getaneh Molla made headlines earlier this year when he won the Dubai Marathon in 2:03:34, the fastest debut marathon in history. The Ethiopian will be moving down in distance in Stanford.

While younger brothers Filip and Jakob will line up for the mile in Stanford, older brother Henrik Ingebrigtsen will contest the two-mile event and will look to improve upon his 8:22.31 fifth-place finish from last year.

Others in the field include world U20 1500m record-holder Ronald Kwemoi, Olympic 10,000m silver medallist Paul Tanui, 2018 world 10,000m leader Richard Yator, world U20 cross-country champion Milkesa Mengesha, Australia’s Stewart McSweyn and Canada’s Justyn Knight.

In other Stanford-related news, world indoor record-holder Yomif Kejelcha has been added to the Bowerman Mile field.

(06/12/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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Prefontaine Classic

Prefontaine Classic

World Athletics made official Thursday what long has been suspected, with international track & field’s governing body announcing the Prefontaine Classic has been postponed. No new date has been set. The Pre Classic, part of the Diamond League series of international meets featuring Olympic-level athletes, had been scheduled for June 6-7 at the new Hayward Field in Eugene. All Diamond...

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Former soldiers ran the Lake Placid half marathon to raise money for the Rangers Lead the Way Fund

Roughly 1,000 people completed either the Lake Placid Marathon or Half on Sunday, and a few runners carried military packs.

John Byrne, a U.S. Army veteran, said his group was running to raise money for the Rangers Lead the Way Fund.

“It’s a fund that helps fallen (Army) Rangers and their families deal with the funeral costs and other costs,” Byrne said. “Or amputees. They come to your house, and they readjust the house so you’re comfortable after your service time.

“I’m not a Ranger. I was an infantryman with Anthony (Cambareri). He’s the spearhead of the whole thing.”

The group was made up of Byrne, Cambareri, Dan Geraghty and Joey Gay. The four donned Lead the Way Fund shirts and military packs during the half marathon portion of the Lake Placid Marathon.

“I’m a 9/11 survivor. I was at the towers on 9/11,” Geraghty said. “I was actually just working there. I was a civilian at the time. But John was one of the guys who deployed. Anthony was one of the guys who deployed.

“When John got back eight years ago, we raised money for the Warrior Project. We were just looking for people to support and keep the message out there. Just because this never-ending war continues doesn’t mean that people haven’t been hurt, that they don’t need help.

“I know it’s cliche, but some gave all, and a lot of gave plenty,” he continued. “And they’ve got to live with that. They’ve got to live with the results for a long time, so we want to help them the best we can.”

The Army Ranger Lead the Way Fund offers former Rangers a number of services, including help with medical costs and transitioning into a career after the military. It also helps Gold Star families, those whose loved ones have died in service to the country.

This was the 15th annual marathon. Three runners who recently graduated from Boston University took the top three slots in the men's marathon, with Johnny Kemps claiming the title. Kemps won the race with a finish time of 2 hours, 43 minutes and 2.4 seconds. He was followed across the line by teammates Alexander Seal (2:43:33.8) and Zachary Prescott (2:45:12.3).

(06/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Shelter Island 10K is celebrating it's 40th year this weekend honoring some of the country's Best Runners

Over the course of 40 years, the Shelter Island 10K has stood out from the ever increasing number of summertime charity road races on the East End, and this year, as it marks a milestone, it will be even more special. Some of the biggest names in long-distance racing will be on hand, along with recreational runners of all ages and abilities, to commemorate the 40th year of the race, which raises money for several local charities.

The 10K and 5K run/walk are set for this Saturday, June 15, at 5:30 p.m. It promises to be as popular as ever, with 1,000 runners signed up to participate. The Shelter Island 10K is an event that has always paid homage to the history of road running and will certainly have the star power to prove it this weekend. The race always attracts top talent, with some of the best young Kenyan and Ethiopian runners making the trek to participate, but race organizers also made a special effort this year to honor older runners, many of whom were in the prime of their careers during the race’s inaugural season 39 years ago.

Some of them have become Shelter Island 10K regulars over the years, including former Olympian Bill Rodgers, a four-time winner of both the New York City and Boston marathons, and Joan Benoit Samuelson, an Olympic gold medalist and first-ever women’s Olympic marathon champion.

Veteran marathon runner George A. Hirsch, who is the chairman of the board of the New York Road Runners and previous publisher of Runner’s World, will also be on hand, along with Amby Burfoot, an author, motivational speaker and winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon.

Jon Sinclair and his wife, Kim Jones, are scheduled to attend, along with Keith Brantley. Sinclair is one of the winningest long-distance runners in the country’s history, and Jones is a former elite marathon runner.

New to the race this year will be Benji Durden and Kyle Heffner, and their presence is a nice homage to what was going on in the running world at the time the Shelter Island race was created. Heffner and Durden both qualified for the U.S. Olympic team in 1980 but were unable to compete at that year’s games in Moscow because of the U.S. boycott.

Race director Mary Ellen Adipietro said the tradition of honoring world-class runners has been part of the Shelter Island race since it was founded by Cliff Clark, John Strode and Jack Faith, who were all collegiate runners. Adipietro and her husband, Frank, continued and built on that tradition when she became the race director in 2000, taking over for longtime director Jimmy Richardson.

In keeping with the theme of honoring older runners, this year’s race will include a Masters category, with prize money for men and women in the 40-and-over age group. Anyone who finished the race in less than 40 minutes will receive a complimentary “I broke 40 at the 40th” T-shirt sponsored by Harry Hackett, of Merrill Lynch.

(06/12/2019) ⚡AMP
by Cailin Riley
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Shelter Island Run

Shelter Island Run

This course has been ranked among the top ten most beautiful courses in the country by Runner’s World Magazine, with areas of the course that allow runners to peer over Dering Harbor, look out at the Orient Point Lighthouse and run through one of the most exclusive private communities in the country. The non-profit Shelter Island Run, Inc. founded in...

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Local runners won the Seattle’s Rock N Roll Marathon

Local runners won both the men’s and women’s marathons on Sunday at the St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon through the streets of Seattle.

Shaun Frandsen of Kirkland took the men’s marathon title clocking 2:36:14.  Christine Babcock, a former University of Washington runner, won the women’s marathon in 2:59.16.

Last year at the Boston Marathon, Shaun finished 49th overall and second in the masters division.

Christine Babcock, a former University of Washington runner competed in the middle distances for the Huskies and ran cross-country from 2008 to 2013 and was named the 2011 Pac-12 Scholar Athlete of the year for cross-country.

Kenneth Kosgei, originally from Kenya and now living in Salem, Ore., won the half-marathon in 1:06.56. This victory came less than two months after winning the Corvallis Half-Marathon in which he broke the meet record by nearly a minute.

Danna Herrick from Boone, Iowa, won the women’s half-marathon in 1:19:45.

(06/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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Rock 'n' Roll Seattle

Rock 'n' Roll Seattle

Seattle is such a fun city and one that we love coming back to year after year,” said Lyndsi Weichert, Event Manager. “This race is a great way for participants to see Seattle’s famous sights and beautiful scenery as they take on their 13.1 or 26.2 mile journey. We encourage all runners to grab a friend, start training and sign...

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The IAAF is going to rebrand as World Athletics

The IAAF Council has approved proposals to change the name of the governing body to ‘World Athletics’ and to introduce a new logo.

The Council said the rebrand is designed to more clearly communicate the organisation’s mission and attract a younger audience for the sport. The new identity will be introduced in October after one last edition of the World Championships under the IAAF banner.

The organisation was founded as the International Amateur Athletic Federation in 1912 but changed its name to the International Association of Athletics Federations in 2001 as the sport became more professionalised.“The hope is that our new brand will help attract and engage a new generation of young people to athletics,” said IAAF president Seb Coe. “We have now created a brand that can come to life in the digital world while reflecting the changing nature of the sport. And at the same time bring into focus the athletes, the heroes of our sport.”

The rebrand comes at a time when IAAF is seeking to draw a line under a wide array of doping and corruption scandals. In May, French prosecutors requested that Lamine Diack, the former president of the organisation stand trial over allegations of corruption linked to the Russian doping scandal.

It was also announced at the IAAF Council Meeting in Monaco that Russia’s ban from international meetings had been extended over ongoing doping concerns.

Russia has been suspended from the sport since 2015, though many athletes have since been allowed to compete as neutrals.

The next vote on the issue is likely to be taken at an IAAF Council meeting on September 23 – just five days before the start of the World Championships in Doha.

(06/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

The seventeenth edition of the IAAF World Championships is scheduled to be held between 27 September and 6 October 2019 in Doha, Qatar at the renovated multi-purpose Khalifa International Stadium. Doha overcame bids from Eugene, USA, and Barcelona, Spain to be granted the rights to host the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Having hosted the IAAF Diamond League, formerly...

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According to scientists human endurance is determined by the gut, not the mind or muscles

There is a limit to human endurance and it is determined by the gut, not the mind or muscles, according to scientists.

US and Scottish researchers studying humans involved in the most demanding physical feats, from running six marathons a week to pregnancy, have shown that the amount of calories the body can absorb a day determine the upper limit of human performance.

The threshold amounts to 2.5 times above the level they would use energy if they were at rest; beyond this limit the body begins to break down fat, muscle and connective tissue to make up for the shortfall in calories.

“This defines the realm of what’s possible for humans,” said study co-author Dr Herman Pontzer, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University, North Carolina. “There’s just a limit to how many calories our guts can effectively absorb per day.”

The team compiled new data on energy use from the 3,080-mile, five-month Race Across the USA. The researchers found that athletes’ energy expenditure started off high, before plunging to flatten out at this 2.5-times limit.

“Humans have evolved greater endurance capabilities than other apes, which has typically been ascribed to selection for increased physical activity, particularly long-distance running,” the authors wrote in the journal Science Advances.

(06/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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If you can't actually be in New York for the Marathon you can run the world's largest marathon through their Virtual program

Jogging solo in Florida in near 80 degree Fahrenheit heat, Theresa Winterhalter’s New York City Marathon experience last November looked much different to what you would expect from the world’s biggest marathon.

The 54-year-old was one of 424 people to finish the iconic race’s first “virtual marathon”, an event that race organizers are now expanding. The New York City Marathon will welcome unlimited, free enrolment in its virtual marathon this year, aiming to attract thousands of runners from across the globe.

With 52,813 finishers last year, the New York City Marathon is famously popular with amateurs and pros alike, attracting massive interest in its yearly lottery entry.

Capiraso said he was eager to draw in runners who might be unable to commit to the travel or expenses, and sees huge potential in virtual races.

