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Galen Rupp's preparation for Boston is the best ever says his coach Alberto Salazar

Galen Rupp finished second in his Boston Marathon debut last year despite not knowing if he would start the race two weeks prior.

This year is a different story says his coach Alberto Salazar, "This is as good as he's ever been prepared for a marathon. Anything can happen. You can have bad luck. But by far this is the best preparation he's ever had in terms of being really prepared," says Salazar.

Rupp, a two-time Olympic medalist, contests his fifth career marathon Monday. "Galen's been able to train much harder, run more miles and do more speedwork. It's gone really well, knock on wood. There have been no setbacks whatsoever," says Salazar.

Rupp can bolster his argument as the best U.S. distance runners of all time. He already has Olympic 10,000m and marathon medals. In his last marathon, Rupp became the first American-born male runner to win the Chicago Marathon in 35 years.

On Monday, he can become the first American-born male runner to win the Boston Marathon in 35 years. (Meb Keflezighi an Eritrean-born American runner won the 2014 Boston Marathon at the age of 38, the oldest winner in decades.)

(04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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We have the greatest marathon team on the planet says Boston Marathon Director

“We held our final BAA Organizing Committee tonight,” says Boston Marathon director Dave McGillivray. “We are READY TO GO! I’ve always said our greatest asset is our team, our people, our leaders. Here is a photo of the greatest marathon team on the planet. Many have 10 years, 20 years, 30 years, 40 years and some even 50 years of experience working this race. It’s an honor and a privilege to work with each and every one of them. The 30,000 runners in this race are really fortunate to have this group of 110 of the most dedicated and passionate professionals producing the best and most prestigious marathon in the world for them! Good luck to this amazing group and to all the participants in the race on Monday.” (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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I just think if you could pick a day and place to win, it would be Patriot’s Day in Boston says Molly Huddle

Molly Huddle is a two-time Olympian, owns the U.S. women’s record in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meter races, and recorded a third-place finish in the 2016 New York City Marathon. Yet in 2018, at the age of 33, she will be making her Boston Marathon debut. It won’t be her first race in Boston, as Huddle has run (and won) multiple versions of the Boston Athletic Association 5K. Yet as she enters a new period in her career oriented more around marathons, Huddle is eyeing Boston as a challenge and opportunity. Asked about the Elite women's field Molly said, "I feel like that’s one of the main storylines of the race is just having such great head-to-head match-ups on the women’s side. Shalane has just won a major in New York, and Desiree [Linden] has always run so well in Boston. Jordan is running really fast in the marathon right now. I think between the four of us it’s just going to be a story within a story on race day. I like that... Competition I think brings out the best in people, so all four of us in the same race on the same day will kind of be like a preview of the Olympic trials in a few years. I’m sure it’ll be exciting and kind of dramatic. I personally was thrilled to see that field." (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Michael Kunyuga was nearing the finish line of the Hannover Marathon when the unexpected happened

Kenya’s Michael Kunyuga was nearing the finish line of the Hannover (Germany) Marathon on Sunday April 8 when the unexpected happened. The Kenyan had been keeping a steady pace throughout the entire Marathon and was in the lead pack with the finish line in sight. Kunyuga was heading towards victory when he began to wobble and stagger. Soon, he collapsed, but miraculously continued to the finish line on his hands and knees. Crowds began to cheer and watched in amazement as he crossed the line to finish second in 2:10:16. Kunyuga managed to barely hold off his compatriot Duncan Koech who clocked 2:10:19 and his determination was rewarded with a personal best as well as the runner-up spot. The race characterized by sunny conditions and rising temperatures was won by Ethiopia’s Seboka Negusse clocking 2:09:44. An eight-strong group reached halfway in 1:04:12. The pacemakers had fulfilled their task to the letter, putting the field at this point on target to attack the course record of 2:08:32. As temperatures rose the lead group slackened their pace and the prospect of attacking the course record slipped out of reach. (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Don’t make plans just yet to attend the USATF 2020 Olympic Trials at Mt Sac

The USATF awarded the 2020 Olympic Trials in June of last year to Mt. SAC, located in suburban Los Angeles. The decision, made by USATF's board of directors in an 11-2 vote, came after Eugene had staged the trials successfully at Hayward Field in 2008, 2012 and 2016. Eugene and Sacramento both submitted bids for 2020. In theory, the trials could go to one site or the other if the Mt. SAC renovation gets tied up in court and falls too far behind schedule. The University of Oregon is expected to begin a complete razing and reconstruction of Hayward Field this summer to transform it into something UO Foundation president and CEO Paul Weinhold terms "spectacular." The new Hayward Field is expected to cost more than $200 million, Money for the project has been privately raised, much of it reportedly contributed by Nike co-founder Phil Knight. If the Hayward project begins this summer it is expected to be completed by April of 2020. That might be just in time. (This photo was taken during the women's Steeplechase at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Eugene.) (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Boston here I come...I thought I would just run one marathon but it's kind of addicting

“It’s been a dream of mine for the last 10 years," says JaneKae Wall. "I competed in the St. George Marathon about 10 year’s ago. I wanted to run at least one marathon and cross it off my bucket list. But, it’s kind of addicting. I ran the St. George race with my sister. She’s always been there with me, pushing me along. “Last year I ran the Denver marathon and I was able to qualify for the Boston Marathon. I had to run three hours and 40 minutes to qualify for my age group. I made the cut with my qualifying time of 3 hours and 36 minutes. I’ve been training for the last 10 years. I’ve done several half marathons too. I’ve also added strength and weight training to my workout and I think that’s reduced my time as well. I’ve been training two days a week with a personal trainer. I run four times a week. I have kind of backed off on the weight training now. I can’t wait to run Boston on Monday April 16.” (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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America's Ben True and Ethiopia's Buze Diriba are back to Defend Their Titles at BAA 5K Saturday

