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Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson in Mountain View, California USA and team in Thika Kenya, La Piedad Mexico, Bend Oregon, Chandler Arizona and Monforte da Beira Portugal.  Send your news items to bob@mybestruns.com Advertising opportunities available.   Over one million readers and growing.  Train the Kenyan Way at KATA Running Retreat Kenya.  (Kenyan Athletics Training Academy) in Thika Kenya.  Opening in june 2024 KATA Running retreat Portugal.  Learn more about Bob Anderson, MBR publisher and KATA director/owner, take a look at A Long Run the movie covering Bob's 50 race challenge.  

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Eritrean duo might eye two records at once in Vienna

Eritrean duo Nazret Weldu and Dolshi Tesfu head the current women’s start list of the Vienna City Marathon on 21st April, race organizers have announced.

Weldu and Tesfu, who are by some distance the fastest Eritrean women marathon runners in history, may be challenged by Kenyans Shyline Toroitich and Rebecca Tanui. There are hopes that the 41st edition of Austria’s major road race will see an attempt to break the course record, which currently stands at 2:20:59.

Including races at shorter distances, the organizers of the Vienna City Marathon expect to register over 40,000 entries for the 41st edition. Around 10,000 of them will be marathon runners. The Vienna City Marathon is a World Athletics Elite Label Road Race.

It took 19 years until the women’s course record of Italy’s late Maura Viceconte was finally broken in the Austrian capital in 2019. Kenya’s Nancy Kiprop improved the mark to 2:22:12. However Kiprop’s time lasted much shorter than Viceconte’s. In 2022 fellow-Kenyan Vibian Chepkirui clocked 2:20:59.

Nazret Weldu and Dolshi Tesfu have both already run faster than Vienna’s course record: 34 year-old Weldu clocked a national record of 2:20:29 when she took a very strong fourth place in the World Championships’ Marathon in Eugene in 2022. She won the Daegu Marathon in South Korea with 2:21:56 in the same year and then placed sixth in Boston in 2023 with 2:23:25. Competing in a hot World Championships’ race in Budapest last summer Weldu finished eighth with 2:27:23. Despite this series of strong performances Nazret Weldu still has not achieved the Olympic qualifying standard for Paris. She will want to make sure in Vienna that she runs fast enough to get into the Olympic race.

Dolshi Tesfu features a personal best of 2:20:40. The 24 year-old, who is just 1.56 m tall and weighs just 42 kg, ran this time in her debut marathon when she finished ninth in Valencia in 2022. During the race Dolshi Tesfu ran the first half in 68:53, which is by far the fastest half marathon time ever run by an Eritrean woman. Dolshi Tesfu then showed fine performances in her two marathons in 2023 as well: First she was runner-up in Rotterdam with 2:21:35 and then she finished 10th in a hot World Championships’ marathon in Budapest in August. She is already qualified for the Olympic marathon.

When Weldu and Tesfu will come to Vienna for the first time they could attack two records in one go: While the course record stands at 2:20:59 for the two athletes the national record of 2:20:29 would probably be even more significant.

There is an athlete on the start list with a sub 2:20 PB, but at the age of 43 Helalia Johannes is not expected to challenge for victory. The Namibian ran 2:19:52 in 2020 and holds the masters world record since then.

Two Kenyan women could be the main challengers for Weldu and Tesfu: Shyline Toroitich and Rebecca Tanui both know how to win a city marathon. Toroitich took the Enschde Marathon last year with a personal best of 2:22:45 while Tanui was the winner of the San Sebastian Marathon in 2022 with a PB of 2:23:09 and then also won in Venice last autumn. Tanui will have the advantage of knowing the course of the Vienna City Marathon since she was fourth here last year with 2:26:34 in warm weather conditions.

For Andrea Ramirez Limon the Vienna City Marathon presents the last chance to achieve qualification for the Olympic Games’ marathon this summer. The Mexican has a personal best of 2:26:34. However she ran this back in 2020, so it does not count as an Olympic qualifier for Paris. While the qualifying time is 2:26:50, Andrea Ramirez Limon would need a faster time to succeed since the Olympic race will have a limit of 80 starters.

Austria’s record holder Julia Mayer has achieved qualification since she was among the 64 pre-qualified athletes at the end of January with her PB of 2:26:43. She will be among a group of runners who target the Olympic qualifying standard.

(03/13/2024) ⚡AMP
by AIMS
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Vienna City Marathon

Vienna City Marathon

More than 41,000 runners from over 110 nations take part in the Vienna City Marathon, cheered on by hundreds of thousands of spectators. From the start at UN City to the magnificent finish on the Heldenplatz, the excitement will never miss a beat. In recent years the Vienna City Marathon has succeeded in creating a unique position as a marathon...

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Brigid Kosgei fine tuning for London Marathon at Lisbon Half Marathon

Former world marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei will be keen to gauge her form at the Lisbon Half Marathon ahead of her return to the London Marathon.

Former world marathon record holder Brigid Kosgei is the star attraction for the Lisbon Half Marathon, where she intends to have a great build-up for the London Marathon.

The 30-year-old will use the 21km race scheduled for Sunday, March 17 to gauge form and pace for the marathon that takes place in the capital city of England.

In addition to Kosgei, there will be other big names in the ladies' elite in Lisbon, with six more women with personal bests under 68 minutes.

Bosena Mulatie (65.46), Tigist Menigstu (66.20), and Betty Chepkemoi Kibet (66.37) will be hoping to stop Kosgei who suffered an injury last season and was forced to withdraw from the London Marathon.

Pauline Esikon (67.15), Vivian Melly (67.35) and Zewditu Aderaw Gelaw (67.25) are the other highlights beyond Kosgei.

The men’s field has attracted 10 athletes with the best marks under the hour. Abraham Kiptum will be returning and he is the biggest highlight, with a personal best of 59.09.

He will face a stern test from Ethiopians Solomon Berihu (59.17) and Dinkalem Ayele (59.30), but also compatriots Brian Kwemoi and Bravin Kipkogei Kiptoo (both with 59.37).

Meanwhile, several European athletes like the Norwegian Sondre Nordstad Moen (59.48), the Germans Amanal Petros (60.09) and Hendrik Pfeiffer (62.05), the Irish Stephen Scullion (61.08), Hélio Gomes and Rui Pinto have also confirmed participation. Brazilian Daniel do Nascimento, with a personal record of 61.03, will also be present, in what is his first race with Nike.

(03/13/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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EDP HALF MARATHON OF LISBON

EDP HALF MARATHON OF LISBON

EDP Lisbon Half Marathonis an annual internationalhalf marathoncompetition which is contested every March inLisbon,Portugal. It carries World Athletics Gold Label Road Racestatus. The men's course record of 57:31 was set byJacob Kiplimoin 2021, which was the world record at the time. Kenyanrunners have been very successful in the competition, accounting for over half of the total winners, withTegla Loroupetaking the...

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Confirmed! When serial track rivals Josh Kerr and Jakob Ingebrigtsen will face off

The date when a showdown between 1500m Olympic champion Jakob Ingebrigtsen and 2023 1500m world champion Josh Kerr has been confirmed.

Serial track rivals Josh Kerr and Jakob Ingebrigtsen have both been confirmed as headliners for the Bowerman Mile at the Prefontaine Classic, the fourth leg of the Diamond League Meeting series happening in Eugene, USA on May 25.

The duo has been known to attack each other with the two-time World 5000m champion from Norway also attacking the Scot most of the time.

The Norwegian, from time to time has been on record, trash-talking his rivals including Kerr and he once referred to him as the guy next door.

In his recent interview Speaking to the UK Times, Ingebrigtsen noted that he believes his competitors are irrelevant and very inconsistent when it comes to the sport.

“I’m going to say my competitors are irrelevant in the way I see them all the same. One of the main issues is they are very inconsistent and that means my rivals are always changing.

“From 2017 I have had ten to 12 different rivals. It’s easier for them to have a rival in me but not as easy for me to have a rival in them,” Ingebrigtsen said.

After the Scot broke the two-mile indoor world record, the World 1500m silver medallist also made fun of him and noted that he would have beaten him blindfolded.

“I would have beaten him in that race, blindfolded… But it’s good that people run better than they have done before,” Ingebrigtsen said.

The duo now clashes at the Prefontaine Classic and Kerr will be debuting at the event. U.S. indoor and outdoor mile record holder Yared Nuguse will also be in the mix.

In last year’s race, Ingebrigtsen battled to the finish line with Nuguse with the Norwegian star winning in 3:43.73. Nuguse took nearly three full seconds off Alan Webb’s American record with a 3:43.97.

(03/12/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Rob Gronkowski named grand marshal for 2024 Boston Marathon

New England Patriots great Rob Gronkowski has been named grand marshal for the 2024 Boston Marathon, the Boston Athletic Association announced Tuesday.

Gronkowski will also receive the 2024 Patriots' Award, presented to a person or organization who is "patriotic, philanthropic, and inspirational, and fosters goodwill and sponsorship." In addition to his athletic achievements, Gronkowski founded the Gronk Nation Youth Foundation, which donated the funds to build Gronk Playground on the Charles River Esplanade.

"Giving back has always been a priority in my life," Gronkowski said in a statement. "When I first got to New England, Mr. Kraft and the Patriots Foundation ingrained in the team the importance of giving back to the community that gives back to us. And this community has supported me throughout my entire career. Now it's time for me to give back to help set others up for their own journey, especially the youth. This is why the Gronk Playground project is close to my heart. My family and I are honored to be able to give kids an awesome new space to play in the city.”

“We are honored to have Rob Gronkowski as part of our Boston Athletic Association's long-standing traditions and celebrations this year. The work that he has done and continues to do for the Boston Community exemplifies what we look to recognize with our Patriots’ Award," B.A.A. Director of Development Nicole Juri said in a statement. “Having him also serve as Grand Marshal on race day will bring a lot of added joy and excitement for the thousands of spectators who will be lining the streets from Hopkinton to Boston.”

Gronkowski will be honored at the B.A.A. Gives Back Celebration on April 13. In his role as grand marshal, he will be driven along the marathon course from Hopkinton to Boston, delivering the tropy to the finish line ahead of the athletes on race day on April 15.

Past recipients of the Patriots' Award include Robert and Myra Kraft and the New England Patriots, Red Auerbach and hte Red Auerbach Youth Foundation, the Boston Red Sox Foundation, Rick and Dick Hoyt, Joan Benoit Samuelson, David Ortiz, Tim Wakefield, Tedi Bruschi, Adrianne Haslet, Marty Walsh.

(03/12/2024) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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I want a medal in Paris, warning shots fired at Sha'Carri Richardson ahead of Olympics

Another sprinter has expressed her desire to bag a medal in the 100m and 200m at the Olympic Games, firing warning shots at Sha'Carri Richardson and her track rivals.

Julien Alfred has joined the cable of female sprinters who also want a share of the Paris 2024 Olympic cake.

Alfred, a young athlete from St Lucia, wants to make a name for herself and she also wants the world to know that her nation can produce great sprinters.

The 22-year-old has expressed her desire to win a medal at the Olympic Games, something she believes would make a great difference in her career and life.

Speaking to World Athletics, Alfred said: “I don’t really pay attention to the media but I do have a lot of supporters back home who give messages to my family and they transfer to me. I definitely want a medal in Paris – a gold, silver or bronze in the 100m and 200m.”

