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Articles tagged #Deena Kastor
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Past national champions Stephanie Bruce, Aliphine Tuliamuk, Emily Sisson and Deena Kastor to toe the line in Central Park

This year’s NYRR New York Mini 10K, the world’s original women-only road race, will serve as the USATF 10 km Championships for the first time in the event’s 47-year history on Saturday, June 8 and feature one of the best professional athlete fields ever assembled for the event.

The professional open division will include four U.S. 10K champions – Stephanie Bruce (2018), Aliphine Tuliamuk (2017), Emily Sisson (2016), and Deena Kastor (2007) – while the professional wheelchair division will return for the second year with defending champion Susannah Scaroni.

“The Mini is one of road racing’s crown jewels and has been a showcase for many of the world’s greatest runners for decades,” said Chris Weiller, NYRR’s head of professional athletics. “With the national championship on the line for the first time, we’re excited to welcome one of the greatest collections of American women in event history. This year will be special.”

The 2019 USATF 10 km Championships will offer a $75,000 prize purse – the most-ever for a single gender USATF 10 km Championships – including $20,000 for the first-place finisher and will be streamed live on USATF.TV. The women’s 10 km Championships have taken place every year since 1978 and since 2002 have been a part of the USATF Running Circuit, which features championships from one mile through the marathon and consistently attracts the best American distance runners. 

Sisson, who won the USATF 5 km title in Central Park last year and was the top American woman in April’s London Marathon in her 26.2-mile debut, will be going for her second national title in the distance. In Central Park, she will be challenged by defending USATF 10 km and Half-Marathon champion Bruce, nine-time U.S. champion Tuliamuk, and U.S. champions Jordan Hasay, Sara Hall and Laura Thweatt, along with Kastor, the American marathon record-holder and 2004 NYRR New York Mini 10K champion. 

“I’m excited to be lining up for one of the greatest American women’s fields ever assembled at the country’s most historic all-women’s race,” Sisson said. “I’ve had success in winning the USATF 10 km Championships before and will look to repeat that at this year’s NYRR New York Mini 10K, which is a great showcase of how far women’s running has come in our country.”

(05/23/2019) ⚡AMP
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New York Mini 10K

New York Mini 10K

Join us for the NYRR New York Mini 10K, a race just for women. This race was made for you! It’s the world’s original women-only road race, founded in 1972 and named for the miniskirt, and it empowers women of all ages and fitness levels to be active and to look and feel great on the run. Every woman who...

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Jordan Hasay will headline the women’s race in the 2019 Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Jordan Hasay has announced that she will target the American women’s marathon record this fall in Chicago.

Rupp’s Nike Oregon Project teammate, Jordan Hasay, offers incredible inspiration when it comes to successful comebacks. After a storybook 2017 season that saw her run the American debut marathon record, 2:23:00, for a third-place finish in Boston and then post the second-fastest time ever run by an American woman in Chicago (2:20:57), she shut down her 2018 season due to two stress fractures in her foot.

She announced her comeback with confidence this spring in Boston, acquiring another podium finish and posting a swift time, 2:25:20. Hasay hopes to take down Deena Kastor’s long-standing American record of 2:19:36. “I am honored to return to the streets of Chicago,” said Hasay. “I love the fast course and exciting atmosphere, which I believe can lead to an attempt at the American record. I look forward to being at my best again and giving it all I have in October.” 

In its 42nd year on Sunday, October 13, the Bank of America Chicago Marathon welcomes thousands of runners from more than 100 countries and all 50 states, including a world-class elite field, top regional and Masters runners, race veterans, debut marathoners and charity runners.

The race’s iconic course takes runners through 29 vibrant neighborhoods on an architectural and cultural tour of Chicago. Annually, an estimated 1.7 million spectators line the streets cheering on more than 40,000 runners from the start line to the final stretch down Columbus Drive.

As a result of the race’s national and international draw, the Chicago Marathon assists in raising millions of dollars for a variety of charitable causes while generating $338 million in annual economic impact to its host city. The 2019 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, a member of the Abbott World Marathon Majors, will start and finish in Grant Park beginning at 7:30 a.m. on Sunday, October 13.

