Running News Daily

Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com  Get your race featured, followed and exposed.  Contact sales at bob@mybestruns.com or call Bob Anderson at 650-938-1005  For more info: https://mybestruns.com/newmem.php

Index to Daily Posts · Sign Up For Updates · Run The World Feed

4,945 Stories, Page: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20 · 21 · 22 · 23 · 24 · 25 · 26 · 27 · 28 · 29 · 30 · 31 · 32 · 33 · 34 · 35 · 36 · 37 · 38 · 39 · 40 · 41 · 42 · 43 · 44 · 45 · 46 · 47 · 48 · 49 · 50 · 51 · 52 · 53 · 54 · 55 · 56 · 57 · 58 · 59 · 60 · 61 · 62 · 63 · 64 · 65 · 66 · 67 · 68 · 69 · 70 · 71 · 72 · 73 · 74 · 75 · 76 · 77 · 78 · 79 · 80 · 81 · 82 · 83 · 84 · 85 · 86 · 87 · 88 · 89 · 90 · 91 · 92 · 93 · 94 · 95 · 96 · 97 · 98 · 99
Share

Course record broken at the Beijing Marathon

Kenya’s Mathew Kipkoech Kisorio broke away in the final 10 kilometres of the Beijing Marathon to rewrite the men’s course record at the IAAF Gold Label road race on Sunday (3).

The 30-year-old clocked 2:07:06 to earn his second victory over the classic distance, knocking 10 seconds off the course record set six years ago by Ethiopia’s 2013 world bronze medallist Tadese Tola.

“It is my first time to run in Beijing and I am very happy to win and to break the course record,” said Kisorio, who set his PB of 2:04:53 last year in Valencia. “The weather was fantastic. I expect to come to Beijing again next year.”

Starting under cloudy and drizzling skies with the temperature ranging from 7-10C, the race was fast from the outset. Four runners – Bazu Worku of Ethiopia, Kisorio and his compatriots Emmanuel Rutto and Solomon Kirwa Yego – led the race to 25km.

Worku, a three-time winner of the Houston Marathon, was the first to fade away after 28km, while 36-year-old Rutto quit the title contest after 30km. After another two kilometres, Kisorio broke away from Yego to move into a sole lead.

The 2017 Daegu Marathon winner was well on track to break the course record at 35km, reached in 1:45:10, and kept pushing ahead before hit the line in 2:07:06. Yego trailed by more than two minutes to finish second in 2:09:45. Rutto clocked 2:10:15 to finish third.

Ethiopia’s Sutume Asefa, 24, ran alone for most of the women’s race and scored her first marathon title in 2:23:31, trimming 29 seconds off her PB set in Dubai three years ago.

China’s Li Zhixuan, the sixth-place finisher in Beijing last year, took second place in 2:29:06. Pre-race favourite Mulu Seboka, the fastest entrant in the field with a PB of 2:21:56, finished third in 2:29:09.

“I am satisfied with second place but the time is kind of slower than I expected,” said the 25-year-old Li, who set a PB of 2:26:15 in Nagoya eight months ago.

The last time a Chinese runner managed to earn a podium finish in the country’s most prestigious road race was in 2014, when Gong Lihua finished third in the women’s race.

(11/03/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Prague Half Marathon

Prague Half Marathon

This event lets runners experience Prague at twilight, when the city is at its magical, mysterious best. The women’s run celebrates the power and beauty of sisterhood. The 10K that follows unites all runner of all levels in a fun, fast romp through the beautiful Czech evening....

more...
Share

ASICS acquires the leading race registration platform Race Roster

ASICS Corporation announced Oct 31 the acquisition of Race Roster, a leading race registration platform for running events. Race Roster will join ASICS Digital’s portfolio of consumer-focused running platforms. As part of the agreement, ASICS formed a new Canadian subsidiary known as Race Roster North America.

Established in 2012, the Race Roster platform is a global leader in race registration helping millions of athletes discover and register for running and endurance events, while providing event organizers with a robust CRM tool for tracking participant data, marketing campaigns and event revenue. 

With the acquisition of Race Roster, ASICS is positioned to disrupt the running event industry - uniquely meet the needs of runners, race directors and the running community by offering world class race management, premium brand sponsorship and marketing, while also enhancing the race day experience for participants. The synergies between ASICS and Race Roster will enable ASICS to build relationships with consumers that will drive engagement to digital, retail and run specialty partners. 

"We are thrilled to welcome the Race Roster team into our ASICS family," said Dan Smith, President of ASICS Digital. "As we take this step together, we are excited to not only expand our digital footprint, but also create new and innovative ways to serve runners and the running community."

"The idea of integrating an athletic brand with race registration solves many of the challenges faced by race directors," said Alex Vander Hoeven, CEO of Race Roster. "We are excited that a brand so deeply ingrained in the running community shares our vision, and we look forward to introducing our expanded offering to the racing industry."

ASICS will enable Race Roster to become the top endurance event platform and partner by bringing premium branded experiences to events of all sizes. Together, ASICS and Race Roster will provide a way to efficiently solving the marketing and sponsorship challenges faced by many race organizers, and will enhance the runner experience by offering access to adaptive training plans through the Runkeeper™ app, ASICS-sponsored celebration opportunities, and other benefits through the OneASICS loyalty program. 

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Des Linden is set for the New York City Marathon and then the 2020 Olympic Marathon Trials

Des Linden could have retired this spring a legend of the sport in the United States: two Olympic teams, nine top-five finishes at World Marathon Majors, and the crown jewel, a win at the 2018 Boston Marathon. But she chose to press on, motivated by what excites her, rather than what is expected of her. Her Boston win gave her the freedom to leave behind the Hansons-Brooks Distance Project and go solo, returning to college coach Walt Drenth.

Now in her fourth Olympic cycle, she goes into every marathon knowing that it could be her last. If she runs another it is because she wants to — not because it’s the best way for her to prepare for the Olympic Trials or the Games themselves.

“It is a different mentality where you don’t put down a race four years out and work backward,” Linden says.

As one of professional running’s elder stateswomen, Linden isn’t afraid to share her opinion on the sport’s most pressing issues, either. During the course of 33 minutes with the press today ahead of Sunday’s TCS New York City Marathon, Linden put a voice to the concerns facing many athletes sponsored by shoe companies other than Nike, and thus unable to run in Vaporflys, the chunky-soled neon racing flats that have changed the sport of marathoning.

Asked whether there was a level playing field in the sport right now facing Nike athletes in Vaporflys, Linden, who remains sponsored by Brooks, did not equivocate.

“No. I think every company has a different pace that they’re working at. So, we’re all obviously behind to begin with.”

More on that in a minute, but let’s remember the purpose of Linden’s visit to New York. She is running marathon #19 of her career on Sunday, and both Linden and her agent Josh Cox believe she is very fit right now, despite an awful showing at the Rock ‘n’ Roll Philly Half in September (76:08, the slowest half marathon of her career by over three minutes).

“Everything went wrong in Philly,” Linden said, adding that she picked up a minor hamstring injury before the race. “I had an amazing segment as a whole…I had one bad day, it was just a very public bad day.”

Linden is ready to roll in New York and holding off any decisions on retirement until after the race. It all depends on how her body recovers. If she feels she can produce a performance to be proud of, she’ll be on the start line at the Olympic Trials in Atlanta in February.

“It will be, do I have the ability to compete on the roads and be proud of how I’m competing?” Linden says. “And is it something that is showcasing all the hard work — is this really paying off anymore? And when I feel like I’m putting too much in and I’m not getting results that I’m happy with or appreciating, I’ll switch to the trails or the ultras or something different.”

Now about those shoes: Linden has mixed feelings.

“It’s exciting times, but it’s confusing as well,” Linden says.

Exciting because Nike has spurred innovation across the sport. Linden won Boston last year in Brooks prototypes and her shoes at NYC last fall featured a carbon fiber plate, one of the Vaporflys’ key features.

“As a Brooks athlete, it’s been fun seeing them respond and say, ‘OK. Let’s get in the game. Let’s make something awesome’ and not ‘Let’s play catch up.’ They are in the lab going, ‘Let’s be better. Let’s be the best.’”

All that innovation has led to the fastest times the sport has ever seen, but Linden says that one of running’s great appeals — the ability to compare times across eras — is more complicated than ever.

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
by Jonathan Gault
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Welsh runner Natasha Cockram breaks national marathon record despite being kicked by a horse four days earlier

Heard the one about the woman who got kicked by a horse and four days later broke the Welsh marathon record?

Natasha Cockram set a new national women's record of 2hr 30min 50sec, finishing fifth in the Dublin Marathon.

Remarkably, she completed the feat just two years after her first race, four days after being kicked in the leg by a horse and despite working full time.

"I didn't have the best week before the race," Cockram told BBC Sport Wales. "I was in panic mode after the kick!"

'I didn't think I would even make my flight'

Cockram's rise in Welsh athletics has been extremely fast, having fallen off the radar because of injuries after a promising junior career.

She had not even run the marathon distance until 2017, but she ran so well in Dublin (running 2:49:37) that she decided to try and take athletics more seriously.

On Sunday at the same venue the Cwmbran runner beat the previous Welsh best of 2:31:33 set by Susan Tooby at the 1988 Olympics in Seoul and did it despite having a big bruise on her knee.

Cockram rescued a horse and when she went to visit it last Wednesday, got an unpleasant surprise.

"I didn't have the best week. On Wednesday I went to check on my horse and I got kicked by another horse in the field," she said.

"So I had a bit of panic mode and didn't think I'd even make my flight to Dublin, let alone the race.

"It did cross my mind when it happened I might not be able to race. I was straight on to the phone to the Welsh athletics physio, but he assured me it was just a bruise.

"It didn't hurt during the race, my leg went numb in mile 18... but I pushed through.

"It didn't really register right away that I had broken the record, I knew I had the time, but I think I was more disappointed I didn't get the Olympic standard, as I was on course to hit it."

Full time work and told she would never run again

Cockram is now targeting a place at the Tokyo Olympics after finishing 80 seconds short of the Team GB marathon qualifying time.

She says she will run the Houston Marathon in January and the London Marathon as she looks to hit the Olympic mark of 2:29:30, having just failed to do so in breaking the Welsh record.

Her success is all the more amazing considering she is not a full time athlete and has suffered with severe injury issues.

"I always liked the idea of doing a marathon. Dublin in 2017 was my first one so it's a good place for me. I have always liked the distance and I have always looked up to people like Paula Radcliffe, I would watch her race as a child," she explained.

"I did Dublin in 2017 more for fun but I ran two hours 49 seconds and thought that was a pretty amazing time and I should do it more seriously again."

At that point Cockram, who went to university in the USA, had all but given up on running professionally.

"I headed out to university as quite a high achieving junior, but university didn't go my way, I think I was over-training and then I got quite a serious injury and was told I would never run again," she added.

"Just to be running again is a blessing. I tore the tendon in my knee and had my patella bone scraped, it is just a serious surgery. Quite a few doctors here said it would be a career ending injury, so I headed back out to the USA to talk to doctors until one said he would give it a go.

"I went into surgery and came out and it took me about two years to get back running."

All eyes now on Tokyo 2020

Cockram works full time for the Welsh Government and admits it is only after breaking the Welsh record that is has dawned on her that Olympic qualification is a realistic aim, having previously mixed training with a 'normal' career.

"Most days I am out of bed at 4, 4.30am to train then and I do a full day's work before training in the evening until about 9.30pm," she said.

"A normal Monday would be a ten mile run in the morning, followed by working all day and then heading straight over to Sport Wales to do strength and conditioning training and then head out for another run and then home and to bed. Repeat it again for the rest of the week!

"I have not run any major championships yet, which is weird to say when I am talking about Tokyo, but I don't see why I can't give it a go.

"I think knocking off 80 seconds is something I can do, especially as things didn't really go my way in Dublin, even leading into the week before.

"Before the race the Olympics didn't seem realistic at all, I was thinking more about 2024, but as the race went on, I was close and now I've definitely got to go for Tokyo 2020.

"My consistency of training, working with my coach and Welsh athletics, it has all contributed to my times getting better and better."

Cockram knows she may have to make sacrifices at work to turn her Olympic dream into a reality.

"I do value my work and life outside of running, but I think to improve and go to the Olympics I will need to be thinking about sponsorship and at least dropping some of my hours in work," she said.

"I don't really sleep enough for an athlete or have the right recovery time, so I would like to give it a go as a full time athlete.

"The motivation is the fact I love it. Even when it hurts I enjoy it and now the Olympics being on the cards is the goal to keep me going."

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

more...
Share

Peter Kmeli Some of Kenya and Bahrain’s Marius Kimutai will start as favorites at the Hangzhou Marathon on Sunday

Peter Kmeli Some of Kenya and Bahrain’s Marius Kimutai will start as favorites at the Hangzhou Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on Sunday.

The 29-year-old Some is the fastest entrant with a personal best of 2:05:38 set when winning the 2013 Paris Marathon. He came close to that mark last year when clocking 2:06:49 to finish third in Daegu. It will be Some’s second race in China following his 2:14:49 victory in Shenzhen two years ago.

Kimutai, 26, has also been triumphant in China. The 2:05:47 performer claimed the 2014 Danzhou Marathon title and more recently took the top honors at the Taiyuan International Marathon two months ago with a clocking of 2:09:43.

It will be Kimutai’s third race in China this year and his eyes may not be only set on the top podium but also on the course record of 2:10:33 achieved by Azmeraw Bekele of Ethiopia two years ago.

Kenya’s Sylvester Kimeli Teimet will be running his third straight race in Hangzhou after finishing fourth and fifth in the past two years. The 35-year-old set his lifetime best of 2:06:49 when winning in Seoul back in 2010 and has threatened the 2:10 barrier this season with a sixth-place finish at the Wuxi Marathon where he clocked 2:10:44.

The field also includes Evans Sambu of Kenya, who set his PB of 2:09:05 in 2017 and finished fourth last year in Hangzhou with 2:11:17, and Abraham Kiprotich of France.

Agnes Jeruto Barsosio of Kenya is the star attraction in the women’s race. The 37-year-old has earned podium finishes in eight consecutive marathons since October 2014, including recording a PB of 2:20:59 to finish second in Paris two years ago.

It will be Barsosio’s first race in Hangzhou but she has experience of running in China, including winning at the Guangzhou Marathon in 2014.

Barsosio’s compatriot Rael Kiyara Nguriatukei, 35, is another title contender. She set her PB of 2:25:23 when finishing fourth in Eindhoven in 2011 and has previously won marathons in Shanghai, Lanzhou, Chongqing, Luxembourg and, most recently, the Taipei Wan Jin Shi Marathon in last March.

Nastassia Ivanova of Belarus also has the credentials to make an impact, bringing a 2:27:24 lifetime best to the start line. The 36-year-old came close to her PB when clocking 2:27:49 to finish fifth at the European Championships in Berlin last year.

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Hangzhou Marathon

Hangzhou Marathon

The Hangzhou Marathon won the honor of “gold medal game” awarded by Chinese Athletics Association, ranking among top domestic competitions. Established in 1987, a total of 32,000 runners from 50 countries and regions compete in these events: Full Marathon (42.195 km) and Half Marathon (21.0975 km), Mini Marathon (7 km), Couple Run (4.5 km) and Family Run (1.2 km). The...

more...
Share

The Best Places to Watch the New York City Marathon

With 26.2 miles stretching across the five boroughs, the marathon route provides no shortage of spots to root on fatigued runners. Here’s a guide to the top places.

The places where runners need you most

The New York City course is set apart from other marathons in part because of the five bridges that carry runners between boroughs. The bridges are deceivingly tough hills, made trickier by their exposure to the wind and, because they are devoid of spectators, their relative silence.

So, when runners get back on land, it helps to have a boost from a raucous crowd.

“Between the solitude and the challenge that a bridge brings, getting to the other side and seeing people or hearing people cheer is really special,” Mr. Capiraso said.

That support is particularly crucial toward the start of the race, after runners descend from the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge and head onto Fourth Avenue in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn.

At that point, runners will have completed a two-mile stretch including a steep hill. By cheering there, you’ll keep them buoyant in the face of the daunting miles ahead.

“The Verrazzano bridge is beautiful and iconic, but there aren’t people cheering on it,” Mr. Capiraso said. “So, when you get to Brooklyn, it’s a great cheering zone.”