The Boston Athletic Association (BAA) announced Monday the elite field for the BAA 5K and Invitational Mile, to be held on Saturday, April 14 two days before the Boston Marathon. New Hampshire’s Ben True will return to Boston looking to earn his fifth BAA. 5K title, while Ethiopia’s Buze Diriba will defend her 2017 crown. Canada’s Nicole Sifuentes and American Drew Hunter will lead world-class fields at the tenth annual BAA Invitational Mile. A $39,900 prize purse will be distributed to the top finishers of the BAA 5K, while a $14,500 prize purse will be available in the BAA Invitational Mile. True is a veteran and New England favorite on the roads of Boston, having broken the American record twice at the BAA 5K in both 2015 and 2017. A year ago, True timed 13:20 en route to his fifth win in seven years. Coming off a win at the NYC Half in March, True will drop down in distance and face a tough field that includes fellow Americans Eric Jenkins, Tommy Curtin, and Scott Fauble. Jenkins, a native of New Hampshire, is a two-time NCAA champion and was runner-up at last year’s USA Championships 5000m on the track. (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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The forecasters are thinking there will be at least some rain during the Boston Marathon

The weather during the Boston Marathon has been all over the place. This year it’s been chilly the past six weeks, and finally spring-like conditions are predicted for Thursday and Friday. The 10-day temperature forecast shows a possible summer-like day Saturday, followed by a return to chilly air on Sunday. “The possible problem for the weekend and early next week is that colder air from the north will once again move south, and when that meets this warm air it’s going to create a fairly significant storm system,” says Dave Epstein of the Boston Globe. “Obviously this can all change, but multiple computer models are indicating the way the atmosphere will unfold over the next five days is conducive to a significant rain event sometime within 24 hours of the Marathon.” Runners should be ready just in case. The challenge for forecasters is exactly when this heavy rain moves in — during the Marathon or before or even after it. “We won’t know for several days just when the rain might begin and when the heaviest will move into Boston, but I think it’s a high enough probability there will be at least some rain during Monday that runners and spectators should be thinking about it,” says Dave. “The worst-case scenario is a strong gusty wind with heavy rain during part of the Marathon. The best case is that it’s just cloudy with a few light showers; I think it’s highly unlikely we are going to have a sunny, pleasant day,” says Dave. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Boston Marathon is just one week out and Tyler Pennel is pumped

"In a week’s time I’ll be racing from Hopkinton to Boylston Street," says Tyler Pennel. "Over the last few months I have been holed up in the mountains, both of Colorado and North Carolina, with the goal of having a great race on Patriot’s Day. And there is no better place for that to happen than one of the most storied races in the world. Since I witnessed Meb win Boston in 2014, I have wanted to run from town to town in the Massachusetts countryside, and I will get to this year! With only a week to go, all the hard work is done and there is only the last 26.2 miles to go!" (Tyler has some impressive PR's Half Marathon 1:01:44, 13:32 5k and a 3:58 mile.) (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Someone said a flat and fast 100 Miler doesn’t really count? Camille Herron doesn't agree!

Someone tried to tell my friend her first 100 miler at Tunnel Hill “doesn’t count” because it was “flat and easy.” Is this really what people think? Anyone who can go 100 miles on any terrain has my respect! And if anyone wants to attempt to run 100 miles at 7:38 pace you’re welcome to try! Flat and fast and trying to hold the pace hurts way worse than any mountain trail race I’ve done. Hardest event in my opinion is a flat road 100K! Having crossed surfaces I respect the challenges they all present. (Camille holds many ultra records including the World Record for 100 miles running 7:38 pace for nearly 13 hours.) (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Camille Herron
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I would not like to see the mile returned to the Commonwealth Games says Walter Sargent

"Offering both the 1500m and mile in the Commonwealth Games would dilute the fields and encourage some of the game-playing that was rampant in the 1980s, when top competitors were using the proliferation of both mile and 1500 events," says Walter Sargent. "This was done often at the same meet, to avoid head-to-head races against their most difficult challengers. As for the choice between the 1500 and the mile, I much prefer the ease of viewing the race as four quarters and calculating splits in a mile, but I wouldn't want to see the mile returned to the Commonwealth Games as a way of extending the sentiment and mythology of the Bannister and Landy races of 1954 or the dominance of Commonwealth milers in earlier eras. The history of the 1500 at the Commonwealth Games is every bit as impressive as the ealier mile competitions; in fact, probably the single greatest middle-distance race at the Commonwealth Games was Filbert Bayi's 1500 world record (photo) at the 1974 Games." (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Walter H. Sargent
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The doctors told 40-year-old Melonie that she would never walk again...now 71 she is running the Pear Blossom 5k this Saturday

Melonie Jorgensen was told by Doctors she would never walk again. At the age of 40, doctors were at a loss for a diagnosis until she found out she had fibromyalgia, and she would be living with chronic pain for the rest of her life. “I truly prayed that I would die, and I truly believe that if there was a pill I would have taken and not woken up, I would have taken it,” Melonie Jorgensen said. But Melonie started to see an end to her pain when her son convinced her to alter her lifestyle by making small changes to her diet, and her sleep. During her forties, Melonie was convinced that she would never be active again. And yet decades later, she’s now preparing to run in the Pear Blossom 5k. “I never could’ve pictured that I would have been doing this. Ever. So I feel like at 70, I’m younger at 70 than I was at 40, 50, 60,” she said. While Melonie would love to be able to place in her age group, her biggest hope is that can inspire others with her story. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
Inspirational Stories
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Ethiopians Yimer And Diriba Cherry Blossom Ten Mile winners but the wind slowed down everyone

On his first trip to America, 21-year-old Jemal Yimer broke away from a dwindling lead group in the last mile of Sunday's Credit Union Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Run to win the race in a time of 46:17. His compatriot Buze Diriba won the women's race in 53:45 after finishing second here the past two years. In a race full of stories, another highlight was 60-year-old Joan Benoit Samuelson's single-age and 60-64 age group record for women of 1:07:56. Given the dire weather forecast of snow on Saturday night earlier in the week, runners and race organizers were delighted to awake to clear blue skies and peak cherry blossoms this morning. While it was a cold 35 degrees at the start, conditions were ideal for racing, though it was a bit too windy for really fast times up front. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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19-year-old Walelegn sets a Turkish all-comers record at the Vodafone Istanbul Half Marathon