The plan is an extension of NYRR’s years-long push into virtual products, which have included a training program, and a virtual racing series launched last year that has so far seen over 57,000 finishers.

Virtual marathon participants will log their marathon miles through Strava, a social networking site geared toward athletes, choosing to run on the day of the marathon or one of the three days leading up to it.

(06/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

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Trevor Wood finished the Southend Half Marathon despite suffering from an aggressive brain tumour

Trevor Wood, 38, who lives in Rayleigh, England has raised £1,550 ($1972US) for Macmillan Cancer Care after completing the half marathon on Sunday.

Dad-of-three ran the Southend Half Marathon in two-and-a-half hours, despite suffering from an aggressive brain tumour.

Trevor, has been diagnosed with stage four Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer.

His wife Leanne Wood said she was overwhelmed with emotion when he finished the race.  “When it came to the end and I saw him approaching, hand-in-hand with some friends, I was literally in tears.

“It was so overwhelming and I had such a huge amount of pride for him.

“The reason he was doing this was a challenge for himself. He wanted to prove to himself that he could do a physical challenge like this, he’s always been very sporty and active, he wanted to reassure himself that despite his tumour he can still run long distance," she said.

Following the discovery of the tumour, Trevor was put on chemotherapy and radiotherapy, where he is now half way through his treatment. He also had to have his driving licence revoked.

He found running to be his coping mechanism, finding time between chemotherapy to train for the half marathon.

After having received help from Macmillan on his journey, Trevor decided he needed to give something back and has beaten his target by more than double.

(06/11/2019) ⚡AMP
by Ellis Whitehouse
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Cape Town Marathon is in pursuit to get an IAAF Platinum Label status

This year's Sanlam Cape Town Marathon will be under close scrutiny by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) as the annual event aims to better its already strong participant and spectator appeal in its pursuit of the federation's new Platinum Label status.

The marathon, which takes place on September 15, is currently the only IAAF Gold Label status marathon in Africa.

"When you run in an IAAF road race label event, you get to experience an event run on truly world-class best practice principles," said race ambassador Elana van Zyl-Meyer.

"Not only does an IAAF road race label offer an excellent runner, spectator and media experience, it also yields great benefits for the development of the sport and helps fight the scourge of doping in sport."

The new IAAF Platinum Label status would be granted from January 2020 to races meeting a full set of new requirements and regulations.

These range from the inclusion of a quota of international elite athletes, validation of the course and photo-finish devices.

The organisers of the Sanlam Marathon will need to increase this year's marathon entries and further extend its international reach to 12.5% from 82 countries.

"Our aim has always been to become a member of the newly formed IAAF Platinum Label status marathons and there's little reason to believe that an African city marathon can't be added to this family of world-class city marathons," concluded Van Zyl-Meyer.

(06/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Cape Town Marathon

Cape Town Marathon

The Sanlam Cape Town Marathon is a City Marathon held in Cape Town, South Africa, which is sponsored by Sanlam, the City of Cape Town and Vital Health Foods. The marathon is held on a fast and flat course, starting and finishing in Green Point, near the Cape Town Stadium. Prior to existing in its current format, the Cape Town...

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Gabriele Grunewald has lost her battle with cancer and wants to thank everyone for their support

On Sunday, June 9, Justin Grunewald revealed that his professional distance runner wife Gabriele “Gabe” Grunewald, who gained thousands of fans over the years by sharing her inspiring cancer story, had been moved to comfort care after her condition began to worsen.

The decision came just two days after Gabe was readmitted to the ICU because she was experiencing septic shock.

“It breaks my heart to say but overnight Gabriele’s status worsened with worsening liver function causing confusion. Wanting to do her no harm we have made the difficult decision to move her to comfort cares this afternoon,” he sadly announced. 

Justin Grunewald shared the update on Instagram on his wife and four-time cancer survivor so fans and supporters could send her one last message “before she heads up to heaven.” He also posted photos of Grunewald running along a shoreline, the couple smiling as they embraced on a beach and them holding hands on a hospital bed.

“At the end of the day people won’t remember the [personal records] run or the teams qualified for, but they will remember that hard period in their life where they were losing hope but they found inspiration in a young lady who refuses to give up,” Justin Grunewald wrote.

Grunewald also posted a letter he wrote a few years ago, thanking her for showing him “what it’s like to be and feel” alive.

“I know life is scary and I know we have won the lottery of uncertainty, and it’s not fair, but I still choose our life of uncertainty and at times fear, over any alternative option I could think of,” Justin Grunewald wrote. “I have so much fun with you and have learned more from having you as my best friend and wife than I learned in the rest of my life combined.”

Gabriele Grunewald — whose battle against cancer has inspired an outpouring of support on social media, including a “BraveLikeGabe” hashtag — was a senior running track and cross-country at the University of Minnesota when she was diagnosed in 2009, the Star Tribune reports.

A year later, Grunewald finished second in the 1,500 meters at the 2010 NCAA Championships after having surgery and radiation treatment. She then became the US indoor champion at 3,000 meters in 2014 before continuing to run professionally as recently as 2017 despite additional treatment for cancer in her thyroid and liver, the newspaper reports.

(06/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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The 2019 Hardrock 100 has been cancelled due to historic snowfall effecting more than 40 percent of the course

Due to historic snowfall, avalanches, avalanche debris, an inability to reach certain aid stations and uncertain conditions on more than 40% of the course, the 2019 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run has been canceled. This decision, while difficult, adheres to the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run’s overall commitment to land stewardship and the safety of the Hardrock community.

The Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run committee’s decision to cancel the 2019 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run was based on a thorough and complete evaluation of all available information and utilized a number of key resources to support its decision.

Firsthand course trail reconnaissance combined with assembled trail reports, key and valuable input from the Bureau of Land Management and the US Forestry Service and the Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run committee and Board of Directors all served to guide the decision-making process.

All runners who are entered in the 2019 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run as of June 10th, 2019 will have the option of either rolling over their entry into the 2020 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run or withdrawing their entry slot and receiving a full refund of their entry fee.

Entrants must notify the Run Director, Dale Garland, by email (dale@hardrock100.com) by July 12th, 2019 if they wish to withdraw; otherwise they will be considered to have elected to roll over their entry into the 2020 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run.

“After an extensive process, it became clear that the uncertainty associated with the condition of the course and the issues that the uncertainty caused among our organizational components meant we could not organize and administer a safe and meaningful 2019 Hardrock Hundred Endurance Run that was consistent with the standards and values Hardrock has become known for,” said Run Director, Dale Garland.

“While snow and snow water equivalent levels looked to be dropping to manageable levels, other issues such as unprecedented avalanche debris, unstable snow bridges and high-water levels all contributed to us reaching the tough final decision that we did.”

The start date for the 2020 Hardrock will be July 17, 2020.

(06/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Hardrock 100

Hardrock 100

100-mile run with 33,050 feet of climb and 33,050 feet of descent for a total elevation change of 66,100 feet with an average elevation of 11,186 feet - low point 7,680 feet (Ouray) and high point 14,048 feet (Handies Peak). The run starts and ends in Silverton, Colorado and travels through the towns of Telluride, Ouray, and the ghost town...

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Galen Rupp is recovering well from his Achilles Tendon injury

Galen Rupp loves to run along the lakefront when he visits Chicago. He occasionally gets noticed as the city’s former marathon champion rather than just an exceptionally fast runner among those who pack the path on sunny days.

“It’s still a weird thing for people to know who you are,” Rupp told the Tribune on Thursday. “I love running along the lake. It’s literally one of the most gorgeous runs I could go on. The architecture of the city is so cool. The people are great here. Obviously I love running here.”

As he works to overcome a foot injury, Rupp logged some miles in the city this week to prepare for the Oct. 13 Chicago Marathon. He’ll have missed nearly a year of competitive marathoning when he returns to the course where he won in 2017.

“It was an easy decision for me to come back here,” Rupp said.

Rupp finished fifth in Chicago last year in 2 hours, 6 minutes, 21 seconds. His coach, Alberto Salazar, revealed two weeks later that Rupp had surgery after the race to fix a condition called Haglund’s deformity, a bone protrusion in his left heel that had worn on his Achilles tendon and partially tore it.

His doctor emphasized how serious the injury could be if Rupp didn’t follow his orders to ease off running. Taking it easy wasn’t easy for Rupp.

“(My doctor) said the only thing I could do wrong is be too aggressive,” he said. “It takes six months to heal. He knows (athletes are) going to try to push it. But he did a good job of scaring me enough. If it went bad, it could have been a career-ender for me. As simple as that.”

Rupp said he’s pleased with his recovery. He’s running about 85 miles per week.

While he recovered, he cross-trained about three hours a week with biking and pool workouts, including running on a water treadmill. He said the break from running was probably good for him from a mental standpoint.

A two-time Olympic medalist, Rupp also hopes to make a fourth U.S. Olympic team at the marathon trials in February in Atlanta. He has won three marathons (the Olympic trials in 2016, Chicago in 2017 and Prague in 2018) and finished second in Boston in 2017.

His time of 2:06:07 in Prague made him the the second-fastest U.S. marathoner of all time behind Khalid Khannouchi’s 2002 record of 2:05:38 in London.

Rupp will face a strong field in Chicago this fall.

(06/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Age-group superstar 62-year-old Brian Pilcher wins the Dipsea for the fourth time.

Kentfield, California's Brian Pilcher, competing in the Dipsea Race for the first time since winning his third race in 2016, crossed the finish line in Stinson Beach first on Sunday morning to claim his fourth career victory.

Colorado’s Mark Tatum (age 59) finished second with San Rafael’s Alex Varner (33) and Sausalito’s Chris Lundy (48) — the two-time defending champion  –finishing third and fourth, respectively.

With his 4th win, 62-year old Brian Pilcher ties Shirley Matson for 2nd most wins in history (after Sal Vasquez with seven wins).

Sausalito’s Chris Lundy, 48, who began with a two-minute penalty after winning the last two Dipseas, said afterwards. 

“I had a good race today,” Lundy said. “It was a little bit slower than last year, but I felt really good and ran as fast as I could. I like the heat, but it still slows you down a little bit.”

Corte Madera’s Clara Peterson, 35, who finished 10th last year, rounded out the top five. Peterson also earned the award for best woman’s time, and two of her four children walked to the stage to accept her two trophies.

Brisbane’s Cliff Lentz, 54, Novato’s Dominic Vogl, 32, Montrose, Colo., resident Heath Hibbard, 66, Larkspur’s Diana Fitzpatrick, 61, and San Rafael’s Wayne Best, 51, placed 6-10, respectively.

Offical times have not been posted yet.  