If you want to be particularly inspiring, travel toward the 20-mile mark, where marathon runners often experience “the wall,” a challenging period when energy wanes.

To help racers push through, head toward East 138th Street in the Bronx, a relatively short stretch of the race, or to Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem, which runners divert around before heading down Fifth Avenue toward the finish line.

Both locations also tend to be less crowded than the miles that follow, making it more likely that you’ll see a particular runner you’re pulling for.The places where the party is

The streets of New York are always lively, but the marathon brings a particularly energetic atmosphere. People crowd the sidewalks with signs, ring bells for hours and play music for both the runners and the crowd.

st Church, where congregants spill out of morning services to serenade marathon participants.

In the second half of the course, runners are met with another burst of sound on First Avenue in Manhattan, between 59th and 96th Streets.

Near 59th Street, marathoners who just finished scaling a challenging and quiet hill on the Queensboro Bridge are greeted with a cacophony of people screaming at runners, clanging noisemakers and banging drums.

The sidewalks here are generally clogged (though they thin out as the race heads uptown). But the energy is so high that it can carry runners as some of them start to hit the wall.

The places where you won’t have to log too many miles

For many city residents, the race winds through their neighborhoods. If you’re one of them, consider staying put.

“If the marathon runs through your neighborhood, your local place is always great,” Mr. Capiraso said. “Because you know the area, and you’ll know the people around.”

The course also has a number of subway stations along the route, a boon for those who need to travel to spots on the course. Notably, the R train runs under the course on Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn, which makes for easy spectating in an early stretch where runners are still plenty enthused.

The sidewalks nearest to subway stations, however, tend to be the most crowded. So, if you’re trying to see a specific runner at a specific spot, give yourself extra time to get settled.

You’ll also want to check with runners about their start time. The first athletes cross the start line at 8:30 a.m., but the last wave of runners won’t begin the race until 11 a.m.

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Age is no barrier for Tokyo-Bound marathoner Diver age 42

For most of the elite field competing at this weekend’s New York City Marathon, running has been a lifelong pursuit; years of extreme tunnel vision from an early age in search of physical excellence. Australia’s Sinead Diver, however, has taken a very different and much more unconventional route to the start line at Staten Island.

Born and raised in County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland, Diver flirted with a few sports at a recreational level in her early years, but never had any desire to participate in running.

“When I was a child I played soccer and basketball and I did a bit of swimming. However, when I was in secondary school I just played basketball. We didn’t have any physical education classes and girls weren’t really allowed to play sport at my school.”

Having lived in Ireland until the age of 25, she moved to Melbourne, Australia in 2002 with her now husband Colin and has lived there for the past 17 years. 

“It was for a bit of adventure. I wanted to travel. There were loads of Irish people going to Australia and I always wanted to go. It just seemed like the place to be. We decided to go for a year and ended up staying long term.”

It wasn’t until eight years later, at the age of 33, that Diver finally got involved in athletics, accidentally discovering her talent when competing in a fun run while trying to get fit after giving birth to Eddie, the first of her two children.

“My sister was organising a team for a fun running event at her work. She needed somebody to fill in on her team as they were missing someone, so she asked me would I run. One of the guys there thought I was pretty quick and said I should join a running club.”

She joined the ‘Crosbie Crew’ coached by Tim Crosbie soon after and progressed rapidly. She initially competed at national level in Australia and flirted with different distances on the track and roads before making her big breakthrough in 2014 in her debut marathon in Melbourne.

Running 2:34:15, Diver easily achieved the qualification standard for the IAAF World Championships Beijing 2015 and faced a difficult decision on which country to represent; Ireland or Australia.

“I thought I would run for Ireland. I’m Irish after all. But then Athletics Ireland changed their qualifying time for Beijing to 45 seconds faster than my time from Melbourne. It was upsetting and I took it a bit personally.

“Thankfully Athletics Australia offered me a spot on the team and by then I had lived in Australia for 12 years and I was set up there, so I was delighted to represent them and have done so ever since.”

Diver finished 21st in the marathon in Beijing and followed it up with 20th at the IAAF World Championships London 2017. Since making her breakthrough into world class territory with a clocking of 2:25:19 at last year’s Melbourne Marathon, she has joined the Melbourne Track Club coached by Nick Bideau, parting ways with her long-time coach Tim Crosbie.

“I got a great base with Tim and the ‘Crosbie Crew’ but moving to Nick has helped me take the next step in my running career. I’ve moved to the next level and my training has changed quite a bit. I’m now training in a group of elite athletes and being around them has made a massive difference to my running. I’m really glad I made the move.”

The switch has paid dividends with Diver, finishing an impressive seventh at this year’s London Marathon in 2:24:11, securing qualification for next year’s Tokyo Olympics. She followed it up with 14th in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships Doha 2019 with 31:25.49, just half a second outside the automatic Olympic qualification standard.

“The London Marathon was brilliant. I went there aiming for 2:23 but unfortunately it was a bit windy. I led the race for half of it which was unexpected and was a bit of fun. I really loved the experience.”

With Olympic qualification secured, Diver will look to place highly in New York on Sunday, rather than focus on bettering her PB.

“New York will be hilly and I prefer flat courses, but the experience of just racing for placing will be great practice leading into Tokyo. To get the opportunity to run in that calibre of field in New York is really special.”

New York will likely be the 42-year-old’s last marathon before the Olympics. Having missed out on Rio 2016 due to a knee injury caused by the cuboid bone in her foot, competing in Tokyo will be extra special for Diver.

“Missing out on Rio was really hard to stomach, so to compete in Tokyo would be a dream come true. The Olympics is the pinnacle of sport. It would be amazing to be part of it.”

Now aged 42 and showing no signs of slowing down, Diver believes it’s never too late to take up a sport for the first time and that people should ignore those who say it’s not possible to excel at a mature age.

“If you feel good enough to do it then give it a go. Nobody else can tell you what your body is capable of. There is nothing to suggest that when you turn 40 you need to fall apart. It hasn’t happened for me and I feel fitter than I was ten years ago.

“If I can do it then I can’t see why other people can’t do it too.”

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

NOMINEES ANNOUNCED FOR MALE WORLD ATHLETE OF THE YEAR 2019

This week marks the opening of the voting process for the 2019 World Athletes of the Year ahead of the World Athletics Awards 2019 in Monaco on Saturday 23 November.

The IAAF is pleased to confirm a list of 11 nominees for Male World Athlete of the Year who were selected by an international panel of athletics experts, comprising representatives from all six continental areas of the IAAF. The nominations of 11 athletes reflects the remarkable range of exceptional performances that the sport has witnessed this year, at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Doha, and in the Diamond League and in road and cross country events. The IAAF’s Competition Performance Ranking show that the World Championships in Doha was the highest quality competition in the history of the event.

The nominees for 2019 Male World Athlete of the Year are (in alphabetical order):

Donavan Brazier (USA) - won world 800m title in a championship record of 1:42.34, won Diamond League title, won four of his five outdoor 800m races

Christian Coleman (USA) - won world 100m title in a world-leading 9.76, won world 4x100m title in a world-leading 37.10, won four of his five races at 100m

Joshua Cheptegei (UGA) - won world cross-country title in Aarhus, won world 10,000m title in a world-leading 26:48.36, won Diamond League 5000m title

Timothy Cheruyiot (KEN) - won world 1500m title, won Diamond League 1500m title, won 10 of his 11 outdoor races across all distances,

Steven Gardiner (BAH) - won world 400m title in 43.48, undefeated all year over 400m,  ran world-leading 32.26 indoors over 300m

Sam Kendricks (USA) - won world pole vault title,  cleared a world-leading 6.06m to win the US title,  won 12 of his 17 outdoor competitions, including the Diamond League final

Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) - won London Marathon in a course record of 2:02:37, ran 1:59:40.2 for 42.195km in Vienna

Noah Lyles (USA) -won world 200m and 4x100m titles, ran a world-leading 19.50 in Lausanne to move to fourth on the world all-time list, won Diamond League titles at 100m and 200m

Daniel Stahl (SWE) - won the world discus title,  threw a world-leading 71.86m to move to fifth on the world all-time list,  won 13 of his 16 competitions, including the Diamond League final

Christian Taylor (USA) - won the world triple jump title, won Diamond League title,  won 10 of his 14 competitions

Karsten Warholm (NOR) - won the world 400m hurdles title, undefeated indoors and outdoors at all distances, including at the Diamond League final and the European Indoor Championships, clocked world-leading 46.92, the second-fastest time in history, A three-way voting process will determine the finalists.

The IAAF Council and the IAAF Family will cast their votes by email, while fans can vote online via the IAAF's social media platforms. Individual graphics for each nominee will be posted on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram this week; a 'like' on Facebook and Instagram or a retweet on Twitter will count as one vote.

The IAAF Council’s vote will count for 50% of the result, while the IAAF Family’s votes and the public votes will each count for 25% of the final result.

Voting for the Male World Athlete of the Year closes on 4 November. At the conclusion of the voting process, five men and five women finalists will be announced by the IAAF.

The male and female World Athletes of the Year will be announced live on stage at the World Athletics Awards 2019.

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Share

NOMINEES ANNOUNCED FOR FEMALE WORLD ATHLETE OF THE YEAR 2019

This week marks the opening of the voting process for the 2019 World Athletes of the Year ahead of the World Athletics Awards 2019 in Monaco on Saturday 23 November.

The IAAF is pleased to confirm a list of 11 nominees for Female World Athlete of the Year who were selected by an international panel of athletics experts, comprising representatives from all six continental areas of the IAAF. The nominations of 11 athletes reflects the remarkable range of exceptional performances that the sport has witnessed this year, at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Doha, and in the Diamond League and in road and cross country events. The IAAF’s Competition Performance Ranking show that the World Championships in Doha was the highest quality competition in the history of the event.

The nominees for 2019 Female World Athlete of the Year are (in alphabetical order):

Beatrice Chepkoech (KEN)- won world 3000m steeplechase title in a championship record of 8:57.84- won Diamond League title- won seven of her eight steeplechase races

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM)- won world 100m and 4x100m titles in world-leading times of 10.71 and 41.44- won Pan-American 200m title- won seven of her 10 races at 100m

Katarina Johnson-Thompson (GBR)- won world heptathlon title in a world-leading 6981- undefeated in all combined events competitions, indoors and outdoors- won European indoor pentathlon title with a world-leading 4983

Sifan Hassan (NED)- won world 1500m and 10,000m titles in world-leading times of 3:51.95 and 30:17.62- won Diamond League 1500m and 5000m titles- broke world mile record with 4:12.33 in Monaco

Brigid Kosgei (KEN)- set a world record of 2:14:04 to win the Chicago Marathon- won the London Marathon- ran a world-leading 1:05:28 for the half marathon and 1:04:28 on a downhill course

Mariya Lasitskene (ANA)- won world high jump title with 2.04m- jumped a world-leading 2.06m in Ostrava- won 21 of her 23 competitions, indoors and outdoors

Malaika Mihambo (GER)- won world long jump title with a world-leading 7.30m- won Diamond League title- undefeated outdoors

Dalilah Muhammad (USA)- broke world record with 52.20 at the US Championships- improved her own world record to win the world 400m hurdles title in 52.16- won world 4x400m title

Salwa Eid Naser (BRN)- won world 400m title in 48.14, the third-fastest time in history- won Diamond League title and three gold medals at the Asian Championships- undefeated at 400m outdoors

Hellen Obiri (KEN)- won world cross-country title in Aarhus- won world 5000m title in a championship record of 14:26.72- ran a world-leading 14:20.36 for 5000m in London

Yulimar Rojas (VEN)- won world triple jump title with 15.37m- jumped world-leading 15.41m to move to second on the world all-time list- won nine of her 12 competitions, including the Pan-American Games

A three-way voting process will determine the finalists.

The IAAF Council and the IAAF Family will cast their votes by email, while fans can vote online via the IAAF's social media platforms. Individual graphics for each nominee will be posted on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram this week; a 'like' on Facebook and Instagram or a retweet on Twitter will count as one vote.

The IAAF Council’s vote will count for 50% of the result, while the IAAF Family’s votes and the public votes will each count for 25% of the final result.

Voting for the Female World Athlete of the Year closes on 5 November. At the conclusion of the voting process, five men and five women finalists will be announced by the IAAF.

The male and female World Athletes of the Year will be announced live on stage at the World Athletics Awards 2019.

 

 

(11/02/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Share

Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa is back in the Big Apple to chase more glory at the TCS New York City Marathon on Sunday

The men’s race looks a wide-open affair, with Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa trying to complete a swift double over the distance, having taken gold in the marathon at the World Championships in Doha just four weeks ago.

The 29-year-old has a PB of 2:04:45 that dates back to 2013, and while that may not be world-beating in the current marathon climate, in races like this – with a hilly course and no pacemakers – Desisa is a formidable player. He clocked 2:05:59 to win here last year and in April he finished a close second at the Boston Marathon, just two seconds behind winner Lawrence Cherono.

“After Doha I tried to take recovery training,” said Desisa. “The marathon is not easy but I said I would see [how] my body [was] and if it’s okay. Winning New York before changed my life, changed my future. I don’t know what will happen but I will try my best.”

Geoffrey Kamworor (second photo), the 2017 champion, is also back and the Kenyan will be keen to go one better than his runner-up finish last year. He arrives off the back of a stunning preparation, having set the half marathon world record at 58:01 in Copenhagen back in September.

On Thursday he confirmed preparations went well at his base in Kaptagat, where he has been training alongside his close friend and mentor Eliud Kipchoge. “I did what I normally do to run a marathon,” he said. “I think I’m ready.”

Ethiopia’s Shura Kitata looks primed to eventually take victory at a Marathon Major, and this may present an ideal opportunity for the 23-year-old, who has a best of 2:04:49. Tamirat Tola is another who can’t be discounted, a fourth-place finisher here last year who finished sixth in London back in May, clocking 2:06:57. He clocked 59:13 for the half marathon to finish second behind Mo Farah at the Great North Run in September.

US athletes Abdi Abdirahman and Jared Ward lead the home contenders, while Germany’s Arne Gabius and Dutch athlete Michel Butter will lead the European charge. Training partners Brett Robinson and Jack Rayner will fly the flag for Australia.

(11/01/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Allan Weitzman, 70, will be running his 11th NYC Marathon with his 11 nieces and nephews

This race should be a ‘relative’ breeze.

When 70-year-old Allan Weitzman runs in his 11th New York City marathon this Sunday he’ll have plenty of very familiar faces competing alongside him — nearly a dozen of his nephews and nieces, who agreed to lace up to honor their ailing aunt, The Post has learned.

It was the brave way Weitzman’s wife Regina, 67, has dealt with her lupus over the last 22 years that inspired the couple’s 11 relatives to run the big race.

“All our nieces and nephews who’ve spent time with Regina think she’s a hero,” Allan said.

“She’s been a role model as somebody who lives with hope, with a smile on her face all the time and the belief of the miracle that one day there will be life without lupus.”

Regina was diagnosed in 1997 with the inflammatory disease, that causes the immune system to attack its own tissues. Since then, she’s had had to deal with daily fatigue, muscle aches and joint pains, as well as blood clots, seizures and regular trips to doctors and hospitals.

But “she’s never played the victim card, never complained, never says ‘why me?'” Allan said.

When Allan ran his last marathon in 2014, to raise money for lupus research, one of his nephews told him he wanted to be included in the next race and, “we grew from two to three and all of a sudden there were 12 of us.”

The group — nine nieces and nephews and two of their partners — range in age from late 20s to early 30s. Three live in New York and the rest are coming from as near as Boston and Jacksonville to as far as Finland.

None of them had ever attempted a marathon when they signed up, and some had never seriously run at all.

Over the last year, they’ve all trained virtually on a group chat where they encourage each other with photos and videos, provide updates on their progress, give and receive tips and discuss how to treat aches and pains.

“We’ve all been comparing notes [and] I think they’re ready,” said Allan, by far the most experienced runner in the group.

The retired attorney ran his first eight New York City Marathons in the 1980s and 90s when he and Bronx-born Regina lived on the Upper East Side.