The path to an achievement like that is, however, filled with hard work and tedious, painstaking repetition. In addition to her start, Alfred has been focusing on improving her strength and technique.

Last year, Alfred set collegiate records to win the NCAA indoor 60m title in 6.94 and the 200m in 22.01, both times putting her second on the world all-time lists.

With another dominant sprint double at the outdoor NCAA Championships last June, she won the 100m in 10.72 and 200m in 21.73, closing out a magnificent collegiate career, then signed a professional deal with Puma.

Her goal at last year’s World Championships in Budapest, Hungary was to win a medal, but she did not achieve her targets, finishing fifth in the 100m and fourth in the 200m.

She started training alongside Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith late last year and also admitted that it has been a great step for her. “It’s competitive, which makes it fun. Iron sharpens iron,” she said.

(03/12/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Paris 2024 Olympic Games

For this historic event, the City of Light is thinking big! Visitors will be able to watch events at top sporting venues in Paris and the Paris region, as well as at emblematic monuments in the capital visited by several millions of tourists each year. The promise of exceptional moments to experience in an exceptional setting! A great way to...

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Kenya's Winnie Jemutai issued with three-year ban for doping offence

Winnie Jemutai is the latest Kenyan athlete to join the list of shame after being provisionally suspended by the AIU for the Presence/Use of Prohibited Substance (Testosterone).

The Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) has banned Kenyan middle-distance runner Winnie Jemutai Boinett for three years due to the presence and use of a prohibited substance, testosterone.

This decision follows the disqualification of Boinett's results since November 12, 2023 when she was provisionally suspended.

Boinett's suspension comes after a urine sample she provided in-competition at the XLI Cross Internacional de Italica in Seville, Spain, on November 12, 2023, tested positive for testosterone, a substance banned under the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) prohibited list.

Following the initial findings, Boinett admitted to the anti-doping rule violations and accepted the consequences, including the forfeiture of any medals, titles, points, prize money, and other prizes won since the date of the provisional suspension.

In a letter to the AIU dated March 5, 2024, Boinett stated, "I had injury. I went to different hospitals for treatment, I don't have exact documents showing exact medications that I went through I honestly accept that I break the anti-doping rules and am ready to face the consequences thank you."

This early admission and acceptance of sanction led to a one-year reduction in the originally asserted period of ineligibility, pursuant to Rule 10.8.1, based on Boinett's cooperation and acknowledgment of the violations.

Furthermore, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) have been granted the right to appeal against this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland, should they find grounds to do so.

This provision ensures that all parties involved have a fair opportunity to present their case and seek justice through the appropriate legal channels.

(03/12/2024) ⚡AMP
by Festus Chuma
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Why Benson Kipruto is Kenya’s best bet for marathon gold at Paris 2024 Olympics

Pulse Sports details the reasons that make 2024 Tokyo Marathon champion Benson Kiptruto Kenya’s best bet for marathon gold at the Paris Olympics.

Tokyo Marathon champion Benson Kipruto appears to be the early favorite to win Kenya gold at the Paris Olympics given his recent form.

Kipruto is still basking in the glory of his win in Tokyo last week when he clocked 2:02:16 to break the course record ahead of countrymen Timothy Kiplagat (2:02:55) and Vincent Ngetich (2:04:18).

That was Kipruto’s fourth win in his last seven marathons, having also won in Prague and Boston in 2021 and Chicago in 2022. During that period, the 32-year-old has also not finished outside the top three, third in Boston in 2022 and 2023, as well as a second place in Chicago last year.

Looking at the provisional Team Kenya marathon team to Paris Olympics selected last December, only Kelvin Kiptum had better numbers, but the world marathon record holder is now deceased, which leaves Kipruto with a head start.

Kenya’s provisional squad of 10 had Kipruto, Kiptum, two-time Olympics champion Eliud Kipchoge, Ngetich, Timothy Kiplagat, Bernard Koech, two-time New York Marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor, Cyprian Kotut, 2022 London Marathon champion Amos Kipruto and Titus Kipruto.

With Athletics Kenya (AK) making their selection based on World Athletics Road to Paris Marathon Rankings, two-time Boston Marathon champion Evans Chebet and Alexander Mutiso, third in Valencia in 2:03:29 on his debut in 2022, winner in Prague last year (2:05:09), before second place in Valencia 2023 (2:03:11) did not make the team.

Mutiso had not run Valencia when the team was unveiled while Chebet has been very consistent. After his marathon debut in 2013 in Seoul (2:11:26), Chebet has managed top four placings in all 15 marathons he has finished, including six wins and six runner-up finishes.

He won in Boston and New York in 2022 before defending his Boston title and he will be back again in April in a bid to make it three straight wins.

Athletics Kenya has yet to indicate if there will be alterations to the team in light of Kiptum’s demise, which could give Chebet or Mutiso a ticket to the Olympics, if they do well in Boston and London respectively next month.

If AK sticks to the original list, then Kipruto will be seen as the hot favourite given the recent form of defending champion Kipchoge.

Kipchoge finished a disappointing 10th in Tokyo after clocking 2:06:50, having come in as favorite following his win in Berlin last year (2:02:42) and the fact that he also won in the Japanese capital in 2021 (2:02:40).

However, his sixth place in Boston last year (2:09:23), which was blamed on the lack of pacemakers and the hilly course, and the latest in Tokyo prove that he is human after all, hence the need to look beyond him for gold in Paris.

(03/11/2024) ⚡AMP
by Joel Omotto
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Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Paris 2024 Olympic Games

For this historic event, the City of Light is thinking big! Visitors will be able to watch events at top sporting venues in Paris and the Paris region, as well as at emblematic monuments in the capital visited by several millions of tourists each year. The promise of exceptional moments to experience in an exceptional setting! A great way to...

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Abdi Nageeye won the NN CPC Loop Den Haag

Abdi Nageeye won the half marathon as part of the 48th NN CPC Run The Hague on Sunday, setting a Dutch record. The Netherland’s best road athlete won the opening classic half marathon race completing it in 1.00.21. In doing so, despite bowel and hamstring problems, he improved his own record by three seconds.

Ethiopian Charlie Kedir (1.00.48) and Israel’s Tadesse Getahon (1.01.01) joined Nageeye on the podium of honour. Khalid Choukoud, ambassador of the NN CPC Loop Den Haag in his hometown, finished in sixth place as the second Dutchman in 1.03.31. He was 25 seconds ahead of Tom Hendrikse.

Among the women, Susan Chembai from Kenya triumphed in a PR of 1.07.12. Lornah Kiplagat’s course record (1.06.56) remained out of reach. Germany’s Katharina Steinruck captured second place (1.09.58). Finishing third, was Dutch competitor Anna Luijten. The reigning national champion in the half and full marathon, improved her time, completing in 1.10.39. A year ago, she set her personal record of 1.12.12.

Nageeye was not the only athlete to run a Dutch record at the NN CPC Loop Rotterdam. So did 76-year-old Rietje Corstens from Bergen op Zoom. In the women 75+ category, she set a time of 1.59.22.

(03/11/2024) ⚡AMP
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NN CPC Loop Den Haag

NN CPC Loop Den Haag

The City-Pier-City Half Marathon (NN CPC Loop Den Haag) was first held in 1975 and featured a 14.5km course. This was extended to the half marathon distance the following year. The competition has been used as the Dutch half marathon championships on a number of occasions. The course is a relatively flat one, which lends itself to fast times for...

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Geoffrey Toroitich, winner of the Malaga Half Marathon for the second year

For the second time in a row, Kenyan runner Geoffrey Toroitich clinched victory at the TotalEnergies Malaga Half Marathon which took place on Sunday. This time, however, he clocked exactly one minute more (1h.00:13, compared to 59:13) than his record in the event.

Despite favorable conditions (no rain, minimal wind and an optimal starting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius), Toroitich fell short of his previous performance as his pace fluctuated, slowing down slightly as the race progressed. Despite this, he, nonetheless, pulled ahead solo by the eighth kilometer.

Toroitich finished more than two minutes ahead of Vincent Kipkorir in second (1h.02:30), followed by Barnabas Kipkoech (1h.02:32). The top European finisher was Jonas Glans (1h.02:44), while the top Spaniard, Daniel Gracia, secured eleventh spot (1h.08:51).

Local athlete Ignacio González finished with a time of 1h.09:33, using the race as part of his triathlon training.

New women's record

The highlight of the event was the women's race, with Loice Chemnung smashing the previous record with a remarkable time of 1h.05:58, placing seventh overall.

Winfridah Moraa followed closely with a time of 1h.05:59. Both runners broke the previous record by over a minute and a half.

Chemnung, known for her impressive 10,000-meter record of 30:08, made her half marathon debut, while Moraa surpassed her personal best of 1h.06:40.

Despite their efforts, Fatima Azzahraa from Cordoba failed to break the Spanish half marathon record, finishing at 1h.11:32. Nonetheless, Malaga now ranks as the third fastest city in Spain for half marathons, with Sunday's women's record-setting performance solidifying its place among the top fifteen fastest cities globally.

The race course, starting from Ciudad de Málaga athletics stadium on the western side of the side and ending at the eastern coastline with minimal elevation changes, provides ideal conditions for achieving fast times.

Prize money totaling 1,500 euros was awarded to both the male and female winners, with an additional 1,000-euro incentive for breaking the race record, which Chemnung accomplished in the women's category.

With over 5,000 participants this year, similar to the previous edition, the event marked another success, especially considering the shorter interval between races.

(03/11/2024) ⚡AMP
by Pedro Luis Alonso
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Malaga Half Marathon

Malaga Half Marathon

The TotalEnergies Malaga Half Marathon is a popular destination race in the beautiful coastal city of Málaga. It is one of the fastest half marathons in the world, with records set in the 2023 edition of 59'13" for men and 1h07'36" for women. It's one of the flattest half marathons in the world, with only a 7-meter elevation difference between...

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Abraham Tadesse sets new course record at the 2024 Zurich Marató Barcelona

This Sunday, the 45th Zurich Marató Barcelona started its new course at a record pace.

Fifth male record for the race in five years

For the fourth consecutive year, the men’s and women’s records of the Zurich Marató Barcelona, have been broken. In the men’s category, the Eritrean athlete with Swiss nationality, Abraham Tadesse, managed to beat the previous best time of this race (2:05:01), five seconds below the time set in 2023 by Marius Kimutai (2:05:06). In second place was the Kenyan Collins Kipkurui Kipkorir (2:06:41) and third was his compatriot Edmond Kipngetich (2:07:21). The three athletes who completed the podium ran together at the head of the race until the 35th kilometer. Then Tadesse broke away to enter the finish line alone.

Tadesse said, “I wanted to win Barcelona again and I have achieved it. I won the half-marathon of this city in 2015 and today, nine years later and almost 42 years old, I can assure that nothing is impossible, age is just a number. I was able to set the course record and I would like to come back to this race to try to finish in 2 hours and 4 minutes”.

The women’s race

In the women’s race, Ethiopian athlete Degitu Azimeraw won in 2:19:52, eight seconds behind the course record set last year by Zeineba Yimer Worku (2:19:44). In second place, her compatriot Shuko Genemo Wote, crossed the finish line (2:21:35). Meseret Dinke Meleka, also Ethiopian and athlete of On, was the third finisher (2:22:58). The Ethiopian women led the women’s elite group throughout the race, until just before 30K, when Azimeraw took the lead alone towards the finish line.