The Dipsea was first run in 1905 and is considered to be the oldest trail race in America. It is run every year on the second Sunday in June.

The scenic 7.4 mile course from Mill Valley, California to Stinson Beach is also considered to be one of the most beautiful courses in the world.

The stairs and steep trails make it a grueling and treacherous race. And its unique handicapping system has made winners of men and women of all ages. Because of its beauty and challenge, it is a very popular event, and because of safety and environmental concerns the number of runners is limited to about 1,500.

While racers enter from all over the world, the Dipsea is primarily a Northern California event and the entry process is tilted slightly to favor local contestants.

(06/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Dipsea Race

The Dipsea Race

2020 Dipsea Race Cancelled:The health and safety of our community is of utmost importance to the Dipsea Race Committee. Given the rapid developments and danger involving the COVID-19 coronavirus, we regretfully have chosen to cancel this year’s race. First run in 1905, the Dipsea is the oldest trail race in America. It is run every year on the second Sunday...

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Researchers, like Dr.Yannis Pitsiladis suggests there needs to be major tech updates to break the two hour mark in the marathon

Dr. Yannis Pitsiladis, a sport and exercise scientist at Brighton University in the UK, presented at a the First Scientific Conference of the Israeli Olympic Sports Research Centre recently, suggesting that in order to break the two-hour barrier in the marathon, a runner needs to receive injectable carbohydrates.

“We need to develop tools to inject carbohydrates into the runner’s body effectively and to provide them with intelligent sensing systems that monitor physiological variables and provide feedback on their condition in real time.”

Back in 1991, Dr. Michael Joyner, the first expert to contemplate this concept, suggested that a sub-two marathon would eventually happen.

He imagined it would be gradual, and that it would take many years, but he did calculate that it was humanly possible.

What’s being suggested now is that it’s entirely possible but will require more than physical training. According to Inside the Games, Pitsiladis said running a marathon in less than two hours is not only a physiological challenge, and that new developments in the field of footwear and nutrition may soon provide the answer.

 

(06/09/2019) ⚡AMP
by Madeleine Kelly
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Brittany Runs a Marathon the movie, a twenty-something takes on the New York City Marathon after her doctor tells her to lose weight

Just in time for Global Running Day, Amazon Studios dropped a trailer forBrittany Runs a Marathon, a movie about a woman who sets out to run in the New York City Marathon.

The movie, which is based on a true story about a friend of the film's director Paul Downs Calaizzo, looks like it'll deliver all the feels. The trailer opens with Brittany (played by Jillian Bell) seeking a prescription for Adderall and her doctor suggesting she lose 55 pounds.

After finding that gym memberships are hella pricey (relatable), Brittany starts running outside and sets her sights on the New York City Marathon.

You can't really judge a movie by its trailer, but the film seems more nuanced than the typical woman-loses-weight-and-it-changes-everything formula. As the trailer progresses, Brittany does appear to lose weight. However, a voiceover toward the end of the preview says her journey "was never about" her weight; it was about "taking responsibility" for herself, suggesting a deeper overall takeaway.

A cast interview with The Hollywood Reporter also indicates that Brittany's transformation isn't ultimately attributed to her physical changes in the movie. "You find out that when you do get that money, that car, that body, that boyfriend, that you're not okay, because that actually wasn't the impetus for what needed to change. You needed to heal something on the inside," actress Michaela Watkins remarked during the interview.

In case you need more proof that Brittany Runs a Marathon is gonna be good, the film got a positive review from Indiewire after its debut at Sundance, and won an Audience Award at the festival.

The movie will hit theaters a few months before the actual New York City Marathon. Mark your calendar now for an August 23 release date.

(06/09/2019) ⚡AMP
by Renee Cherry
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TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

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South African Gerda Steyn shattered the course record at Comrades as Camille had to drop out due to hamstring issues

The 94th running of South Africa’s premier Ultra marathon, the Comrades got underway at 5:30am Sunday June 9. 

South African runners Edward Mothibi and Gerda Steyn ended up the 2019 Comrades Marathon champions.  Gerda broke the course record winning one million R ($66,849US) in the process.  

Edward Mothibi won the race after a fourth placed finish in his Comrades debut last year, beating defending champion Bongmusa Mthembu by just 25 seconds.

Local favourite Gerda Steyn stole the show on Sunday as she shattered the women’s record leading the charge with South African athletes produced sterling performances in KwaZulu-Natal.

After breaking clear of the rest of the women’s field shortly before the halfway mark, Steyn gradually extended her lead throughout the second half, crossing the line in 5:58:53 to secure her maiden victory in the 87km race between Durban and Pietermaritzburg.

This shattered the up-run record, held by Russian runner Elena Nurgalieva, by more than ten minutes. Steyn became the first woman to run the Comrades up run in less than six hours. Her time was the fourth fastest of all-time for women, the only faster times were notched in down-runs.

The race is run ‘gun to gun’ meaning that contestants have 12 hours in total to complete the course.

This year’s race is an “UP RUN” starting at the City Hall in Durban and finished at the Scottsville Racecourse in Pietermaritzburg. The race distance is approximately 87km.

28-year-old Gerda Steyn has enjoyed a meteoric rise from amateur to professional in the space of just five years. After finishing as runner-up last year, Steyn took a six-week break from the sport before preparing to tackle the New York Marathon, finishing 13th in a PR of 2:31. The 2018 and 2019 Two Oceans winner made it clear in advance that her goal this year was to win and that is what she did this morning. 

America’s Camille Herron was not able to finished and dropped out.  

Camille’s brother Jack posted this on Facebook.  “My sister Camille Herron ended up dropping out from Comrades due too hamstring issues she’s been dealing with. I’m heart broken for her because this is just such a special event for her and our entire family.

“I understand the whole mentality of getting to race another day... but she trains so hard and we wait all year for her to defend this title she’s earned. I mean, just her single win is enough, but she goes out every time for a win, so when it doesn’t happen... it’s tough.”

Steyn now will shifts her focus away from Ultra marathons in a bid to qualify for the Olympic marathon in Tokyo next year. The Olympic marathon is expected to be run in blistering heat, with the start moved to 06:00 to mitigate potentially dangerous temperatures. Steyn’s ultra experience could make her a real contender for the Olympic crown.

(06/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Filipino and Japanese runners shine at the 2019 Laguna Phuket Marathon

Phuket’s largest mass participation sports event, the Laguna Phuket Marathon, welcomed a record 12,000-plus runners from 73 countries for its 14th edition held Sunday June 9. 

The largest nationalities represented at this year's Laguna Phuket Marathon were Thai, Japanese, Chinese and British. There was also a large contingent of runners from the Philippines and who made their presence known with Richard Salano and Prince Joey Lee finishing first and second in the Men's Half Marathon, and Christine Hallasgo (PHI) and Christabel Martes (PHI) placing first and third in the Women's Half Marathon. 

The Japanese couple of Hiroki Nakajima and Tomomi Nakajima won their respective Marathon distances at the 2017 Laguna Phuket Marathon and returning this year ran 10.5km on Saturday, and the Marathon on Sunday. While Hiroki was out sprinted to finish fourth overall in the Men's race, Tomomi went on to win the Women's distance for the second time ahead of Amy Mumford (GBR) and April Rose Diaz (PHI).

The Men's Marathon was won by Japanese runner, Takashi Mino clocking 2:35:02. 

Famed for it's beautiful course around Laguna Phuket and the island's northern beaches, organisers strived to reduce single-use plastics on the course this year.

(06/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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LAGUNA PHUKET  MARATHON

LAGUNA PHUKET MARATHON

2020 race is moved from June 14 to Dec 6. The world-famous Laguna Phuket Marathon is set to celebrate its 13th year with numbers expected to break 8,000 runners from over 50 countries. Sanctioned by the Association of International Marathons and Distance Races, the Laguna Phuket Marathon is held from sunset to sunrise over two days, and is organized by...

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A Response from a Proud “Lazy Parasite” Trail Runner

Marc Peruzzi’s recent Ouside magazine column about trail work clearly touched a nerve in the running community. Part of his argument is fair criticism, but he got some important things wrong.

I’ve been a competitive trail runner for over a decade; I’ve participated in some of the most well-known and competitive ultras around the world, including the Barkley Marathons, the Ultra-Trail du Mont Blanc, and the Western States Endurance Run.

I’ve also been a human rights lawyer for about the same period of time, and I take a deep interest in how we in the trail and ultrarunning community contribute to broader society. I know I’m not alone in this—as trail runners, many of us pride ourselves on being responsible stewards of our environment and contributing members in the outdoor sports community. We pick up trash left behind on the trails by inconsiderate urbanites. We don’t cut switchbacks, and we know how deep a hole to dig to bury our own poop (minimum: six inches).

We see ourselves as the “good ones”—runners who lightly tiptoe along mountain and forest paths, leaving no trace. Our intimate connection with the outdoors makes us protective of the wilderness that we enjoy, and that is something we hold tightly as part of our culture and identity as runners.

Given all that, it’s no surprise that when Outside published an article on May 22 calling trail runners “lazy parasites” and “deadbeats,” the reaction from the trail and ultrarunning community was swift and fierce. The writer, Marc Peruzzi, claimed that we simply aren’t pulling our weight when it comes to trail work. “When compared to mountain bikers and hikers, trail runners are the least likely to volunteer to build and maintain trails,” Peruzzi wrote. Leaning heavily on anecdotal evidence to back up his views, Peruzzi tried to hit us right where he knew it would hurt—and it did.

Candice Burt, an elite ultrarunner and the race director of the Triple Crown 200 mile series, wrote in a response on her website that she was shocked when she read the article. “I have no issue with asking user groups to do more to give back,” she wrote. “However, this article was not so much a call to action as it was a full on insulting diatribe aimed at my community.” For her part, Burt wrote about how she organizes an annual volunteer work party to maintain trails that would otherwise cease to exist, and how her company donates over $20,000 to the Tahoe Rim Trail Association for building and maintaining trails. “Trail running and stewardship are my life,” she wrote, “[It] has always been an important part of the trail running culture.” Many others in the trail community echoed her reaction.

A number of prominent ultramarathon races in North America in addition to Fat Dog and Burt’s 200 mile race series, require volunteer service from entrants, typically in the form of eight hours of trail maintenance. (Peruzzi briefly acknowledged this in his story.) These races include the Western States Endurance Run, the Vermont 100 Endurance Race, Angeles Crest 100 miler, and the Wasatch Front 100 Mile Endurance Run. 

In short, we in the trail running community know that we aren’t the lazy parasites and deadbeats Peruzzi claims we are. So why does he have this impression? And are we taking his criticism so personally because there is a kernel of truth to it? Could we be doing more?