Ethiopian's Amdework Walelegn, clocked a personal best of 59:50 in his second half marathon at the Vodafone Istanbul Half Marathon Sunday. Walelegn, who turned 19 last month, arrived in Istanbul with a modest 1:02:00 lifetime best, a time he ran in his half marathon debut in Riyadh in February. However, he had proved that more was coming when he finished in a world-leading time of 27:36 at the Laredo 10km three weeks ago. The Ethiopian was in the leading pack going hard from the gun. The fast opening 2:43 kilometre led to a 14:10 split at five kilometres with an 11-man pack at the front. Along with Walelegn, Asefa Tefera of Ethiopia, Kenyans Leonard Langat and Evans Cheruiyot, and the Turkish duo Kaan Kigen Özbilen and Polat Kemboi Arıkan were still in contention when the group passed the 10-kilometre mark in 28:09. Arikan was the first to start losing ground after the 12th kilometre, but the rest held together at 15-k, reached in 42:15 and still well in line with the targeted pace of sub-60. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tura running his third marathon in five months wins Milano Marathon in 2:09:04

Seyefu Tura of Ethiopia and Kenyan Lucy Kabuu took the honours at the 18th edition of the EA7 Emporio Armani Milano Marathon,In his third marathon of the past five months, Tura, 21, crossed the finish line in 2:09:04. He was second in Seoul in his debut over the distance in 2:09:26 and seventh in Dubai with an impressive 2:04:44 last January. Kabuu, 34, came from behind to take a close win in the women’s race in 2:27:02 holding off her compatriot Vivian Jerono Kiplagat by six seconds in the final two kilometres. “I am happy with the win, but I struggled with a cramp problem," Tura said. "The final time was not good, but the conditions were not ideal because of the wind." (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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My feet have pretty much taken me all over the world says Zach Miller

Zach Miller likes to look down from a mountain, see a distant peak or valley that looks inviting and know he can just run there. The 29-year-old Miller has surprised himself and the racing world by becoming one of the top mountain runners and ultra racers, running for up to 105 miles at a time. But, at its core, it’s a will to use the gift of his legs that propels him. “My feet have pretty much taken me all over the world,” he says while cooling down after one of his daily 20-mile training runs on Colorado’s Pikes Peak, where he lives in a one-room cabin above 10,000 feet. “They’ve taken me physically up and down mountains. They’ve enabled me to do enough in races to send me anywhere in the world.” In just a few years’ time, Miller has exploded on the scene as an extreme-racing legend and fan favorite by the way he starts each race like a spooked horse in a sport in which measured is considered the only way to win. “I just like to be at the front if I can be,” the 2007 Hempfield High School grad says. “I don’t like being at the back. It makes me nervous.” Not trailing the pack is one thing. Being able to run like your pants are on fire over hill and dale for 50 miles or more at a time is another. But Miller does it. Sometimes he hits the wall like any human testing the limits of physical and mental endurance. But sometimes the go-get-’em mindset makes for great performance. Zach is in France in preparation for the grueling 103-mile Ultra-Trail Du Mont-Blanc race through three countries. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Should the mile be added back into the Commonwealth Games? How about the 1500m?

A mile race could be added to the programme for future editions of the Commonwealth Games as part of a broader attempt to embrace the heritage of athletics. International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) President Sebastian Coe spoke enthusiastically about such a plan here today when asked about possible innovations. The mile featured on the programme at all editions of the event until Kingston 1966, when it was replaced by the 1,500 metres. It is not yet clear if a restored mile would sit alongside, or instead of, the 1,500m, although the latter scenario seems more likely due to the similarities between the events. "We have had the thought of introducing the mile back into the Commonwealth Games and I have an ambition to create and celebrate our own heritage, because often we have events that are the bedrock of our history," Coe said. "Some of the great moments in track and field have been established in a Commonwealth Games. "We still talk about the Miracle Mile, 1954 in Vancouver, these are indelible moments." The Miracle Mile saw England's Sir Roger Bannister beat Australian rival John Landy at Vancouver 1954 in the first race in which two men broke the four minute barrier. "The mile is something that we have been talking with the IAAF about recently, particularly with the passing of Roger Bannister," added Commonwealth Games Federation chief executive David Grevemberg today in Australia. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Erick Kiptanui was just 19 seconds off the world record at Berlin Half Marathon

Kenya’s newcomer Erick Kiptanui clocked a sensational course record of 58:42 in the Berlin Half Marathon, equalling the fastest time in the world this year. Running only his third race in Europe and winning for the third time, Kiptanui moved to equal fifth in the all-time performances for the distance. His impressive running on Berlin’s fast course left him just 19 seconds short of the world record. Kenyans dominated the event and took the first seven places. Emmanuel Kiprono and Richard Mengich finished second and third with 60:29 and 60:36 respectively. The best non-Kenyan runner was Germany’s Homiyu Tesfaye who took eighth place in 62:13. Ethiopia’s Melat Kejeta won the women’s race in sunny but windy conditions with 69:04. Switzerland’s Martina Strähl was second and set a Swiss record of 69:29, improving her personal best by more than two minutes. Anne-Mari Hyryläinen of Finland took third with 71:04, also setting a personal best. At her second attempt the European steeplechase champion Gesa Felicitas Krause of Germany finished the distance for the first time and placed fifth. Her time of 72:16 was the fastest time by a German woman this year. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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For six miles there were 20 Runners in the Lead Pack at the Cherry Blossom Ten Miler

As the elite men’s racers took off in the Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Run, the large pack that typically separates into smaller groups of runners at different paces didn’t budge. Instead, for the first half of the 46th annual race, which has a course that features views of the city’s monuments amid the newly bloomed cherry blossom trees, the men stayed together. Until about the sixth mile, there were about 20 runners in the lead group, proving the deep talent pool this year’s competition offered. But in the last stretches of the course, a few pulled ahead and as Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer, 21, reached the nine-mile marker, he made his move to the front of the lead group. Yimer, who had never been to the United States before entering this race and is excited to go sightseeing, used the burst to win the elite men’s division in 46 minutes and 17 seconds. Aweke Ayalew Yimer finished five seconds behind as runner-up in 46:22, while Philip Langat (46:25), James Kibet (46:36) and Chris Derrick (46:53) rounded out the top five. In the women’s race Buze Diriba, 24, representing Ethiopia, won in 53 minutes and 45 seconds. Diriba had been second in the previous two Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Runs and avenged last year’s runner-up finish by 15 seconds to Hiwot Gebrekidan. Gebrekidan, last year’s winner, crossed the line three seconds after Diriba at 53:48. Hiwott Yemer (53:51), Alemitu Hawi (53:53), Diane Nukuri (53:56) and Vicoty Chepngeno (53:59) completed the top six. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Four runners go under 2:06 at the Rotterdam Marathon this morning