Degitu Azimeraw, “I am very happy to have won in Barcelona. I really liked the course. I will try to repeat next year because it is a course that I think can be run even faster and I would like to beat the course record next time”.

Also, this Sunday the 46th Catalan Marathon Championship was celebrated in the 45th Zurich Marató Barcelona. A championship in which Artur Bossy won in the absolute male category (2:19:11) and for the absolute female category the winner was Jessica Tipán (2:48:21).

(03/11/2024) ⚡AMP
by Christopher Kelsall
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Zurich Marato Barcelona

Zurich Marato Barcelona

The race is popular both with pro athletes and amateurs and provides a unique running experience in and around Zurich. The route runs for the most part along Lake Zurich and consequently is not only attractive as a sports event, but also visually. The start and finish lines are at the upper lake basin and go through downtown Zurich, which...

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Ando achieves first career marathon victory in Nagoya

Yuka Ando became the first Japanese winner in three years at the Nagoya Women’s Marathon, taking the title in a PB of 2:21:19 at the World Athletics Platinum Label road race on Sunday (10).

Before today, Ando had completed 10 marathons in her career, and had reached the podium in Nagoya on three previous occasions. But today’s performance marked the first marathon victory of her career.

After a chilly start with temperatures of about 5C, Ando and fellow Japanese duo Ayuko Suzuki and Rika Kaseda formed aleading pack alongside 2022 world champion Gotytom Gebreslase of Ethiopia and Asian champion Eunice Chebichii Chumba of Bahrain.

The lead group reached the halfway point in 1:09:56, inside 2:20 pace, but the tempo dropped slightly in the second half. Chumba and Gebreslase opened up a bit of a gap on the leading Japanese contenders. Suzuki started to fall back as Ando and Kaseda ran side by side as they tried to chase the leaders.

Gebreslase dropped out at about 36km, leaving Chumba in front. Ando caught up with the leader at about 39km and they ran together for a couple of kilometres before Ando kicked ahead in the final 800 metres.

Ando went on to cross the line in 2:21:18, consolidating her position at eighth on the Japanese all-time list. Chumba finished second in 2:21:25, and Suzuki placed third in a PB of 2:21:33.

Ando, who would have had to have broken the Asian record of 2:18:59 to make it on to Japan’s team for the Paris Olympics, was delighted with her run.

“There are many people who have helped me to get this far, and I’m filled with gratitude,” she said. “I can’t go to Paris, but I’m really happy that I won. It was really hard when I fell behind the lead pack, but I was able to catch up by running, only focusing on going forward.”

(03/10/2024) ⚡AMP
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Nagoya Women's Marathon

Nagoya Women's Marathon

The Nagoya Women's Marathon named Nagoya International Women's Marathon until the 2010 race, is an annual marathon race for female runners over the classic distance of 42 km and 195 metres, held in Nagoya, Japan in early March every year. It holds IAAF Gold Label road race status. It began in 1980 as an annual 20-kilometre road race held in...

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Conquer Your Longest Distance Yet With These 9 Tips

Ultrarunners and coaches share their best advice for building mileage without getting injured.

Whether you want to progress from a 5K to a half marathon or a marathon to an ultra, a few general rules on how to run longer can help you get there.

While building mileage and time on your feet is paramount, the key to doing it successfully involves patience and persistence. “As much as volume matters—volume is king—too much volume too soon can get you on the sidelines,” Bertrand Newson, RRCA-certified run coach and founder and team captain of Too Legit Fitness, based in San Jose, California, tells Runner’s World. 

Follow these tips from Newson and other coaches and ultramarathoners to successfully increase your mileage, avoid injuries, and crush your longest distances.

1. Build a Base, Then Keep It Consistent

“I steadily built up to running 250-mile races over many years, but I started by running one mile at a time,” says Sarah Ostaszewski, pro ultrarunner with Tailwind Nutrition who won the 2023 Ouray 100-Mile Endurance Run. “Build a strong base and try to keep a consistent running routine, so then adding a little extra here and there won’t seem so daunting.” 

Base training typically requires about four to eight weeks (before following a race training schedule) to strengthen your cardiovascular system and your muscles, but the longer you can regularly run and set a foundation, the better. Your base work should involve mostly easy runs, low mileage, and maybe low-key speedwork (depending on your fitness level), like ending a run with strides. This part of your training is all about consistency, rather than actually building mileage. 

Ultrarunner Mirna Valerio stays consistent by focusing on time on her feet, rather than distance. “This has been mentally freeing,” the author of A Beautiful Work in Progress tells Runner’s World. 

“I have a standing appointment with my treadmill a couple times a week,” says Valerio, who will aim to run a minimum of 12 hours a day over six days at the Lululemon Further event, an ultramarathon for women in March. “I just get it done, which incidentally is one of my mantras.”

2. Find Your Best Approach to Building Volume

If you’re new to running and want to run longer, add another day of a short, easy run to your schedule, suggests Stefanie Flippin, an ultrarunner, Lululemon ambassador, and doctor of podiatric medicine, who has earned a first-place finish at several 100-milers.

Maxed out on available days of the week? Add to your long-run mileage, which is what Leah Yingling, ultrarunner and biochemical engineer who will see how far she can run in 24 hours at Lululemon Further, does first when aiming to build volume. The general rule is to increase your weekly mileage by about 10 percent each week, adding to that long run. For example, if you currently clock 17 miles per week with three four-mile runs during the week and a long run of five miles on the weekend, you would keep your midweek mileage the same, but kick up your long run to about seven miles next weekend.

Yingling, and many other pros, also do two runs a day. While this won’t work for everyone, if you don’t have a significant single block of time, clocking some miles in the morning and again in the evening and resting between can help you clock more mileage. One must-do to make it work: Tame the intensity on at least one of those runs.

Charlie Lawrence, 50-mile world record holder, views his second run of the day as a sort of active recovery. He often goes for double digits in the mornings, then runs for about four miles (at minimum) in the evening, keeping the effort light. 

No matter what, testing out strategies to see what works for your schedule is the best way to run longer. “That might be adding a walk a few days a week in addition to your daily runs, or maybe you’re adding back-to-back long runs,” says Yingling. “Whatever you do, find something that is sustainable.”

3. Follow a Progressive Training Plan

A good training plan will slowly build mileage to decrease your risk of getting sidelined, as research shows taking on too many miles too soon is one of the biggest risk factors for overuse injuries. 

When choosing your training plan, you have to be realistic about the time you have to build up to the distance you want to conquer—and where you’re at now, says Newson. For example, if you have your sights set on a half or full marathon, think about what you can comfortably run today. Then, following the loose rule of adding 10 percent more miles each week, how long do you need to train? If you currently run five miles without stopping and feel good after, and can comfortably clock 12 miles per week, you can probably conquer a 10-week half marathon plan. 

Another important factor to look for when it comes to mileage on a training plan: recovery weeks. Newson explains you’ll typically see this as three weeks of building, then a week in which you back off mileage a little to give your body time to recover and actually make gains from all the work you put into your plan. This will also keep your body strong and help you sidestep aches and pains, he adds.

4. Keep Easy Runs Easy

You’ve heard it before but it’s especially true when trying to run longer: Don’t overdo your low-effort days. 

“It’s important for me to always run my easy runs, short or long, at a conversational, aerobic rate of perceived exertion. This means that I can easily chat with a training partner for the duration of my runs without becoming out of breath,” Flippin says, who also clocks her heart rate to make sure she’s in an easy zone. 

Don’t worry about what shows on Strava, either. “I think a lot of runners run their easy runs too hard and that is because of ego and they don’t want people to think they are slow,” says Devon Yanko, ultrarunner who’s placed first in several 100-mile races and will aim to conquer her longest distance over six days at the Lululemon Further event. “I delight in the idea that people may look at my Strava and think I am too slow, because on race day that won’t be the case!” 

More generally, applying the 80/20 rule to your training overall can also help you record more low-intensity runs, Newson says, as it means 80 percent of your workouts should happen at a low intensity, and 20 percent at a hard effort.

It’s these easy runs that will help keep you running consistently—the key that unlocks higher mileage. “A B+ average of consistent runs, strength work, and recovery measures stacked over weeks, months, and years will always trump sporadic A+ weeks followed by a total drop-off,” Flippin says.

5. Master the Long Run

For most people, the long run will make up the bulk of your weekly mileage, but it doesn’t just help you clock more time on your feet. It also teaches you mental stamina, how to deal with fatigue, and it can help you get comfortable with being uncomfortable. With years of practice, this is what many pros say pulls them through farther distances.

Even though Lawrence can deal with being uncomfortable for long periods of time, he still turns to mind games to mentally check off miles. For example, he often breaks a race down into small, manageable chunks, often focusing on the next fuel stop (typically about every four miles) as a check point. If he’s struggling to get to the next four-mile marker, he may tell himself he’ll feel better in 10 to 15 minutes and checks in again then. 

In addition to breaking your long run up into segments, Newson also suggests dedicating each mile to someone else, which takes it outside of yourself and gives you another reason to keep going, and says to focus on the mile you’re in, simply putting one foot in front of the other. 

Finally, the long run is the perfect time to practice your fueling and fluid intake, Newson says, considering you need energy to clock longer miles. Aim to take in carbs when going for 90 minutes or longer, and go for about 30 to 60 grams per hour after the first hour. 

6. Schedule a Few Harder Workouts

To build endurance, you want to run long, but you can also add intervals and speed work into your schedule. 

Lawrence gets on the track for VO2 max-specific workouts at least once a week. VO2 max is the amount of oxygen you can take in while running and is a major marker of fitness—the better this metric, the easier running will feel, which will help you go longer with less effort. Focusing on VO2 max intensities on runs means going for about 90 to 100 percent of your max heart rate or about 5K pace, and it could involve intervals like 400-meter repeats. 

You could also focus on lactate threshold training. Your lactate threshold is the point at which your body produces lactate at a rate you can no longer clear, leading to fatigue. To help you prolong that side effect—helping you go faster for longer—practice running at your threshold pace. (Here’s how to calculate your running speed at lactate threshold). 

To do this, Ostaszewski prefers longer interval workouts with work periods ranging from six to 10 minutes near aerobic threshold. But tempo runs at your threshold speed are also smart. 

7. Supplement Your Runs With Mobility and Strength

Before you jump into high mileage, you need a solid warmup. Lawrence has been doing the same activation drills before runs for a long time. He starts with foam rolling most of the lower body, then does a series of exercises, like:

Leg swings

Down dog to lunge rotation

Ankle mobility moves

Banded work, like glute bridges

This go-to routine wakes him up and gets him in run mode, even when he’s not feeling it. 

Cross-training workouts are also key. Valerio mixes strength training, mobility workouts, Pilates, and rowing into her training schedule, which she says helps her avoid overuse injuries. Meanwhile, Flippin points to strength training in particular as crucial to running longer. She suggests starting with one day a week to build consistency, then adding on days from there. 

Lawrence focuses specifically on doing core workouts every day (one of his go-to moves: the ab roll out), along with dedicated gym time for lifting, in which he conquers moves like hex bar deadlifts.