The short answer is yes, we could be doing more. Adam Chase, the President of the American Trail Running Association (ATRA), responded to Peruzzi’s article on Facebook by saying: “I must confess. We are guilty as charged…we need [to do] more. A lot more.” Indeed, as trail running continues to increase in popularity, it will become even more important that we expand our volunteer and conservation efforts.

Clare Gallagher, an elite ultrarunner and environmental activist, has not been shy in calling us out on this and urging us to do more, long before Peruzzi’s story was published. “If we are not engaging with the politics of public land protections, we are freeloading,” she wrote in September 2017.

While I’m more than willing to admit that we need to do more as a community, I refuse to accept the suggestion that we are lazy deadbeats who “are the least likely to volunteer to build and maintain trails,” as Peruzzi claims.

Does that mean that we aren’t deeply involved at a grassroots level or that we don’t care? Hell no. We may be a ragtag bunch, but we are compassionate and committed. From the moment I joined this community, I understood that the expectation was to give back, whether through trail work, guided running for visually impaired athletes, or simply picking up garbage left behind by others. Advertising these good deeds was certainly not required, and it was maybe even discouraged. 

But rather than engage in a pissing contest with our fellow athletes over who is doing more to protect our common lands, I’d prefer to join forces to make us all more effective. 

The definition of a parasite is something that exists by taking from or depending on something else. In that sense, I will happily embrace Peruzzi’s label. I am a trail running parasite: I truly rely on the trails to exist. For that reason, I see it as my duty to ensure that the trails I run on—and all the ones I haven’t yet—are protected. I will do this by working alongside my trail running companions, and learning from my mountain biking colleagues. The only way to make progress on these issues is to band together, not drive each other apart. As for the rest of Peruzzi’s article? Well, it’s going in a six-inch hole, where it belongs. See you out on the trail.

(Editor’s note:  this is a condensed version of Stephanie’s article.  Click on the link to read her entire article.). 

(06/09/2019) ⚡AMP
by Stephanie Case for Outside Online
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America’s Camille Herron has a real shot at winning the Comrades marathon for the second time

The 94th running of the world-famous Comrades Marathon is scheduled to begin at 5:30am (8:30pm Pacific time Saturday) on Sunday, taking place from Durban to Pietermaritzburg.

“The Comrades Marathon attracts the very best ultra-runners in the world and this year will be no different. This year’s up-run already promises to be an epic race,” said Cheryl Winn, CMA chairperson.

In the women’s race, America’s Camilla Herron has a real shot of winning for the second time but her competition is top notch.

Here are the top five female contenders: 

1. Ann Ashworth (second photo) shocked the field to win the 2018 race with a tactical and composed performance. She subsequently left her career as an advocate to run full time ahead of the 2019 race. Ashworth is in good form and achieved a marathon PB of 2:35 at the Valencia Marathon in December.  A genuine contender to become the first female to win back-to-back races since Elena Nurgalieva.

2. Gerda Steyn The 28-year-old has enjoyed a meteoric rise from amateur to professional in the space of just five years. After finishing as runner-up last year, Steyn took a six-week break from the sport before preparing to tackle the New York Marathon, finishing 13th in a PB of 2:31. The 2018 and 2019 Two Oceans winner has made it clear, her goal this year is to claim a maiden Comrades Marathon title.

3. Camille Herron (first photo) was left gutted just weeks before last year’s race as injury robbed her of a chance to claim back-to-back victories. It has been two years since her big win but the raging crowds and electric atmosphere which greeted her at the finish at Scottsville Racecourse will serve as a huge motivating factor as she prepares for a comeback. She set a new 100-mile record at the Desert Solstice Track Invitational in December. As the reigning up-run champion, the 37-year-old is a genuine title contender.

4. Charne Bosman The 2016 down-run winner has proved to be one of South Africa’s most consistent athletes in recent years. She has five gold medals from six starts at Comrades. She is now 43 but there are no signs of her powers waning. She won the Johnson Crane Hire Marathon in January and the Om Die Dam Marathon in March. Bosman is in red hot form and is a genuine contender to win the race.

5. American Devon Yanko’s (third photo) Comrades journey began back in 2012 when she came fifth on debut. She then took a four-year break from the race but returned over the last two years to earn another two gold medals. She won the Oaklands Marathon in a time of 2:43 in March. An accomplished runner who knows what it takes push for a win.

Should the winner in either the Men’s or Women’s races in this year’s Comrades break the ‘Up Run’ Best Times of Russia’s Leonid Shvetsov (2008 – 5:24:49) or Elena Nurgalieva (2006 – 6:09:24) respectively, he or she will take home a minimum of R1-million ($66,849US) in Comrades prize money, comprised of a first prize of R500,000 plus a R500,000 incentive for breaking the Best Time; in addition to prizes for First South African (R200,000) and First KZN Man and Woman (R45,000). 

(06/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Sara Hall was the winner at the New York Mini USA 10-K in Central Park

On a morning with near-perfect weather conditions in Central Park, Sara Hall won a thrilling battle for the USATF Women’s 10-K Championship, using a devastating kick to pull away from fellow Flagstaff, Arizona, resident Stephanie Bruce in the final 100 meters. The event was held as part of the 48th edition of the NYRR New York Mini 10-K, the longest-running women’s-only road race in the world.

Five minutes before the open race began, a field of 28 American professionals set out for the national title under comfortable temperatures (68F/20C) with moderate humidity and a slight breeze. Emma Bates, winner of U.S. titles in the marathon and 25-K in the past sixth months, took the early lead as the pack raced up Central Park West for the first mile (5:20), with Jordan Hasay and Carrie Dimoff a step behind.

As the race moved into the park a few minutes later, Bruce inserted herself just behind Bates, while Hall began to move up through the tightly-bunched group.

Shortly past 2 miles (10:28), a pack of five began to pull away, including Bates, Bruce, Hall, Aliphine Tuliamuk and Sally Kipyego. Laura Thweatt soon reconnected to the leaders and those six women climbed and descended the steep north hill in the park together through 3 miles (15:34) and 5-K (16:11). In the fourth, uphill mile Bates finally gave up the lead and appeared to be dropping back, with Thweatt and Kipyego taking turns controlling the pace.

“It was an honest pace the whole way. I couldn’t believe how fast we came through 5-K, which is mostly uphill,” Hall told Race Results Weekly. “There was always someone else would get in the lead and start pushing any time it slowed down.”

At the 4-mile mark (21:02) Bates had worked her way back into the mix, with Bruce and Thweatt now leading the group of six. Shortly past 8-K (26:02), the pack passed Sara’s husband and coach, Ryan Hall, cheering on the side of the course.

“I could tell she was relaxed,” the two-time Olympian said. “She smiled at me when she came past me. I was just telling her to collect herself on the downhill. When you’re at that point in the race, everyone is screaming at you and you have to just relax, take a deep breath, collect yourself for the finish.”

Moments later the 36-year-old Hall began a surge to the front, running side-by-side with Bruce, and Kipyego a stride back. With a little more than 400 meters to go, Kipyego lost contact as Bruce and Hall were powering uphill to the finish. At 6 miles (31:25) it was still tight, before Hall unleashed a powerful sprint over the final climb to the tape adjacent to Tavern on the Green (the same iconic finish line as the TCS New York City Marathon).

(06/08/2019) ⚡AMP
by Richard Sands
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New York Mini 10K

New York Mini 10K

Join us for the NYRR New York Mini 10K, a race just for women. This race was made for you! It’s the world’s original women-only road race, founded in 1972 and named for the miniskirt, and it empowers women of all ages and fitness levels to be active and to look and feel great on the run. Every woman who...

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A mum of five is taking on a charity run to raise funds to send a UK doctor to an American conference focussing on the genetic condition affecting her son

Lisa Smith is part of the eight-strong Childhood Tumour Trust (CTT) team taking on the ASICS London 10k in July, seeking to raise £4,000 ($5,000US) to send a doctor from the UK to the Neurofibromatosis conference in the USA for specialist training.

Lisa’s eldest son Daniel Barnes (12) suffers from the condition – known as NF1 – which has caused growths on his brain and skin and may cause them along his nerves too. The disease can also lead to problems with the bones, eyes and nervous system.

It was several years before Daniel was diagnosed and further complications meant he also developed Hydrocephalus – too much fluid on the brain – and had to undergo life-saving surgery to have a shunt valve fitted to drain the excess away.

Daniel has since undergone numerous life-saving brain operations and replacement shunt procedures and although he is currently stable, Lisa says he will be shunt-dependent for the rest of his life.

“Daniel was six when he was finally diagnosed, after we’d be back and forwards to the doctors and health visitors numerous times.

“He had all the signs including birth marks on his skin but I was told this was just pigmentation.

“NF1 is the most common unheard of genetic disorder and affects a lot of children in lots of different ways. If Daniel had undergone an MRI scan sooner it might have been picked up more quickly.

“There is such a huge gap in the diagnostic knowledge, so many children are missed off the radar, that’s why we want to raise the funds to send a UK doctor to a specialist conference in America where there is much greater knowledge about it.”

“It’s hard, he’s such a lovely, lovely boy, but he suffers memory loss, fatigue and gets exhausted quite easily and he just finds everything very difficult, although he always tries his hardest,” she added.  

“We just want to help raise awareness about it.”

(06/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Asics London 10K

Asics London 10K

When we run together, amazing things happen. We unite in a common aim, we spur each other on, the stuff that divides us falls away and we keep on going. So, this summer we invite runners of all abilities to unite in one of the world's most inclusive and diverse cities to celebrate the things that bringus together. When you...

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70-year-old Rosina Sebati will be this year’s oldest female runner at the Comrades Marathon

Rosina Sebati, 70, who ran her first Comrades in 2008, said her inspiration came after watching Bruce Fordyce still competing at an advanced age.

Sebati said her goal was to run at least 10 Comrades Marathons in her lifetime.

“I was very nervous about the race, I had never seen so many people all in one place at the same time and although I did not make it in time to finish, I got to experience the spirit of Comrades.

Runners do help each other out there while running, its where age, gender and colour disappear,” she said.

Sebati said although she had been a runner while growing up, even representing her province (Transvaal) , she only began running again after she was 50 in an effort to keep healthy.

“I will walk/ run up those difficult Cowie’s and Field’s hills. I want to finish in 11 hours,” she said.

(06/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Refugee immigrant Hop Le and his 18-year-old son, Alex, are set to run the Dipsea this weekend

Hop Le, who serves as chief of the plastic surgery department at the Kaiser Permanente San Rafael Medical Center, is running in the 109th annual Dipsea Race with his son, Alex, on Sunday for the first time.