(05/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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This year London Marathon will have the deepest women’s field in marathon history

This Sunday is the Virgin Money London Marathon, and the women’s field is so strong it feels too good to be true. It feels like winning an all-inclusive trip for two by calling into a radio show–things this good just don’t happen.

But this field is real, and very much happening. Getting underway on Sunday morning at 4:25 a.m. EDT is a women’s event that could make history.

The only piece of bad news is that one of the fastest marathoners in history, Tirunesh Dibaba, has announced that she and her husband are expecting their second child and that she won’t be racing for the remainder of the year.

The top women coming in are defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot and women’s-only world record-holder Mary Keitany. These are just two of the six women with incoming personal bests under 2:20:00.

The others are Birhane Dibaba, who was the winner of the 2018 Tokyo Marathon in 2:19:51, Gladys Cherono (a three-time Berlin champion with a personal best of 2:18:11), Brigid Kosgei (the 2018 Chicago champion in 2:18:35) and Roza Dereje at 2:19:17 (from the Dubai Marathon in 2018).

The wild thing about this group of women is that each of them (except for Dereje) have a world major title and a recent personal best. Keitany has the oldest PB (which is the women’s-only world record) and it’s only from 2017. In terms of who will take the title, it’s a genuinely tight race between these women.

Depending on the day, the order could change, but Kosgei’s Chicago performance was truly dominant, as was Cherono’s in Berlin in 2018. But Keitany has had luck in London before, setting the world record there, so she knows how to run the course well.

The other women’s story to watch is the American battle. The Molly Huddle and Emily Sisson battle could make history for American women. Both women have had impressive 2019 seasons. Sisson ran within seconds of Huddle’s American half-marathon record in Houston.

Then the two women competed against each other three weeks ago at the Stanford Invitational 10,000m, where Sisson came out on top in 30:49 and the third-fastest American woman of all time.

Huddle is going in with an extremely impressive personal best of 2:26:44, and London will be Sisson’s debut. Both women are clearly in incredible shape, and the women’s field is top-notch, so they are sure to push each other to some of the fastest American women’s times in history. Deena Kastor’s American record of 2:19:36 may not be within reach just yet, but it likely will be one day soon for these women.

(04/24/2019) ⚡AMP
by Madeleine Kelly
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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America’s Amy Cragg is set to race the Prague Half on Saturday

Success for reigning USA Olympic Trials Marathon champion Amy Cragg did not come easily or quickly.  Indeed, the 35 year-old Nike Bowerman Track Club athlete nearly quit the sport before her true talent really showed through, eventually carrying her to Olympic Trials wins in both 2012 (at 10,000m) and 2016 (marathon), four USA titles, and a 2:21:42 marathon personal best.  It’s been a long, and sometimes bumpy, road.

“Definitely, I’ve made some mistakes along the way,” Cragg told Race Results Weekly in a telephone interview from Prague where she’ll be running the Sportisimo Prague International Half-Marathon on Saturday.  “I’ve learned from them and that’s kind of led me to here.  So, every once in a while I’ve looked back and I’m, like, I should have done this differently or this differently.  But, the reality is that I might not have ended up here.  I think I’m in a really good place.”

Working with coaches Jerry Schumacher and Pascal Dobert and Bowerman teammate Shalane Flanagan since the end of 2015, Cragg has blossomed into one of America’s best at 26.2 miles.  After winning the February, 2016, Marathon Trials on a brutally hot day in Los Angeles, she went on to finish ninth in the Olympic Games Marathon in Rio. 

She backed up that performance a year later with a thrilling, late-race charge at the 2017 IAAF World Championships marathon in London, taking the bronze medal (the first medal for a USA woman at those championships in the marathon since 1983), and only missing the silver by a fraction of a second. 

She recovered from her London race well, then ran the Tokyo Marathon in February, 2018, finishing third in an excellent 2:21:42.  That performance made her the fifth-fastest American of all time behind only Deena Kastor, Jordan Hasay, Flanagan and Joan Samuelson.

"I love where I’m at,” Cragg continued.  “I love my team and my coach.  Just living in Oregon, that’s been incredible.  I think overall, those rough moments, those times when I considered stopping have made me a stronger athlete.  I’m glad I went through that.  It’s hard to say that.  Those times, I think I really learned a lot from them.”