8. Make Recovery a Priority

Many pro runners turn to a solid nutrition practice to jumpstart recovery and fuel future performances. “I ensure I’m always getting in carbohydrates and protein within 30 minutes of finishing a key workout or long run,” Yingling says.

Finding time for other recovery practices, like mobility work, foam rolling, even meditating, can also support your training and get you prepped for the next round of mileage, Newson says. Full rest days are also important, especially if you’re feeling any aches and pains.

And you can’t forget about sleep for recovery—striving for at least the recommended seven to nine hours—especially for those looking to push their mileage. 

9. Don’t Rely on Motivation Alone

Running your longest distance takes dedication and determination, but don’t expect to feel motivated every day. “People often wait to do things until they are motivated, when instead, they should have been focused on completing their plan or working toward their goal,” says Yanko. “I don’t jump out of bed every morning peppy and excited to run, but I am committed to doing the work and thus, I simply get the work done.”

Yanko also suggests tapping into curiosity to keep you going longer. “That is, instead of being intimidated by a workout or long run, I allow myself the opportunity to be curious about what might happen if I simply begin the session,” she says. “I do not believe that one workout or one long run ‘proves’ anything about my fitness or ability to race, so having curiosity means I can get into a session and allow it to unfold with confidence that if I just continue to show up and do the work, I will build my fitness brick by brick.”

Newson also suggests a running group to keep you accountable and consistent, and to elevate the fun of your workouts. 

“On the mental side, I always try to see the big picture and remember that all the miles I’m running are for fun and for my own personal enjoyment,” Ostaszewski adds. “I’m always aiming to enjoy the process and recognize growth in the journey.”

(03/10/2024) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World
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HOW TO START A RUN WHEN YOU DON’T FEEL LIKE IT

I’VE ALWAYS FELT validation when reading a story about writers and their love of procrastination. I thought it was just me who gets more work done around the house with a deadline looming and who finds every excuse not to write until the time feels exactly right—or the time has run out. 

Well, a while ago I realized how I do this with running, too, especially long runs on the weekends. I stare at my closet trying to determine the perfect outfit for the weather. I go back and forth on what to eat and how much coffee to drink. Should I have half a cup? Down a full one (or two) then wait until after I go to the bathroom to head out? I stop for a quick foam-rolling session or grab my massage gun for a bit, then do some dynamic stretches. Before I know it, I’m starting my run an hour later than planned. 

Some prerun rituals are necessary, of course. A warmup helps me feel ready for those initial steps. If I have double-digit miles on deck, I definitely need to eat and drink before I start my stride. But really, I’m just putting off those initial few miles—those steps where the legs feel tight and the upper body cranky, the mind remains in bed, and instead of finding a rhythm, the steps feel like short, broken verses waiting for me to string them together in better harmony. I tend to overthink my runs, especially the start, rather than focusing on how the sport makes me feel powerful and strong, and like I’m gliding over the trail rather than clomping with every footfall. That rumination makes getting out the door super difficult sometimes. 

I know I’m not the only one who has trouble simply getting started. Ahead of the Chicago Marathon this fall, Emily Sisson, pro runner and U.S. women’s marathon record holder, said one of her favorite mantras is “motivation follows action.” She’s not always inspired to go run 20 miles or clock a tempo run at a 5-minute pace. But once she starts moving—after a few warmup exercises with her mini band or a light and breezy running warmup—the drive to put in the work picks up.

Similarly, Tristen Rodriguez, a RW+ member who trained with Runner’s World for the 2023 NYC Marathon, mentioned how he is only motivated to run about 20 to 30 percent of the time during a training cycle. It’s the discipline that gets him out there. Checking off training runs and workouts on a plan can give you a shove to get out the door instead of relying on the sheer desire to do so. 

Like Rodriguez, I’ve found that setting goals, following a schedule, and tackling workouts on a plan helps remove the need to rely on willpower alone, and adds in the determination to succeed. That’s one reason I sign up for races on a consistent basis throughout the year. And like Sisson, I know once I start moving, I’ll want to pick it up and conquer the run ahead because the resolve to perform well settles into my stride. 

Focusing on how good it feels to finish a run—no matter the pace or distance—also gets me out the door. So does removing any barriers to said door. That’s why, despite being more of a night owl, I’ve come to love early morning easy runs: I can basically roll out of bed, slip into the outfit I laid out the night before, and hit the road. No fretting about prerun activities. I just go, without thinking about it. 

Even with all my love and deep appreciation for running, I still have to tell myself a little story about the run ahead, about how wonderful it will feel just to get myself moving (even if that’s not entirely the truth, at least not all the time). These helpful mind games give me a little kick in the glutes to start running. And sometimes, when I find I’m still procrastinating, I just thank my deadline-driven mindset, which turns on when time is running out and I need to stop thinking and just start stepping. 

(03/10/2024) ⚡AMP
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Rise of the “Illegal” Running Shoes

Super trainers are fast, fun, and maybe a little risky. Here’s what to know about these max-cushioned shoes. 

Banned shoes emerged courtside long before they found their way onto a marathon course. Legend has it that nearly 40 years ago, Michael Jordan laced up a pair of red-and-black high-tops in violation of the NBA’s approved uniform colors. 

In 2010, the league cracked down again—this time, for reasons besides aesthetics—on a pair of basketball shoes that were shown to increase a player’s vertical-jump height. Today, Nike’s Air Jordan brand is a household name and multibillion-dollar business, and shoemaker Athletic Propulsion Labs (APL) has since released additional banned styles (Superfuture and Concept X) of its performance-boosting kicks.

Though some speculate these bans were mostly crafty marketing, the same can’t be said about the wave of “illegal” shoes that is flooding the roadways on the feet of runners. Super shoes have proven a true performance boon to both elites and recreational runners on race day. Now the tech has trickled down to shoes for daily runs, ushering in super-thick, though still permissible, shoes that have created their own category: super trainers.

What Is a Super Trainer?

Technically, a formal definition doesn’t exist. But we’ll establish some general parameters.

Super trainers share many of the same qualities as super shoes built for race day: a tall stack height, efficient midsole geometry, high-powered super foam, and usually some sort of plate. But these trainers aren’t meant for racing, like a Nike Vaporfly or Saucony Endorphin Elite—they’re designed for everyday mileage.

Super shoes for racing have to balance cushioning and propulsion, but still be lightweight. Super trainers, though, can have beefier constructions that help to extend their life spans. For example, shoe brand On guarantees only four marathons from the Cloudboom Echo 3—that’s little more than 100 miles. Super trainers can handle more mileage, and should have the typical 300- to 500-mile range of a normal running shoe.

To do that, they may have more outsole rubber for durability. Their uppers are usually softer and thicker than a racing shoe’s, as well, with comfortably cushioned ankle collars and tongues. They tie up with sturdier laces and offer a more forgiving fit overall, closer to what you’d expect from a workhorse daily trainer. And, since super trainers aren’t made to toe a starting line, brands can pile on midsole foam in excess of the 40mm limit imposed by World Athletics.

But they’re more than just extremely cushioned running shoes. Super trainers have additional mechanisms and “super foams” geared toward running efficiency and energy return, explained below.

Anatomy of a Super Trainer

If we break down a super trainer into its key components, we see a recurring theme: a stack of super foam in the ballpark of 40mm (or more), a carefully sculpted midsole shape for propulsion, and a plate that harnesses those pieces and holds it all together. This is the tech that puts the “super” in super trainers; it needs to interact with the foot and the rest of the kinetic chain in specific ways to deliver the intended ride and energy return. 

Here’s what’s happening inside the midsole under your foot, and how these elements work to boost your stride. 

1. Rocker Geometry

When we talk about a rocker sole, we’re describing the curvature of the bottom of the shoe’s sole. Both the heel and the toe curve upward, away from the ground, to give the shoe a more rounded base. The result is a shape like that you’ll find on a rocking chair. This is needed because the shoes are so thick, they don’t bend under the forefoot for a smooth transition during your gait cycle. 

Shoe developers can also manipulate the inflection points of the rockers around a runner’s pace and foot strike to potentially manipulate transition time. Usually, you’ll find the most aggressive rocker designs in racing shoes. Still, pronounced rocker soles on super trainers are essential to make transitions comfortable. 

→ How do rocker soles work?

Rocker soles in shoes function to mimic the natural rockers of the foot to make us feel more efficient. The foot has three functional rockers—the heel (first), ankle (second), and forefoot (third)—that we use while walking and running. The heel bevel in a shoe prepares the foot to contact the ground and smooths out the shoe’s ride when you land. Forefoot rockers assist movement during toe-off, which generally means the toes and ankle joint don’t have to work as hard. 

For some runners, a stiff rocker sole can decrease demand on the calves by transitioning effort upward to the knee and hips. A runner’s experience will depend on their specific biomechanics, where the rocker is placed, and how their footstrike contacts it.

2. Super Foam

Polyether Block Amide, or PEBA, is a common foam compound for super trainer midsoles. (A popular trade name for the material is Pebax, made by a company called Arkema.) It’s the basis for foams like Nike ZoomX, Saucony Pwrrun PB, Puma Nitrofoam, and Asics FF Blast Turbo. Many of those brands leverage the same foam used in their top-tier racing shoes for their super trainer models.

Right now, PEBA-based foams lead the way for energy return. While current research and our own testing indicates that supercritical EVA and TPU blends are also impressive, PEBA has the edge more often than not. Why? It’s lighter than TPU and far softer and bouncier than supercritical EVA. Some iterations are firmer than others, depending on which brand’s flavor you try.

→ How does foam work?

Cushioning serves to absorb shock upon landing and provide overall comfort while running, but it can also return energy to the runner and stabilize the shoe. PEBA foams are especially lightweight, so brands can pile it on—both in thickness and in width—without the same weight penalty applied when using EVA or TPU materials. The additional width is just as important as the height. These shoes often need a wide platform of midsole material to remain stable.

Every brand’s PEBA-based foam compresses at a different rate, with varying amounts of responsiveness, so each offers a unique benefit based on the runner. For example, runners who land with lots of force can bottom out and crush a foam that’s too squishy, so they may prefer a firmer platform. A harder midsole can offer more support without any additional stability elements. On the other hand, a softer foam can provide more comfort, and research suggests that it may have a protective benefit for lighter runners. 

Keep in mind that dozens of pieces within a shoe, as well as countless runner-specific characteristics, come together alongside a super foam to deliver its specific ride and response. It’s not always possible to parse each element individually.

3. Plates

Not every super trainer has a plate in its midsole, but it’s increasingly common. That’s because—regardless of whether it’s made from TPU, EVA, PEBA, carbon fiber, or a mix—a plate stiffens the midsole and can add support. It may also give the ride some extra pop, but it largely functions to stabilize the shoe. The Adidas Adizero Prime X 2 Strung, which has a heel stack height of 50mm, requires two stiff carbon-infused plates.

Some shoes need less support and utilize pliable materials with thinner rod constructions or forgo full-length plates for ones that extend only halfway along the midsole.

→ How do midsole plates work?

While plates can add propulsion, research suggests that the true hero is the foam itself. A plate mostly serves to “facilitate motion and add stiffness to the sole to balance out the softer compliant foams,” says Matt Klein, DPT and founder of the Doctors of Running website and podcast.