Competing in the Dipsea — a 7.4-mile trail footrace, from Mill Valley to Stinson Beach, handicapped by age, gender and previous performances — may not evoke a sense of freedom to most of its participants, but for Le, who has been running both by choice and involuntarily his entire life, that is exactly what it represents.

“For a refugee immigrant to run just for fun instead of away from danger or as a means of transportation is to truly be an American,” he said.

Le, 49, a Greenbrae, California resident, attended Yale University for undergrad and University of California at San Francisco for medical school. He has climbed the ladder at Kaiser during the past 13 years. He prides himself on always choosing the toughest path, a mindset he implores his children to adopt.

Le was born in Saigon in 1969, during the Vietnam War, to a family heavily involved in the war, specifically his father and uncle. He was taught from a young age to stop what he was doing and run as fast as he could when sirens blared, electricity was lost and the thunderous sound of bombs filled the air.

“Parents try to shelter their kids from the ravages of war,” Le said. “They would rush you into the basement until it passed. It became part of my life as a kid, just like going to school. You didn’t know why you had to do it, but it’s what you did.”

When the Vietnamese government collapsed, Le’s family became targets because of their military ties.

American soldiers in Vietnam were faced with a dilemma: obey the White House’s orders to evacuate only U.S. citizens or risk treason and save the lives of South Vietnamese citizens attempting to flee from the North Vietnamese Army.

The family was smuggled by Marines — against the ambassador’s orders — into the seatless belly of a U.S. military cargo plane as the runway was being bombed.

“It was just meant to carry tanks and jeeps,” said Le, who was 5 years old at the time and vividly remembers the day. “Hundreds of us were herded onto the plane. It was very traumatic.

“When they close that hatch, it’s essentially like you’re being buried alive.”

(06/07/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Dipsea Race

The Dipsea Race

2020 Dipsea Race Cancelled:The health and safety of our community is of utmost importance to the Dipsea Race Committee. Given the rapid developments and danger involving the COVID-19 coronavirus, we regretfully have chosen to cancel this year’s race. First run in 1905, the Dipsea is the oldest trail race in America. It is run every year on the second Sunday...

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For the first time in its 48-year history, the NYRR Mini 10K, will host the USATF 10K championships

For the first time in its 48-year history, the NYRR Mini 10K, which takes place in New York’s Central Park on Saturday, will host the USATF 10K championships. Stephanie Bruce will step up to defend her national title, which she earned at last year’s Peachtree Road Race. (She was seventh at the Mini 10K last year.) If she wins, she will earn USD $20,000.

Bruce is also the reigning American half-marathon champion.

Americans Aliphine Tuliamuk, Emily Sisson and American marathon record-holder Deena Kastor, all past national 10K champions (Tuliamuk in 2017, Sisson in 2016, Kastor in 2007) will join Bruce on the start line, as will Jordan Hasay, Sara Hall and Laura Thweatt.

USATF.TV will broadcast the race live starting at 7:40 a.m. ET. 

(06/07/2019) ⚡AMP
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New York Mini 10K

New York Mini 10K

Join us for the NYRR New York Mini 10K, a race just for women. This race was made for you! It’s the world’s original women-only road race, founded in 1972 and named for the miniskirt, and it empowers women of all ages and fitness levels to be active and to look and feel great on the run. Every woman who...

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This year 80-year-old Alf Burgess his running his 19th Comrades Marathon

The Richmond, KwaZulu-Natal Midlands, resident said he is a regular runner in his neighborhood and has become a familiar face to drivers on this route.

“I start my running regime at midnight but moved it to 2am or 3am to run with the delivery trucks entering the area to feel safer. I run at least 7 minutes per kilometer,” said Burgess.

“I ran my first Comrades in 1967 with my teammate Tommy Malone, who died two months ago.”

He recalled the marathon in 1966 where Malone won his first his Comrades, saying this had inspired him to participate the following year.

Burgess participated in the race the following year where Malone lost by one second to Manie Kuhn because of a leg cramp.

“I placed 51st in my first race. I’m running again after 18 years and I’ve run 18 (Comrades) marathons.”

He admitted that he used to start the marathon too fast causing him to tire easily and this contributed heavily to his 18-year long break from his last race in 2001.

Burgess said he plans to run another race in order to complete his personal goal of 20 races.

His advice to those who are keen on running the Comrades for the first time was to be fit, to start off with a walk and then a park run.

(06/07/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Emily Sisson withdraws from the NYRR New York Mini 10k

Emily Sisson announced Tuesday on Instagram that she will not race Saturday's NYRR New York Mini 10k featuring the USATF Women's 10 km Championships.

Sisson made her marathon debut at the London Marathon five weeks ago. She ran the second-fastest debut marathon by an American when she finished sixth in 2:23.08.

Sisson now holds the 2020 Olympic standard in both the 10,000 meters, run at the Stanford Invitational in the build-up to London, as well as the marathon.

The reason for Sisson's withdrawal is understandable. Following her marathon performance, Sisson does not feel ready to get back into racing yet.

Sisson will still be in New York City this week. She is taking part Wednesday in Global Running Day celebrations.

NYRR New York Mini 10k featuring the USATF Women's 10 km Championships will be live on USATF.TV. The broadcast is scheduled to begin at 7:40 am EDT.

(06/06/2019) ⚡AMP
by Adam Kopet
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New York Mini 10K

New York Mini 10K

Join us for the NYRR New York Mini 10K, a race just for women. This race was made for you! It’s the world’s original women-only road race, founded in 1972 and named for the miniskirt, and it empowers women of all ages and fitness levels to be active and to look and feel great on the run. Every woman who...

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Water running is great for both training and injury rehabilitation

If you are a runner, you have probadly experienced an injury, muscle strain, or a pain in your joints and bones. 

Deep water running, involves a slow running in a swimming pool. the pool is deep enough that your feet cannot  touch the bottom. it is an excellent impact-free cross training for those looking for rehabilitation after an injury. 

This rehabilitation tool allows you to recover from injuries without losing your fitnees . Not only does deep water running help you deal with an injury, but it can also help prevent injuries. Athletes of all sorts can attain the benefits of deep water running. 

It can also help with improving running form and decreasing the risk of sustaining injuries by reducing the stress of running on hard surfaces.

Submerged in the water you will have resistance on all sides. This forces opposing muscles to work equally. As you move your arms and legs against the resistance of the water, you will get a great cardiovascular and strength training workout.

Adding additional hydro devices, such as socks, dumbbells, paddles, and gloves allows you to vary your effort and intensity.

It is also a way to work on technique. With water running, you can increase resistance and effort while reducing mileage and the risk of injury. It's also a way to ease exercise boredom. You can get a good workout at the pool instead of putting in miles on the road, especially in summer or winter when the weather isn't welcoming. If it's raining outside, you may enjoy getting wet in the pool instead.

Unlike ciclyng versus working on an elliptical machine in the gym, the range of motion and muscles use during deep water running is almost the same as actual jogging/running. Deep water running has the same cardiovascular demands as if you were running on a hard surface at an easy to moderate pace.

Deep water running is also an effective alternative to outdoor running during the extremely humid and hot days.

Water provides an extra resistance  because of its higher viscosity than the air, wich means it is more difficult to move in the water than on dry land. The calories burned while doing deep water running are even greater than an ordinary run. This makes it an excellent exercise for those looking to avoid weight gain while they take time off from their regular running routine.

(06/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Callum Hawkins is back in training following his Scottish marathon record run

Scottish marathon record-holder Callum Hawkins is ready to step up his preparations for the IAAF World Championships this autumn – and a midnight run in Doha, writes Peter Jardine.

The Kilbarchan AAC athlete ended a 34-year wait for a new fastest time by a Scot over the classic distance when he clocked 2:08:14 to finish 10th in the London Marathon in April.

Allister Hutton’s 2:09:16 mark had stood since 1985 and, after a short break which included his own version of the North Coast 500 road trip around Scotland, Hawkins has resumed training following confirmation of automatic selection for the global event in Qatar.

“I’m selected for Doha and that’s the main target for 2019,” said Hawkins, who was fourth in the 2017 world championships marathon.

“It will be warm out there, of course, but they have put the start of the marathon to midnight to try and help that. The main thing is there won’t be any sunshine because, as I’ve discovered, that can be the worst element!

“I’m racing again next in the Czech Republic in a half-marathon on June 15. It’s an evening start-time but the last time I was there for this race, at the same time of year, it was 27C (80F)  degrees.”

Hawkins, of course, had collapsed in the final stages of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games marathon some 12 months prior to exorcising those ghosts with his superb run in London.

“To be honest, it didn’t feel like a huge mental barrier to complete the race in London,” added Hawkins, who helped Scottish Athletics present the Lindsays Trophy for cross country participation to Giffnock North in Glasgow this week.

“I was really just thinking and concentrating more on trying to run fast, rather than just finishing.

“Having said that, I did have a wee wobble at the 40km point and my head just went a bit for a moment. I really just had to grind out the last 2km and get it done.

“However, it was a good run. The last 5km were actually quicker than Mo Farah’s last 5km! His last 1km was definitely faster than mine, though!

“I had come out beforehand and said publicly I was looking to get a new Scottish record and a top 10 finish in London and in the end that’s what happened – even though I took the record by over a minute and I do feel I can go even quicker.

(06/06/2019) ⚡AMP
by Athletics Weekly
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IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

The seventeenth edition of the IAAF World Championships is scheduled to be held between 27 September and 6 October 2019 in Doha, Qatar at the renovated multi-purpose Khalifa International Stadium. Doha overcame bids from Eugene, USA, and Barcelona, Spain to be granted the rights to host the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Having hosted the IAAF Diamond League, formerly...

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Gene Dykes did it again by setting new US 100-mile and 24-hour M70 records in Pennsylvania

Gene Dykes, aka the #Ultrageezer, is a modest fellow, not given to trumpeting his achievements (especially after discovering that his takedown of Ed Whitlock’s M70 marathon world record at Jacksonville in December 2018 would not be ratified due to the race not being a USATF-sanctioned event).

This could be why we only just learned that last month at the Dawn 2 Dusk 2 Dawn 24-hour ultramarathon in Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania (not far from where he lives), in the pouring rain, Dykes quietly broke the M70 100-mile and 24-hour track records.

Dykes ran 100 miles in 21:06:07 and 111.79 miles (179.98K) over 24 hours. Records are ratified by the American Ultrarunning Association, though Dykes’ latest records have not been updated on the site. The previous records were both held by Edson Sower, 72, of Arizona, at 22:01:34 and 172.80K.