Cragg is at an unusual juncture in her career.  She hasn’t run a marathon in over a year.  She built-up for Chicago last October, but ended up withdrawing from the race after she and her coaches felt that her training hadn’t brought her to the fitness she would need to run her best.  They had intense discussions, she said, about what to do next.

“When I pulled out of Chicago last year the big talk was, OK, what do we really want to get out of the next two years?” Cragg said.  “I’ll probably be in the sport two years and reassess.  The big thing is making another Olympic team and trying to perform well in Tokyo.  Everything we do from here on out, that’s the goal to make that team and we’ve been working back from there.”

Cragg decided not to do a spring marathon this year.  Instead, she worked with her Bowerman teammates Shelby Houlihan, Marielle Hall, Courtney Frerichs, and Karissa Schweizer to get ready for the USATF Cross Country Championships last February where she finished fifth in her first national cross country championships in nine years. 

A month later she ran the special Road to Gold test event in Atlanta where she was able to run on the 2020 Olympic Trials course.  Uncontested, she covered the 8-mile route in 43:23 and won by a minute.  She told Race Results Weekly that the Atlanta race was essentially the kick-off of her Trials training.

“I felt pretty good,” Cragg said.  “I think I’m in a good position and I’m pretty excited to get into the bigger miles.  For me, that makes a huge difference.  I feel ready to start that, which is exciting for me.”

Saturday’s race in Prague is the next logical step on Cragg’s long journey to Atlanta next February for the marathon trials and Tokyo for the Olympics next August.  On Prague’s flat, record-eligible course Cragg wants to race hard with the goal of improving herself as a marathoner.

(04/05/2019) ⚡AMP
by David Monti
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Prague Half Marathon

Prague Half Marathon

Start the RunCzech season with one of the biggest running events in the Central Europe! Every year the Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon excites spectators with performances of elite athletes breaking records. Enjoy a course with incomparable scenery in the heart of historic Prague that follows along the Vltava river and crisscrosses five beautiful bridges. Take in majestic views of...

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John Hancock today announced its Elite Athlete Ambassador Team for the 2019 Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon champions Meb Keflezighi, Tatyana McFadden, Bill Rodgers, Joan Benoit Samuelson, Greg Meyer and Uta Pippig will join Shalane Flanagan, Ryan Hall, Deena Kastor, Becca Pizzi and Team Hoyt as ambassadors for this year’s race.

“As Patriots’ Day nears, we welcome our 2019 Elite Ambassador Team for the Boston Marathon,” said John Hancock Chief Marketing Officer Barbara Goose.

“Through their mentorship and inclusiveness, these accomplished athletes inspire runners of all ages and abilities during race week and throughout the year at John Hancock sponsored events.

The team has become an integral part of our community.”

Ambassadors will cheer on the 30,000 participants racing from Hopkinton to Boston on Patriots’ Day and attend media, community and race week events, including making appearances at the Runner’s Seminar at the Expo, surprise “meet and greets” near the finish line, and at the John Hancock Elite Athlete press conference on April 12 at 10 a.m. at the Fairmont Copley.

(03/28/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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Deena Kastor is still getting American records and now owns the american W45 record in 8k

Thirteen years after she ran her American marathon record of 2:19:36, Deena Kastor is still setting American records. On Sunday afternoon at Chicago’s Shamrock Shuffle, the 46-year-old ran an American masters 8K record of 27:12, besting the previous mark held by Carmen Troncoso at 27:45. 

Kastor also holds the outright national record at this distance (24:36), and she set it at the same race, back in 2005. This time though, it looks like she didn’t set out with the goal of breaking the master’s record–it just happened.

Kastor struggled recently at the Tokyo Marathon, finishing in 2:51:58 in cold, wet conditions that some said rivalled those at last year’s Boston Marathon. It was her fifth of six Abbott World Major Marathons, the final one being Berlin, which she may race in September.

Deena says this on her website.  “As an athlete I’ve found aside from hard work, the greatest tools for success are optimism and gratitude.These practices have led to happiness and the routine pause to realize I’m living the life I love and dreamed of.”