It was a good day for Kenyans in Rotterdam as Kenneth Kipkemoi and Visiline Jepkesho dominated to win their respective races during the 38th edition of the Rotterdam Marathon in the Netherlands on Sunday April 8. Kipkemoi clocked 2 hours, 05 minutes and 44 seconds to win and locked out Ethiopians Abera Kuma and Kelkile Gezahegn from the top podium place. Kuma, the 2015 winner was forced to settle second in 2:05:50, beating Gezahegn to third place by sevens second in 2:05:57. Kenya’s Laban Korir came in fourth in 2:05:58 followed by the 2016 champion Marius Kipserem in 2:07:22. Under sunny circumstances, the 33-year-old Kipkemoi finished solo on the Coolsingel Street in his European marathon debut. After the start at the Erasmus Bridge, a group of 14 athletes distanced themselves from the rest and halfway, there were 10 leaders left. In the final kilometers, Kipkemoi proved to be the best to edge out Kuma and Kelkile. Jepkesho, the 2016 Paris Marathon champion, ended Kenyan women’s long drought at the championship, winning her race in 2:23:47, missing the course record of 2:23:27 held by disgraced doper Jemima Sumgong by 20 second (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kipchoge wins the Rome Marathon this morning in 2:08:03

Kenyan Cosmas-Jairus Kipchoge Birech won the Rome marathon on Sunday April 8 with Ethiopian Rahma Tusa winning the women's race for the third straight year. Kipchoge clocked 2hr 08min 03sec in the Italian capital to finish just ahead of Bahraini Abdi Ibrahim with another Kenyan Paul Kangogo third. Tusa, 24, clocked 2hr 23min 46sec in the women's race with Bahrain's Dalila Gosa three minutes behind and Kenya's Alice Kibor in third. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Lonyangata becomes the first man to win back-Back titles at Paris Marathon in recent times

Paul Lonyangata and Betsy Saina ran to victories at the Schneider Electric Paris Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race whose 42nd edition took place today April 8. Lonyangata clocked 2:06:25 to become the first man to win back-to-back titles since Briton Steve Brace in 1989 and 1990. Saina clocked 2:22:55 to take the win in the first marathon she's completed. In the men’s race, a large group detached itself from the gun with 20 athletes, including all the favourites, reaching five kilometres in 14:54. They maintained a steady tempo, hitting the 10km marker in 29:51, suggesting a possible finish time of 2:06:00. Midway through the 40th kilometer, Lonyangata decided to put in a surge, leaving Kisorio behind for good. Lonyangata then took advantage of having the lead women in sight –-the women’s race had begun 16 minutes and 26 seconds before the men’s-- to continue his quest for a successful title defence. He eventually caught the leaders before crossing the line in 2:06:25, 15 seconds outside his personal best set last year in Paris. “It’s a wonderful day for me. I love Paris so much,” said a delighted Lonyangata, who led a Kenyan sweep. Kisorio held on to finish second in 2:06:36 with Ngeno third in 2:06:41. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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I pushed really hard to win this Shovel says Steve Cryer with a smile on his face

Sometimes the most interesting and unique awards are given out by the smaller home town races. Steve Cryer ran a race this morning in North Easton, Mass and won a shovel for his effort. “I really think this is cool,” says Bob Anderson, a friend of Steve’s. “ I love the big races but this sort of race reminds me of the good old days.” The 5k Race was held this morning April 8 at the Shovel Town Brewery in Easton with live music and free samples. “I pushed really hard to get this shovel,” said Steve. This was a tune-up race for Steve as he prepares for the Boston Marathon coming up April 16. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Smiling keeps the nerves at bay and reduces tension and helps me run faster

Whenever she runs, Michelle Yuen makes it a point to recall funny memories and think positive thoughts. This strategy doesn’t just relax her body and mind; it also puts a big smile on her face. “Smiling keeps the nerves at bay and reduces tension in my body,” says the 43-year-old, who describes herself as a casual runner and trains a couple of times a week with the Hong Kong Ladies Road Runners Club. “This makes for a more pleasant and comfortable run, and when I’m enjoying myself I tend to move a little faster, too.”Singing, reminiscing about pleasant memories, thinking funny thoughts – all induce happiness which makes activities feel easier and can help performance, research shows. Frowning and grimacing, though, can do the opposite.A recent study by the Ulster University School of Psychology in Northern Ireland confirmed that smiling can decrease an athlete’s perception of effort during endurance exercise. The lower the perceived effort, the easier an activity can feel; as a result, athletes are more likely to perform better. Many world class runners smile and are thinking positive thoughts during and at the end when running world class times. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Gold Coast Commonwealth Games Had A Thrilling Start this morning

Dane Bird-Smith and Tom Bosworth ensured that athletics action at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games had a thrilling start as they battled for the 20km race walk title on Currumbin Beachfront on Sunday morning. Roared to victory by a home crowd, Australia’s Olympic bronze medallist Bird-Smith broke the Games record to secure gold, clocking 79:34 to finish four seconds ahead of England’s Bosworth, who smashed his British record for silver. A further 13 seconds back, Samuel Gathimba claimed bronze for Kenya. The race was about redemption for Bosworth, devastated after his disqualification at the IAAF World Championships in London last summer, the Rio Olympics sixth-placer was determined to bounce back in Australia and he did so in superb style. After putting in a surge half way into the race, which was passed in 39:57, Bosworth was happy to let Bird-Smith and Gathimba move to the front. The Brit closed the gap and with 6km to go the race was on Games record pace. Friends off the track and road but rivals in competition, neither Bosworth nor Bird-Smith was willing to give in and the gold medal battle went all the way down to the closing stages, as the Australian used the home support to help him move away over the final 600m. “I’m so pleased with this medal and to be up there with Dane,” said Bosworth. “He’s a really good mate so I am really pleased for him. Athletics Weekly reporting (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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71-year-old Marin Wang says that the Paris Marathon will be her last