However, if you take a look, you’ll see that Dykes already holds the US age-group records in the 50K, 50-mile, 12-hour, and 100K categories. He set those last year at the same race.

“I am starting a 24-hour race,” Dykes posted on Facebook beforehand. “By 7:03, I will have seen the entire course!”

“I really have mixed feelings about fixed-time races,” Dykes goes on, “but the main feeling is, ‘I should really have my head examined!’ …The main reason I occasionally do them… is that I like to get out of my comfort zone now and then, but this race was WAY out of my comfort zone!”

As so often happens at long races, the weather changed drastically over the course of the day, and never conformed to what was forecast. “The forecast was promising–cloudy during the day with a high in the upper 60’s and showers at night–but what we got was something altogether different. Brilliant sunshine all day, and, not being prepared for that, I got some nasty sunburn on my calves.

At night it was cold, rainy, and windy–not the light rain I expected. Fortunately, I brought along a down jacket, which I wore under my raincoat, and heavy wool gloves.”

(06/06/2019) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
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Returning champ Chris Lundy hopes to become only the second person to win three Dipsea Races in a row

Two years ago, the narrative surrounding Sausalito’s Chris Lundy was that she was the best female runner who had yet to break through and win the Dipsea.

On Sunday, Lundy enters the 109th Dipsea Race with a chance to become only the second person to win three in a row. The question about her has changed from ‘When will she win?’ to ‘How many will she win?’

“After winning it the first year, you’re no longer in that zone of just trying to get to get the win,” Lundy said. “Then it becomes ‘What’s the next challenge?’ The next challenge was to try to win it again and that happened. I don’t think it’s looking super likely to win it a third time in a row but I’m certainly going to try.”

Only four women have ever won back-to-back Dipseas — Lundy, Diana Fitzpatrick (2013-4), Shirley Matson (2000-1) and Megan McGowan (1991-2). Only one person has won three in a row. Sal Vasquez won four consecutive Dipseas in the 1980s.

Although three people have won back-to-back Dipseas this decade — Lundy, Brian Pilcher and Fitzpatrick — the race is set up to prevent anyone from going on an extended run of success, literally punishing anyone who does.

As a two-time defending champion, Lundy will be penalized an additional two minutes in the age-handicapped race from Mill Valley to Stinson Beach. Normally her age, 48, would grant her 12 headstart minutes but she’ll only receive 10.

“Obviously the penalty minutes definitely come into play,” Lundy said. “Every year you get a little bit older. You hopefully stay just as fast but it becomes more of a challenge to keep the same speed. Other people around you might move up in age groups at different times. Every year you just have to re-evaluate who is starting in each group.

“You pretty much just get as fit as you can and see how it goes that day.”

Fitness isn’t an issue for Lundy heading into the race this year — she has no injuries to report after winning her first Dipsea two years ago despite tearing her ACL down the stretch of that race. She repeated as champion last year while coming off rehabbing that same injury.

(06/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Dipsea Race

The Dipsea Race

2020 Dipsea Race Cancelled:The health and safety of our community is of utmost importance to the Dipsea Race Committee. Given the rapid developments and danger involving the COVID-19 coronavirus, we regretfully have chosen to cancel this year’s race. First run in 1905, the Dipsea is the oldest trail race in America. It is run every year on the second Sunday...

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The mission of Dean Karnazes is to help all of us get off the couch and on our feet

Dean Karnazes is one of the most famous runners in the world.He's known for running 50 marathons in all 50 states over 50 consecutive days and was named one of Time Magazines "100 Most Influential People in the World." Karnazes also won the world's toughest footrace, the Badwater Ultramarathon. He ran 135 miles nonstop across Death Valley during the middle of the summer.

What is his secret to success? Good genes. Karnazes says he has his parents to thank for his runners body and ability to run without injuries.

That's right, after years of running Karnazes has never had to take time off because of an injury.One of Dean's missions is to help all of us get off the couch and on our feet.

Dean's tips:1. All you need is a pair of sneakers to get started

2. Start small - try running to the end of your street for the first couple of days. Slowly extend the run to a couple of blocks. Before you know it you will have your fist mile under your belt. Then sign up for a 5K

3. You can do it alone-just you and your music or audiobooks-- or you can do it with family or friends. Start a walking club in your community. Make new friends, or new bonds with family members.

4. A great path to physical and mental fitness

5. It doesn't matter if you're running or walking. Either way you're out there enjoying the same benefits.

(06/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Happy Global Running Day! Be sure to run, walk or jog at least one mile today!

Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you.

Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk, or call your friends for a pick-up game in the park. The important thing is that you have fun being active—and you inspire others to join you.

Global Running Day is a day that celebrates the sport of running. It is held annually on the first Wednesday of June. 

Participants of all ages and abilities pledge to take part in some type of running activity by submitting their names through the Global Running Day website. 

Global Running Day was formerly known as National Running Day and began in the United States. The first event was in 2009.

The inaugural Global Running Day was held on June 1, 2016. More than 2.5 million people from 177 countries pledged to run more than 9.2 million miles. 

New York City Mayor, Bill de Blasio, declared June 1, 2016 to be Global Running Day in the City of New York. 2014 Boston Marathon winner Meb Keflezighi led a group run from the Boston Run Base, and the Atlanta Track Club organized a “run around the clock” event, where at least one person from the Atlanta metro area would be running every hour of Global Running Day.

More than 100 organizations support Global Running Day and the Million Kid Run.

As part of Global Running Day, the Million Kid Run aims to get young people excited about fitness. By moving and having fun, kids discover that living an active lifestyle can be fun and easy.

The 2018 Global Running Day inspired Bob Anderson to start the Run The World Challenge.  It launched July 4, 2018.  Since then 289 people all over the world have run and logged over 110,000 miles.  This program encourages people to run and or walk everyday.

”If you are a runner already,” says My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson, “be sure to run at least a mile today.  For everyone else, there is no better time than today to get started.”  71-year-old Bob Anderson is a lifetime runner who ran his first mile Feb 16, 1962.  He is on track to hit 1820 miles over the last 12 months ending July 3.  

“I just love to run and programs like Global Running Day and Run The World challenge motivate me to do more,” says Bob Anderson.  “So get in your mile today.  Run, walk, jog it all counts.” 

(06/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Global Running Day

Global Running Day

What is Global Running Day? Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you. Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk,...

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Maurice Rosen is running the 2019 Comrades Marathon for the 36th time since he was 25

Comrades veteran Maurice Rosen, 65, a financial officer says it was the feelings and emotions he felt in 1979 when he crossed the finish line after 89km that keeps him coming back every year.

“It's just that feeling at the end when you cross that finish line.

"Probably 95% of Comrades is the actual training and you put so much training into it and it is such a special day. I just want to get to the finish line,” he said.

Rosen said he had finished every Comrades he had entered, and he also enjoyed taking part in the Sanlam Cape Town Marathon and the Two Oceans Marathon.

The early riser said he starts training for the marathon a few months before Comrades by doing smaller weekend marathons in and around Joburg, and the intensity of his training picked up about three months before Comrades.

Over a five-month period, Rosen said, he runs about 2000km (1240 miles) in total.

He added there was a 10-week period before the marathon which was crucial for training, and he “buckles down.”

However, the week before the gruelling event he spends most of his time resting.

“It's difficult to train, but I think that it would be more difficult to sit in front of the television and try and watch it. I would say to myself that 'I just want to be there, I have got to be there',” he said.

Rosen ran Comrades for the first time in 1979 and has run every year except 1984 when he was studying. 

(06/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Michael Wardian is training in Wales to race against 60 horses

Michael Wardian has finished the Boston Marathon 18 times. He holds the world record for fastest 50-kilometer run on a treadmill. This year he raced 631 miles across Israel in barely 10 days’ time.

He’s twice completed seven marathons on seven continents in seven days, and holds a world record for that, too. This year, when he got back to the United States, he decided to tack on three more marathons in three days, giving him yet another record: fastest completion of 10 marathons in 10 days.

Oh, and he holds the fastest mark for running a marathon while dressed as Spider-Man. And also Elvis.

Needless to say, Wardian, 45, is an accomplished distance runner who has no problem getting creative to scratch his competitive itch. Which is why he’s in Wales this week. Preparing to race 60 horses.

The Arlington runner will be one of 650 or so humans and five dozen horses racing against each other in the annual Man Versus Horse Marathon on Saturday.

“Like many things that I do, I’m just kind of curious to see if I can do it,” Wardian said in a recent interview. “The chances are probably not good that I’m going to beat the horse. But it’s possible.”

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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2018 Lake Placid Marathon winner returns for half this weekend

The first and only time David Bea visited Lake Placid, he took home first-place honors in the Lake Placid Marathon.

Bea, a 40-year-old Cincinnati-based marketing executive at Proctor and Gamble, beat out 175 other runners in the marathon portion of last year's race.

"I had a good time up there last year," Bea said. "I won the marathon, and I'm heading back this year to run the half marathon and see if I can have a similar result."

This year's 15th annual race is on Sunday, June 9.

Bea has been running for half of his life. Rather than train in the lead-up for a race, Bea works out constantly throughout the year to maintain "base fitness," he said. Throughout the last 20 years, "stay ready, so you don't have to get ready" has been his motto. After competing in nearly 60 full marathons, that sort of consistent training regime has worked out well for him.

Last year's win wasn't without some difficulty. Bea didn't take first place by a landslide. That win was hard-fought, and it took a well of reserve and endurance to push through. Nine seconds are what separated him from the second-place finisher, Jacob Andrews, who'd come up from an 8-minute deficit. Bea's finishing time was two hours, 40 minutes and 10.9 seconds.

"I'd heard the course had its share of rolling hills and turns," he said. "I expected that last climb. That was a little bit of a shock to the system to have to finish with that really steep hill.

"I'll hopefully be more prepared for that this year."

A few things will change for Bea this time around: This year he'll be in a new age category, and because he's fresh off a 25K in Michigan, he'll be changing the distance up with a half.

Finishing the half marathon in Lake Placid has been a goal for Bea since the start of the year. He wants to set a pace around 5:33, and cross the finish line at one hour, 12 minutes and 30 seconds.

He says the Lake Placid course is among his favorites.

"The surroundings, the lake, the beautiful landscape with the mountains - it's high on my list. That's part of the reason I'm coming back this year."

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Ottawa's John Halvorsen directed his last Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon last Sunday, and was inducted into the Ottawa Sport Hall of Fame

A week after his final stint as race director of the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, Run Ottawa president John Halvorsen was inducted into the Ottawa Sport Hall of Fame on Friday evening.