The couple — who met on a blind date at the Waldorf Astoria and wed a year to the day later in 1984  — moved to Boca Raton, Fla., in 1994. Allan, who is originally from Baltimore ran the marathon again in 2013 and 2014.

Every time he’s raced, Regina cheers him on from 69th Street and 1st Ave — and Allan pauses to give her a kiss.

“I’m not worried about time, she deserves a hug and kiss,” Allan said. “Every day I have Regina, I’m a lucky guy.”

(11/01/2019) ⚡AMP
by Tamar Lapin
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

The men's and women's Tokyo Olympics marathons could be held the same day in Sapporo where it should be cooler

It was recently learned that based on the premise of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics marathons and race walks being moved to Sapporo as a safeguard against hot temperatures, the IAAF and other involved parties have proposed two plans to compress the five events into three days.

Both plans call for the men's and women's marathons to be held the same day. In the first plan the men's and women's 20 km race walks would be held Aug. 7, with the men's 50 km race walk held Aug. 8. Originally scheduled for Aug. 2, the women's marathon would be held the same day as the men's marathon on Aug. 9.

In the second plan, the five events would be held either July 27 to 29 or 28 to 30. The men's and women's marathons would be held the same day, but which day they would be held has not been specified. Under this plan the road events would take place prior to the start of track and field competition at Tokyo's new Olympic Stadium on July 31, making it possible to avoid having athletics events happening in Tokyo and Sapporo simultaneously.

The IAAF has asked participating national and regional federations to express their preference between the two proposals by Oct. 31.

(11/01/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organized the Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, originally scheduled from July 24 to August 9, 2020, the games were postponed due to coronavirus outbreak, the postponed Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 23 to August 8 in 2021, according to the International Olympic Committee decision....

more...
Share

Kenyan Felix Kimutai set a course record of 2:09:57 at the Istanbul Marathon last year, and this year he aims to retain Instanbul Marathon title

The 30-year-old won the Dongying Marathon earlier this year in 2:09:23, taking more than half a minute off his previous PB set when winning in Istanbul 12 months ago. But he may need to produce another lifetime best if he is to become the first back-to-back men’s winner since 2011.

Former track specialist Yitayal Atnafu of Ethiopia is the fastest in the field, having clocking 2:07:00 in Paris last year. The 26-year-old returned to the French capital earlier this year and recorded a season’s best of 2:08:31.

Based on this year’s times, Turkey’s Polat Kemboi Arikan leads the field. The two-time European 10,000m champion set a PB of 2:08:14 in Paris back in April, finishing just ahead of Atnafu, but earlier this month he withdrew from the marathon at the IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha 2019.

Aside from Kimutai, two other men in the field know what it’s like to triumph in Istanbul. 2016 winner Evans Kiplagat of Azerbaijan and 2015 champion Elias Chelimo – both sub-2:08 performers at their best – return to the Turkish city. Kiplagat also recently withdrew from the World Championships marathon, while Chelimo has a season’s best of 2:11:41, set in Hong Kong.

Fellow Kenyans Cosmas Birech, Joseph Aperumoi and Hillary Kipchumba all have PBs inside 2:09 and so have the ability to contend for a podium finish. And watch out for Bahrain’s Abdi Ali Gelchu and Ethiopia’s Musa Babo, who have been in PB form this year, clocking 2:09:44 and 2:09:55 respectively.

Three pacemakers will lead the field through 30km on schedule for a 2:09 finish, so it’s possible that Kimutai’s course record could fall on Sunday.

Visiline Jepkesho has the strongest credentials of the entrants in the women’s race. The 29-year-old has the fastest PB (2:21:37) and season’s best (2:22:58) and outside of major championships has finished in the top four in all of her marathons to date.

Former track specialist Yitayal Atnafu of Ethiopia is the fastest in the field, having clocking 2:07:00 in Paris last year. The 26-year-old returned to the French capital earlier this year and recorded a season’s best of 2:08:31.

Based on this year’s times, Turkey’s Polat Kemboi Arikan leads the field. The two-time European 10,000m champion set a PB of 2:08:14 in Paris back in April, finishing just ahead of Atnafu, but earlier this month he withdrew from the marathon at the IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha 2019.

Aside from Kimutai, two other men in the field know what it’s like to triumph in Istanbul. 2016 winner Evans Kiplagat of Azerbaijan and 2015 champion Elias Chelimo – both sub-2:08 performers at their best – return to the Turkish city. Kiplagat also recently withdrew from the World Championships marathon, while Chelimo has a season’s best of 2:11:41, set in Hong Kong.

Fellow Kenyans Cosmas Birech, Joseph Aperumoi and Hillary Kipchumba all have PBs inside 2:09 and so have the ability to contend for a podium finish. And watch out for Bahrain’s Abdi Ali Gelchu and Ethiopia’s Musa Babo, who have been in PB form this year, clocking 2:09:44 and 2:09:55 respectively.

Three pacemakers will lead the field through 30km on schedule for a 2:09 finish, so it’s possible that Kimutai’s course record could fall on Sunday.

Visiline Jepkesho has the strongest credentials of the entrants in the women’s race. The 29-year-old has the fastest PB (2:21:37) and season’s best (2:22:58) and outside of major championships has finished in the top four in all of her marathons to date.

But Jepkesho, who represented Kenya at the 2016 Olympics, contested the marathon at the World Championships just five weeks ago, finishing a respectable 15th in 2:46:38, so she may not be at her freshest on Sunday.

Merima Mohammed’s PB of 2:23:06 was set back in 2010, but the Bahraini runner is still highly competitive. She has a season’s best of 2:27:34 and won the Jilin Marathon in June.

Ethiopian duo Hirut Tibebu and Fatuma Sado are also expected to challenge. Tibebu finished second in Seoul in March, beating Mohammed and coming within 30 seconds of her PB with 2:24:05. Sado, meanwhile, is a 2:24:16 performer at her best and will be keen to improve on her third-place finish from Istanbul last year.

Three other women in the field head to Istanbul off the back of recent lifetime bests. Kenya’s Angela Tanui and Maurine Chepkemoi clocked respective PBs of 2:25:37 and 2:26:16 in Vienna seven months ago, while Ethiopia’s Sifan Melaku ran a PB of 2:26:46 in Seville in February.

The pacemaker in the women’s race will aim to put the leading athletes on schedule for a 2:21 finish.

(11/01/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Vodafone Istanbul Marathon

Vodafone Istanbul Marathon

At the beginning, the main intention was simply to organise a marathon event. Being a unique city in terms of history and geography, Istanbul deserved a unique marathon. Despite the financial and logistical problems, an initial project was set up for the Eurasia Marathon. In 1978, the officials were informed that a group of German tourists would visit Istanbul the...

more...
Share

Ethiopia’s Mekuant Ayenew returns to the Chinese capital aiming to regain the title he took three years ago at the Beijing Marathon

The 28-year-old Ayenew, who set his 2:09:00 PB at the 2017 Prague Marathon, clocked 2:11:09 to earn his first international marathon victory in 2016 at the most prestigious road running race in China, which was first launched in 1981.

It will be Ayenew’s third appearance in Beijing as he also finished seventh with 2:15:16 two years ago. His familiarity of the course, which starts at the landmark Ti’anmen Square and ends outside the Olympic Stadium, will be a big advantage for Ayenew. But retaining the title will not be an easy task as Ayenew will face a quality field that includes several sub 2:05 runners.

Fellow Ethiopian Endeshaw Negesse is the fastest man on paper with a personal best of 2:04:52 set in Dubai back in 2013. Negesse came close to that mark two years later when he won in Tokyo with 2:06:00, but his only race since then was a 17th-place finish in Dubai in 2:26:27.

Kenya’s Mathew Kipkoech Kisorio, meanwhile, is a serious title contender in Beijing. The 30-year-old improved his PB to 2:04:53 last year when he finished third in Valencia and clocked 2:06:36 to finish second at the Paris Marathon last April.

The men’s field also includes Bazu Worku of Ethiopia, a three-time winner of the Houston Marathon with a PB of 2:05:25, as well as Kenyan duo Evans Korir and Solomon Kirwa Yego, who both have sub-2:07 career-best times and both have broken 2:08 in 2019.

Mulu Seboka of Ethiopia is the fastest entrant in the women’s field. The 35-year-old owns a PB of 2:21:56, set in Dubai in 2015, and has won three straight races in China since 2018 with two victories in Dalian and one in Shenzhen. She clocked 2:27:19 in May to retain her title in Dalian.

Compatriots Sutume Asefa and Letebrhan Haylay are also among the favourites. With a best of 2:24:00, Asefa is the slightly quicker of the two women but is yet to win a marathon, while Haylay set a PB of 2:24:47 to break the course record at the Dongying Yellow River Marathon last year.

Kenya’s 2018 Daegu Marathon champion Janet Jelagat Rono, a 2:26:03 performer at her best, is another woman to watch.

Li Zhixuan is China’s best hope for the title on Sunday. The 25-year-old is the fastest Chinese woman this year as she clocked 2:26:15 in Nagoya in March, improving her PB by more than four minutes. She will be hoping to improve on her sixth-place finish from last year.

The last time Chinese runners took the top honours at Beijing Marathon dates back to 2013, when Zhang Yingying clocked 2:31:19 to extend China’s winning streak in the women’s race to 22 years.

(11/01/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Beijing Marathon

Beijing Marathon

The Beijing Marathon is an annual marathon held in Beijing, People's Republic of China. The race was first held in 1981 and has been held every year since. The race begins at Tiananmen Square and finishes at the National Olympic SportsCenter stadium. Beijing Marathon is now a full marathon only marathon race. At the 2009 edition of the race, 4897...

more...
Share

David Eikelboom has sights set on Shanghai International Marathon

It is off to China for Yukon runner David Eikelboom who will be competing in the 2019 Shanghai International Marathon on November 17.

In May, Eikelboom raced the BMO Vancouver Marathon and came seventh overall out of 2,766 athletes. He came fourth in his age group 30-34 and was the second Canadian to finish.

Both the Shanghai and Vancouver marathons have an agreement to send the top runner from each country to their respective races. The top Canadian finisher in Vancouver was Robin Watson, who declined the invitation to China, opening up the door for Eikelboom.

Eikelboom’s time in the Vancouver Marathon was two hours, 25 minutes and 26 seconds - only 16 seconds behind Watson. His final time in B.C. was far lower than his previous personal best.

“I was nine minutes faster than my best time,” said Eikelboom about his Vancouver time.  In Shanghai, Eikelboom said he hopefully shave off another five minutes to get into the two hours, twenty minutes range.

“Opportunities really open up in the 2:20 range,” said Eikelboom. “Pan Am Games and World Championship qualifying times are 2:16 and being 2:20 is a good stepping stone. Being in that time, I am capable of that.”

The Shanghai marathon will feature 38,000 runners and will be the second-largest race Eikelboom has ever competed.

“In 2014 I ran the Boston Marathon a year after the Boston bombing,” said Eikelboom. “In Boston, you are a bit of a sardine but I never found it too crowded.”

This race will begin with the elite athletes at the front of the pack. “If you go out reasonably hard, the top 20-30 will have about 20-30 second gaps,” said Eikelboom. “There won’t be too many people around me.”

Eikelboom described the Shanghai Marathon as a “top-level race” comparable to marathons in Berlin and Toronto.

“The winning time was 2:09:19 last year,” said Eikelboom. “That’s pretty premium.”

Eikelboom said he is excited about China. “China was never a country I thought I need to visit,” said Eikelboom. “I’m only there for five days so I won’t get to do the whole tourist thing and see the sights.”

The race will take the runners past some landmarks like the Bund Bull, Shanghai Museum, and the Longhua Temple, to name a few, but Eikelboom said he doesn’t remember “a single thing from any of my races.”

At the start of a new running season, Eikelboom said he addresses his areas of need and works on making it an area of strength. He referred to this as training cycles and has been currently working on his sprinting.

“I’m a terrible sprinter and since July and August I was doing a lot of training sprinting,” said Eikelboom. “Sprinting won’t help with a marathon but it is a good predictor of performance and running economy. It’s about becoming more efficient.”

Before his sprint training, Eikelboom was working to improve his lactate threshold, which is a good indicator of overall fitness and aerobic capacity.

On top of the physical training, Eikelboom also said he has done mental training as well.

(10/31/2019) ⚡AMP
by John Tonin
Share
Shanghai International Marathon

Shanghai International Marathon

Shanghai International Marathon has established itself as the marquee running event on China’s Marathon calendar. Every November, tens of thousand participants run passing the many historical places of this city such as Bund Bull, Customs House, Shanghai Museum, Shanghai Grand Theater, Shanghai Exhibition center, Jing’an Temple, Nan Pu Bridge, Lu Pu Bridge, Long Hua Temple, Shanghai Stadium. The course records...

more...
Share

Frankfurt Marathon champion Valary Aiyabei is targeting the women's only world record held by Mary Keitany of 2:17:01 during the 2020 season

Aiyabei, who is a former Beijing Marathon champion, has thrown her hat in the ring and is seeking to conquer any of the six World Marathon Majors (WMM) course in 2020 alongside making it to the Kenya team for the Tokyo Olympic Games.

The 28-year-old ran the fifth-fastest women's marathon time in Frankfurt last Sunday after recording 2:19:10 to break the previous course record of 2:20:36 set by Ethiopia's Meskerem Assefa in 2018.

"I know I can run faster. I now target the women's record of Keitany, which was set two years ago in London. Then maybe I can start dreaming of challenging Brigid Kosgei's women's marathon record," Aiyabei said on Thursday in Nairobi after arriving from Frankfurt.

It has taken over a decade for Kosgei to break the women's all-time world record of 2:15:25 set by Paula Radcliffe in London back in 2003. Kosgei clocked 2:14:01 to break the 16-year-old mark.

"My plan is to break the record in any of the World Marathon Majors. I will plan with my coaches to see which race is convenient for me and my mission," Aiyabei added.

New York, Berlin, Tokyo, Chicago, Boston, and London races form the WRR series with the Olympics and World Championships being part of the circuit.

But Aiyabei hopes her performance in Frankfurt will open doors for her to secure a call to run in either Tokyo, Boston or London in April.

"That record can be broken. But it's rather safe to start with the women's only record and then push for Kosgei's mark later. It all depends on one's mental strength, psyche and how you train. I have a dream to lower Kosgei's record and I believe with God's blessings, it will come to pass," added Aiyabei.

Already Kosgei has called out on sponsors to fund her training to try and make history, similar way Olympic Champion Eliud Kipchoge did in Vienna with the INEOS 1:59 Challenge.

"I believe women can run below two hours and ten minutes," said Kosgei. "I can run faster than the time I set in Chicago."

That spirit has also given Aiyabei the belief she can control her own destiny and push herself to break the world record.

"Kosgei's feat was very inspiring and I have decided to emulate her and make another step in my career," she said.

(10/31/2019) ⚡AMP
by
Share
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organized the Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, originally scheduled from July 24 to August 9, 2020, the games were postponed due to coronavirus outbreak, the postponed Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 23 to August 8 in 2021, according to the International Olympic Committee decision....

more...
Share

The Xiamen Marathon to receive AIMS Green Award

The Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS), the member organization representing more than 460 of the world’s leading distance races is pleased to announce the Xiamen Marathon from the Chinese city of Xiamen as the recipient of the 2019 AIMS Green Award, becoming the first Chinese running event to win the Award.

The Award is given in recognition of excellence in environmental practice and will be presented during the prestigious AIMS ‘Best Marathon Runner’ (BMR) Awards Gala to be held in the birthplace of the Marathon in Athens, Greece on Friday November 8 2019.

Candidates for the AIMS Green Award are judged, among other criteria, on how the race promotes environmentally friendly practices, how volunteers contribute to the success of the event and how the race educates younger generations about the benefits of sport and environmental protection.

The two other races shortlisted by the judges were the Marine Corps Marathon (USA) – 2nd, and the Schneider Electric Marathon de Paris (France) – 3rd.

The Xiamen Marathon was founded in 2003 and has been rated as an ‘IAAF Gold Label Event’ for 12 straight years. The race organizers are demonstrating significant effort regarding climate change, waste reduction and environmental awareness raising. The start and finish of the race is Xiamen International Convention and Exhibition Center accessible by many public transport options which are promoted by the race. Free shuttle buses are provided to runners by the race while shared bicycle parking is provided. In 2019, over 40 thousand people took advantage of public transport options.