Some people slow down with age, but it’s not stopping a Richland, Washington woman from running the Paris Marathon on Sunday. Maron Wang, 71, took off on Wednesday for France with a goodwill package from Delta staff at Sea-Tac airport. “The Delta staff were all amazed at my marathon enthusiasm at my relatively mature age,” she said. Wang will be one of the 55,000 people running in the 42nd Paris marathon. The race starts at 8:20 a.m. Paris time on Sunday. Her enthusiasm for long-distance running started in 2002 when her second child left for college. Since then she’s run in more than a dozen marathons, including a top finish in her age group (4:05:32) at the 2012 Boston Marathon. She runs 25 to 65 miles a week. Running keeps her fit and energized, along with keeping her occupied, she said. After nearly 16 years of long distance running, the Paris marathon will be her last, she said. (04/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Kenyan men claimed the top nine spots at the Prague Half Marathon

In the men’s race at the Prague Half Marathon today, Benard Kimeli broke from a three-man pack in the final kilometre to claim an emphatic victory in 59:47. “I won the 10-kilometre Birell Prague Grand Prix last year, and now can add the half marathon to that,” said Kimeli, who dipped under the one-hour barrier in just his second race over the distance. He finished eighth in Ras Al Khaimah in February, clocking 1:00:16. He clocked 27:10 in that Prague 10km last year, the fastest performance in the world in 2017. “Prague really suits me and I race well here. The conditions went in our favor today and I’m really pleased that I managed to win.” Geoffrey Yegon was second in 59:56 with Peter Kwemoi third in 59:58 to round out the Kenyan podium sweep. Spots four through nine also were claimed by Kenyan runners. (04/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Joan Melly runs 1:05:04 to win the Prague Half Marathon today, her first 5k was 14:51

Kenya’s Joan Melly won the Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon clocking 1:05:04 in the Czech capital to highlight the 20th running of this IAAF Gold Label road race Saturday April 7. Melly passed the opening five kilometres in 14:51, reached 10k in 30:14 and 15 in 45:54, an ambitious pace that came back to haunt the 27-year-old Kenyan in the waning stages. Her performance nonetheless elevated her to the No. 4 position all-time with the fifth fastest run. “The first five kilometres were exceptionally fast with us running it in under 15 minutes, but I didn’t look at my watch at all, I just followed the pacemakers," said Melly, who set her previous lifetime best of 1:05:37 at the RAK Half in Ras Al Khaimah in February, where she finished fourth. "I felt my strength wane a bit towards the end, but it was still enough to break a new personal best and secure a win.” Her compatriot Caroline Chepkoech Kipkirui was second in 1:06:09 followed by Worknesh Degefa from Ethiopia, the runner-up last year and winner in 2015, who clocked 1:08:10. (04/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Dangers of Under Fueling can effects your health and performance

Experts contend that pushing the calorie-cutting envelope can potentially backfire and actually lead to negative effects on both your health and performance. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) is a condition that can affect athletes of any age and sex. RED-S occurs when an imbalance in energy intake and energy output has detrimental effects on bone health, menstrual function (in women), metabolic rate, immune function, cardiovascular health, and psychological health. Recently, an expert panel brought together by the International Olympic Committee, examined this. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport, or RED-S, was coined to describe health and performance issues that arise when athletes don’t eat enough to cover both training and daily life activities. How is RED-S different from eating disorders? RED-S may overlap with an eating disorder or serve as a risk factor for eating disorder onset, but not necessarily. Even when RED-S does not overlap with a typical eating disorder presentation, energy deficiency can cause major problems with physical and psychological health. One concern in those with RED-S is osteoporosis. Poor bone growth as a result of energy deficiency in young people can lead to stress fractures. In addition, individuals with RED-S evidence increased risk for injury, decreased endurance, and reduced muscle strength, along with decreased coordination, impaired judgment, irritability, and depression. The bottom line is that sports participation should be beneficial, not detrimental to your body. Correctly estimating and addressing energy needs is the single best way to equip your body for the rigors of training. (04/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sister Lloyd dresses a little different when she runs her many races for Orphans Rising

For weeks, runners have been training for the Cooper River. Ridge Run. One runner is dressing for the run a little different than others. “Some people when they pass me, say ‘Oh good, I beat the old nun,’” Sister Mary Beth Lloyd said. She is from New Jersey and is no stranger to running races like this. “I always run with a rosary, and this rosary was made right here at Christ Our King church,” Sister Lloyd said. She says the Cooper River 10K is no big deal. She usually runs longer races—like 50 miles, 60 miles, even 100-mile runs. “I don’t go fast, I get to the end,” she said. “That’s the trick.” But along the way, she spreads awareness of her cause. She said she runs for children, in countries like Ethiopia, who have become orphans because their parents died from AIDS. “They have very little to eat, very little clothing, education, and so we’re trying to provide for them,” Sister Lloyd said. She runs for an organization called Orphans Rising. She said she meets people while she runs, which encourages them to donate to the children she’s helping. (04/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Boston Marathon unicorn is a mythological figure that is meant to be pursued

The unicorn, with its horn pointed upward and majestic mane, has graced the Boston Marathon finish line for decades. The mythical creature, which started as the symbol for the Boston Athletic Association, has become synonymous with the historic race, gracing runner’s jackets, medals, and trophies. Jack Fleming, the BAA’s chief operating officer said, the rich heritage up here between the Scots and the English and the Irish.” The athletic club was founded in 1887 (the first Boston Marathon took place in 1897), and the unicorn was associated with all the organization’s sports. “The unicorn is a mythological figure that is meant to be pursued, but, in that pursuit, you never catch it,” Fleming said. “So it inspires you to continue to try — to race harder in the case of running — and though it may be elusive, it really is the pursuit of the unicorn that makes you better and better and better.” (04/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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How Runners are dealing with the air Pollution in China