He explains that the effects of stiff-plated shoes are not clear-cut. “Everything we know [about super trainers] is applied from super shoe and maximal shoe research. These shoes shift work up to the knees and hips. The ankles may do less, but that doesn’t always apply. If the shoe is too stiff, the ankles will actually end up doing more work. But once a midsole gets so thick, it may not need a plate; the amount of material naturally stiffens the ride.”

What Are the Benefits of Super Trainers?

Simply put, these shoes are so much fun to run in. They can lend a bounce to your stride that feels like bounding on a trampoline. And since the springy sensation and high energy return can help you move more efficiently, running fast feels easier.

Plus, a review of 63 research studies concluded that these trainers can also help attenuate shock and dampen some of the hard impacts from training. So, runners recover from hard efforts more quickly; they’ll lace up the next day feeling fresher and less sore than if they’d worn regular running shoes. And for those eager to increase mileage, this may allow some runners to increase their weekly workload with less fatigue and fewer aches and pains.

“These have the benefit of having similarities to super racing shoes. These shoe types certainly increase the capacity of work you can do, so I suspect those running higher miles will probably benefit most from these,” Klein speculates.

But, the recovery boost from super trainers can make it tempting to tack on too many miles too soon or overcook the pace on easy days. “Just because you are less sore does not mean you are at a lower risk for injury. You can still get injured with overdoing things,” Klein says.

Our wear-testers report that they’re able to run faster paces with less effort in super trainers, but it’s still important to keep easy jogs relaxed. Double-check your training log and pull back on the reins if you notice spikes in mileage or intensity outside your typical training volume. 

Are There Any Risks to Super Trainers?

Though they feel great, super trainers can have an impact on our natural gaits and biomechanics. “One of the injury risks for this shoe type is that it is so different from normal mechanics and footwear. The current evidence from super shoes and super-max stack-height shoes is that we tend to stiffen our legs in taller, softer shoes,” Klein says. “This is not bad short-term, but some evidence suggests long-term super-max stack-height shoes can actually increase joint loading due to that stiffening.”

“I suspect running in them a ton will cause less joint motion, as the body will stiffen up to find stability as shock absorption isn’t needed. This may be great for a recovery run/faster run, but trying to transition back to normal shoes can take time if you only run in these and super racing shoes.” Klein recommends making the transition slowly to avoid injury and keeping more than one pair of running shoes in your rotation. 

“I do suspect that with the workload being shifted up to the knee and especially the hip, there may be an increase in injuries in those areas. The hip still has to work harder being on a softer, less stable surface. So, those with hip instability and strength issues may want to avoid super shoes, at least until these issues have been addressed,” Klein says. New runners should focus on building strength and experience before experimenting with super trainers.

There is little doubt that these shoes have effects at the point where our feet meet the midsoles as well as farther along our kinetic chains. Super trainers shift more of the workload of running to the hamstrings, which means that you won’t engage the calves and lower leg muscles as much. Moving some of that effort to larger muscle groups can be beneficial for some runners, like those who are struggling with calf or Achilles tendon injuries. But those who have a nagging hamstring strain may need to be wary. Whether or not it’s your goal, those upper leg muscles will receive more of a workout.

At the very least, one thing can be said for sure. It’s that all the foam underfoot is going to put a lot of distance between your foot and the ground. This limits the amount of ground feel you receive from the shoe. It can be easier to wipe out if you’re hopping a curb on a night run. And on rain-slicked sidewalks or technical trails, it can be tough to steer a thick and bulky midsole. If you’re prone to ankle rolls or need a keen sense of where and how your foot is landing whenever you touch down, a super trainer might not serve you well.

Will I Really Get DQ’d in a Race?

It depends. If you’re an elite runner, absolutely. But if you’re going for a 3:10 BQ, it’s unlikely. Ethiopian runner Derara Hurisa won the 2021 Vienna Marathon in 2:09:22 but was disqualified when race organizers found he’d raced in the Adidas Adizero Prime X, a different shoe than he’d declared on his prerace form. Another runner at a fall 2023 half marathon was disqualified after winning in the same shoe. 

Our Favorite Super Trainers

Running shoes aren’t cheap. Maxed-out midsoles with top-end shoe tech only add to the bill. Most super trainers will cost you $180 at least, and there are options to be had for well over $200.

(03/10/2024) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World
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Paris Olympics opening ceremony to be held during sunset on July 26

PARIS (AP) — The opening ceremony of the Paris Olympics along the river Seine will be held during sunset, organizers said Friday.

It’s the first time an Olympic opening ceremony will be held outside a stadium setting, in line with the Paris organizers’ motto: “Games Wide Open.” About 10,500 athletes will parade through the heart of the French capital on boats on the Seine along a 6-kilometer (3.7-mile) route.

Organizers said the open-air event will start on July 26 at 7:30 p.m. Paris time.

They said the ceremony will offer “an unprecedented experience, using the natural light of the setting sun with all its nuances to illuminate the river promenade of all the world’s best athletes along the Seine, in the heart of the capital.”

This week, the French government said tourists won’t be given free access to watch the opening ceremony over security concerns. Free access will be invitation-only instead.

Organizers had planned a grandiose opening ceremony July 26 for as many as 600,000 people, most watching free of charge from riverbanks. But security and logistical concerns — and an outcry from booksellers along the city’s picturesque quays — have led the government to progressively scale back its ambitions.

Earlier this year, the overall number of spectators was reduced to around 300,000.

(03/10/2024) ⚡AMP
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Nagoya Women's Marathon winner to pocket Ksh 35 million

The Nagoya Women's Marathon will be coming up on Sunday offering the highest prize money with the winner set to walk away with Ksh 35 million ($241,500US).

The 2024 Nagoya Women’s Marathon is certainly one of the marathons in the world that offers the highest prize money.

The winner of the race will walk away with more than Ksh 35 million with every finisher also being awarded a beautiful, specially designed pendant from a global luxury jeweller, Tiffany & Co., as a memento of their achievement.

As per the race organisers, the prize money for the subsequent places will be determined separately based on the competition results.

Meanwhile, this year’s field has attracted Gotytom Gebreslase who will have the course record in her sights when she races in the marathon, a World Athletics Platinum Label road race.

The 2022 world champion set her Personal Best time of 2:18:11 when winning that title in Oregon and she went on to secure silver at last year’s World Championships in Budapest.

This will be the Ethiopian’s first marathon since then and she goes into it targeting at least a lifetime best, if not the course record of 2:17:18 set by Kenya’s Ruth Chepngetich in 2022 – that time being the second-fastest-ever women-only marathon behind the 2:17:01 run by Mary Keitany in London in 2017.

“My goal for Sunday is to run under 2 hours and 18 minutes, and if the weather and pacemakers are good, I will try to break the course record of 2:17:18,” she said at the pre-event press conference.

She will face a stern test from Bahrain’s Eunice Chebichii Chumba, who finished seventh in the Olympic Games marathon in Sapporo, and Romania’s Delvine Relin Meringor who ran her national record of 2:20:49 when finishing third in Barcelona a year ago and she went on to place 12th in the Berlin Marathon in 2:23:25.

Violah Cheptoo will be Kenya’s sole representative in the race, hoping to retain the title that was won by Chepng’etich during last year’s edition of the race.

(03/09/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Nagoya Women's Marathon

Nagoya Women's Marathon

The Nagoya Women's Marathon named Nagoya International Women's Marathon until the 2010 race, is an annual marathon race for female runners over the classic distance of 42 km and 195 metres, held in Nagoya, Japan in early March every year. It holds IAAF Gold Label road race status. It began in 1980 as an annual 20-kilometre road race held in...

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Jakob Ingebrigtsen thinks doping is worse now than 10 years ago

Norway’s gold drought at the World Indoor Championships hit 29 years last weekend in Glasgow, with the country’s star middle-distance runner, Jakob Ingebrigtsen, sidelined by injury. In a recent interview with the Times, Ingebrigtsen did not hold back, slamming doping in athletics, saying it’s worse now than a decade ago.

“I think doping is worse now than 10 years ago,” Ingebrigtsen told the Times. “It is difficult to prove that, but it’s what I feel. The problem now is that we see fewer positive tests, and that really concerns me; it is a sign that people are getting smarter and finding better ways to evade detection, or perhaps the tests are not detecting enough.”

The Olympic 1,500m champion went on to say that not enough people are getting caught by regular testing, and the only way “cheats” are detected is through whereabouts (three missed doping tests in 12 months). “If you know what you’re doing, that is a genius way of cheating,” he says.

One thing that is different than 10 years ago is the number of athletes tested. World Athletics president Sebastian Coe introduced the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) in 2017, a crucial governing body dedicated to safeguarding the integrity of athletics. Each year, World Athletics spends an estimated $8,000,000 putting systems in place to tackle doping.

Ingebrigtsen voiced his satisfaction in beating suspected dopers, like two-time world championship medalist Mohamed Katir, who was given a two-year ban on whereabouts in February. “It’s the ultimate destruction,” he said to the Times. “It’s more embarrassing for them—even when they have the audacity to cheat, and they are not doing it right.”

The 23-year-old has yet to race in the 2024 season, as he continues to recover from an Achilles injury he suffered last fall. He expects to make his debut on the track in late May and round into form to compete at the 2024 European Championships in Rome in June.

(03/09/2024) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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British journalist exonerated for alleged cheating at London Marathon

In one of the most high-profile cheating cases in recent years, British running journalist Kate Carter has been cleared of wrongdoing by England Athletics after facing accusations of cheating during the 2023 London Marathon and London Landmarks Half Marathon events.

Carter, a journalist and editor for Runner’s World UK, was under suspicion for allegedly entering a fake time at the London Marathon and course-cutting the London Landmarks Half Marathon last April. Marathon Investigation blogger Derek Murphy publicized the allegations, claiming there was no evidence Carter had run the entire London Marathon and that she may have used software to manually create GPS data based on an out-of-date course map. Murphy’s second allegation was that there was no record of her having completed the 10K to 20K section of the Landmarks event. Besides missing the timing mats, early race photos show Carter’s bib fully visible, compared to photos from later stages in the race, where her bib is folded, only revealing part of her number.

Carter denied the allegations, telling Athletics Weekly that she was not a cheat but just made some ill-considered decisions. Her defense was that, at the London Marathon, she decided not to run with a chip, as she felt she wasn’t in good shape and did not want an official time. However, she later decided to give herself a personal record on Strava, and used the app to draw a map of her run. Having later realized the map was inaccurate, she removed the post. At the London Landmarks Half Marathon, a race used by thousands of runners in preparation for the London Marathon, Carter says she had to leave the course because she had urinated on herself. She did not rejoin the race at the same point (which she claims was unintentional), and insists that her GPS watch had died.

England Athletics (EA), the governing body of all road races in the country, launched an investigation and found there was “no intention to deceive and no attempt to benefit from the results.” A spokesperson from EA told Athletics Weekly that every effort was made to arrive at the correct outcome.

“Investigators found that I did run last year’s London Marathon without a timing chip, as I have always said,” Carter said. “To reiterate: I am not a cheat. And I have never cheated. I ran without a timing chip as I thought I would perform poorly, and I didn’t get a time. I then attempted to draw the run on my Strava so my miles counted towards the monthly total.”