The race aimed to create the first ‘zero pollution’ marathon event in China by organizing volunteers to collect litter from the course of the marathon and categorize it for recycling. In 2019 the race recycled 16.15 tons of plastic bottles and paper cups and cleaned up six tons of plastic from the course.

Since 2015, the Xiamen Marathon have donated over 130 thousand saplings to be planted, creating the “Xiamen Forest of Love” in cooperation with the project ‘Million Forest’ run by China Green Foundation.

Ruan Dunliang, Vice President of the Xiamen Marathon comments: “We are very proud to be recognized with this very prestigious award by AIMS. We take our environmental responsibilities very seriously. From the year 2020, we will advocate Car-free Day on the race day. Meanwhile, we will continue to build ‘Xiamen Marathon Forest of Love’ and promote the plan of UNEP for cleaning the ocean to reduce environmental pollution. We look forward to visiting the home of the Marathon in Athens to receive the award.”

Paco Borao, President of AIMS: “I am looking forward to welcoming the Xiamen Marathon to Athens for the Best Marathon Runner Gala on behalf of AIMS Members, Partners and Sponsors. All our Members can look to their example for inspiration in how to host a sustainable event. We would like to thank and congratulate all the member races that submitted their candidateship for the AIMS Green Award.”

AIMS has been honoring races with the AIMS Green Award that have shown exceptional work in this area since 2013. However, AIMS intention is not only to honor ‘environmental initiatives’ of its members, but also to help them improve their races, in terms of good environmental practices during their marathon events. To this end, AIMS in collaboration with the Institute Team for the World Environmental Alliance 2004+, a scientific non-governmental not-for-profit organization headed by Mr. George Kazantzopoulos, Chairman of the AIMS Sustainability Commission and former Member of the IOC Sport & Environment Commission, has established a set of environmental guidelines, in line with the IOC Olympic Movement’s Agenda 21 and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, over and above the creation of the AIMS Green Award.

(10/31/2019) ⚡AMP
by
Share
XIAMEN INTERNATIONAL MARATHON

XIAMEN INTERNATIONAL MARATHON

Every January, the first medal of marathon race around the world is awarded here. The race has become a golden name card of Xiamen, showing its splendor to the whole world. The Xiamen International Marathon is an annual marathon race held in January in the coastal city of Xiamen in Fujian province, People’s Republic of China. Every January, the first...

more...
Share

Defending champion Brimin Misoi from Kenya leads elite field in Athens

Brimin Misoi, the Kenyan who made headlines with an emphatic victory last year, will take pride of place on the start line for the 37th edition of the “Athens Marathon. The Authentic” on Sunday, November 10.

In 2018 Misoi ran the third fastest time ever of 2:10:56 on the renowned, tough course from the coastal town of Marathon to the heart of Athens. He crossed the finish line in the Panathenaic Stadium, venue for the 1896 Olympic Games, almost two minutes clear of his nearest rival.

Retaining the title will prove no easy task despite the Kenyan improving his personal best to 2:09:31 in the Vienna City Marathon in April where he was sixth. His rivals will include compatriot Daniel Muteti, whose best of 2:09:25 in finishing second in the Cape Town Marathon was achieved in mid-September.

Adding historic lustre will be the 2004 Olympic champion Stefano Baldini. On his return to the original marathon course the Italian will be running as a “tourist” rather than elite competitor but his Olympic winning time of 2:10:55 was just one second faster than Brimin Misoi’s last year, further proof of the Kenyan’s quality.

The “Athens Marathon. The Authentic” has already broken records in the race build-up with participation limits in the marathon and parallel events now fully booked. A record total of more than 20,000 will run the marathon, a further 12,000 take part in the 10km road race and another 20,000 run the 5km Road Race ZERO WASTE FUTURE (by Coca-Cola), while total numbers of runners in all events has exceeded 60,000, another record. This festival of running is organized as in previous years by the Hellenic Athletics Federation (SEGAS). For the first time the 10km road race will be held on Saturday evening in central Athens, rather than all the running events taking place on Sunday, another indication of the tremendous growth of interest in the past few years, including a steep rise in the international entry among mass runners. This year 12,000 runners from more than 120 countries will be represented among the 60,000 involved in total, making the Athens Marathon one of the most international races in the world.

One more record of the event is the attendance of the races at the 13th AIMS Marathon Symposium and the 7th Best Marathon Runners Awards Gala: Race directors and representatives of 80 international marathons from 45 countries will be present.

As for the race for top honors, Brimin Misoi has not raced since the Vienna City Marathon in April where he brought his personal best down to 2:09:31. A rival and fellow Kenyan who knows what it means to run at that level is Daniel Muteti, making his debut on the Athens course. As recently as September 15 he ran his best of 2:09:25 to finish second in Cape Town. He has had a busy year in marathon terms in general, having begun with 2:10:55 for fourth in Mumbai on January 20. Athens and its challenging, rolling hills then descent for the last 10km may test his powers of recovery. Rhonzas Kilimo of Kenya dropped out of his debut marathon in Hamburg in late April but the former steeplechaser finished second in the Berlin Half Marathon with 61:01, an indication of marathon promise, at least. Also known as Rhonzaz Lokitam he clocked a half marathon PB of 60:49 a year ago in Valencia. These runners and others have the potential to put Felix Kandie’s 2014 course record of 2:10:37under pressure.

One outcome already certain is that every marathon finisher in the Panathenaic Stadium will receive their own piece of history in the form of the inaugural medal depicting the history of the race. To be awarded over the next eight years, this debut finisher’s medal, aptly enough, portrays the Battle of Marathon where the legend of the lone Athenian soldier-messenger began.

(10/31/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Athens Marathon

Athens Marathon

The Athens Classic (authentic) Marathon is an annual marathon road race held in Athens, Greece, normally in early November. The race attracted 43.000 competitors in 2015 of which 16.000 were for the 42.195 km course, both numbers being an all-time record for the event. The rest of the runners competed in the concurrent 5 and 10 kilometers road races and...

more...
Share

Indianapolis Monumental Marathon Expects Most Competitive Elite Fields in their history for this year

Known for being flat and fast, the CNO Financial Indianapolis Monumental Marathon and Half Marathon have once again attracted international fields of elite runners aiming for course records and fast times for the races taking place Saturday, November 9 in downtown Indianapolis. In addition to the $12,000 prize purse, a $1,000 bonus incentive is on the line for any American athlete who runs a time standard to qualify for the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon. Expected contenders are as follows:

The men’s marathon top contenders consists of many athletes who have already qualified for the 2020 Olympic Team Trials. The close personal bests (PR’s) of Juris Silenieks (Bath, MI, PR 2:17:37), Mark Leininger (Colts Neck, NJ, PR 2:17:51), Jonathan Mott (Lakeland, FL, PR 2:18:35), and Nate Guthals (Olathe, KS, PR of 2:18:38) could make for an exciting race. Jake Polerecky (Flagstaff, AZ) is making his marathon debut and could also be among the top contenders.

Four-time Olympic Team Trials Qualifier Dot McMahan (Oakland Township, MI) is expected to lead the race in a field that has 52 women seeded at the Olympic Trials Standard of 2:45:00 or faster. Three-time Olympic Team Trials Qualifier Amanda Scott (Boulder, CO) qualified for her first trials at the 2012 Indianapolis Monumental Marathon and is also in contention. Melissa Johnson-White (Fairport, NY) has qualified for the Olympic Team Trials four times, and is aiming for her fifth qualification on November 9.

In addition to these world class athletes, a projected 19,000 more will aim to achieve their goals on race day. Runner’s World recently recognized the event as one of “10 Great Marathons to Qualify for Boston”, an objective for thousands of participants each year.

Beyond Monumental provides the Indianapolis community with a complement of activities built around their premiere event that promotes healthy living & fitness for all ages. Beyond Monumental gives back to the Indianapolis community by supporting youth programming that reinforces healthy lifestyles for young people, with an emphasis on working with urban students and Indianapolis Public Schools, donating more than $1.3 million in 11 years. The CNO Financial Indianapolis Monumental Marathon is a top 15 marathon in the US and is nationally recognized by Runners’ World as one of “Ten Great Marathons for First Timers”.

(10/31/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Indianapolis Monumental Marathon

Indianapolis Monumental Marathon

Now one of the 20 largest marathons in the US, the Indianapolis Monumental Marathon is the ideal fall marathon for everyone from the first time marathon runner to elite athletes. Starting and finishing at the Indiana State Capitol, the course highlights landmarks and historical neighborhoods throughout Indianapolis. Nationally recognized as flat and fast, this event has hosted Olympians, PR seekers,...

more...
Share

Tokyo city officials are in a public feud with the International Olympic Committee over IOC plans

The abrupt decision to shift the marathons and race walks was announced almost two weeks ago by the IOC.  Made without consulting the city or local organizers — to move next year’s Tokyo Olympic marathons 800 kilometers (500 miles) north to Sapporo to avoid the capital’s summer heat.

Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is angry about it. Her allies say no change is needed and have raised questions about who will pay if the move goes through, and have not ruled out a lawsuit to recover damages.

Taro Shirato and Hiroshi Yamada, members of Koike’s political party in the metropolitan legislature, told a news conference Tuesday that moving the marathon would cost at least $34 billion yen (about $310 million).

The IOC said it is making the change, thinking first of athletes’ safety from Tokyo’s blistering summer heat.

Koike’s allies offered a different take. Koike is one of Japan’s most influential politicians and just a few years ago was viewed as a potential candidate for prime minister. And she’s miffed about not being consulted.

“Although they (IOC) talk about so-called athletes first, this can only be perceived as IOC first,” Shirato said through an interpreter.

“You get the sense that no considerations have been made for the athletes,” Shirato added, “or the spectators who had already bought their tickets and who were looking forward to these events, or the potential spectators who will be cheering on the streets, and also to the people involved in the operation.”

In a statement to The Associated Press, the Tokyo city government said it wants to see “sufficient scientific evidence” to justify the switch. It also asked if any other city was considered besides Sapporo.

Don’t expect the IOC to budge. It has inspectors in Tokyo this week looking at preparations with the Olympics opening in just under nine months on July 24.

IOC member John Coates heads the team and is an ally to President Thomas Bach. He has said repeatedly the IOC does not intend to change its plans, and has told that to Koike.

The IOC fears worldwide television audiences might see a repeat of the recent world track and field championships in Doha, Qatar, where 28 of 68 starters failed to finish the women’s marathon and 18 of 73 men failed to complete the course.

The races started at midnight in Doha with TV showing runners collapsing on the course. The scenes apparently shocked IOC President Thomas Bach.

Yamada acknowledged the heat posed a risk. He said Tokyo has proposed moving the start to 5 a.m., which is mid-summer sunrise in Tokyo. Last week city officials also floated the idea of a 3 a.m. start.

Estimates suggest the temperature would be 27 degrees C (81 degrees F) at 5 a.m., and would be 25.4 degrees C (78 degrees F) in Sapporo for a 7 a.m. start. The starting temperature in Doha for the women’s marathon was 32.7 degrees C (91 degrees F).

Yamada described the starting temperatures in Tokyo and Sapporo “on a par.”

“We do recognize and understand that the heat is a very important factor, but we do not believe that at this moment it represents an overly excessive risk,” Yamada said.

Tokyo’s soaring costs are also a major issue.

A government audit report last year said Tokyo was spending about $25 billion to organize the Olympics, all of which is public money except for $5.6 billion from a privately financed operating budget.

Tokyo said in its bid in 2013 that the Olympic would cost $7.3 billion.

Yamada was asked who would pay for the increased costs.

“In the event this is changed to Sapporo, then I believe the citizens of Tokyo will not be convinced they need to pay,” Yamada said. “What I can say is that the Tokyo Metropolitan Government should not be the one to pay.”

Asked if the Tokyo government might sue for damages, Yamada hedged.

(10/30/2019) ⚡AMP
by Stephen Wade
Share
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organized the Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, originally scheduled from July 24 to August 9, 2020, the games were postponed due to coronavirus outbreak, the postponed Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 23 to August 8 in 2021, according to the International Olympic Committee decision....

more...
Share

Haji Adilo is the coach behind many of the world´s greatest runners

“This is very difficult work,” coach Haji Adilo says as we drive past an elderly woman toting a bundle of sticks on her back down Entoto Mountain in northern Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on a Thursday morning. “She’ll probably only get a few hundred birr for this.” Then he pulls out a 100 birr note (a little more than $3) from his pocket and hands it to her through the window of his black Toyota.

Four-and-a-half hours earlier, as the sun was just beginning to rise, we were driving up the same mountain for a training session. Adilo, 44, was monitoring a different kind of difficult work — often glorified in Ethiopia: marathon running. Entoto Mountain stands around 10,000 feet and overlooks Ethiopia’s burgeoning capital city. It’s the highest nearby reachable point to push athletes to their peak endurance and part of the schematic planning that Adilo oversees as coach of Ethiopia’s preeminent marathon training group.

When we arrive, Adilo greets his two brothers and assistant coaches, Kassim and Moges, and his 100-plus athletes, taking the time to shake everyone’s hand individually and kiss each of them on the cheek. He then orders a one-hour-and-40-minute endurance run for most athletes and an easy 45-minute jog for those about to head out to the Berlin Marathon. Among the latter group is Kenenisa Bekele, who would win that week, two seconds shy of world-record time. Lelisa Desisa leads another pack, and two weeks later, he’d become the world champion in Doha, Qatar. Now Desisa is looking to defend his New York City Marathon title this weekend — requiring quick-turnaround training arguably more innovative than Eliud Kipchoge’s recent feat of finishing a marathon in under two hours.

As the athletes head off in single-file lines, zigzagging their way through the eucalyptus forest, Haji, Kassim and Moges jog next to each other, looking to spot their athletes, observe their form, talk strategy and share a few jokes.

Countless stars from Ethiopia throughout the last few decades have trained under the tutelage of the Adilo family, who, as former athletes, understand the slog. Thus, the brothers are constantly talking to their athletes and consulting with each other to see how each individual is feeling physically and emotionally.

“Our philosophy is structured around the athletes maintaining interest and excitement in the training,” Adilo says. “So one day we might go to Entoto for endurance training, but then we may drop down to [lower-altitude] Sebeta for speed work.”

At the end of some training sessions, the coaches host an open forum, where the athletes and supporters — partners, siblings, etc. — can voice concerns and express feedback. The coaching magic occurs by taking each individual’s training progression, race date and mental, physical and emotional health into consideration, then producing workouts that upward of 90 people can do together: collectivism in an individual, often solitary, sport.

But extensive familial ties are more than a coaching style for the brothers — it is a way of life. Adilo was raised in an agrarian family with 13 siblings near Mount Chilalo in the Arsi province, famed for being the birthplace of many Ethiopian icons. He went on to win several international marathons, but his career was cut short due to injury. Now, at any given time, up to 17 extended family members reside in his sizable Addis Ababa home. And Moges lives five houses down.

Adilo has always incorporated attention to athletes’ entire well-being, from advising them about financial investments to sharing personal experiences. In 2006, he and Hussein Makke, of Elite Sports Marketing & Management, met through a mutual Ethiopian friend. From there, they began working together to develop the next great crop of Ethiopian distance runners. 

“What makes Haji such a good coach is his ability to read each athlete individually,” Makke says. “He’s very understanding and genuine.”

 

(10/30/2019) ⚡AMP
by Hannah Borenstein
Share
Share

Australia’s Sinead Diver hopes to reach the Tokyo Olympics qualification standard and run well in New York on Sunday

Diver finished 21st in the marathon in Beijing and followed it up with 20th at the IAAF World Championships London 2017. Since making her breakthrough into world class territory with a clocking of 2:25:19 at last year’s Melbourne Marathon, she has joined the Melbourne Track Club coached by Nick Bideau, parting ways with her long-time coach Tim Crosbie.

“I got a great base with Tim and the ‘Crosbie Crew’ but moving to Nick has helped me take the next step in my running career. I’ve moved to the next level and my training has changed quite a bit. I’m now training in a group of elite athletes and being around them has made a massive difference to my running. I’m really glad I made the move.”