Running in China is rapidly growing and the pollution can’t stop people’s enthusiasm. People are finding alternative ways to keep running. Pollution isn’t really a factor if you run on the treadmill in the gym if the Air Quality Index (AQI) is bad. Otherwise many people run in the morning on the streets, between 7 and 8am. Unfortunately the chronic air pollution is indeed an issue, and it often pushes people indoors or discourages them from exercising all together. This is particularly the case in northern China. “Personally, when I moved from Jilin to Beijing,” says Helen, “I was initially making fun of Americans, who instead of asking what the day’s temperature was, said “what’s the AQI today?” When the reply came, these people, who two seconds earlier had been totally fine, often got sick on the spot. However, it did not take long before I had to adjust my opinion and acknowledge the effect the dirty air has on one’s lung capacity.” The Beijing area was required to reduce pollution by 25 percent, and the city set aside an astounding $120 billion for that purpose. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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There is Just something about an Ultra Marathon says Arianne Brown

It was a Saturday afternoon, and I was sitting on my couch scrolling through my Instagram news feed. I saw picture after picture of good friends and acquaintances crossing the finish line of the Buffalo Run held on Antelope Island near the Great Salt Lake in Utah. As I did, I could feel the lactic acid in my legs build up and the soreness settle in after a morning spent racing several miles to a second place overall finish. While I should have been feeling the endorphins of a well-fought race, I was wishing I had experienced what my friends had that morning as they trekked those long miles on the island. Several weeks prior I had signed up to run the 50K distance of the Buffalo Run. It had been three years since I ran this particular course, and I was looking forward to doing it again. Sure, there are times when I quite enjoy pounding the pavement and pushing my body to its lactic threshold, using every single muscle in my body at a relentless speed. But today wasn’t one of those days. Today I wanted nothing more than to spend long, slow miles completing an ultra distance race. Because there’s just something about an ultramarathon. There’s nothing quite like the quiet, meandering about before the race as everyone settles in for a slow, methodical start. I love the restraint at the beginning because there are rarely any weekend warriors out there trying to prove a point. We all know that the miles ahead will be long. They will be hard and taxing. And slow and steady does often win the race. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Bekele has made it very clear unlike some of the other elites, his goal is to win London

Kenenisa Bekele said today, “My goal is to win the London Marathon.” The three greatest distance runners of their generation will race the Virgin Money London Marathon. Ethiopian legend Kenenisa Bekele will join Mo Farah and Eliud Kipchoge on the start line for the IAAF Gold Label road race on April 22. Bekele is the world record-holder for 5000m (12:37:35) and 10,000m (26:17:53), the second fastest marathon runner in history (2:03:03) and the owner of three Olympic and five World Championship gold medals. Bekele has run the past two Virgin Money London Marathons. He finished third in 2016 in 2:06:36 when he admitted he was at just 90 per cent fitness, and was then second last year in 2:05:57 behind Daniel Wanjiru. “I am thrilled to be returning to London for the third year in a row and would love to go one better than last year and win the race,” said Bekele. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Hershey 10K Race was cancelled because of snow yet there is no snow in the current forecast?

On the website Penn Live the headline (at 12:25pm April 5) read: Predicted snowfall won't stop Hershey 10K. "Even with snow in the forecast, more than 2,000 runners are expected to participate in Saturday's Hershey 10K." The article ended with this quote, "Runners and mail carriers have one thing in common. Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat or gloom of night keeps them from swift completion." Then one hour later Penn Live updated their story: "The safety of our runners, volunteers and guests is always our primary focus,” says the organizers. “With the inclement weather predicted for Saturday, we have made the difficult decision to cancel the Hershey 10K in the interest of safety for all concerned. Registered participants will be able to still pick-up their runner's gifts, including, t-shirt, recovery bag and medal on Friday, April 6 from 12-6 p.m. at the Ice Palace." In checking the current forecast for Saturday, there is no snow predicted now, the temperatures will be between 28 and 44 and there will be winds of 12mph. "I don't see why this race was cancelled," says Bob Anderson. "A race should go on rain or shine with only a few exceptions. The current predicted running conditions sound almost perfect except for the wind. Of course, things could change for the worse." (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Gunder Hagg's world records stood for almost a Decade

DID YOU KNOW: Gunder Hagg set over a dozen middle distance world records at events ranging from 1500 to 5000 meters, including three at both the 1500 meters and the mile, one at 3000 meters and one at 5000 meters. It all began on New Year’s Eve 1918 when Gunder Hägg was born on a small farm in the forests of northern Sweden. From a fairly early age he had to help out on the family farm where the main income came from timber work. His school was three kilometers away a distance which he walked, ran or travelled by ski (in the winter) every day. Hagg and fellow Swede, Arne Andersson, lowered the record for the mile to just over four minutes (4:01.4). Both athletes set three world records for the mile. However, Hagg had the last word when he ran 4:01.4 in Malmö, Sweden in 1945 (Hagg’s record was not broken until Roger Bannister ran the first sub-4 mile in Oxford in 1954). Hagg was also the first man to run a sub-14 minute 5000m. All these performances were run on cinder tracks. He certainly made his mark in athletics history: At the main distances (1500m, 1 Mile and 5000m) his records stood until 1954, for about a decade! Gunder Hagg passed away November 27, 2004 at the age of 85. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Bob Anderson's passion for running is contagious and some may even say, a bit fanatical

In this episode of Runners Connect Podcast we speak with Bob Anderson photographer, filmmaker and founder of Runner’s World Magazine, My Best Runs and runner-finisher of a grueling year-long race challenge that consisted of one race a week for 50 weeks. He averaged 6:59/mile pace for the 350.8 miles at age 64 which was 81% age-graded. The next year at age 65 he ran the Boston Marathon finishing in 3:32:17. Bob started running at age 15 and two years later launched Distance Running News, a 1,000 copy magazine that later blossomed into the 2.5 million monthly readers periodical known as Runner’s World. But, as successful as Runner’s World became, it was not without a cost which we learn about in this interview. Bob shares personal ups and downs with running, especially as they relate to his early creation of Runner’s World. We move on to discuss his epic film A Long Run detailing his one year race challenge and featuring many of Bob’s running peers including Paula Radcliffe and Bill Rogers; the creation of a new running event called Double Racing; and the development of an informational and interactive website, mybestruns.com which features the best, most interesting and unique races from around the world. Bob’s passion for running is contagious and, some may even say, a bit fanatical as detailed in the year long 50 race challenge documented in the film A Long Run. His ideas and direct involvement in fitness continue into the current decade where Bob broke into a new race age category, 70 plus. We hope you enjoy our conversation with Bob Anderson. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
by Stephanie Atwood
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British Milers Club is launching the Bannister Mile Series