“At the London Landmarks race, I stepped off the course after wetting myself in a bid to find a bin and clean myself up. This was a hugely embarrassing moment, and I accept that I then inadvertently re-entered the race in a different spot. However, England Athletics have now told me that, after speaking to organizers who have also provided details of my timing chip, they have ruled that: ‘This was not a deliberate act of deception, and you did not gain any benefit or win anything as a result’,” Carter reveals.

Murphy told Canadian Running in a statement that he believes England Athletics’ investigation did not dispute any of the facts from his original article. “The findings pertain to her intent to deceive and whether her actions rose to the level of ‘serious misconduct’,” he says. “I do understand that they probably don’t want to open the door to receiving complaints on every mid-packer that cuts the course or doctors their Strava. I am not sure how they would conclude that there is no intent [from Carter] to deceive based on the verifiable and admitted facts.”

Carter, 47, is known for her achievements as an age grouper and for holding the world record for the fastest marathon by a woman in an animal costume (3:48:32). She told Athletics Weekly that the entire process has been damaging to her mental and physical health, and her reputation. “Running was a big part of my identity,” said Carter. Having been cleared, I really hope to find that joy again.”

The London Landmarks Half Marathon has offered Carter an invitation to run this year’s race.

(03/09/2024) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Your dog can now be a Strava local legend

Shoutout to all dog walkers and proud pet owners out there: the world’s largest fitness-tracking app is teaming up with Fi, a smart dog collar brand, to bring canine athletic achievements to your activity feed. Last week, Strava announced this pet-friendly collaboration to showcase their four-legged friends’ fitness alongside their owners’.

Fi collars are equipped with built-in satellite systems (like your GPS sports watch) and are primarily designed to locate lost pets; they also monitor basic health metrics, like sleep and step counts. Now, this same technology enables pet parents to log their dog’s activities online, receive kudos and compare their numbers with other pets of the same breed.With a membership, users can track their dog’s distance travelled and the total number of steps taken, while also monitoring their best friend’s progress toward daily goals and sleep totals. The app seamlessly uploads routes of your dog’s walks or play sessions onto a map, providing a visual representation of their adventures. Like run data privacy, there is also an option for the maps to be hidden, visible only to your followers (or to you).

According to the 2023 Strava Year In Sport report, 76 per cent of all Strava athletes with pets say their furry companions motivate them to get active. With the integration of Strava and Fi, users can now track dog-specific stats and share their pet’s progress with their community.

If you already use Fi, you can sync your Fi and Strava accounts and begin seamlessly uploading your dog’s walk activities.To celebrate this collaboration, limited edition co-branded Fi x Strava collars are available for purchase at the Fi store, allowing pet parents to showcase their love for Strava while keeping their furry friends safe and stylish. To learn more about the Strava and Fi partnership, visit tryfi.com/strava.Like GPS watches, pet tracking on Strava does come with a cost; Fi plans start at USD $192.00 annually.

(03/09/2024) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Elite Runners Gear Up for Thrilling Showdown at 2024 Los Angeles Marathon

Event organizers are optimistic about witnessing one of the fastest men's races in the history of the Los Angeles Marathon.

The spotlight will be on Kenya's Dominic Kipyegon Ngeno when the 2024 edition of the Los Angeles Marathon takes place on March 17.

Ngeno clinched the third spot at the Eindhoven Marathon in the Netherlands last October, achieving a personal best of 2:07:26 and is set to lead the elite field  in what promises to be a thrilling race.

Ngeno's compatriot, Moses Kiptoo Kurgat, arrives in Los Angeles boasting a personal best of 2:08:40, following his recent triumph at the 2022 Kuala Lumpur Marathon, where he clocked an impressive 2:11:05. The duo's presence adds an extra layer of excitement to the event, showcasing Kenya's dominance in long-distance running.

Eritrean runners Tsegay Tuemay and Tesfu Weldegebreal, who have been honing their skills in Flagstaff, Arizona, are also set to make their mark. Tuemay, with a personal best of 2:09:07, claimed victory at the McKirdy Micro Marathon in New York last October in a time of 2:11:04. Meanwhile, Weldegebreal, with a half marathon personal best of 62:48, is gearing up for his marathon debut.

Other contenders vying for the top spot include Cosmas Kiplimo from Kenya, boasting a 2:09:44 personal best and a third-place finish in the Geneva Marathon (2:10:44) in Switzerland last October. Sammy Rotich, a Kenyan who secured victory at the Austin Marathon (2:14:25) and achieved a personal best of 2:10:08 at Grandma's Marathon in 2022, will also be a force to be reckoned with. Ethiopia's Belay Tilahun Bezabh, winner of the 2019 NYC Half Marathon and with notable performances in Hamburg and Dalian Marathons, completes the formidable lineup.

Given the impressive credentials of these elite runners, the event organizers are optimistic about witnessing one of the fastest men's races in the history of the Los Angeles Marathon. 

The current fastest time ever recorded in Los Angeles is Ethiopia's Markos Geneti's remarkable 2:06:35 effort in 2011 on the Stadium to Sea course. The Stadium to Stars route's course record is held by Ethiopia's Bayelign Teshager, who clocked 2:08:26 in 2020, setting the stage for an exciting showdown among these elite athletes.

(03/08/2024) ⚡AMP
by Michezo Afrika
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Los Angeles Marathon

Los Angeles Marathon

The LA Marathon is an annual running event held each spring in Los Angeles, Calif. The 26.219 mile (42.195 km) footrace, inspired by the success of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games, has been contested every year since 1986. While there are no qualifying standards to participate in the Skechers Performnce LA Marathon, runners wishing to receive an official time must...

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Dr. Kris Sheppard explains how your shoe may be helping–or hindering–your stride

Shoe offset, also known as heel drop, refers to the difference in height between the heel and forefoot of a running shoe. This feature influences a runner’s stride and can have implications for injury susceptibility. We spoke to Dr. Kris Sheppard, a chiropractor at the Runner’s Academy in Toronto, to understand how the heel drop in your shoe may be impacting your running.

How does shoe offset affect running stride?

Low-drop shoes may have a drop of between 0 mm and 6 mm, whereas a higher-drop shoe will generally be between 8 mm and 12 mm. Sheppard explains that a lower heel-toe drop in running shoes can decrease inward knee motion (knee adduction), which has been associated with knee and hip issues in running. A lower drop can also reduce load at the patellar femoral joint (knee joint) by approximately 30 per cent.

“Some studies have shown that zero-drop shoes can encourage a midfoot strike, which was once considered to be protective overall,” says Sheppard. “And a midfoot strike can also help reduce forces on the patellar femoral joint.”

During the minimalist shoe trend, it was believed that lower-drop shoes were superior, however recent research suggests otherwise.

Is heel-striking bad?

Some experts suggest that higher-drop shoes encourage heel striking, which is thought to be “bad.” But Sheppard points out that heel striking is not actually the problem; the problem is that it usually leads to overstriding. More on that in a minute.

“Lower [drop] shoes have been shown to encourage a midfoot strike rather than a heel strike,” says Sheppard. “It is important to note that heel striking does not necessarily equate to overstriding. Interestingly, research has shown that the majority of runners, including elite runners like [former marathon world record holder Eliud] Kipchoge, actually land with their rear foot.”

Overstriding occurs when the foot and ankle land in front of the knee, rather than directly under the knee with the shin in a vertical position. “Imagine landing on a trampoline with your foot and ankle in front of your knee; this would result in a rebound backwards, regardless of the foot strike pattern,” he says. Over-striding increases horizontal braking forces in the body, which has been shown to increase the risk of injury–as well as slowing runners down.

It is worth mentioning that the new “super shoes” with carbon and spring-type components work with the heel-toe offset to drive runners faster and more efficiently toward the big toe, but this is only effective if landing on the rear foot.

Is a higher or lower offset better for your Achilles tendons? 

“Contrary to common belief, a higher drop does not increase the risk of Achilles tendon injury,” says Sheppard. “In fact, a higher drop has been shown to help with Achilles tendon pain.”

However, the body’s tissues adapt to the way they have been loaded. If a runner has always been using a higher drop shoe and suddenly switches to a lower offset, the tissues are at greater risk of injury. To mitigate this risk, a gradual transition is recommended. For example, a small change of 2 mm can be made over a period of six months by incorporating low-offset shoes into training cycles once or twice a week. This strategy can help adapt the tendons to a lower drop and reduce the risk of injury.

Should runners buy high or low-offset shoes? Are some runners better suited to one or the other?

“In general, it is not recommended to make drastic changes in the drop of the shoe you have been consistently using if it has been working well for you,” says Sheppard. “However, if a runner is prone to knee pain, a shoe with a lower shoe may be beneficial.” This means that if you buy a new shoe you haven’t worn before, make sure the new shoe’s drop isn’t significantly lower than what you’re used to–or if it is, incorporate it into your routine gradually to avoid injury.

On the other hand, Sheppard notes that if someone is susceptible to Achilles tendon issues, a higher drop may be more suitable. He adds again that making significant changes in shoe offset can increase the risk of injury, so it is important to proceed with caution and consider personal factors and injury history when selecting running shoes.

(03/08/2024) ⚡AMP
by Brittany Hambleton
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Gotytom Gebreslase hopes to break Nahoya course record

In advance of the highly anticipated race scheduled for this Sunday, March 10, 2024, the Nagoya Women’s Marathon held a pre-race press conference for the invited elite athletes today in Nagoya, Japan.

Gotytom Gebreslase (ETH), 2022 Oregon World Champion and 2023 Budapest World Championships silver medalist said, “My goal for Sunday is to run under two hours 18 minutes, and if the weather and pacemakers are good, I will try to break the course record of 2:17:18.” Her competitor Eunice Chebichii Chumba of Bahrain, 2023 Asian Games Champion said, “My preparation has been going well, and my focus will be to improve my personal best of 2:20:02.”

For Japanese athletes, the Nagoya Women’s Marathon 2024 will be the last chance to win a place in the Paris Olympics team by beating the new national record of 2:18:59 just set by Honami Maeda this January.

The 2020 Tokyo Olympians Ayuko Suzuki will aim to break the target of 2:18:59 so she can compete in the Olympics again to show what she really can do, adding that she was ready to turn the support of the local spectators of her hometown Aichi into strength. Sharing the same goal with Ayuko, Rika Kaseda commented that she had prepared for a high-speed race and would challenge herself to keep up with the pace of other fast athletes to grab the last ticket for Paris 2024.

In addition to these top elite athletes, many recreational runners will join the Nagoya Women’s Marathon 2024 from home and abroad, making it an exciting race with 18,000 participants. All finishers will be presented with an event’s exclusively designed Tiffany & Co. pendant and a New Balance T-shirt as the finisher prize.

Sunday’s race will be streamed live free of charge to 37 countries and regions (Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Brazil, Brunei, Cambodia, Chile, Colombia, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Macau, Malaysia, Mexico, Monaco, Myanmar, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Romania, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom, and United States of America) on the race’s official website at https://womens-marathon.nagoya/en/broadcast.php. Stay tuned for the race to start at 9:10 a.m. on Sunday, March 10, 2024, Japan time.

(03/08/2024) ⚡AMP
by AIMS
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Nagoya Women's Marathon

Nagoya Women's Marathon

The Nagoya Women's Marathon named Nagoya International Women's Marathon until the 2010 race, is an annual marathon race for female runners over the classic distance of 42 km and 195 metres, held in Nagoya, Japan in early March every year. It holds IAAF Gold Label road race status. It began in 1980 as an annual 20-kilometre road race held in...