The switch has paid dividends with Diver, finishing an impressive seventh at this year’s London Marathon in 2:24:11, securing qualification for next year’s Tokyo Olympics. She followed it up with 14th in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships Doha 2019 with 31:25.49, just half a second outside the automatic Olympic qualification standard.

“The London Marathon was brilliant. I went there aiming for 2:23 but unfortunately it was a bit windy. I led the race for half of it which was unexpected and was a bit of fun. I really loved the experience.”

With Olympic qualification secured, Diver will look to place highly in New York on Sunday, rather than focus on bettering her PB.

“New York will be hilly and I prefer flat courses, but the experience of just racing for placing will be great practice leading into Tokyo. To get the opportunity to run in that calibre of field in New York is really special.”

New York will likely be the 42-year-old’s last marathon before the Olympics. Having missed out on Rio 2016 due to a knee injury caused by the cuboid bone in her foot, competing in Tokyo will be extra special for Diver.

“Missing out on Rio was really hard to stomach, so to compete in Tokyo would be a dream come true. The Olympics is the pinnacle of sport. It would be amazing to be part of it.”

Now aged 42 and showing no signs of slowing down, Diver believes it’s never too late to take up a sport for the first time and that people should ignore those who say it’s not possible to excel at a mature age.

“If you feel good enough to do it then give it a go. Nobody else can tell you what your body is capable of. There is nothing to suggest that when you turn 40 you need to fall apart. It hasn’t happened for me and I feel fitter than I was ten years ago.

“If I can do it then I can’t see why other people can’t do it too.”

(10/30/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organized the Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, originally scheduled from July 24 to August 9, 2020, the games were postponed due to coronavirus outbreak, the postponed Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 23 to August 8 in 2021, according to the International Olympic Committee decision....

more...
Share

Four-time champion Mary Keitany is on a mission as she targets to win the New York Marathon for a fifth time on Sunday

The all-women marathon World Record holder won the NYC Marathon for the fourth Time last year after beating compatriot Vivian Cheruiyot and USA’s Shalane Flanagan, who came in second and third, respectively, by more than three minutes. Keitany previously won the race in 2014, 2015 and 2016.

In an exclusive interview with Nation Sport, Keitany said she has prepared well and is ready to fight for the title.

“I’m ready to go to New York and fight to defend my title again for the fifth time having won it four times. I know it’s not easy, but I’m certain the three months training I have undergone will enable me to do my best,” said Keitany.

“I’m happy that I have won the race (New York Marathon) several times and again if I’m to win this time it will turn out historical. To me and my family, winning this marathon the fifth time will be a great achievement.”

For the fourth time in five years, Keitany sped past more than 50,000 runners to win the women’s race with a time of 2 hours, 22 minutes, and 48 seconds last year. This made her time the second fastest in the history of the New York race. Kenya's Margaret Okayo holds the course record of 2:22:31 set in 2003.

Keitany joined Grete Waitz as the only woman to win the New York City Marathon four times or more. She will have to win a few more times to beat Waitz’s record, though. Between 1978 and 1988, the Norwegian runner won the marathon nine times.

Keitany said that the secret to prosperity requires athletes to train well and athletes must learn to persevere because nothing comes easy. She said one should have a dream and must be focused. They ought to have an attitude and should be mentally focused so as to fulfil their goals.

For Keitany, discipline and perseverance are key in her sports career. "You must put God first for you to prosper," she said.

The athlete said training may not be easy but athletes must be disciplined if they are to succeed in sports. Some promising athletes have destroyed their careers due to indiscipline.

Keitany set the women-only marathon record when she won the London Marathon in 2017. She has also held records for best half marathon time and best 10-mile time. She also has titles from London Marathon she won in 2012, 2016, and 2017.

(10/30/2019) ⚡AMP
by Bernard Rotich
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Adriel Fernandez, a blind runner veteran, gets ready for first New York City Marathon

For Long Island native Adriel Fernandez, the New York City Marathon is more than just a race -- it's a major milestone after going blind two years ago. Before his life changed forever, Fernandez was on active duty with the Navy and enjoyed an active lifestyle.

He was involved in a major motorcycle accident that broke almost every bone in his body and blinded him. Fernandez was determined from the start to stay fit and not let his lack of sight stop him from being like everyone else.

"People told me about the things I couldn't do anymore and I just kind of got fed up with that," Fernandez said." I didn't want people to tell me how to live my life, I wasn't going to let anyone else tell me what my limitations were."

Fernandez met his running guide, John Reynolds, through Achilles International, an organization which empowers people with disabilities to participate in mainstream running events.

Reynolds started training with Achilles International every Saturday in Central Park. Then he met Fernandez, who like Reynolds is from Long Island, and they decided to train closer to home.

The pair have been running together since last February and have found their rhythm just in time for the TCS New York City Marathon."It's just motivating to me to see how hard he works in spite of not being able to see, he doesn't let that interfere with his life," Reynolds said.

"I think it should be an example for all of us, you know we're all going to have different things that happen to us in life, but to keep plowing on."This won't be Fernandez's first time running 26.2 miles, but it'll be his first New York City marathon.

He can't wait to hear the roaring crowds and take on this new goal with his guide and now friend, Reynolds, by his side.

(10/29/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Olympian Nick Symmonds attempts 1:59 marathon pace

Nick Symmonds is the American two-time Olympian in the 800m who attempted Eliud Kipchoge’s 1:59 marathon pace for as long as possible.

Eliud Kipchoge made history. The runner has become the first person to run a marathon in under two hours. Kipchoge finished the historic event in 1:59:40.

Weeks ago Symmonds, who’s a former professional 800m runner, gave the historic pace a try. He only made it 1K.

The Ineos 1:59 was a beautiful event. The weather was nearly perfect, a little rain (but mostly overcast), with moderate temperatures. Kipchoge was wearing Nike shoes specially created for the event, and his team of pacers executed the race perfectly.

Kipchoge’s 5K pace was a consistent 14:14. According to Athletics Canada, in 2019 only five Canadian men have run under this pace in a 5K race on the roads. His 10K pace was double that at 28:28–our Canadian record is only 11 seconds faster at 28:17.

There are some who believe that Kipchoge’s attempt was too calculated, too contrived and too much about the shoes. Regardless of your stance, it’s clear that 1:59 is insanely fast, especially since a two-time Olympian can only handle this pace for 1K.

(10/29/2019) ⚡AMP
by Madeleine Kelly
Share
INEOS 1:59 Challenge

INEOS 1:59 Challenge

Mankind have constantly sought to reach new frontiers and to achieve the impossible. From Edmund Hillary reaching the summit of Mount Everest to Roger Bannister’s four-minute mile to Felix Baumgartner jumping from space we have frequently redefined the limits of human achievement and broken new barriers previously seen as simply impossible. After the four-minute mile and the ten second 100m...

more...
Share

Tyler Pennel is Ready for Long-Awaited Marathon Comeback At TCS New York City Marathon

With little fanfare, Tyler Pennel has quietly established himself as one of America's top marathoners over the past five years. Despite often being overshadowed by bigger names from high-profile training groups, he's won a national title, played a decisive role in the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, and finished in the top five at an Abbott World Marathon Majors race. But he's also dealt with a series of frustrating injuries that have disrupted his momentum and left some unanswered questions about his true potential.

With the next Olympic Trials looming this winter, the 31-year-old Pennel will make his comeback at the distance on November 3, at the TCS New York City Marathon. It will be his first marathon in 18 months and only his fourth race at any distance this year. "I'm a little nervous," Pennel told Race Results Weekly in a recent telephone interview from Blowing Rock, N.C., where he lives and trains as part of the On ZAP Endurance group. "That first race back is always a shock to the system. A lot of it is mentally remembering what it feels like to race."

Pennel grew up in Golden, Colo,, and had an impressive career at Western State College (since renamed Western Colorado University), winning the NCAA Division II title over 10,000 meters as a senior in 2012. He joined the ZAP Endurance group shortly after graduating and made his 26.2-mile debut at the Twin Cities Marathon in 2014, which doubled as the USA Track & Field championship that year. He pulled off a surprise win that day, setting a still-standing personal best of 2:13:32.

He carried that momentum into 2015 with a series of strong results on the roads and track (including lowering his best in the mile to 3:58.99), and headed into the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials riding high with confidence. Perhaps too high. On a hot day in Los Angeles, Pennel took the lead in the 16th mile and forced the pace for the next several miles. The tempo ultimately took a toll and he faded to fifth place in 2:14:57, missing a spot on the squad for the Rio Games by just under two minutes.

"The Trials was my second marathon, and I think since I had a good first one maybe I was a little bit overconfident," he says. "Initially when I made that move I felt great. That first mile that I led I was almost shocked nobody went with me. That's how good I felt. It wasn't until after I started pressing after that first mile of leading that it really hurt."

Since that disappointment, a variety of injuries prevented Pennel from consistently training and racing. He's put together some bright spots, including finishing eighth at the TCS New York City Marathon in 2016 and running to a gutsy fourth-place finish at the 2018 Boston Marathon during the now-infamous nor'easter that turned the race into a cold, wet and windy war of attrition. But after taking third-pace at the Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta in July 2018 he didn't race again for 11 months, first battling a sacral stress fracture, followed this past winter and spring by a bout of osteitis pubis (inflammation of the tissues around the pubic bone). That's the same injury that plagued marathoner Laura Thweatt.

Pennel has been healthy since May, but raced sparingly during his preparation for New York. "The build-up has been really stellar," says On ZAP Endurance coach Pete Rea. "He was able to train through the summer and put together a full marathon build-up cycle. In terms of actual true consistency and healthy running for months and months, that had not happened for Tyler since 2016 until these last six months."

Pennel has been making adjustments to his routine to avoid injuries, including taking one day off from running each week. "If anything I would say he has really made a conscious effort to try to hit fewer home runs in training since, in some respects, that's what got him in trouble in the past," Rea says. "He's actually running more quickly at a lower intensity. He's working less-hard in terms of intensity, but it seems far more comfortable than it did a few years ago."

(10/29/2019) ⚡AMP
by Runners web
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Ultrarunner Legend Michael Wardian Wins Inaugural MCM50K

The 45-year-old Arlington resident added another title to his name, while women's champion Liz Kakouris Ozeki of Rockville won her first big race in the area.

Okay, tough guy. If running a marathon isn’t hard enough, try adding a steady downpour, stretches of shin-deep flooding, and unpredictable gusts of wind. And, how about adding another 4.87 miles, making it an even 50 kilometers (31.07 miles)? Just for fun.

Any takers?

Almost 1,700 runners stepped up to the challenge and the start line on Sunday morning in the inaugural MCM50K, hosted by the event organizers for the Marine Corps Marathon. In its first year, the MCM50K sold out in less than an hour, and instantly became the largest ultramarathon in the United States.

Two accomplished local runners who have made a name for themselves in the D.C. running community claimed the titles on Sunday. In the men’s race, 45-year-old Michael Wardian of Arlington finished with a time of 3 hours, 11 minutes, and 52 seconds (6:10 per mile pace). In the women’s race, 31 year-old up-and-comer Liz Kakouris Ozeki of Rockville won in a time of 3:42:04 (7:08 per mile pace).

Both Wardian and Ozeki seemed unfazed by the weather. They took the rain in stride—quite literally—and just executed their strategy, no excuses.

Wardian, a celebrity in the ultramarathoning world, was characteristically upbeat and positive about the race conditions and his preparation.

“I’m lucky because I’ve run in so many conditions, so I was prepared for the things you have to be worried about when you’re getting that kind of exposure," he said. "We’re lucky in that it was dumping [rain] but wasn’t really cold. So, I didn’t have a lot of issues.”

Ozeki also felt prepared for the weather, having been tested in prior races, including the 2018 Boston Marathon, which she likened to a monsoon.

“I ran my first two marathons in the pouring rain," she said. "I’ve done it before, so I was confident it wouldn’t affect me. I think it might actually have helped because the rain cooled me off.” 

The MCM50K was Ozeki’s second race at the 50K distance, and also her second win (she set the women’s course record at the Algonquink 50K in the spring). “I knew 50K was a distance I could be competitive in,” she said. “Initially, I wanted to finish top 10. Then, I thought a podium finish would be nice. But then, a bunch of friends kept encouraging me, saying, ‘Liz! You could probably win it!’”

Ozeki tested a risky strategy, deliberately going out faster than her marathon pace, so that she wouldn’t get caught behind larger crowds when the 50K course linked back up with the Marine Corps Marathon course in Georgetown. “I kept looking at my watch and thinking, ‘I should probably should slow down,’ but I just kept hanging on,” she said.

The strategy pushed Ozeki to the brink. “I think I paid for it later in the race. My hamstrings and calves kept cramping and spasming," she recalled. "I was scared I was going to DNF. But I just kept telling myself to keep running while you can. Just get to the finish line, it doesn’t matter what place you’re in.”

With the win, it’s clear that Ozeki’s risk paid off. She had never won a big race in the D.C. area.

"So this was really incredible," she said. "And the trophy is really sweet. I’m going to cherish that for a while.”

(10/29/2019) ⚡AMP
by Kelaine Colochan
Share
Marine Corps Marathon

Marine Corps Marathon

Recognized for impeccable organization on a scenic course managed by the US Marines in Arlington, VA and the nation's capital, the Marine Corps Marathon is one of the largest marathons in the US and the world. Known as 'the best marathon for beginners,' the MCM is largest marathon in the world that doesn't offer prize money, earning its nickname, “The...

more...
Share

Steph Twell has set a new Scottish record for the marathon, eclipsing Liz McColgan's 1997 mark in Frankfurt

Steph Twell ran a PB of 2:26:40 to break the Scottish marathon record and achieve an Olympic qualifying mark at the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon on Sunday.

The women’s race was won by Kenya’s Valary Jemeli Aiyabei in a course record of 2:19:10, a time which moves her to 12th on the world all-time list, while the men’s title was claimed by Ethiopia’s Fikre Tefera in a close finish.

For Twell, her time to finish eighth puts her fifth on the UK all-time rankings in only her second ever marathon, behind Paula Radcliffe, Mara Yamauchi, Charlie Purdue and Veronique Marot.

It improves on the 2:30:11 she ran on her debut in Valencia last December and betters Liz McColgan’s 22-year-old Scottish record by 12 seconds.

Her fellow Briton Jenny Spink of Bristol & West took almost four minutes off her PB with 2:31:14, while Spink’s England team-mate Hayley Carruthers dropped out after 30km after suffering sickness and fainting.

(10/28/2019) ⚡AMP
by Athletics Weekly
Share
Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

more...
Share

Eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt, the fastest man in the world, declared that he's willing to join the New England Patriots

If he joins the Patriots, Bolt believes he could win championships with Tom Brady. 

Eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt, the fastest man in the world, declared that he's willing to join the New England Patriots if they need another speedy wide receiver. In an interview with TMZ Sports, Bolt said he’s ready to suit up if either the Patriots or the Green Bay Packers call. “If they call me, I'm ready!" said the 33-year-old Bolt, who holds the world record in the 100-meter and 200-meter dash with a time of 9.58 seconds and 19.19 seconds, respectively, which he both recorded at the 2009 Berlin World Athletics Championships.

Last month, Bolt told Arash Markazi of the Los Angeles Times that several NFL teams offered him a spot on their team after his impressive performance during the 2008 and 2012 Olympics when he was just 22 and 26 years old, respectively. Bolt, a known Packers fan, explained that he declined the offers because he’s afraid of his safety back then.

“If it was like it is now, I think I would probably transition and try to play in the NFL,” Bolt told Markazi.

In last season’s NFL Super Bowl Experience in Atlanta, Bolt unofficially tied the 4.22-second record in the 40-yard dash set by John Ross in the 2017 Combine while wearing sweatpants and flat shoes.

Bolt, who retired from competition in 2017, said he’s now willing to play in the NFL if the Patriots or the Packers call. If he joins the Patriots, Bolt believes he could win championships with veteran Tom Brady as his quarterback.

However, when asked if Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers is better than Brady, Bolt gave a safe answer, replying “it’s tight.”

As of now, Bolt said Rodgers is doing well despite the Packers’ lack of manpower at wide receiver.

“He’s doing great with what he has,” said Bolt of Rodgers, who has led the Packers to a 6-1 record this season, best in the NFC North. The Patriots, for their part, recently acquired Mohamed Sanu from the Atlanta Falcons for a 2020 second-round pick.