She continued, " I have been running since I was 11 years old and have learned over the years that there is no greater influence on success than the power of optimism. When we are positive, we master our physical potential. The power of our own thinking can open doors and elevate our performances. With optimism I have been able to pursue every goal, win medals, earn American and world records, but more importantly, I’ve been able to be resilient in the face of injury and falling short. Optimists are dreamers, believers and solution seekers. I believe that these lessons are universal and not running exclusive."

She goes into details in her new book Let Your Mind Run.

 

(03/25/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K

Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K

The Shamrock Shuffle 8k is a huge celebration of the beginning of running season. It is the world's largest timed 8k, starting and finishing in Chicago's Grant Park. Runners feel the energy of over 30,000 runners and a big cheering crowd (present during the entire course.)The excitement lasts throughout the after-party, where participants find beer, food and live music. The...

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Sineard Diver improved her 40 Plus world record at Marugame Half Marathon clocking 1:08:55

Betsy Saina pulled away from Ayuko Suzuki in the final kilometer of the Marugame Half Marathon to successfully defend her title at the IAAF Silver Label road race in 1:07:49 on Sunday Feb 3.

Abdi Nageeye, meanwhile, caught front-running Simon Kariuki just before the 20-kilometer point and went on to win in 1:00:24, taking 46 seconds off the Dutch record set 20 years ago by Greg van Hest.

Saina and Suzuki ran together, passing five kilometers in 16:02, 10 kilometers in 32:06 and 15 kilometers in 48:15. They were still together at 20 kilometers, reached in 1:04:25, but Saina then made her move and pulled away from Suzuki to win in 1:07:49, smashing her previous best of 1:09:17 set in Marugame last year.

The Kenyan became the fifth woman to win back-to-back Marugame Half Marathon titles, joining Eunice Kirwa (2016 and 2017), Tiki Gelana (2012 and 2013), Kayoko Fukushi (2006, 2007 and 2011) and Yasuko Hashimoto (2003 and 2004). Her time is also the third fastest time in Marugame.

Despite missing out on victory, Suzuki was still pleased with her 1:07:55 half marathon debut.

“I am bit disappointed to be out kicked at the end of the race, but it was good that I was able to keep the steady pace all the way,” said Suzuki.

41-year-old Sinead Diver finished third in 1:08:55, improving her own world W40 best by 25 seconds. Charlotte Purdue was fourth in 1:09:46, her first sub-70-minute performance. Mao Ichiyama, who will be running the Tokyo Marathon in four weeks, was sixth in 1:10:49, about a minute shy of her PR.

Before Diver, American marathon record holder Deena Kastor held the record at 1:09:37. 

The lead group in the men’s race went through five kilometers in 14:16 and then Japan-based Kenyan Simon Kariuki pulled away from the pack. He went through 10 kilometres in 28:24, about 20 seconds ahead of the chase pack, and managed to maintain that lead up to 15 kilometres, which he reached in 42:46.

Nageeye then started to reel in Kariuki and took the lead just before 20 kilometres, which he passed in 57:18. The 29-year-old continued to pull away from his competitors in the closing stages to win in 1:00:24, improving his PB by one minute and 44 seconds.

Kariuki finished second in 1:00:43, a PR by 42 seconds. Australia’s Jack Rayner was third in 1:01:36, while fourth-placed Takato Suzuki was the first Japanese finisher, just ahead of Masao Kizu, both credited with PRs of 1:01:45.

(02/04/2019) ⚡AMP
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Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon

Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon

The Kagawa Marugame Half Marathon is an annual road running competition which takes place in early February in Marugame, Japan. It currently holds IAAF Silver Label Road Race status and the professional races attract over 1000 entries each year, and hosted by the Sankei Shimbun, Sankei Sports, Okayama Broadcasting, BS Fuji. The race in Marugame was first held in 1947...

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Emily Sisson is really focused on running a fast time Sunday at the Aramco Houston Half-Marathon

Emily Sisson’s focus for Sunday’s Aramco Houston Half-Marathon is all about running a fast time. The Team New Balance athlete admitted, however that she’s feeling a little out of her comfort zone.

 “I’m used to racing New York Half where I’m, like, really focused on all the competition.  I’m still really focused on that here, but I’ve never run on a really fast course before, so that was never on my mind, really.  It’s a good opportunity to run fast, so I’d like to break sixty-eight minutes.  I think that’s a realistic goal.”