Halvorsen, along with a number of other prominent figures in the sporting life of the nation’s capital, became one of the more than 250 Hall of Fame inductees at a ceremony and dinner at Lansdowne Park’s Horticultural Building.

An Ottawa resident since his early teens, when his family moved there with the Norwegian Embassy, Halvorsen had a stellar running career, winning the Canadian university cross-country championships four times and the Canadian senior men’s title twice, competing at the World Cross Country Championships eight times, winning multiple Canadian 10K (road) championships and making it to the final of the 10,000m for Norway at both the 1988 and 1992 Olympics.

The first time Halvorsen won the Ottawa 10K, in 1988 (he would go on to win three more times), he set a course record of 28:12, which stood for 21 years, until it was finally broken by Ethiopia’s Deriba Merga in 2009, lowering it to 27:24.

A graduate of the University of Ottawa in both mechanical engineering and its MBA program, Halvorsen worked in Ottawa’s high-tech sector for 18 years while raising a family with his wife Susan, and running the not-for-profit Run Ottawa for several years on a volunteer basis before it became a full-time gig in 2013.

Over his 20-year tenure as race director, Halvorsen has shepherded the growth of the Ottawa race weekend event from a relatively modest affair involving 10,000 athletes to the biggest running event in Canada, with 40,000 participants and not one, but two IAAF Gold Label designations (for the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon and the Ottawa 10K).

Halvorsen was in good company on Friday evening, with a number of fellow inductees being honoured in similar fashion, including Glashan Public School coach Rick Desclouds, wheelchair athlete Chantal Benoit, retired Ottawa Senators defenceman Chris Phillips, and the 1968 and 1969 Ottawa Rough Riders.

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
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Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon

Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon

2020 race has been canceled and it is going viral. Welcome to Canada’s largest and fastest marathon: the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon. As one of two IAAF Gold Label marathon events in Canada, the race attracts Canada’s largest marathon field (7,000 participants) as well as a world-class contingent of elite athletes every year. Featuring the beautiful scenery of Canada’s capital,...

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Romanian firefighter Iulian Rotariu returned home after winning 522-km ultra-marathon in Australia

Romanian firefighter Iulian Rotariu returned home on June 1 after winning one of the toughest ultra-marathons in the world – The Track, which took place in Australia between May 15 and May 24.

The Romanian completed the 522-km race in 57 hours, 6 minutes and 20 seconds, beating the 2017 winner’s time by seven hours, the Romanian General Inspectorate for Emergency Situations (IGSU) announced on Facebook. Another Romanian, Andrei Gligor, placed second with a time of 59 hours, 2 minutes and 35 seconds, while Belgian Guy Goossens ended the race in third place with a time of 59 hours, 30 minutes and 11 seconds.

The Track takes place in the Northern Territory of Australia, in the hottest desert in the area. The participants had to cover 522 km in nine stages, and each of them had to carry his/her own backpack containing food, mandatory equipment and personal equipment. The distance the competitors had to cover increased with every stage, and so did the altitude. If on the first day they had to run 30 km at an altitude of 700 m, on the last day the distance increased to 137 km and the altitude was 1,700 m. Only 18 of the 38 competitors who started the race managed to cross the finish line, four of them quitting right from the start, IGSU said.

“The victory obtained at The Track ultra-marathon is the best result achieved by Iulian Rotariu in endurance competitions, and the success in Australia was prefigured by another phenomenal race last year in Antarctica, when the Romanian firefighter ranked second, entering the “4 Deserts” global top,” IGSU said in its Facebook post.

Iulian Rotariu participates in such events for a good cause, aiming to support the children with autism from Botosani, his home city.

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Gerda Steyn is focused to take the title at the 94th Comrades Marathon Sunday

After narrowly missing the record in last month’s Two Oceans Marathon, Steyn has enjoyed a trouble-free training camp in the mountains of France, together with third place finisher from last year, Steve Way, and Anthony Clark, both running this year’s race in the colours of Nedbank Running Club.

“A lot of people asked me if I am disappointed at just missing the record in Two Oceans,” laughed Steyn.

“Looking back at it now it was a little bit sad to be so close but even with 8km to go, I told myself to save the legs because Comrades is my main focus of the year and I didn’t want to do too much damage.” It’s a decision that Steyn hopes will pay dividends in this year’s event.

Last year’s winner Ann Ashworth comes into this race much faster than before, but it is the Up-run defending champion, Nedbank Running Club’s Camille Herron, who is hoping to defend her title.

A strong athlete with multiple world records, Herron is well known for her awkward running style that took her to victory in 2017.

Teaming up with her club mate Steyn, the two make a dangerous combination.

Throw in stalwart Fikile Mbuthuma and OMTOM gold medalist Ntombesintu Mfunzi who will be one to watch on her Comrades debut, the ‘Green Dream Team’ ladies will be a force on the route.

Adding to Nedbank’s Comrades debuts this year is Poland's Dominika Stelmach who had an unfortunate injury that forced her out of starting last year’s race.

After her fourth-place finish at this year’s Two Oceans, Stelmach is hungry to make an impression.

Also making a debut will be four-time World Ironman champion Chrissie Wellington. The 42-year-old English athlete ran 2 hours 51 minutes in this year’s London Marathon to qualify for Comrades which puts her in with a chance of a top 10 finish.

Carla Molinaro who represented Great Britain last year in the World 100km championships, but now has South African citizenship, will be another athlete looking for a top 10 finish after finishing ninth last year.

South African Deanne Horn is a newcomer in the ultra-marathon scene. She finished 42nd in her debut in 2017 and finished 15th last year and has represented South Africa in the World 100km championships. Together with team-mates Steyn, Mfunzi, Molinaro and Mbuthuma, the Nedbank ladies will be looking to take the team prize in this year’s race.

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Want to Run the 2020 Derby Festival Mini and Marathon? Registration opens June 5

If it seems early to be registering for Kentucky Derby Festival's miniMarathon and Marathon, it is.  Wednesday, June 5 is National Running Day and the Festival is opening race registration at 9 a.m. with discountate rates and offers for the first 24 hours.

Shanna Ward, Race Director says “It’s the perfect opportunity for runners to get a great deal on registration prices and guarantee their spot in the 2020 race.”

For one day only registration for the mini is $50 and $ for the Marathon.  In addition to the reduced registration, the first 500 entrants will receive a free safety light armband and everyone who registers in that 24 hour window will get 15% off shoes and apparel from Swag Sports Shoes.

The 2020 miniMarathon and Marathon takes place Saturday, April 25, 2020. It will be the 47th annual miniMarathon and the 19th annual Marathon.

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kentucky Derby Festival

Kentucky Derby Festival

The Kentucky Derby Festival Marathon and mini Marathon presented by Walmart and Humana Vitality has grown from a small local road race into the largest day of road racing in Kentucky history. Runners from all 50 states and several foreign countries annually complete the scenic 13.1- and 26.2-mile courses that start and finish in downtown Louisville. Both races share the...

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J&A Racing invites Runners to Honor Virginia Beach Shooting Victims on Global Running Day

The Hampton Roads community to come together to honor the victims affected by the senseless tragedy that took place in our community last week. 

“In moments of sadness, it is our community that lifts us up. This event is about more than running together. It is about honoring those who left us too soon,” said Jerry Frostick, J&A Racing. “Coming together as one to lift each other up is what our community does best.”

 In the running community, Wednesday, June 5th is recognized as Global Running Day - a worldwide celebration of running designed to inspire everyone to be active.

In light of the tragedy in Virginia Beach, this year’s event will be dedicated to the memory of the twelve victims and their families. Local run clubs, community members, and first responders will join together as Virginia Beach Strong.

 The community event will start at 6:15 p.m. at Murphy’s Irish Pub with a moment of silence to honor the victims followed by a run/walk on the Virginia Beach Boardwalk. Participants are encouraged to wear blue and to join us following the run for a gathering at Murphy’s Irish Pub.

Raffle packages and merchandise will be available to support the United Way South Hampton Roads’ Virginia Beach Tragedy Fund. This event is free and is open to the public.

(06/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Global Running Day

Global Running Day

What is Global Running Day? Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you. Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk,...

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Canadians Catrin Jones and Calum Neff head to Comrades Marathon

Catrin Jones and Calum Neff, two of Canada’s strongest ultrarunners, are heading to South Africa this week to tackle the 94th running of South Africa’s most famous and historic ultramarathon, the Comrades, next Saturday, June 8.

Neff ran it for the first time last year, finishing in 31st position overall, in 6:08:06. Jones will be racing Comrades for the first time.

Jones is a veteran of the BC trail and road scenes who has eased back into racing since having her daughter, Elodie, who is now two.

“I’ve been wanting to go for years and thought about it many times,” says Jones, inspired by her friend, the much-decorated ultrarunner Ellie Greenwood, who won Comrades in 2014.

Jones won last year’s Squamish 50K and Whistler 30K, and finished third at the 2018 BMO Vancouver Marathon.

Neff holds the Guinness World Record for fastest marathon while pushing a stroller (2:21:22), set with his daughter Alessandra at the 2016 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

(Neff also held the half-marathon stroller record for a time, but his 1:11:27 from 2016 was eclipsed in 2017.) Neff is from Ontario but lives and trains in Houston, Texas.

(06/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Comrades Marathon

Comrades Marathon

2020 race has been officially cancelled. Arguably the greatest ultra marathon in the world where athletes come from all over the world to combine muscle and mental strength to conquer the approx 90kilometers between the cities of Pietermaritzburg and Durban, the event owes its beginnings to the vision of one man, World War I veteran Vic Clapham. A soldier, a...

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Nicky Spinks will lead the way at Trail Skills for Ultrarunners

Scotland-based women’s guided trail running company, Girls on Hills Ltd, have just announced that they will be hosting a ‘Trail Skills for Ultrarunners’ course in Glencoe October 11-13, with the legendary ultrarunner Nicky Spinks the star tutor.

Spinks will be sharing her experiences and coaching women in the essential skills of ultrarunning, including training advice and running with poles. She will be joining an otherwise all-Scottish line-up of other providers, with experts covering areas such as yoga, nutrition, foot-care and self-massage. 

For female ultrarunners, there can be no better teacher than Spinks. The inspirational Inov-8 athlete just became the first person to complete double rounds of Britain’s three classic 24-hour mountain running challenges: the Bob Graham Round in England; the Charlie Ramsay Round in Scotland; and now the Paddy Buckley Round in Wales. 

On her two laps of the Paddy Buckley Round circuit last month, Spinks ran 94 peaks and 56,000ft of height gain (almost two times Mount Everest), in 57hrs 27mins to complete the ‘doubles’ and make fell-running history. 