(10/28/2019) ⚡AMP
by ZeeGee Cecilio
Share
Share

Morocco's Othmane El Goumri wins the 40th Dublin Marathon

The 40th Dublin Marathon has been won by EI Goumri of Morocco.

He took the title in a new course record of 2:08:04 on Sunday. This compares to last year's win - set by Asefa Bekele from Ethiopia - of 2:13:23.

El Goumri ran a personal best of 2:08:20 at the 2019 Rabat Marathon, where he finished second.

Ireland's Stephen Scullion took second place, with a time of 2:12:01.

Patrick Monahan claimed the wheelchair title in 1:39:50. And Moth Gedefa took home the women's title in a time of 2:27:48.

A record 22,500 runners took part in the cross-city event. International elite runners competed against Ireland's top endurance athletes. Irish athletes also battled it out for national titles.

Meanwhile, 13 runners who have taken part in all 39 Dublin Marathons since the race began in 1979 completed their 40th this year.

This group included Mary Nolan Hickey from Wicklow - the only woman to have finished all of the marathons.

There were also rolling road closures around the city as a result, as well as some public transport diversions. Transport for Ireland (TFI) said its real-time information would not be in operation during the race.

Aidan Power is director of customer, brand and marketing at KBC. He said: "This year, the KBC Dublin Marathon is celebrating 40 years and we are honoured to be part of history in the making.

"Yes, a marathon is about running 26.2 miles, however, the Dublin Marathon represents so much more than that.

"It is about community spirit, bringing together runners, supporters, family members, volunteers and of course, fans, every October.

"In 1980, 2,100 took part in the first ever Dublin Marathon, this year, a record 22,500 runners will be at the startling line.

"As sponsor, we are immensely proud to be associated with such a special event and we would like to wish all of those running, the very best of luck."

(10/28/2019) ⚡AMP
by Jack Quann
Share
KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

more...
Share

Valary Jemeli Aiyabei smashed the 2:20 barrier at the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon on Sunday clocking 2:19:10

In a thrilling men’s race, Ethiopia’s Fikre Tefera broke clear from his compatriot Dawit Wolde to win by just two seconds in 2:07:08.

Just one week after Brigid Kosgei clocked a world record of 2:14:04 at the Chicago Marathon, spectators in Frankfurt wondered if another record was about to happen in the German city after Aiyabei went through 10km in 31:44, on schedule for a 2:13:54 finish.

The 28-year-old Kenyan was paced by her husband Kenneth Tarus until he had to drop out at 15km because of stomach problems, but Aiyabei continued in imposing style, going through halfway in 1:07:42.

Aiyabei’s pace slowed in the second half, but she continued to operate inside the required schedule to finish inside the course record of 2:20:36 set 12 months ago by one of her distant pursuers, Meskerem Assefa. Aiyabei eventually crossed the line in 2:19:10, improving the course record by 86 seconds.

“My aim was to break my personal best,” said Aiyabei, whose previous PB was 2:20:53. Despite her tremendously fast early pace, she hadn’t planned an attack on the world record. “Running alone isn’t easy. I had to struggle and grind it out.”

The chasing group, some way behind, comprised high class talent who were themselves on course for sub-2:20 much of the time. Ethiopia’s Megertu Kebede emerged to take second place in a PB of 2:21:10. Defending champion Meskerem Assefa finished third in 2:22:14 ahead of European 10,000m champion Lonah Salpeter of Israel, who came home in 2:23:11.

The leading group in the men’s field set off slower than intended and the prospect of a finishing time inside of 2:05 soon drifted out of reach. The 14-strong leading group went through halfway in 1:03:29 and were without pacemakers from 25km onwards. The fastest man in the field, Ethiopia’s Tsegaye Mekonnen, dropped out before 30km.

It was only at about 35km that the group started to break up. Mark Kiptoo, the Kenyan who set a world M40 best of 2:07:50 on this course last year, dropped off the pace and eventually finished sixth in 2:08:09. Four men pulled away: Kenya’s Martin Kosgey, Ethiopia’s Fikre Tefera and Dawit Wolde and Bahrain’s Aweke Yimer, the latter making his marathon debut.

The outcome was decided with fewer than 300 metres to run before they reached the red carpet in Frankfurt’s Festhalle. At that point the 21-year-old Fikre Tefera went clear and won in 2:07:08.

“I had hoped for a faster time but the pacemaker wasn’t fast enough, although the conditions were good,” said Fikre, who has a PB of 2:06:27. Wolde finished two seconds behind Fikre and two seconds ahead of Yimer in what was the closest finish ever in Frankfurt.

(10/28/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

more...
Share

Camille Herron sets new world record for women for the most miles run in 24 hours in Albi France

With her performance in Albi, France, on Sunday, ultrarunner Camille Herron came back strong after a hamstring injury forced her to drop out.  

She achieved a world best for the most distance covered in 24 hours on her way to winning the International Association of Ultrarunners 24-Hour World Championship.

Herron, 37, completed the challenge by running 270.116K (167.842 miles) in a span of 24 hours on a series of 1500-meter loops in and around the Terrain Honneur Stadium. This is an average of 8:37 per mile.  Pending ratification, the ultrarunner’s performance is the record for the most distance covered in a day for women. 

Less than a year ago, Herron broke the world record for the 24-hour run on the track, which made her the favorite heading into Sunday’s race. She established herself up front early on, taking the lead in the first lap and maintaining her top position for the entire race. 

Around the halfway point, she almost caught men’s race leader Aleksandr Sorokin of Lithuania, according to the International Association of Ultrarunners (IAU).

(10/27/2019) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World
Share
Share

Rowlinson and Rowlands storm to Eryri victories at 37th Snowdonia Marathon

Callum Rowlinson and Andrea Rowlands became the latest winners of the Snowdonia Marathon Eryri on Saturday, as both produced runs of strength and determination to win one of the UK’s most prestigious marathon crowns. 

Starting under grey skies, chilly temperatures and in steady rain, a record number of starters headed out of Nant Peris for the 37th running of this classic event. Runners from as far-a-field as the US and Australia had made the long journey to take part, and as they headed up the Llanberis Pass after the traditional 10.30am start the buoyant mood of the runners made sure that the weather was not going to deter the fantastic atmosphere that this annual celebration of running produces. 

As the race began to develop in the men’s event on the long and steady climb to Pen y Pass at mile 5, it was clear that this was going to be a battle between Salford runner Rowlinson, local man Tom Roberts, Mercia Fell Runner Dan Connolly and last year’s runner-up Martin Green.

In the women’s race it was shaping up to be a repeat of last year, when Anna Bracegirdle and Eryri Harrier Rowlands battled it out. It was the 2018 winner Bracegirdle who took it out hard on the Llanberis Pass to reach to the summit and the first feed station in 33:15, a lead of over one minute on Rowlands. 

Meanwhile in the men’s race Rowlinson crested Pen y Pass with Roberts and Connolly in close attendance. Their time of around 27:38 demonstrated that if they could stay together and make a race of it the course record of 2:33:38, held by 2015 winner John Gilbert, was within sight.  

As they hit halfway and up to mile-14 the race had now developed into a two-way battle between Rowlinson and Roberts, with Green and Connolly running around three minutes back in third. However, for Roberts and Connolly this was their debut marathon and they were now into unknown territory as they began to ascend out of the village of Beddgelert and onto the tough second half of this 26.2 mile brute.

At the same 14-mile checkpoint Bracegirdle was still running strong in the women’s race, however having had some recent issues with iron deficiency Anna was unsure if she would feel the effects of this and later stated that she wasn’t sure at this point if she would be able to finish. That said her lead over Andrea was still over a minute as they too headed into the unforgiving second half of the race. 

Behind these two a tremendous battle was developing for the final podium spot and Danielle Higham and Beth Taylor were also within a minute of each other. 

From this point onwards it was to become clear that Callum Rowlinson’s recent chest cold was not to be a factor. By mile 20 and on to 23 miles the former Bangor University student was beginning to build a sizable lead, and may well have had Gilbert’s 2015 course record in the back of his mind. 

Roberts had now been caught and passed by Green and Connolly, but was determined to hang on to complete the race. 

If the men’s race winner was looking clear cut the women’s race was anything but, as by mile-23 Rowlands had caught long-time leader Bracegirdle. However, with a lead of less than a minute heading into the last three miles the race was far from over. 

In both events the last miles of this race are a huge undertaking as they head to the highest point of the race at mile 24, almost 380 metres above sea level and an ascent of over 200 metres in just 1 mile!

Whilst the women battled it out, Rowlinson was cruising to a maiden  Snowdonia victory. Descending back into Llanberis after conquering the Bwlch y Groes climb, Callum had a number of falls on the wet, muddy and rocky downhill section incurring a nasty cut to his elbow in the process. However this was not to deter him as he entered the Llanberis high street and the finish to take a fantastic win in 2:34:14, just 36 seconds outside of the course record and for the second fastest-ever time on this course. 

Speaking to the crowd as he crossed the line a tired, blood and mud spattered Rowlinson said:

“I can’t believe it. This means so much, and I am not sure how I made it down in the last couple of miles as I am a terrible downhill runner! But to win this race, when you look at some of the past winners, is just amazing.” 

Behind fell and mountain specialist Dan Connolly plummeted into Llanberis, to take second place in a superb 2:38:26. Martin Green held his nerve and form over the last 2 miles to take an excellent third place in 2:41:18, over two minutes faster than his time from 2018.

The last 3 miles unfortunately saw Welsh international mountain runner Roberts really struggle, especially on the climb to mile 24, but he used his strength on the mountains to good effect to finish a highly satisfactory fourth in 2:45:59.

Whilst Rowlinson and the lead men took the plaudits of the huge and appreciative Llanberis crowd, the lead women were now entering the last couple of miles and with just a minute between them at mile 23, Rowlands and Bracegirdle were in a mammoth battle. 

However, the vastly experienced mountain and ultra-runner and former Eryri winner Rowlands didnt look back, as she began her descent of Bwlch y Groes and held her form on the slippery descent as she entered the village of Llanberis. 

Heading towards the finish line a clearly delighted Andrea was full of running, breaking the tape in 3:09:18. The time was immaterial as the accolade of being crowned a now two-time Snowdonia Marathon Eryri winner after her victory in 2014 puts her in the greats of this historic race.  

Speaking after the race Andrea commented: 

“I am really happy to have won this race again. It’s also a demonstration to others that age isn’t a barrier to success. I am 46 now and I feel as strong as ever to be honest!”

Bracegirdle was by now also enjoying the final sprint into the finish as she took a highly-popular second place in 3:09:54, just 30 over seconds behind Rowlands. She was embraced by her family as she crossed the line and was clearly still extremely happy with the runner-up spot. 

(10/27/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Snowdonia Marathon

Snowdonia Marathon

The Snowdonia Marathon has been voted best British marathon twice. The demanding and spectacular route, encircling Snowdon, Wales’ and England’s highest peak, gives the event a unique place in the annual marathon calendar. The inaugural Snowdonia Marathon was held in 1982, and was conceived as a dramatic alternative to the numerous city and town races becoming so popular. The demanding...

more...
Share

Adugna and Kipkoech were first across the finish line at the Marseille Cassis 20k in France

Olika Adugna of Ethiopia became the first runner in more than a decade to retain a Marseille Cassis 20km title, while Brillian Jepkorir Kipkoech prevailed for the first time in the challenging French race on Sunday (27).

A group of eight runners – Shadrack Korir Kipyegon, who entered the race at last minute, Joseph Koech, Gilbert Korir, Gerald Vincent, Dennis Rutoh, Josphat Kiprono Menjo, Adugna and his compatriot Yasin Haji – went through 5km in 15:09.

The leading pack then tackled the first slopes of the tough 327-metre climb up to the Col de la Gineste. Adugna changed gears on the steepest slopes of the Col de la Gineste, breaking the field and building a small lead from the first chasers to hit the summit 10km into the race in 32:15, 11 seconds ahead of Kipyegon and 12 seconds ahead of Haji.

Adugna covered the next five kilometres – mainly downhill – in 14:26 to reach the 15km checkpoint in 46:41, nine seconds ahead of Haji. Kipyegon started to fade and was now 23 seconds adrift the leader.

Adugna held on to capture his second win at this race in 1:01:10, 41 seconds slower than last year.

Haji was eventually forced to withdraw in the waning stages. Menjo, who was fourth at 10km, finished strongly to place second in 1:01:50 as Korir Kipyegon rounded the podium in 1:02:13.

In the women’s race, a trio of Kenyans –Brillian Jepkorir Kipkoech, Lucy Macharia and Lydia Nialaka Simiyu – separated themselves from the gun and hit 5km in 16:49, 37 seconds ahead of the rest of the field.

As expected, pre-race favourite Jepkorir ratcheted up the pace in the Col de la Gineste and reached the summit and the 10km mark in 35:52, almost one minute ahead of Simiyu and 1:04 ahead of Macharia. The gap continued to grow over the next kilometres.

Jepkorir Kipkoech, who improved her half marathon PB to 1:07:12 one month ago, didn’t fade in the closing stages to seal the win in 1:07:54, 2:23 ahead of Simiyu and 2:42 ahead of Macharia.

(10/27/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Marseille Cassis

Marseille Cassis

Once upon a time…How could we imagine one day of March 1979, the idea of organizing a race opened to everyone between Marseilles and Cassis could take such an International dimension? A very young athletic section, a group of close friends and the unfailing support of every sections of an “omnisport” club, the SCO Ste Marguerite, gave birth...

more...
Share

Senbere Teferi breaks Ethiopian half marathon record in Valencia clocking 1:05:32

Ethiopia’s Senbere Teferi and world indoor 3000m champion Yomif Kejelcha were victorious at the Medio Maratón Valencia Trinidad Alfonso EDP on Sunday (27), winning in 1:05:32 and 59:05 respectively at the IAAF Gold Label road race.

At yesterday’s technical meeting, pre-race favourite Sifan Hassan was cautious on her chances of breaking the world record. “I don’t know how my body has recovered from the Doha efforts,” said Hassan, who won the 1500m and 10,000m at the recent World Championships.

But right from the start, perfectly paced by compatriot Roy Hoornweg and Morocco’s Yakoub Labquira, Hassan seemed determined to chase the record as she went through the opening 5km in 15:19 with only Teferi and Kenya’s Joan Chelimo for company as the women-only record holder and world half marathon champion Netsanet Gudeta ran eight seconds in arrears.

With exactly 22:15 on the clock, Hassan tripped and fell hard, losing ground on the leaders. Even though the pacemakers didn’t seem to notice her fall, the European record-holder soon re-joined the lead group.

The lead trio reached 10km in 30:43 – still inside world record pace – with Teferi and Chelimo heading the race while Hassan trailed by four seconds, likely hampered by her fall.

Although Hoornweg remained pacing Hassan throughout, Teferi and Chelimo’s leading margin increased to 16 seconds by the 15km checkpoint, which the lead duo reached in 46:16.

Chelimo began to fade shortly afterwards and Teferi went on to win by a clear margin. The 24-year-old reached the finish in 1:05:32, taking 13 seconds off the Ethiopian record she had set in Ras Al Khaimah earlier this year. Hassan, who overtook Chelimo just before 20km, finished second in 1:05:53 with Chelimo finishing third in 1:06:09.

“I’m really satisfied with my performance,” said Teferi, the 2015 world 5000m silver medallist. “In addition to winning the race, I managed to improve my PB so I can’t ask for more.”

On a perfect day for road running (a slight wind and 12C), the men’s race opened according to plan with the main pack passing the opening 5km in 13:55. By the 10th kilometre, the pace had dropped slightly as the leading pack went through that checkpoint in 27:56. By then, only the Ethiopian duo of Jemal Yimer and Kejelcha plus the Kenyan quartet of Benard Ngeno, Albert Kangogo, Leonard Barsoton and Geoffrey Koech remained with winning chances.

Once the pacemakers had dropped out, the leading quintet of Ngeno, Kejelcha, Yimer, Barsoton and Koech passed 15km in 42:09, indicating the course record of 58:18 would remain intact.

Once Koech lost ground, Kejelcha, Yimer, Ngeno and Barsoton fought hard for the victory in the closing stages after passing 20km in 56:15. Kejelcha unleashed a significant change of pace with about 700 metres to go and went on to cross the finish line in 59:05.