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Purity Komen retires after being slapped with six-year ban by Athletics Integrity Unit

Purity Komen, 25, has decided to retire after the Athletics Integrity Unit slapped her with a six-year ban for the Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone), Evading Sample Collection.

After finding herself on the wrong side of the Athletics Integrity Unit, Purity Komen thought it would be wise to quit the sport and avoid the punishment but the AIU still gave a dose of her own medicine.

Komen who beat Ruth Chepng’etich during the 2023 Istanbul Half Marathon was slapped with a six-year ban by the AIU after a series of violations. Komen’s ban began on July 6, 2023 and she was punished for the Presence of a Prohibited Substance (Norandrosterone), Evading Sample Collection.

Norandrosterone is a Prohibited Substance under the WADA 2022 Prohibited List under the category S1.1 Anabolic Androgenic Steroids. It is a NonSpecified Substance prohibited at all times.

On May 12, 2023, A Doping Control Officer ( DCO) and a Blood Collection Officer arrived in Iten to test Komen out-of-competition but she was nowhere to be found.

After communicating with the two personnel and giving them wrong directions, Komen switched off her phone and the officers could not trace. She later reached out to the AIU saying: “Thank you I got the email. I read everything and I understood all the information.

“I would like to request for more 14 days, since I had prolonged back injury I seek medication from different hospitals. Thus, I need to provide accurate information about my medication thank you.”

On July 13 last year, the AIU granted the Athlete an extension until July 24 to provide her explanation for the Adverse Analytical Finding. However, Komen failed to submit any explanation for the Adverse Analytical Finding by the extended deadline (or at all).

On November 13, the AIU wrote to Komen and granted her an extension until no later than November 20 to provide an explanation for the Adverse Analytical Finding and the potential violation of Rule 2.3 ADR.

On the same day, Komen wrote to the AIU via WhatsApp saying: “Thank you for your information, I accept I did a mistake unknowingly but am sorry, am no longer interested in running career.”

After that, Komen failed to respond or to return the admission of anti-doping rule violations and acceptance of consequences form signed by February 28, 2024.

(03/08/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Former NCAA coach gets five years in prison for tricking athletes into sending nude photos

Steve Waithe, a former college track and field jumps coach with Northeastern University, Penn State University and the University of Tennessee, has been sentenced to five years in prison for setting up fake social media and emails in an attempt to trick his athletes into sending him nude photos of themselves.

The 31-year-old was sentenced Wednesday to five years behind bars, pleading guilty to 12 counts of wire fraud, one count of conspiracy to commit computer fraud and one count of computer fraud. He was also found guilty of cyberstalking one victim through text messages and Instagram, as well as by hacking into her Snapchat account.

Waithe reportedly asked for the phones of his female athletes so he could use them to film the women’s form in practice and at meets. According to a press release from the United States Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts, Waithe was seen “scrolling through” athletes’ phones on multiple occasions.

Prosecutors said he also made the fake social media accounts using the names of two female personas “Katie Janovich” and “Kathryn Svoboda” to contact women, saying he had found compromising photos of them online. He would then offer to help the women get the photos removed, asking them to send additional nude or semi-nude photos that he could use for “reverse image searches.”

Prosecutors said Waithe “left behind a devastating path riddled literally with dozens of victims,” and called for him to be jailed for 84 months, including the 17 months he has already served since his arrest in 2021, along with 36 months of supervised release. They accused him of getting photos from more than 50 victims and trying to get them from another 72. According to The Boston Globe, a half-dozen of his victims spoke at the sentencing, some using their first names and many appearing close to tears.

Waithe was a former NCAA All-American triple-jumper at Penn State, where he went on to win several Big Ten conference titles and a silver medal at the 2014 North American, Central American and Caribbean Championships (NACAC) in Kamloops, B.C.

After serving his sentence, Waithe will be banned from coaching at the collegiate level and will be listed on the banned coaches list by the U.S. Center for Safe Sport.

 

(03/07/2024) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Here’s why you run faster in a crowd

For many runners, the familiar struggle of maintaining motivation through training sessions is transformed into a surge of energy on race day, when they’re surrounded by fellow competitors and enthusiastic spectators. Sure, being in a crowd can make you feel excited, but have you ever wondered why, exactly, you’re capable of kicking it up a notch in these moments? The concept of performing better in front of others is a psychological phenomenon known as social facilitation—something that has been studied for a long time. You really can run faster on race day, and here’s why.

Why do people act differently when watched?

Social facilitation is the idea that an audience can serve as a potent motivator, and while the concept is far from new to science, only recently have neuroscientists begun to determine what happens in the brain when people are being watched, and why, exactly, their performance improves. As reported recently in Discover Magazine, humans are reward-motivated, whether by a dollar amount or by an adoring audience, and it seems that during social facilitation, social areas of the brain interact with value areas to help us perform better.

In a study published in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, researchers investigated the neural mechanisms behind social facilitation. Participants engaged in a task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), revealing heightened activity in brain regions associated with processing the presence of an audience as a rewarding stimulus. When we have an audience, the brain processes the resulting stimuli as rewards that inspire enhanced performance and the observed boost in motivation and ability.

Does it always work?

Research emphasizes that the effectiveness of social facilitation is context-dependent. A report in the International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, analyzin

g 82 studies with more than 7,000 participants, demonstrated that the type of task people engaged in significantly influenced social facilitation outcomes.

Generally, conditioning activities like running or skiing tend to thrive with an audience, while tasks requiring co-ordination may experience hindrances. However, the absence of spectators during the COVID-19 pandemic uncovered intriguing exceptions. A 2021 study compared results from the World Cup biathlon during the pandemic, when athletes did not have an audience, to results during previous World Cups. Research showed differences between men and women athletes, with male participants excelling in conditioning tasks (skiing) with an audience, but struggling in co-ordination tasks (shooting). Conversely, female athletes exhibited better shooting performance with an audience but faced challenges in the skiing portion.

The discovery of these gender-specific distinctions highlights the need for more inclusive research, as historical studies predominantly focused on male participants. Future research might also explore the potential of visualizing an audience to spark motivation, offering intriguing possibilities for mental training techniques.

(03/07/2024) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Two-time Olympian Suguru Osako plans to run in marathon at Paris Olympics

Two-time Olympian Suguru Osako said Monday that he plans to represent Japan in the men's marathon at the Paris Olympics, having been coy over his participation.

The 32-year-old had provisionally earned the third and final Japanese slot after finishing third in October's Marathon Grand Championship. No runner from the country has since met the Olympic qualification benchmark set by the Japan Association of Athletics Federations through Sunday's Tokyo Marathon, sealing Osako's spot.

Osako, who clarified his latest stance on his YouTube channel, had previously claimed, "The Olympics is an important race, but not something to be fixated on as much as people think."

He ran 5,000 and 10,000 meters at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics before coming sixth in the marathon at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics. He retired after his second games but returned in 2022.

Osako also said he will run the Boston Marathon, where he made his racing debut in 2017, as scheduled on April 15.

"I'm excited I might be able to notice something new there," he said.

Naoki Koyama and Akira Akasaki punched their tickets to Paris after finishing in the top two at October's race.

(03/07/2024) ⚡AMP
by The Japan Times
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Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Paris 2024 Olympic Games

For this historic event, the City of Light is thinking big! Visitors will be able to watch events at top sporting venues in Paris and the Paris region, as well as at emblematic monuments in the capital visited by several millions of tourists each year. The promise of exceptional moments to experience in an exceptional setting! A great way to...

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Mary Moraa confident of breaking Caster Semenya's 600m world record

Mary Moraa has revealed that breaking Caster Semenya's 600m world record is among her many plans this season.

In her build-up to breaking the 800m world record, reigning world 800m champion Mary Moraa will be keen to attack the 600m world record.

Moraa explained that her body is responding well to training and she is clearly on fire owing to her dominant exploits during the African Games national trials.

Kisii Express won the 400m final of the race to cut a direct ticket to the continental showpiece scheduled for Accra, Ghana.

“I will go for the 600m where I will attack the world record…I don’t know where I’ll compete exactly but I’m going for the record,” Moraa said.

The 600m world record currently stands at 1:21.77 and was set by South Africa’s Caster Semenya back in 2017 in Berlin, Germany.

Meanwhile, after the African Games, Moraa will return to the country to compete in the Kip Keino Classic where she also intends to shine.

She also noted that she is impressed with her form this season and cannot wait to see how the campaign will turn out for her.

“I’m happy to have come here and run well and my body is coming up slowly and I’m excited to see how the season turns out,” Moraa said.

The 23-year-old had an amazing 2023 season, winning her first world title and becoming only the third Kenyan woman to claim the 800m title at the World Championships.

This she achieved after clocking a Personal Best time of 1:56.03 to win the race ahead of Great Britain’s Keely Hodgkinson and Athing Mu. She now looks forward to enjoying an amazing 2024 season, with the Olympic Games in Paris, France being in the cards.

(03/07/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Beatrice Chepkoech reveals ambitious plans to end Olympics medal drought

World 3,000m steeplechase record holder Beatrice Chepkoech has explained how she is planning to end her Olympics medal drought after disappointing outings in previous editions.

World 3,000m steeplechase record holder Beatrice Chepkoech is keen to win the only medal still missing in her collection, the Olympics.

Chepkoech has won gold at the World Championships (2019) as well as silver in 2023, another silver at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, the year she won one of her back-to-back Diamond League trophies, World Cross-Country gold and she is back from claiming bronze at the World Indoor Championships.

Besides, she is also the world record holder over the distance, but the Olympics has eluded her, finishing fourth at the 2016 Rio Games before seventh place in Tokyo five years later and she is keen to right those wrongs at the 2024 edition in Paris.

“This is so far a very wonderful year for me. I have struggled with injuries in the past but now I am back to my best and ready for the Olympics where I want to win a medal,” Chepkoech told Capital Sport.

“I ran in my first Olympics in 2016 in Rio and Paris will be the third time for me to compete. I want to mark it with a medal in the 3,000m steeplechase because that is the only medal I am yet to clinch.”

Chepkoech won her first Indoor medal on Saturday night, marking a significant achievement with a new National Record and a Personal Best time of 8:22.68, with American runner Elle St Pierre claiming victory in a new championship record time of 8:20.87, narrowly outpacing Ethiopia's Gudaf Tsegay, who secured a silver medal with a time of 8:21.13.

The 32-year-old wasted no time after the event as she jetted into the country and headed straight to the African Games trials at Nyayo Stadium where she won the 5,000m in 15:29.69 on Wednesday to clinch her ticket to the event slated to begin in Accra, Ghana on Friday.

Embu’s Mary Mananu clocked 15:45.45 to finish second behind Chepkoech with Sandrafelis Chebet of Lemotit Athletics camp completing the podium in 16:01.33.

“I want to run in the 5,000m at the African Games because I am looking to better my endurance and then afterwards, I want to work on my speedwork as well,” added Chepkoech.

(03/06/2024) ⚡AMP
by Joel Omotto
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Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Paris 2024 Olympic Games

For this historic event, the City of Light is thinking big! Visitors will be able to watch events at top sporting venues in Paris and the Paris region, as well as at emblematic monuments in the capital visited by several millions of tourists each year. The promise of exceptional moments to experience in an exceptional setting! A great way to...