The American record for the half-marathon is 1:07:25, a mark which Molly Huddle set on a chilly day here one year ago.  Only Huddle, Deena Kastor (1:07:34), and Jordan Hasay (1:07:55) have broken 1:08-flat on a record-quality course (Kara Goucher ran 1:06:57 on the slightly-aided Great North Run course in England in 2007). Sisson, 27, has the road racing chops to challenge Huddle’s mark, and said that her recent training in Arizona has her in very good form.

“I feel much more fit than I was two years ago when I ran my PR in New York,” Sisson observed.  “I know Molly made a comment about (my breaking) her record.  She wouldn’t say something like that, just say something like that.  So, I’m going to take that as a compliment that she thinks I’m fit and ready to run fast.”

At the NYC Half, women run separately from the men and typically start the race cautiously.  The weather is usually cold, the course is hilly, and the athletes like to warm into their pace.  Here, Sisson will have to get on her goal pace quickly, despite the fact that it will also be cold (just above freezing at the start).  She’s a little worried about that, especially with so many sub-elite men running near her and the other top women.

“It’s so different than New York,” Sisson explained.  “In New York I feel you have a little bit of a warm-up period.  We start in the park, then go over the Manhattan Bridge.  So, you’re like jogging the first 5-K.  It will be different going straight from the gun this time.  You start with the guys, so it will be hard to hold back a little bit.”

(01/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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Jordan Hasay is working toward 2020 Olympics after latest injury setback

Even through two significant foot injuries in 2018, Jordan Hasay remains optimistic about her long-term running career and is focused on having a successful year leading up to the 2020 U.S. Olympic Trials.

Hasay captured the attention of the running world when she finished third at the Boston Marathon in April 2017.  Jordan shattered the record for an American woman in her marathon debut by nearly three minutes.

Six months later, Hasay cemented her status among the world’s elite marathon runners with a third-place finish at the Chicago Marathon. She clocked 2:20:57, the second-fastest marathon time ever recorded by an American woman.

Hasay, an 18-time All-American at the University of Oregon, had her sights set on breaking Deena Kastor’s American record this year when she suffered two separate fractures to the bone in her left heel.

In April, Hasay withdrew from the Boston Marathon the day before the race after an MRI revealed the significance of the initial injury.

Hasay said she was encouraged the first injury healed so well, and she expects to make a full recovery from the most recent setback.

She’s thankful to be able to return the Central Coast and spend time with family while she rests and recovers.  Sacrificing eight weeks of running is a concession Hasay is ready to make for what she hopes will be a long career ahead.

“You’ve got to find things that can make you smile each day when you’re out injured like that, because you’re not out there doing what you love the most,” Hasay said.

“I see it as sort of the beginning of my marathon career, and hopefully we’ll figure it out so I don’t have these sort of injuries again.”

(12/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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America’s Molly Huddle just might be the one to beat at this year’s New York City Marathon

Last year Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Desiree Linden followed with a victory in April at the Boston Marathon, the first American woman to win in 33 years. Those achievements motivate Molly Huddle, who finished third at the 2016 NYC Marathon in her debut after a successful middle-distance career. "We have a very talented group of women marathoners," Huddle said. The 34-year-old from upstate New York is among that group. At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Huddle broke Flanagan's 10,000-meter American record from the 2008 Beijing Games. In January, Huddle broke Deena Kastor's 2006 American record at the Houston Half Marathon. Kastor, who won bronze in the marathon at the 2004 Athens Olympics, watched Huddle surpass her record in Texas. "Some of the other American women already have the accolades under their belt," Kastor said. "Molly is coming in a little more hungry. So I think we'll see something special out of her on Sunday." Huddle recently trained for two months in Arizona in the high altitude of Flagstaff and Scottsdale. She lives and trains in Providence, Rhode Island, where her longtime coach Ray Treacy is the track coach at Providence College.  The 5-foot-4 Huddle called it a "confidence boost" to finish on the podium in her first marathon. Defending champion Flanagan and Linden are in the field Sunday, along with Kenyans Mary Keitany and Vivian Cheruiyot. Last year, Flanagan brought it home to a cheering crowd against a fading Keitany. "She really captivated everybody watching, the two million people on the streets, those of us glued to our televisions or here at the finish line to welcome her at Central Park," Kastor said. "It was an extraordinary performance." Kastor thinks Huddle has a good chance on Sunday. Huddle aims to make the U.S. team for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. "Molly has such a great range and she's pushing it into the marathon," said Kastor.  "She could really make the team in whatever event she chooses — 5K, 10K and marathon." Huddle attributes the surge of American women in the marathon to watching the likes of Kastor, Flanagan and others perform at international levels.  She says "once you see it is possible" it helps "shift your subconscious." "It's raised the bar," Huddle said. "It's more encouraging than anything."  (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Akron Marathon will honor Deena Kastor with their 2018 Ambassador Award