Ngeno was runner-up in a lifetime best of 59:07 while Yimer completed the podium after a thrilling sprint finish with Barsoton, both being credited in 59:09, a PB for the Kenyan.

(10/27/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Valencia Half Marathon

Valencia Half Marathon

The Trinidad Alfonso Valencia Half Marathon has become one of the top running events in the world in its 25th year. For the second year running, Valencia is the fastest half marathon in the world. The race, organized by SD Correcaminos Athletics Club, celebrated its silver anniversary in style with record participation, record crowd numbers, Silver label IAAF accreditation and...

more...
Share

Kipkorir and Jebichi triumph at Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon

Brimin Kipkorir and Purity Jebichi are the winners of the 17th edition Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon held on Sunday at Nyayo Stadium.

Kipkorir from Elgeyo Marakwet and the 2017 event winner outsmarted Steven Kipchirchir, his main challenger in the men’s 42km to win the race in 2 hours, 10 minutes and 42 seconds.

The Kaptagat-based Kipchirchir settled for the second slot in 2:11:53 as Victor Serem closed the podium in 2:12.00.

"I was in good form coming into the race and also confident of recapturing the title. The weather conditions were great. After this victory, I will take two to three weeks recovery before embarking on training for another race probably in abroad,” said Korir.

In the women’s 42km event, Jebichi, the 2015 Standard Chartered Marathon half marathon winner stepped up to the full marathon event in style.

Jebichi took command of the race just after covering 21km of the race to emerge victorious in 2:30:33, beating Chemtai Rionotukei to second place in 2:33:03 as Shelmith Muriuki settler for the third position in 2:34:39.

“I’m just returning from maternity break and to come here to win the main marathon is a great achievement for me. I’m proud of my performance because I wasn’t sure of victory but I was confident of finishing within podium bracket. At 28km, I could feel that I was in good shape to win the race,” said Jebichi.

Both Jebichi and Kipkorir walked home with Sh2 million prize money from increased Sh1.5 million.

Andrew Kwemoi and Sheila Chepkirui of Kenya Defence Forces were the winners of half marathon event.

Kwemoi, 20, who finished third at the Bank Half Marathon brush off his opponents to win in one hour, one minute and 51 seconds.

Kiprono Koech edged out Edmond Kipng'etich to secure the second slot in 1:02:01 as Kipng’etich clocked 1:02:06 in third.

Former African 5000m Champion Chepkirui won the women’s half marathon race in her marathon debut just a few weeks after winning Durban 10km in South Africa.

hepkirui clocked 1:11:51 to win the race ahead of Deborah Serum (1:12:10). Cynthia Kosgei was third in 1:13:45.

"I enjoyed the race and it felt good this being my first half Marathon race, I think I will be winning races as I continue gaining experience on the roads,” said Chepkirui.

In 10km, Daniel Simiu won the race in 28 minutes and 22 seconds while Nancy Jelegat won the corresponding women race in 32minutes and 03 seconds

(10/27/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank. The other three legs of this four-marathon race...

more...
Share

Kenyans Andrew Ben Kimutai and Cynthia Cherop are the favorites in Venice

Kenyan Andrew Ben Kimutai starts as the fastest runner in the men’s field at the 34th edition of the Hauwei Venice Marathon, an IAAF Bronze Label road race on Sunday (27). The 30-year-old, who set his 2:08:32 personal best at the Seville Marathon in 2018, won this year's Wuhan Marathon in China in 2:10:06.

Kimutai will take on compatriot Geoffrey Yegon, who finished second at the Rome Ostia Half Marathon in 1:00:23 and has four sub-one hour half marathon runs to his credit. He clocked 59:56 at the Prague Half Marathon in 2018 and has a career best of 59:44 from 2016.

The men’s line-up also features Moses Mengich of Kenya, who was second at the Treviso Marathon in 2019 and Ethiopians Asefa Habtamu (2:08:32 in Dubai 2013) and Tsegaye Hiluf (PB 2:12:30 in Barcelona 2018).

The top Italian runner is Ahmed Nasef, who won the national marathon titles in 2016 and 2017.

The favorite in the women’s race is Kenya’s Cynthia Cherop, who clocked 2:25:55 on a slightly downhill course at the Los Angeles Marathon in March and finished runner-up at the Gothenburg Half Marathon setting her PB with 1:08:26 in May.

She'll face compatriots Judith Korir, winner at the Belgrade Marathon this year, and Jackline Autonyang, who will make her debut over the distance.

More than 13,000 runners are expected to take part in the Venice Marathon and the popular 10km mass race.

(10/26/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Venice Marathon

Venice Marathon

The Venice Marathon is one of the most beautiful marathons known for the historical, artistic and picturesque surrounding in which it takes place. It starts in Stra, a small village located at about 25 km west of Venice, at the beginning of the Riviera del Brenta, a beautiful area near the River Brenta, where the rich and noble Venetians built...

more...
Share

Noor Alexandria Abukaram, 16, was disqualified from high school cross-country meet for wearing a hijab

Noor Alexandria Abukaram, 16, was disqualified from her district cross-country meet last weekend for wearing a hijab without submitting a waiver ahead of the race. According to OHSAA (Ohio High School Athletic Association) rules, a form must be completed ahead of a competition if a runner is planning to compete in religious headwear. Abukaram finished her 5K race in 22:22, a season’s best that won’t count.

According to Runner’s World, Abukaram attends a private school (Bounty Collegium) but competes for her district school’s cross-country team, Sylvania Northview High School, in Sylvania, Ohio. The runner had raced 10 times earlier in the season while wearing her hjiab, without any issues.

The Toldeo Blade reports that Ohio high school runners are not allowed to wear any head coverings, including hats, unless they have received special permission via a waiver. Abukaram has already submitted a waiver for this weekend’s regional competition, which has reportedly been approved.

As a result of Abukaram’s case, the athletic association is looking at rewriting their rules. OHSAA Director of Communications Tim Stried told The Blade, “The OHSAA is also already looking at this specific uniform regulation to potentially modify it in the future, so that religious headwear does not require a waiver.”

Abukaram’s story has gone viral. The runner’s cousin and Cure Your World founder Zobaida Falah first posted the story on Instagram and Facebook on Wednesday, and it quickly caught media attention.

Abukaram shared on Facebook Friday morning that she’s so thankful for everyone’s support. “I knew I had to do something so that no other student athlete competing in a hijab would ever endure the humiliation and anguish that I went through last weekend. I am so thankful to each and every person who has shown me love and support. You guys don’t realize what that did for me, so thank you!”

(10/26/2019) ⚡AMP
by Madeleine Kelly
Share
Share

Olympic marathon could start at 3 or 5 a.m. to keep it in Tokyo

Tokyo, host of the 2020 Olympic Games, is considering proposing to start the marathon and race walking events as early as 3:00 a.m. to counter an IOC decision to move the races to Sapporo due to worries about heat, Kyodo news agency said on Thursday.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) this month announced a plan to move the marathon and race walking to Sapporo, on Japan’s northern island of Hokkaido, from originally planned courses in the capital.

Kyodo, citing unnamed sources, said Tokyo is looking into an alternative plan to have the races start at 3 a.m. or 5 a.m. to keep them in the city.

An official at the Tokyo metropolitan government’s Olympic preparation bureau told Reuters he was not aware of such a plan.

Yoshiro Mori, the president of Tokyo 2020 Olympics, said the city had little choice but to accept the IOC plan, but Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike believes the races should be held in Tokyo.

“We have made many preparations and there’s no change in my thinking that it should be held in Tokyo,” she told reporters last week.

(10/26/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organized the Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, originally scheduled from July 24 to August 9, 2020, the games were postponed due to coronavirus outbreak, the postponed Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 23 to August 8 in 2021, according to the International Olympic Committee decision....

more...
Share

Are treadmill workouts really as effective as running outside?

Regardless of your cardio credentials—beginner, intermediate, or Mo Farah himself—heading outdoors for a run isn’t always a realistic option. That’s especially true come wintertime, when guzzling mugfuls of hot chocolate sounds significantly more appealing than trudging through whipping winds and mountains of snow. But your New Year's resolution to exercise regularly doesn’t allow for breaks in the action. This is also true, by the way, in the summer, when Mother Nature double-dog dares you to step outside without instantaneously turning into a melted popsicle.

When bad weather arrives—in whatever form it takes—the treadmill is your climate-controlled friend. To properly assess how the treadmill actually stacks up against leaving the house for a run, we consulted a panel of experts who are well-acquainted with this predicament. The verdict: A treadmill doesn’t offer quite as strenuous a workout as does running in the Great Outdoors, but with a few tweaks, your body won’t know the difference.

Remember: It could be way, way worse

One of the first treadmill-like contraptions was the brainchild of a 19th-century engineer named Sir William Cubitt, and whatever your disdain for the modern version, it probably can’t match that of the earliest adopters of Cubitt's "treadwheel": British prisoners. Guards would make them run on the newfangled devices all day, an exercise so cruel and torturous that Britain literally banned them at the turn of the 20th century. (And you thought your gym’s TV perma-tuned to Fox News was bad.)

Nowadays, with a bevy of technological improvements, the experience of running on a treadmill is roughly equivalent to running outside, says RunDoyen running coach Mark Hadley. In fact, the winner of this years men’s U.S. Marathon Championship, Brogan Austin, is reported to have done many of his key training runs on the ‘mill.

Even if you live somewhere where weather isn’t an issue—good for you, I’m definitely not jealous—there are other reasons that the treadmill might be a smart option. For example, it’s worth keeping in mind how safe an outdoor run would be, particularly at night, when it’s harder to avoid dicey areas, dodge potholes, or make your presence clear to motorists. “Sure, you might not have the workout you would outdoors,” says running coach Laura Norris. “But a treadmill run is far more beneficial than no run at all.”

What you lose (and how to get it back)

There’s a reason that running outdoors can feel harder than running on a treadmill: It is. “When you run on hills or against the wind, you have to expend more energy to maintain the same pace,” says former NCAA distance coach and New York City-based running coach Sean Fortune. “As a result, the treadmill burns less calories, because the energy demand is lower.”

The boredom associated with the “dreadmill” matters physically as well as mentally: Fortune explains that you’ll have to spend additional time on the treadmill to match the benefits of going outside. “You don’t build the same strength in the musculoskeletal system, since the treadmill platform is relatively soft,” he says. Steep hills and varied outdoor surfaces are helpful for developing your legs and ankles in a way that the hamster wheel is not.

The most important thing you can do while running on a treadmill is to actually use all those fancy tools that appear on its control panel. Try simulating a few small hills at different intervals, Hadley suggests, to get more of your legs involved. Running coach Bobby McGee recommends a slight incline of 0.5 to 1.5 percent to help achieve that goal.

Those adjustments are contingent on finding a treadmill that doesn’t suck, which is its own battle, especially if you’re running on a budget. If you’re using equipment at your gym, steer clear of models that feel overly “bouncy,” says Hadley. As a general rule, McGee advises runners to be wary of older, worn-out machines, which may be in desperate need of calibration. “I have seen elite runners struggle to reproduce real-world performances predicted off of treadmill workouts,” he says. “The treadmill doesn’t require the same level of focus.”

If you elect to soldier on in the cold, great, but that won’t necessarily save you a ton money. “You don't want any excuses to miss a chance to run and ruin your continuity of training,” Fortune says. Thus, it’s a must to invest in the proper gear before committing to a winter-weather regimen, which means means a good pair of dependable shoes, and clothing that will prevent the development of frostbite without slowing you down in the process.

Whichever side of this debate you come down on, remember that as long as you’re exercising, indoors or not, you can’t really lose. And don’t forget everyone’s favorite holiday melody: When the weather outside is frightful, the treadmill can be sufficient.

(10/26/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Healdsburg Wine Country Half Marathon Cancelled due to Fire

We are sad to announce that we must cancel the Hallowine Run on October 26th due to the Kincaid fire which has burned over 10,000 acres in Northeast Sonoma County and forced evacuations in Geyserville, near our race start venue at Coppola Winery. Local law enforcement and other vital resources are needed to help with evacuations, road closures, fire fighting and other support duties over the next few days.

We would like to support the fire victims and responders who work so tirelessly to save lives, homes, businesses and natural habitat in the area. One way to show our appreciation - and YOURS - is come to our Race Expo in Santa Rosa’s Historic Railroad Square from noon to 6:00pm tomorrow. We are asking all our exhibitors and other vendors to also show their support by coming to the expo tomorrow as planned. There will be wine and beer tasting, product sampling and demonstrations, food truck, music, a raffle, fun runs, games and more! Registered runners will be able to pick up their race shirt, wine glass, medal and even race bib if desired. We have plenty of product from our sponsors and exhibitors that will be offered to the race participants and also donated to those evacuated by the fire, and firefighters. Wine and beer tasting is complimentary for all registered runners and $15 for others (includes wine glass). The event is open to the public. Our staff and many of our volunteers will be there to manage the event.

While most of wine country in Northern California remains open and most wineries are not directly affected, those wineries in the Alexander Valley, including Coppola, are currently closed. Dry Creek Valley wineries and downtown Healdsburg tasting rooms are open today and not directly impacted. This weekend some of our participating wineries will be offering wine club member for a day benefits such as a complimentary wine tasting and a discount on wine purchases to registered runners. We will post those wineries on social and our website as soon as we learn which ones are open and making that offer. We hope this information is helpful for those of you traveling from out of town.

Once we’ve had a chance to confer with our charity partners, vendors, Active Network and suppliers, we’ll be sending another email next week explaining your options regarding your entry. Right now we are focused on dealing with logistics and communication to all our suppliers, wineries, hotels, etc. In times of crisis we have seen the local community, and the running community, come together to support those affected by this natural disaster that has become all too commonplace in recent years. Thanks again for your understanding, patience and support.

(10/26/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
The Hallowine Run

The Hallowine Run

The Hallowine Run (formerly Healdsburg Wine Country Half Marathon) originated in October of 2008 after Destination Races founder Matt Dockstader attended the popular Marathon du Medoc in France. His vision was to create a wine harvest themed race in one of America's most iconic wine regions , along with the flair and colorful themed costumeshe witnessed at the Medoc event....

more...
Share

Gerry Fay will be taking on his 522nd Marathon at Dublin Marathon

Gerard Fay hopes to complete his 522nd marathon this Bank Holiday weekend to complete an astonishing 109 marathons in 365 days. 

Gerard is an accomplished marathoner. To date in this calendar year, the 48-year-old has done 86 Marathons. All these marathons were done in Ireland and all will be a minimum of 26.2 Miles each.

Aside from the marathons he also does numerous shorter distance races from 800m to half marathons as his training  during the week and on weekends when there are no marathons on.

Dublin City Marathon was Gerard's first Marathon back in 1998. This weekend will be his 22nd Dublin event. 

"A lot of miles have been done in the past 21 years and each an everyone has been done with thousands of people in my head pushing me along. 

"These people are of course those with Cystic Fibrosis both living and deceased. People constantly ask where do I get my motivation and it is simple Just look at a person with CF. 

"Learn what they have to go through day in day out with physic, medication and just basic breathing. Things we as healthy people take for granted. I have know some of these CF's over 30 years now and to see their achievements in their lives pushes me on to do what I do. 

"There are plenty others out there doing what I do and more but we all have the one goal to try and help the real warriors the Persons with CF. They are the ones who push me to achieve my dreams and if by doing so I can help them achieve their then I am happy. 

"The running is my pastime but this is their lives and with the support of their families they are doing their very best to achieve their potential. Please support those with CF if you can. Donation page is always open."

Gerard's chosen charity is Cystic Fibrosis Ireland who provide excellent and much needed support services to people with Cystic Fibrosis. The funds raised will be used for the purchase of vital equipment in the CF units around the country but also to assist Cystic Fibrosis Ireland with their Exercise Grant Scheme whereby they give a grant to persons with CF for part funding gym memberships or the purchase of home exercise equipment. The target for the fundraising is to raise a minimum of €50,000.

"I have been fundraising for Cystic Fibrosis over the past 30 years and in that time have raised in excess of €150,000 of which €100,000 was used for the purchase and refurbishment of the dedicated CF Outpatients unit in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Drogheda. All funds will go to Cystic Fibrosis Ireland and all expenses are borne by myself."