The British Milers Club is staging a new Bannister Mile Series in memory of Sir Roger Bannister, who died last month aged 88. Sir Roger ran the world’s first sub-4 minute Mile clocking 3:59.4 in Oxford on May 6 and he was also founding president of the British Milers Club. The 2018 series kicks off with men’s and women’s ‘City Mile’ races at Lee Valley in north London on May 9 – just three days after the anniversary of Sir Roger’s famous feat. The BMC is the premier middle distance athletics club in the United Kingdom. Through its racing program, training courses and coaching articles they aim to improve the world standing of UK Middle Distance running. The BMC was established in 1963. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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A 72 Grandfather, from Woodstock is set to take on the Maraton Des Sables

A grandfather from Woodstock is set to take on a 156 mile trek through the Sahara Desert in Morocco. Mahmut Hilmi, 72, will compete in the Marathon des Sables this week, becoming the third oldest man to take on the endurance challenge. Over the course of the race, participants will cover 250km in seven days, carrying all their food and equipment. Temperatures in the desert can soar to 50C. The adventurous fundraiser will use the challenge to raise cash for two charities, Macmillan Cancer Support and Hope for Children. He said: “I am looking forward to doing this event, with a mixture of excitement and trepidation. “I hope that managing the extreme physical and emotional demands presented will be a fulfilling experience. “Despite my advancing years I am in good shape for the event.” The challenge will see competitors take on a wide variety of terrains as they cover the set distance. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Can Kenyan´s Paul Lonyangata win the Paris Marathon Again?

The Paris Marathon course starts at the Champs-Elysees and then heads toward the Place de la Concorde and continue through the city to finish at Foch Avenue. Along with the Berlin Marathon and the London Marathon, it is one of the most popular marthons in Europe. For this years race this weekend Kenya's Paul Lonyangata will be looking to retain his title. The Kenyan could become the first man to win back-to-back titles since Steve Brace of Great Britain in 1989 and 1990. Last year, he improved his personal best to 2:06:10. On the women’s side, the battle for the victory should, on paper, come down to a duel between Amane Gobena of Ethiopia and Ruth Chepngetich of Kenya. Gobena, second in the event three years ago, clocked a best of 2:21:51 in Tokyo in 2016. She also won in Mumbai in January. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian women's runners looking at dominating the Rome Marathon Again

The 24th edition of the Rome Marathon route start and finish at the Fori Imperiali. The race circle around Ostiense up to Ponte Milvio in Flaminio, zig-zaging across the Tevere. It is perhaps one of the most scenic marathon routes, runners will pass by major monuments such as St. Peter’s and Piazza del Popolo. For this year's race Ethiopia will be looking to add to its success. In the women’s race, runners from the east African nation have won on nine occasions and look set to continue their proud tradition. Twenty-four year-old Rahma Tusa will be looking to win the women’s race for the third consecutive year after triumphs in 2016 in 2:28:49 and in 2017 in 2:27:21. If she achieves this feat, she would tie her compatriot Firehiwot Dado, who won in the Eternal City consecutive titles in 2009, 2010 and 2011 and went on to win the New York Marathon in 2011. Tusa set her personal best of 2:25:12 in Guangzhou in 2017. Tusa will face a strong field led by Kenyan runners Sharon Cherop and Angela Tanui and Ethiopia’s Berha Afera Godfay. Cherop finished runner-up in the 2013 Berlin Marathon setting her personal best of 2:22:28 and won the world marathon bronze medal in Daegu 2011. She reached the podium three times in Boston winning in 2012 and finishing third in 2011 and 2013. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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A stronge elite field is ready to take on the Vodafone Instanbul Half Marathon

One of the fastest runners in the men’s field is Leonard Langat who has a lifetime best of 59:18 from 2016. The Kenyan has run a half marathon each month this year, finishing second in 59:41 at The Hague City-Pier-City Half Marathon in March. Eyes will also be on Albert Kangogo, also from Kenya, keeping in mind the 59:25 he ran at the Copenhagen Half Marathon last year. Amdework Walelegn of Ethiopia, the youngest in the field, may be a newcomer to world-class road running but he is still one of the athletes to watch on Sunday. The 19-year-old won the Laredo 10km in March in a world leading time of 27:36, showing the potential to go fast for the 21.1km distance. Evans Kiplagat of Azerbaijan, who achieved a time of 59:56 back in 2009, is no stranger to the race course. He will be running the Istanbul Half Marathon for the fourth consecutive year. (04/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Adidas says it will create unique videos for all Runners in the Boston Marathon

Roughly 30,000 runners will compete in the Boston Marathon on Patriot’s Day, and Adidas says it will create unique videos for every runner delivered within hours after the race is over. To celebrate 30 years of partnership between Adidas and the Boston Marathon this campaign is a monumental task. Here's how it is going to works: data generated by RFID chips on race bibs, like pace and split times combined with street mats that broadcast ultra-high frequency radio signals from antennas allow Adidas, in partnership with digital agency Grow, to capture individual videos using just seven cameras and a 20-person crew around the 26.2-mile course. The highlight reel will combine scenes from race day against an inspiring soundtrack. Personal footage will be captured at the 15K mark and finish line. Trial runs at other road races, storyboarding and prototyping with prescriptive camera angles, shot lists and sound effects will eliminate excess footage and unnecessary editing to make quick delivery a possibility. “We’re capturing the excitement, support and celebration that is Boston in a way no one has ever done before,” said Paul Bowyer, head of Adidas Running US. Runners will receive an email from the BAA after the race to access their sharable videos. (04/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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This will be Christine Miskinis 33rd Boston Marathon