The Akron Marathon will honor Deena Kastor with their 2018 Ambassador Award as part of the events leading up to its marquee event in the Akron Children’s Hospital Akron Marathon Race Series, the FirstEnergy Akron Marathon, Half Marathon & Team Relay. The Award, given since 2008, recognizes the contributions of dedicated leaders and those who serve as an inspiration in the sport. Deena Kastor is one of the most accomplished distance runners in American history, and currently holds eight American records in distances ranging from the 5k through the marathon. A three-time Olympian, Kastor won bronze in the marathon during the 2004 Athens games – America’s first Olympic medal in the marathon in twenty years. In the USA Championships, she is a three-time marathon winner, a five-time 10k champion, and a nine-time road champion ranging in distances between 8k and 15k. In addition to her Olympic bronze, internationally, Kastor is a two-time silver World Cross Country medalist and won the 2005 Chicago Marathon and the 2006 London Marathon. Deena set five world masters records in the 10k, 15k, 10 mile, 20k and half marathon distances in 2014 alone. Her new book “Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory” was released in April and gives readers a look inside the mind of an elite athlete and how the power of positivity can give anyone a competitive edge. (08/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympian Deena Kastor share her secrets to success in her new book Let Your Mind Run

“When I first became a professional runner, I thought the hardest part would be the physical training. After all, what could be tougher than running to the top of an 11,000-foot peak while trying to fend off a pack of highly trained male distance runners? What could be more taxing than interval workouts so intense you taste blood in the back of your throat? The answer quickly became clear: wrestling with my mind.”—Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory. Most recognize Deena Kastor’s name as one of the best American female road runners in history. Kastor, 45, is the American record holder in the marathon. At one point, she held records in every distance from the 5K to the marathon. She is a three-time Olympian (earning bronze in 2004) and eight-time NCAA All-American. Kastor has just released a new book, Let Your Mind Run, a memoir that dives into the lessons she’s learned throughout her life and running career (which started at age 11) about the importance of mindset, gratitude and how, ultimately, attitude really is everything. Living in Mammoth Lakes, California, Kastor does the majority of her training out her backdoor, in the mountains at 8,050 feet. “I love being on the trails—it’s my happy place,” she says. (08/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jordan Hasay is Back and she is Ready to race the Chicago Marathon in October

Jordan Hasay was projected to be one of the top contenders to break a 33-year U.S. title streak at the Boston Marathon in April, but the 26-year-old was forced to withdraw from the nation’s oldest marathon the night before the event due to a stress fracture in her calcaneus bone. With a month of cross-training and a slow but steady build-up under her belt, she’s back to 100-mile weeks with her sights firmly set on breaking Deena Kastor’s American record at this fall’s Chicago Marathon. How did she do it? Swimming, spin class and hot yoga, she says when she was finally cleared to start running again in mid-May.  “I’ve been a pretty good swimmer my entire life—my mom was a swimmer—so whenever I do get injured, or have little aches and pains, I just go to the pool,” she said. “Overall, I just kept it pretty easy. I did do a marathon build-up so even though I didn’t race Boston, I still needed some kind of break.” Hasay admits it was tough not to go hard every single day in cross-training, since she was “frustrated” with her injury and having to withdraw from Boston, which had been her focus for the better part of six months. (08/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Deena Kastor is the honored guest at the 12th annual Missoula Marathon weekend