Cystic Fibrosis is a Genetic Disease which effects over 1,250 people in the Republic of Ireland which is the highest per head of population in the World. The Association is over 50 years in existence and over those years has contributed nearly 20 million to research and over 15 Million for the building of the dedicated centers around the country. These centers are invaluable to those with CF.

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gavan Becton
Share
KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

more...
Share

Super grandma, 70, Collette O’Hagan is gearing up for her 695th marathon in dublin this weekend

The 70-year-old has no plans to stop there, as she’s aiming to bring her grand total to a cool 700 before the end of the year.

Colette has ran marathons all over the world including places such as Boston and New York.

Collette has run marathons all over the world, but Dublin holds a special place in her heart as it’s where she ran her first marathon 30 years ago.

She explained: “My running journey started in Dublin. I never looked back. I do love Dublin.”

While most runners spend months preparing for a big race, superfit Collette can easily clock up two or three marathons every weekend.

She has also completed all of the major marathons around the world including Boston 11 times and New York six times.

Her impressive list also includes Berlin, London, Chicago and Tokyo, making up the Big Six in marathon circles.

The Dundalk woman recalled how a small crowd joined her on her first Dublin marathon, but over the years the event has grown dramatically, “and now I am doing it with 22,500.”

She said: “I owe a lot to Dublin for getting me going and for my running journey.”

Collette began running with her husband Larry and as time passed her interest in it, and in running longer distances, outgrew his.

She gets a lot out of running and her advice is to “stay focused, keep yourself motivated and enjoy it.”

She said: “I particularly look forward to Dublin; the spectators are amazing, they bring you through it, they are just fantastic.

“Some of the women are out and ask do you want a cup of tea, they are so friendly, it is like a day out nearly going around Dublin, it is just fabulous, I’d say it will be a massive big party day on Sunday.

“It has special meaning and definitely is one of my favorites.”

While she doesn’t keep a close eye on the clock, Collette is happy now to complete a marathon within approximately five hours.

She explained: “I don’t push myself that I’m stressed, if you are stressing your body all the time, stress will bring on an injury.”

2019 is also a special year because it marked her golden wedding anniversary and she celebrated her 70th birthday.

She and Larry have five children and 10 grandchildren and that does not include over 80 children they have fostered over the years.

She said: “This is a special year, a lot of milestones this year and my ambition is to continue running and see how far the journey takes me.”

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by Elaine Keogh
Share
KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

more...
Share

Olika Adugna of Ethiopia will be aiming to defend his title at the 41st edition of Marseille Cassis 20km

It’s been 12 years since Wilson Chebet retained his title in the race, the last runner to do so. Last year the 20-year-old Adugna defeated Amera Kuma following a fierce sprint. But Adugna, who clocked a half marathon PB of 1:01:43 one year ago, has a season’s best of just 1:04:23 from August, so doesn’t seem to his in his best shape.

One of Adugna’s rivals will be Vincent Gerald of Kenya, who also knows the challenging course along the French Mediterranean coastline. He rounded out the podium last year in 1:00:33, just four seconds behind Adugna.

Yasin Haji, who’ll be making his debut in this event, will be another strong contender. The Ethiopian, 23, is the fastest man on the field courtesy of a 1:01:19 half marathon career best, a time he ran just two weeks ago.

Josphat Kiproo Menjo should also be a threat, on paper, as he is the fastest man in the field over 10km, although his 27:04 came nine years ago.

The Kenyan, who turned 40 in August, set his half marathon best in March 2018 when running 1:01:36. In 2019 he clocked season’s best of 28:37 and 1:06:23.

Dennis Rutoh will have a role to play following his victory at the Montbéliard half marathon last September in a new lifetime best of 1:01:44. He also set his 10 km best in July with 28:21. 

French hopes will rest on Mohammed Serghini and Julien Devanne. The latter won within a month both half marathon and marathon national titles.

On the women’s side, Brillian Jepkorir Kipkoech looks to be the favourite to succeed to Gete Alemayehu. 

The Kenyan, 24, improved her half marathon best one month ago with a 1:07:12 run. She also bettered her 10km best to 31:04 in July. She seems to have a big margin over the rest of the field.

Compatriots Susan Kipsang Jeptoo and Lucy Macharia should be her main rivals. The former improved her 10km, half marathon and marathon bests in 2019 while the latter finished fourth at last year’s event.

French hopes will rest on the shoulders of Elodie Normand and Leonie Periault.

The start takes place near Marseille’s well-known Velodrome Stadium and then follows the Mediterranean coast before a tough 327-metre climb up to the Col de la Gineste halfway through the race. Runners then wind down a long descent towards the finish line in the port town of Cassis.

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
Marseille Cassis

Marseille Cassis

Once upon a time…How could we imagine one day of March 1979, the idea of organizing a race opened to everyone between Marseilles and Cassis could take such an International dimension? A very young athletic section, a group of close friends and the unfailing support of every sections of an “omnisport” club, the SCO Ste Marguerite, gave birth...

more...
Share

Nairobi Standard Chartered Marathon´s race organizers have increased the prize money for this year

In a bid to have it promoted to the world's elite marathons, this year's Nairobi Standard Chartered Marathon will see over 200 technical officials deployed by Athletics Kenya (AK) to monitor the annual race that will run this weekend in the capital city.

Athletics Kenya Nairobi boss, Barnabas Korir said the event organizers are paying extra attention to the technical aspects of the city road race as they aspire to get the road race in the IAAF permit.

Over 20,000 participants have registered for the run that returns to its traditional venue, the Nyayo National Stadium.

For the first time in a long period, race organisers have increased the prize money from Sh1.5 million ($14,500) to Sh2 million ($19,400US). 

And in line with the international safety provisions, the Nairobi Traffic department on Tuesday released an elaborate road closure diversions schedule that will see traffic to and out of the city diverted to alternative roads between 4am and 2pm.

The affected roads include sections of Mombasa Road, Uhuru Highway, Upper Hill and Forest road while within the CBD, Kenyatta Avenue, Muindi Mbingu and sections of Haile Selasie and University Way will also be closed.

"We do not expect a major disruption in the flow of traffic. We have carefully organized traffic diversions to ensure that Nairobi County residents have alternative routes to critical locations in the city including hospitals, churches and airports," Traffic Commandant, Nairobi County, Joshua Omukata announced.

The event organizers have announced a few changes to the route for the six race categories largely due to relocation of the start and finish points back to in and around Nyayo Stadium.

Speaking during a press briefing, Peter Gitau, the Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee expressed optimism that the goal of raising Sh60 million this year for the FutureMakers initiative will be attained.

"We have increased the prize money from Sh1.5 to Sh2m for 42km, and from Sh150,000 to S 300,000 for 21km and we have noticed heightened interest from the elite and fun runners," Gitau underscored.

"So far, we have registered close to 20,000 participants and we are optimistic of reaching our target. There is a big uptake from both individuals and corporates entries. We expect this trend to boost the numbers towards achieving our target of 25 000 runners," Gitau added.

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank. The other three legs of this four-marathon race...

more...
Share

German Katharina Steinruck and Kenyan Mark Kiptoo will headline the elite field at Mainova Frankfurt Marathon On Sunday

Mark Kiptoo goes hunting for Masters World Record and Katharina Steinruck chases Olympic qualifying time. Mark Kiptoo and Katharina Steinruck know that the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon on Sunday is the most important race of the year in pursuit of their respective goals. The Kenyan Masters world record holder and the leading woman runner among the home contingent aim to exploit the Frankfurt course, renowned for its fast times.

Last year Kiptoo, now 43, ran 2:07:50 for a M40 world record and he says he feels capable of improving on that time. Katharina Steinruck has shown excellent form this year after heel surgery and her eyes are on the qualifying time of 2:29:30. Her personal best is currently 2:28:34, set three years ago.

Around 14,000 runners are expected on the startline for the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon which is an IAAF Gold Label race, the highest category of road race. It is still possible to enter during the Marathon Expo on Friday and Saturday. Further details can be found at: www.frankfurt-marathon.com

Mark Kiptoo credits his longevity with a disciplined attitude not only to training but also his life in general:"What we put into our body, is what will come out. So the training we have been doing means I have confidence the body is capable of going through halfway in 62:30." That level of performance would put the 43-year-old on course for a major improvement on his age group world best.

Kiptoo’s story may well give other late developers hope, though not everyone perhaps has the ability at his level:"I am sure that the reason why I can run so fast these days is because I began late as a runner. It wasn’t until I was 28 that I realised I had talent." He made his marathon debut at 37 after a solid career on the track and cross-country." His preparation has gone flawlessly:"The key is that I don’t have any physical problems and have also been able to do good speedwork sessions. Age is only a number." His personal best of 2:06:00 goes back to his pre-Masters days.

Frankfurt has been a happy hunting ground for the runner from Eldoret. He made his marathon debut here in 2013 with second place in 2:06:16, just one second behind the winner. A year later he won, aged 38, in 2:06:49, then came last year’s age group world best.

Everything points to Katharina Steinruck being in excellent form before she attempts to run the Olympic qualifying time of 2:29:30. After heel surgery in November 2018 she has set a clutch of personal bests recently which have put her on the right course:"I wouldn’t say I am in the form of my life but there has been a clear step forward." In preparation for the marathon Steinruck has run personal bests of 32:39 for 10km and 1:12:23 for the half marathon. „The Olympic qualifying time is of course my number one goal. However I am also looking for a personal best. To run sub 2:28 would be a dream come true.“

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

more...
Share

Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso EDP announces that Sifan Hassan, Fancy Chemutai and Gudeta Kebede are focused to set a new women’s world record

The Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso EDP announces that two international athletes are joining those already on the quest to set a new women’s world record on the 27th of October in Valencia Ciudad del Running. The city has had this lofty goal since 2017.

This injection of new blood comes from one outstanding athlete: Sifan Hassan, joining others who have already confirmed their participation in the trial — Fancy Chemutai and Sembere Teferi. 

Their quest is none other than to break the world record set by Joyciline Jepkosgei (1:04:51).

The Dutch athlete of Ethiopian origin, Sifan Hassan, comes to Valencia with a best time of 1 hour 05:15 (Copenhagen 2018) and is one of the favorites to win a place on the podium. She holds various European records, including those for the Half-Marathon, and for the mile world record (the latter won this year). Sifa is undoubtedly one of the star attractions in the Valencia race.

Gudeta Kebede, who won the gold in the past IAAF / Valencia World Marathon Media Championship held in 2018 (1h06: 11), with world registration for races of only women included, will also fight for the victory next 27th October Kebede has a better personal mark of 1h05:45, held in Ras Al-Khaimah in 2019. 

Another athlete competing with them will be the Ethiopian runner Sembere Teferi (1 hour 05:45, who will also run in Doha four weeks before the trial in Valencia), as will her fellow-countrywoman and last year’s winner Gelete Burka (1 hour 06:11), and the Kenyan athletes Fancy Chemutai (1 hour 04:52) and Joan Chelimo (1 hour 05:04). This bevy of elite athletes make up a women’s ‘Dream Team’.

The Organizers will offer a special €70,000 prize (which is in addition to the rewards set out in the Regulations) for those athletes who set a new men’s or women’s world record, and award a bonus of €30,000 if the winner sets a time of under 58:00 for men or of under 1 hour 04:30 for women.

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Valencia Half Marathon

Valencia Half Marathon

The Trinidad Alfonso Valencia Half Marathon has become one of the top running events in the world in its 25th year. For the second year running, Valencia is the fastest half marathon in the world. The race, organized by SD Correcaminos Athletics Club, celebrated its silver anniversary in style with record participation, record crowd numbers, Silver label IAAF accreditation and...

more...
Share

BLOM BANK Beirut Marathon has been postponed

The BLOM BANK Beirut Marathon (LIB) has been postponed due to ongoing civil unrest in Lebanon.

After extensive discussions the organizers decided to cancel the race which had been planned to take place on November 10.

“The Beirut Marathon remains committed to its mission of moving and uniting Lebanon through running by placing our beloved country on the international map of sports and showing the true colors of Lebanon,” the organizers said in a statement.

“Keeping true to our mission, values and relations with our partners, runners, stakeholders, volunteers, international participants and friends, we have hereby decided to postpone the 17th edition of BLOM BANK Beirut Marathon to a later, more appropriate date.”

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Blom Bank Beirut Marathon

Blom Bank Beirut Marathon

On the morning of October 19th 2003, Lebanon witnessed a unique event in its history and hosted its first international Marathon. It all began with a dream that May El Khalil had of bringing the running culture to Lebanon. After surviving a near fatal accident while running, May El Khalil began to actualize her dream: from her hospital bed...

more...
Share

New partnership for London Marathon in 2022

London Marathon Events Ltd announced on Tuesday that 2021 will be the last year of Virgin Money’s long-standing sponsorship of the London Marathon.

After a hugely successful partnership which dates back to 2010, first with Virgin and then with Virgin Money from 2014, Virgin Money has decided not to renew the current contract which comes to an end after the 2021 event.

Hugh Brasher, Event Director for London Marathon Events, said: “Our partnership with Virgin Money has been fantastic and together we have established London as the greatest marathon in the world. This year we celebrated a landmark in our history as we passed £1 billion raised for charity since our first race in 1981 and more than £560 million of that was raised since the first year of this partnership.

"We are very proud that this partnership led to the creation of Virgin Money Giving, the not-for-profit fundraising platform which has meant that so much more of the money raised by our runners goes to their chosen charity.

“Twelve years is a very long time in sports sponsorship and further illustration of the mutual success of this partnership. We would like to thank everyone at Virgin Money for their wonderful support of the London Marathon.”

Helen Page, Group Brand and Marketing Director at Virgin Money, said: “We are proud to have partnered with the London Marathon. Together we have raised more than £560 million for charities and built an enduring legacy that will benefit society and causes for decades to come – with £200 million of that raised on Virgin Money Giving, our not-for-profit fundraising platform.

"As a new organization with a new purpose we need to realign our future sponsorship and take a different direction. We remain committed to sponsoring the London Marathon until 2021 and look forward to playing a huge part in the London Marathon's 40th race celebrations in 2020."

The 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon, the 40th race, takes place on Sunday 26 April. It is the most popular marathon on the planet with a world record of more than 450,000 people applying for a place through the ballot.

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

more...
Share

KBC Dublin Marathon is offering runners the chance to personalise their commemorative 40th anniversary medal with an iTAB medal insert

KBC Dublin Marathon Can Personalize Their 40th Anniversary Medal with iTAB. The small plate is laser-engraved with the runner’s name and unique finish time and is the perfect way to celebrate this memorable marathon or a hard-earned PB.

Taking place on Sunday 27th October, the iconic event is the fifth largest city marathon in Europe and has seen the number of participants grow from 2,100 in 1980 to 22,500 for their 40th event.

Race Director, Jim Aughney comments: “KBC Dublin Marathon has partnered with iTAB for the past 5 years and we are delighted with the runner's feedback.

The facility for runners to book an iTAB for their well-deserved medal adds greatly to the runner's experience in Dublin, which is celebrating its 40th year in 2019.”

iTAB Senior Account Manager, Kirsty Moulsley, will be flying to Dublin for the big day to run the marathon and says: “I’m excited to have been given the opportunity to run this great race in its 40th year! I’ve been told that the support and the Irish hospitality is second to none and I can’t wait to experience it for myself!”

(10/23/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

more...
4,945 Stories, Page: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20 · 21 · 22 · 23 · 24 · 25 · 26 · 27 · 28 · 29 · 30 · 31 · 32 · 33 · 34 · 35 · 36 · 37 · 38 · 39 · 40 · 41 · 42 · 43 · 44 · 45 · 46 · 47 · 48 · 49 · 50 · 51 · 52 · 53 · 54 · 55 · 56 · 57 · 58 · 59 · 60 · 61 · 62 · 63 · 64 · 65 · 66 · 67 · 68 · 69 · 70 · 71 · 72 · 73 · 74 · 75 · 76 · 77 · 78 · 79 · 80 · 81 · 82 · 83 · 84 · 85 · 86 · 87 · 88 · 89 · 90 · 91 · 92 · 93 · 94 · 95 · 96 · 97 · 98 · 99


Running News Headlines


Copyright 2020 MyBestRuns.com 149