Christine Miskinis started running in 1980 at age 29, motivated by her fear of turning 30. She could have never expected that 38 years later, at age 68, she would be preparing for her 33rd Boston Marathon on April 16, her 54th marathon overall. Now, as a personal trainer and running coach, Miskinis helps others realize their goals, no matter their age. She has always found running the Boston Marathon to be a “magical” experience, even after participating for 33 years. She enjoys the journey, and feels connected to the spectators as she passes by. “The experience is so amazing, to be out there with the spectators who really want to support you,” she said. “Especially since the bombing. You can really feel everyone is there with you.” (04/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Prague Half Marathon course is notoriously fast with a World Record Last Year

The 20th Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon is a thing of beauty. Not just because of our breathtaking scenery. But because of who comes out to participate. Over 11,000 runners have registered. Kenyans James Rungaru and Caroline Chepkoech Kipkirui are two of the favorites racing this Saturday April 7. The course, which winds through the historical heart of the Czech capital, is notoriously fast, evidenced last year when Joyciline Jepkosgei broke the world record with a sizzling 1:04:52 run, while picking up world records for 10km (30:04), 15km (45:37) and 20km (1:01:25) en route. While the latter two are now considered world bests and Jepkosgei has gone on to further improve the 10km and half marathon marks, her performance was nonetheless one of the most memorable road running achievements in recent memory. The men's course record is fast too. Atsedu Tsegay clocked 58:47 to win the 2012 edition, still the seventh fastest performance in history and Ethiopian national record. The 27-year-old returns to Prague hoping to bounce back into sub-one hour territory for the first time since 2013. He showed reasonably good form last month in Lisbon, where he clocked 1:00:28 in windy conditions to finish fifth in the Portuguese capital. (04/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Using Poles can greatly add to a more efficient trail running experience

Poles can greatly add to a more efficient trail running experience, primarily while walking on uphills. Poles are especially useful in longer in trail running races with lots of sustained or steep terrain. Walking with poles can be a good way to conserve leg power as it allows athletes to engage otherwise unused muscles in the upper body. Poles can also be helpful on very steep uphills with loose footing. In these situations racers can take up body weight with the upper body and reduce foot slip. On steep downhills the use of poles can aid balance and stability. While striding with poles, keep your hands relaxed get into a natural rhythm. Let momentum & gravity swing the pole forward. (04/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Hawkins chances of winning the Commonwealth Games Marathon has improved since Zane Robertson has withdrawn

Callum Hawkins (UK) wants to medal in the Commonwealth Games marathon on Sunday April 15. His chances have improved since New Zealand's Zane Robertson won't be running. Callum spoke to Martin Yelling on Tuesday's Marathon Talk show and confirmed a recent 125-mile training week. Hawkins has been training in Australia since shortly after his third place run behind Mo Farah at the Big Half in London on March 4 and was pleased to get a 22-hour flight out of the way well ahead of the Games. Since then he has been able to concentrate on his programme and as he settles into his race taper, Hawkins reported that he had been 'cranking big sessions in the heat', both in terms of miles and quality. Race preparation has also included a detailed look of the marathon course which starts and finishes at Southport Broadwater Parklands, consideration of winds on race day, experiments with hydration strategies and detailed discussion of tactics with his coach (and father) Robert Hawkins. Following a 9th place at the 2016 Olympic marathon in Rio, a Scottish record-breaking run at the 2017 Kagawa Marugame International Half Marathon in Japan and a fourth place at the 2017 World Championships marathon (2:10:17). (04/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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USATF Half Marathon Championships in Pittsburgh

Some of the nation’s best runners will descend on the City of Champions on Sunday, May 6 for the 2018 USATF Half Marathon Championships. Headlining this year’s field are the defending USATF Running Circuit Champions Leonard Korir and Aliphine Tuliamuk. For the first time, the UPMC Health Plan Pittsburgh Half Marathon, part of the 10th annual DICK’S Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon weekend of events organized by P3R, will host a national road championship race. Korir, 31, a U.S. Olympian in 2016, recently set a half-marathon personal record of 59 minutes, 52 seconds - the third fastest time by an American. The 2017 USATF Half Marathon Champion has had previous success on Pittsburgh roads, winning the EQT Pittsburgh 10 Miler in both 2014 and 2016. (04/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Middle Distance Superstar Bernard Lagat at 43-years-old move to the roads has been impressive

Every sport has examples of athletes who seem infuriatingly immune to senescence, 43-year-old Bernard Lagat is in another league entirely. Lagat has competed in five Olympics, a distinction that puts him in very select company among track and field athletes. The fact is all the more impressive when you take into account that his first games didn’t happen until 2000, when he was 25...In the men’s 5,000 meters at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, the 41-year-old Lagat was in sixth place going into the last lap of the race. He proceeded to unleash a 52.82-second final 400 meters to win the most competitive 5K ever held at a U.S. Trials. Lagat had the decency to retire from track racing at the end of the 2016 season, he is once again redefining what should be feasible, only this time on the roads. In January, he ran the Houston Half Marathon in 62 minutes flat, breaking Meb Keflezighi’s U.S. masters record for the distance by over a minute. In March of this year Lagat was the second American finisher at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships. For someone who holds the third-fastest 1,500-meter time ever, Lagat seems to be having way too much fun competing in the half marathon. Full story at Outside Online (04/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Boston narrated by Matt Damon on the big screen April 12-19 in Boston

BOSTON is the first ever feature-length documentary film about the world's most legendary running race, the Boston Marathon. A special one-week only engagement is taking place April 12-19 at the Boston Showplace ICON Theatre at Seaport. Narrated by Academy Award winner Matt Damon, produced with The Kennedy/Marshall Company and featuring an original score by Jeff Beal recorded by members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, BOSTON chronicles the story of the iconic race as it evolved from a workingman's challenge to welcoming foreign athletes and eventually women, becoming the stage for many firsts and in no small part paving the way for the modern marathon and mass participatory sports. The film features many of running's greatest champions including Shalane Flanagan, Meb Keflezighi, Bill Rodgers, Frank Shorter and Joan Benoit Samuelson. (04/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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