Deena Kastor started running at age 11 in 1984, after witnessing Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first American to ever win the Olympic marathon, and she ended up breaking Benoit Samuelson’s American record at the London Marathon. Kastor is here this weekend as the honored guest of Run Wild Missoula for the 12th Missoula Marathon weekend. She described her start in running at a very young age. “I set the American record 15 years ago at the London Marathon, and it was Joan Benoit Samuelson’s record,” said Kastor. “She is a hero and mentor of mine for many years. The year she won the first ever women’s Olympic Marathon in 1984 in the L.A. Olympics.” Kastor recently completed a book about the true challenge in running, the mind. The book is titled ‘Let Your Mind Run’. “It’s a memoir of my running life, but it only takes place in my head,” she said. “It reveals the mental twists and the great qualities of the mind that we get to cultivate over time. We just fall into habits of thinking, but it’s our job to create the right habits of thinking. So, I like to think of it more of an instructional memoir and the feedback I’ve gotten has proven that I’ve done a good job of doing that.” (07/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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ASICS have unveiled the world’s first running track to train the mind, the blackout Track in London

The blackout track was developed in collaboration with sports scientists and top coaches to remove all distractions and encourage runners to focus on synchronising the mind and body, and runners have been trialling the first race track.  It is a custom-built course in London and the circuit – one lap is 150m – is dark apart from one spotlight trailing the athlete. The track’s absence of sound, technology, scenery and even a finish line means runners can focus their mind on each step. The “ASICS Blackout Track” was developed in collaboration with sports scientists and top coaches.  Researchers included Professor Samuele Marcora, the director of research at the University of Kent’s School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, and Dr Jo Corbett, leader of the Human Performance and Health Research Group at the University of Portsmouth. In addition, ASICS ambassadors Chevy Rough, a mind coach who works with leading athletes, and Jan Erik Kruse, a lead ASICS frontrunner, also helped to shape the various experiences on the track. Three runners, with a range of athletic abilities, completed 66 laps in near darkness as part of a 10km “mental marathon” – pacing the track without any of their usual running comforts. Olympic medallist and marathon record holder Deena Kastor (USA) ran the fastest time in just 37 minutes and 16 seconds. (06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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American marathon record holder Deena Kastor has been writing and decided in December to run Boston

At 45, Deena Kastor has been writing and training at her high-altitude home in Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Her newly-released book, "Let Your Mind Run, A Memoir of Thinking My Way To Victory" (Crown Archetype), is a gem. She's also in the final stages of her training for the Boston Marathon on Monday, a race she has only run once before. At her last Boston Marathon in 2007, she battled the rain and wind which was so strong that organizers nearly canceled the race. Kastor sloshed her way to fifth place and won the USA marathon title, a prelude to her victory one year later at the USA Olympic Trials Marathon which were also held in Boston, but on a different course. "It wasn't my intention to be part of this phenomenal American field that is being put together," said Kastor, who admitted that she only got the idea to run Boston at the end of December after finishing up the bulk of her writing on the book. "It was my intention, when I finished with this book, I couldn't wait to get in shape again because I had spent so much time in front of that computer." She added: "I needed to put something on the calendar again. Why not go big and choose the most historic marathon in our country?" (She was speaking with David Monti from Race Results Weekly) (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Cherry Blossom Ten Miler has a lot of exciting things Planned

Joan Benoit Samuelson, Meb Keflezighi and Deena Kastor highlight race and Health & Fitness Expo lineups. The 2018 Credit Union Cherry Blossom Ten Mile and 5K Run-Walk, to be held on April 8, will truly offer something for everyone with an interest in distance running. In addition to hosting the 2017-18 Professional Road Running Organization (PRRO) Championship, and the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) National 10-Mile Championship...America’s three most highly decorated marathon runners will be making appearances and signing autographs leading up to and including race day. “We are pleased to have true American marathon royalty appearing at our Health and Fitness Expo this year,” said Event Director Phil Stewart. “Joan, Deena and Meb have been the dominant names in American marathon running going back to the 1980s when Joan won the gold medal in the first women’s Olympic Marathon in 1984”. (03/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Hasay and Huddle are going after Shalane Flanagan’s national 15k Record Saturday