Girls on Hills Ddirector Keri Wallace told runABC Scotland online: “Nicky is an incredible woman and an inspiration to so many people, runners and non-runners alike. As a 51-year old, a woman, a farmer and a cancer-survivor, she breaks so many trail-running stereotypes! Who better to join us at Girls on Hills and help coach women in the skills they need to get outside and explore their limits through ultrarunning!”

As a company, Girls on Hills Ltd, who are sponsored by Ellis Brigham Mountain Sports and are partnered with Inov-8 clothing, seeks to address the gender gap in participation that exists in trail, fell and skyrunning by increasing the accessibility of off-road running disciplines. 

“There are no actual barriers stopping women from running long distances in remote places or exploring the mountains – there are only perceived barriers. We welcome women of all ages and from all walks of life, and surprise them with how much they can achieve!”  

(06/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Vivian Cheruiyot and Mary Moraa took part in the “IAAF Run 24:1” race at the Nairobi National Park on Sunday

Vivian Cheruiyot and Mary Moraa as well as Athletics Kenya president Jackson Tuwei and Kenya Wildlife Service director general John Waweru took part in the race that started and ended at the famous elephant ivory burning site.

The race initiated by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) to popularise the sport was held concurrently in 24 major cities in six continents covering One Mile hence the Run24:1 race.

“It’s a great feeling to be part of this race that is being held for the first time in Kenya and at an iconic place. I have really enjoyed and interacted with both the old and the young,” said the 35-year-old Cheruiyot, who started representing the country at the age of 15. “I want to encourage everyone to start running.”

Cheruiyot said that she resumed training one week ago since finishing second at London Marathon on April 28, this year.

“I will in a week’s time unveil my next race,” said Cheruiyot, who hinted of taking a stab at the Berlin Marathon for the first time or making a second return at New York City Marathon where she finished second last year.

This year’s Berlin Marathon is due September 29 while the New York City Marathon is planned for November 3 this year.

Cheruiyot said she might have opted out of the World Championships planned from September 28 to October 6 this year in Doha, but her dream for the second Olympic victory is on.

“I want to work hard and make the 2020 Tokyo Olympics marathon team,” said Cheruiyot.

Moraa, whose focus is now on qualifying for the World Championships, said: “It should happen every year because it’s a wonderful event and we need it every year here in Kenya.”

The IAAF Run24:1 race was also held in three other African cities, namely Gaborone (Botswana), Yaoundé (Cameroon) and Rabat (Morocco).

(06/03/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan Kipkering makes up for his 2018 Sundown Marathon DNF by winning the title this year

A year ago, Kenyan Hillary Kipkering had high hopes of capturing his first Osim Sundown Marathon in Singapore, but a thigh injury forced him to drop out at the 27km mark.

On Saturday (June 1), he returned and delivered, claiming the top spot on the podium with his time of 2hr 49min 33sec.

He was followed by Lee Wai Kin, who came in at 3:03:55 and Qu Jinchao (3:04:45).

Said Kipkering, 45: “Last year, I had come from another marathon in Indonesia and I injured my thigh muscle there so I stopped at the 27km (mark). It’s very nice that I managed to finish first today, I was confident.

“The race was very good. It was humid, but the course was very nice. The only issue was that there was congestion near the end but, besides that, everything else was very good.”

In the women’s category, Singapore’s Sharon Tan finished first in 3:23:16. She was followed by Jade Chow (3:29:01) and Naum Jepkosgei (3:29:01).

(06/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Sun Down Singapore Marathon

Sun Down Singapore Marathon

Singapore’s largest night marathon, the Sundown Marathon, is looking to redefine the art of night running and is designed as the perfect rush of adrenaline for everyone!Sundown Marathon injected a jolt of energy into Singapore’s running scene when it became the nation’s first night marathon in 2008, and has become Asia’s largest night marathon.Being Singapore's first night...

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Nikki Johnstone again wins the Rhine-Ruhr Marathon

The Dusseldorf Scot Nikki Johnstone won the 36th Rhein-Ruhr Marathon in Duisburg on Sunday. The runner of the LAZ Puma Rhein-Sieg crossed the finish line in front of Gunnar Diederichs (TuS Opladen) in 2: 43,41 hours and Cemal Ineci, Lefke Avrupa ÜNi, in 2:52 in a time of 2: 29,48 hours. 01 hours.

(06/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Rhein-Ruhr-Marathon

Rhein-Ruhr-Marathon

2020 race may have to be cancelled. A final decision has not been made as of April 14. Duisburg is running…through the world’s biggest inland harbor, through the internationally known city district Innenhafen, over Rhein and Ruhr, to the finish line inside the Schauinsland-Reisen-arena. Duisburg enthuses…by the tradition of a marathon established in the same year as the classics in...

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The top four women were inside the course record at the Lanzhou Marathon Sunday

Ethiopia’s Worknesh Edesa beat the hot weather and a loaded field to break the women’s course record at the Bank of Lanzhou Cup Lanzhou International Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on Sunday June 2. 

The top four finishers in the women’s race all finished inside the previous course record of 2:31:22 set by Kenya’s Nguriatukei Rael Kiyara in 2015. The 26-year-old Edesa, whose 2:21:05 PB from Dubai earlier this year made her the fastest entrant for Lanzhou, lived up to expectations as she broke the tape in style in 2:30:22.

The race started under cloudy weather conditions but the sun came out about an hour after the gun and the temperature rose rapidly. A group of eight runners led the race to 15km in 53:31, 25km in 1:29:08 and 30km in 1:47:29.

After 35km, the pack was soon whittled down to just four runners: Edesa, Gutemi Shone, Sifan Melaku and Fantu Jimma. Edesa waited for another four kilometres before launching her powerful surge to pull away from the others.

Although the temperature reached as high as 26C, the in-form Ethiopian kept widening the gap and went on to win in 2:30:22. It was Edesa’s first marathon victory since winning the 2016 Xiamen Marathon in 2:24:04.

Edesa’s compatriot Shone, winner of this year’s Seville Marathon with a PB of 2:23:32, finished second in 2:30:40, while the 31-year-old Jimma, winner of this year’s Wuhan Marathon, lagged nine seconds further behind to complete the Ethiopian podium sweep.

Kenya’s Justus Kimutai upset a strong Ethiopian contingent to win the men’s race in 2:11:47.

Ethiopian runners filled the next six positions with Gizachew Hailu finishing second in 2:12:05 and Afewerk Mesfin third in 2:14:10.

The race saw a crowded leading group in the opening five kilometres and before they went through the 10km water station China’s Guan Yousheng was the first to drop back.

Ethiopia’s Bira Seboka, a 24-year-old with a PB of 2:08:51, made his bold early charge after reaching 20km in 1:03:01. Seboka built an advantage of some 15 seconds at 25km but was later swallowed by the chasers near 28km.

A new leading pack of seven runners paced the race for another five kilometres before the 26-year-old Kimutai, who was running for the first time on the Chinese soil, started his charge.

This time only Hailu and Mesfin managed to keep up with Kimutai’s pace. But the 26-year-old Mesfin, who set a course record of 2:09:49 in Chongqing in 2017 and improved his career best to 2:09:08 in Xiamen five months ago, had to drop behind near the 35km tables.

Kimutai then kept pressing ahead and finally notched the sole lead after 38km. When he reached 40km in 2:05:17, the Kenyan was 11 seconds ahead of the 21-year-old Hailu.

Kimutai’s winning time of 2:11:47 was more than one-and-a-half minutes shy of the 2:10:10 course record set by Ethiopian Abayneh Ayele in 2015.

(06/02/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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Lanzhou International Marathon

Lanzhou International Marathon

Lanzhou International Marathon has been honorably awarded as China’s “Best Marathon” and “Marathon Gold Label Race” by Chinese Athletics Association, meanwhile it has upgraded into one of the National Scoring Races.Lanzhou International Marathon is carefully crafted on the course along the Yellow River line which is spotted with beautiful natural scenery and mountains and waters along the way, and it...

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Colby Mehmen is living in his blue 1976 Chevrolet camper van, Pursuing His Olympic Dream

Colby Mehmen's daily routine is simple: Wake up, run, eat, sleep, work, and do it all again tomorrow. Sounds like the lifestyle of a sponsored pro, but for the 24-year-old reigning Dallas Marathon champ, it is the pursuit of his Olympic Marathon Trials dream-something that he's living out while living in his blue 1976 Chevrolet camper van.

The van has been his home since his fifth year at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, where he competed on the cross-country and track teams. Prior to that, the Texas native had been good, but never great. Then he met his college teammates, who showed him what it took to compete at a higher level.

This required pushing mileage into the triple digits, starting with 100-mile weeks his freshman year and building up to as much as 150 in a week. The fruits of his labors were there, as he posted his best times in the 10K (29:34) and 5K (14:24). Yet with an option for a fifth year, he decided to take his final year off.

Without a scholarship, money would be tight, so he came up with a plan.

"I bought the van and just lived in it for my fifth year," Mehmen said. "But my life was simple: I'd run, get back in the van, change, go to class, eat, and sleep. It was also nice that I had the rec center to shower."

Mehmen's college experience turned out to be a good road map for successful nomadic living. Cooking simple meals-Mehmen shoots for 4500 calories a day with meals like tacos, Cream of Wheat, rice, and barbecued chicken-was easy on his propane stove. When he wasn't running, eating, or sleeping, he was working part time, splitting his time among a running store, coaching online, and his own apparel company, Nomad Running Co.

The only thing lacking in his van-dwelling existence is a fridge, something he is still looking to remedy. Currently, he freezes food in a cooler.

For some, this may be a ludicrous monastic lifestyle of simplicity. For Mehmen, he wouldn't have it any other way.

"It's amazing; I can park near any of my favorite running spots, wake up, and just run them," Mehmen said. "It's an adventure every day. I'm exploring things day in and day out."

His next chance to qualify will come at Grandma's Marathon in June. With little else to worry about right now, Mehmen will continue on in his van, going after his dream.

"Right now, the plan is to run the Trials, and I'm not sure how far I'll take it after that, but [I still have] two or three years left in the van," he said. "I only get one chance to do this in my life, so I'm going to take advantage of it."

(06/01/2019) ⚡AMP
by Andrew Dawson
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Grandmas Marathon

Grandmas Marathon

Grandma's Marathon began in 1977 when a group of local runners planned a scenic road race from Two Harbors to Duluth, Minnesota. There were just 150 participants that year, but organizers knew they had discovered something special. The marathon received its name from the Duluth-based group of famous Grandma's restaurants, its first major sponsor. The level of sponsorship with the...

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