In the women’s race, at the Gate River Run this Saturday, the key number is 47. That’s the time, in minutes, of Shalane Flanagan’s national record 15K time from 2014 (47:03). If everything falls into place with the expected high-octane showdown of Jordan Hasay (photo) and Molly Huddle, the race director believes that mark could go down. Hasay, 25, used last year’s victory as a stepping stone to success at April’s Boston Marathon. There, she placed third with the fastest-ever time (2:23:00) for an American woman in her marathon debut. Her chief challenger is Huddle, who finished second here in 2012 and now enters in the best form of her career. The 33-year-old from Providence, R.I. broke the American half-marathon record on Jan. 16 in Houston, running 1:07:25. That surpassed Gate River Run legend Deena Kastor, whose mark of 1:07.34 had stood for 12 years. (03/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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One of the world's leading experts in long distance running, Dr David Martin has Died

Dr. David Martin, USATF marathon stalwart and dedicated researcher, died February 28 in Decatur, Georgia after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. He was 78. Martin was one of the exercise physiologists responsible for USATF’s heat-training program assisting Team USATF marathoners Deena Kastor and Meb Keflezighi on to the medal podium at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games, sharing his research on ways to train and race in hot weather with Team USATF athletes’ personal coaches. Recognized as one of the world's leading experts in long distance running, Martin published more than 50 articles in coaching journals intended to assist coaches and athletes understand the science of human athletic performance. He published five books including Better Training for Distance Runners in 1997. R.I.P. my friend, you will be missed. (03/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympians Keflezighi and Kastor will help celebrate the RRCA 60th Birthday

Since 1958, the Road Runners Club of America, the oldest and largest organization dedicated to the promotion of distance running, have gathered in different cities around the country for the RRCA National Convention. This year's Convention will be held April 5-8, 2018 in Arlington, VA. The event concludes on Sunday April 8 with the Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile and 5K race, which serves as the 2018 RRCA National 10 Mile Championship Event. Olympians Meb Keflezighi and Deena Kastor will be the keynote speakers at the luncheon. (02/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Deena Kastor “passing the Torch” to Molly Huddle

“A sincere CONGRATULATIONS to @MollyHuddle for breaking my American record in the half-marathon today in #HoustonHalfMarathon. Held for 12 yrs and I couldn't dream of passing the torch to a more deserving athlete.” (Posted today on Twitter) and Molly’s reply: “Thanks @DeenaKastor - you never cease to inspire us all! #theOG.” Two classy runners! (01/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Molly Huddle Sets a New Half Marathon American Record

Houston Half Marathon, Molly Huddle breaks Deena Kastor's previous 🇺🇸 record in 1:07:25 this morning in Houston. She went out with the leaders and pulled it off. The race was won by Ethiopia’s Ruti Aga, the 2017 Berlin Marathon runnerup, in 66:39. Molly said, “It means a lot. To be in the company of Deena Kastor, who had such a great marathon career, gives me a lot of confidence, and that’s a really special feeling. Deena has really set the bar high for us.” (01/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Hasay And Huddle at Aramco Houston Half-Marathon

American records could fall here on Sunday when Jordan Hasay and Molly Huddle do battle at the 17th Aramco Houston Half-Marathon, the first important road race in the United States this year. Both Hasay, 26, and Huddle, 33, will use Sunday’s race primarily to test the progress of their training for the upcoming Boston Marathon on April 16, but they also hope to run fast. Both women are capable of breaking Deena Kastor’s American half-marathon record of 1:07:34 set in Berlin, Germany, in 2002. (01/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Strongest American Elite Field Ever for Boston

MBR BEST 100: John Hancock announced its strongest U.S. Elite Team since its principal sponsorship began in 1986. The team, recruited to compete against an accomplished international field, will all be going for the coveted olive wreath on April 16, 2018. The US elite team: Shalane Flanagan, Galen Rupp, Sara Hall,Desiree Linden,Serena Burla, Shadrack Biwott, Abdi Abdirahman, Dathan Ritzenhein, Deena Kastor, Molly Muddle, Jordan Hasay, Scott Smith, Ryan Vail, Kellyn Taylor and Andrew Bumbalough. (12/12/2017) ⚡AMP
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