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Trevor Uyemura and Abigayle Money claimed victories at the 2024 Little Rock Marathon

On a day that showcased the epitome of endurance and speed, Trevor Uyemura and Abigayle Money emerged victorious at the 2024 Little Rock Marathon. Uyemura, hailing from Vienna, Virginia, clinched the men's title with a blistering pace, clocking in at 2:42:58.8. Meanwhile, Abigayle Money, representing Fayetteville, Arkansas, dominated the women's division with her impressive finish time of 2:51:37.4.

Race Day Highlights

The Little Rock Marathon, known for its challenging course and enthusiastic community support, did not disappoint this year. From the early hours, the streets of Little Rock buzzed with excitement as runners from across the nation gathered to test their limits. Uyemura's and Money's victories were not just personal triumphs but also inspirational achievements that underscored the marathon's competitive spirit. Their performances set a high bar for future competitors and added to the event's growing reputation as a must-participate race for marathon enthusiasts.

Behind the Victories

Both Uyemura and Money trained rigorously in the months leading up to the marathon, their victories a testament to their dedication, strategy, and resilience. Uyemura, at 40, proved that age is but a number when it comes to long-distance running, while Money's win highlighted the growing prominence of female athletes in competitive sports. Their successes are a source of inspiration for aspiring marathoners and a reminder of the physical and mental fortitude required to conquer such a demanding race.

Looking Ahead

The 2024 Little Rock Marathon may have concluded, but the stories of Uyemura and Money will undoubtedly fuel the aspirations of many future participants. As the dust settles on this year's event, the focus shifts to the next race, with athletes around the world already setting their sights on Little Rock for 2025. The marathon's ability to draw talent and foster a sense of community among runners is a testament to its enduring appeal and the unifying power of sports.

The victories of Trevor Uyemura and Abigayle Money at the 2024 Little Rock Marathon are not just remarkable achievements in their running careers but also significant milestones for the event itself. Their performances, underpinned by sheer determination and hard work, set new records and exemplify the spirit of marathon running. As the Little Rock community and the wider world of athletics celebrate their accomplishments, the anticipation for next year's marathon is already building, promising another chapter in the storied history of this beloved race.

 

(03/06/2024) ⚡AMP
by Salman Khan
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Little Rock Marathon

Little Rock Marathon

The mission of the Little Rock Marathon is provide a premier event open to athletes of all abilities, while promoting a healthy lifestyle through running and walking and raising money for Little Rock Parks & Recreation. Since inception in 2003, more than $1,093,000 has been donated to Little Rock Parks & Recreation. Little Rock Marathon Race Weekend is held the...

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Kenyan Bernard Koech wins Paris Half Marathon

Kenya’s Bernard Koech took the top honors at the Harmonie Mutuelle Semi de Paris (Paris Half) held on Sunday (03) in Paris, France.

Koech was followed in second place by France’s Mehdi Frere in 1:01.15 with his compatriot Jorum Okombo closing the podium three finishes in 1:02.12.

Emmanuel Roudolff and Donovan Christien both from France finished in fourth and fifth in respective time of 1:02.11 and 1:02.28.

LEADING RESULTS

21KM MEN

Bernard Koech              (KEN) 1:00.45

Mehdi Frere                  (MOR) 1:01.15

Jorum Okombo             (KEN) 1:02.02

Emmanuel Roudolff     (FRA)  1:02.11

Donovan Christien        (FRA) 1:02.28

(03/06/2024) ⚡AMP
by James Koech
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Semi de Paris

Semi de Paris

Paris Half Marathon (French: Semi de Paris) is an annual half marathon held normally every March in Paris, France since 1993. It currently holds IAAF Bronze Label status. Kenya's Stanley Biwott is the men's course record holder, with his winning time of 59:44 from the 2012 race. The women's course record is held by Nigsti Haftu (ETH), who ran a...

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Jim Walmsley, Mathieu Blanchard will return to UTMB in 2024

2023 UTMB champion Jim Walmsley and 2022 second-place finisher Mathieu Blanchard have confirmed they will appear at this year’s Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (UTMB) final, which takes place in Chamonix, France on Aug. 30, according to a report by iRunFar. A number of other ultratrail elites have also been announced, including the U.K.’s Tom Evans, who finished third in 2022 and who won Western States 100 in 2023, and Canada’s Christian Meier, the former pro cyclist who won the 145-km TDS race last year. 

On the women’s side, Canada’s Marianne Hogan (who finished second in 2022) is confirmed, as are 2022 champion Katie Schide of the U.S., France’s Claire Bannwarth and New Zealand’s Ruth Croft (who won Western States in 2022). (Three-time UTMB champion and course record holder Courtney Dauwalter does not appear on the list.)

Four-time champion Kilian Jornet and 2023 second-place finisher Zach Miller will also not be returning. After the October, 2023 announcement by UTMB and its minority partner, the Ironman Group, of a new race in Whistler, B.C. in 2024, and the Dec. 1 announcement that UTMB livestream announcer Corrine Malcolm had been fired, the two publicly questioned the organization’s decisions and its treatment of athletes. There was talk of a boycott, though Jornet and Miller dispute this; in the wake of all of this, regular discussions between UTMB and the Pro Trail Runners Association (PTRA), of which Jornet is a founding member, became more frequent, with a view to smoothing relations between athletes and the race. 

Walmsley moved to France for two years to hone his mountain-running skills before finally winning UTMB on his fifth try in 2023 (he Walmsley first ran UTMB in 2017, finishing fifth; he DNF’d in 2018 and again in 2021, then finished fourth in 2022). Blanchard, who has returned to France after living in Montreal for a few years (and taking out Canadian citizenship), finished fourth last year after following Jornet onto the podium in 2022. Hogan has been dealing with injuries for much of the last year and a half since her podium finish in 2022.

(03/06/2024) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
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North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

Mountain race, with numerous passages in high altitude (>2500m), in difficult weather conditions (night, wind, cold, rain or snow), that needs a very good training, adapted equipment and a real capacity of personal autonomy. It is 6:00pm and we are more or less 2300 people sharing the same dream carefully prepared over many months. Despite the incredible difficulty, we feel...

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Former World Cross Country Champion Irine Cheptai runs marathon debut in Hamburg, Katharina Steinruck chases special record time

Irine Cheptai, Kenya’s World Cross Country Champion from 2017, will run her debut marathon in Hamburg on 28th April. This was announced by the organisers of the Haspa Marathon Hamburg, who released some of the top women’s contenders and presented Germany’s Katharina Steinruck during a press conference.

While Steinruck will chase a special family record on the fast Hamburg course it is Winfridah Moseti who heads the current women’s start list. The Kenyan has a personal best of 2:20:55. 14,000 runners are expected to compete in Germany’s biggest spring marathon on 28th April. Online registration for the race is still possible at: www.haspa-marathon-hamburg.de

Irine Cheptai has been very successful on the track as well before she focussed more on road running. In 2021 she was sixth in the Olympic 10,000 m final in Tokyo and a year later the Kenyan won the 10,000 m silver medal in the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham. Then she showed very promising half marathon races, culminating in a 64:53 PB in Valencia where she was second. With this time Cheptai was the fourth fastest half marathoner in the world in 2023. 

Hamburg has seen great debut marathons in the past. In 2013 it was Eliud Kipchoge who won with a course record of 2:05:30. Two years ago Ethiopia’s Yalemzerf Yehualaw ran an unofficial world debut record of 2:17:23 which still stands as Hamburg’s course record. There are two more debutants on the women’s start list who could do very well on 28th April: Kenya’s Nelly Jepchumba has a half marathon PB of 67:00 while Roselida Jepketer of Bahrain has run 68:40 for the half. 

Winfridah Moseti ran a huge personal best of 2:20:55 when she was runner-up in last year’s Frankfurt Marathon. While the Kenyan will want to build on this performance Frankfurt’s third place finisher will be among her rivals in Hamburg: Sharon Chelimo improved to 2:22:07 last October. Ethiopia’s Kidusan Alema and Canada’s record holder Natasha Wodak, who have personal records of 2:22:28 and 2:23:12 respectively, will also run their spring marathon in Hamburg.

Katharina Steinruck will be very much in the national focus when she hopes to break her mother’s family record. It was exactly 25 years ago when Katrin Dörre-Heinig, the bronze medallist of the 1988 Olympic marathon in Seoul, won the Hamburg Marathon with 2:24:35. For many years this was the German marathon record. “It is my aim to break my Mum’s record and it would be great if I could do it in Hamburg,“ said 34 year-old Katharina Steinruck, who is coached by her mother and improved to 2:24:56 in Osaka at the end of January. “Katha“ Steinruck returns to the race for the first time since 10 years and has good memories.

In 2013 and in 2014 she clocked personal bests of 2:34:20 and 2:33:56 in Hamburg as a young athlete. Ten years later running around ten minutes faster will be the goal. And there could not be a more fitting race than the Haspa Marathon Hamburg to break the family record. 

(03/06/2024) ⚡AMP
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Haspa Marathon Hamburg

Haspa Marathon Hamburg

The HASPA MARATHON HAMBURG is Germany’s biggest spring marathon and since 1986 the first one to paint the blue line on the roads. Hamburcourse record is fast (2:05:30), the metropolitan city (1.8 million residents) lets the euphoric atmosphere spill over and carry you to the finish. Make this experience first hand and follow the Blue Line....

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World record in danger! Three of the top four fastest women confirmed for London Marathon

The world record will be in danger with three of the top four fastest women in the history having been confirmed for the 2024 London Marathon.

World marathon record holder Tigst Assefa will brace up for a tough battle at the 2024 London Marathon that has attracted three of the top four fastest women in history.

The strong field assembled for the assignment on Sunday, April 21 will be keen to ensure that the women’s world record goes down one more time after being lowered during the 2023 Berlin Marathon.

The record was set by Assefa, who became the new world record holder when she ran an incredible 2:11:53, obliterating the previous best mark of 2:14:04 set by Brigid Kosgei during the 2019 Chicago Marathon.

Assefa and Kosgei will now clash for the first time with Kosgei going for the world record which she noted belongs to Kenya.

Others with eyes on the record include Ruth Chepng’etich, the fourth-fastest woman of all time (2:14:18), Peres Jepchirchir (Kenya), the reigning Olympic champion, and Yalemzerf Yehualaw (Ethiopia), the 2022 TCS London Marathon champion.

Pacemakers will be tasked with keeping the leading women on track for the women’s-only world record, which is possible at the TCS London Marathon as the elite women run a separate race to the elite men and masses.

Hugh Brasher, Event Director of the TCS London Marathon, said: “We are in a golden age of women’s marathon running.

“When Paula Radcliffe ran her incredible world record of 2:15:25 at the 2003 London Marathon, we had to wait 16 years for Brigid Kosgei to beat it.

“But since then, a further four women have run faster than Paula’s time including Tigst Assefa, who lowered the world record even further with her stunning run in Berlin last year.

“Despite this, the women’s-only world record of 2:17:01, set by the great Mary Keitany here at the London Marathon in 2017, has amazingly stayed intact.”

He added that however, he suspects that with Assefa, Kosgei and the likes of Chepng’etich, Jepchirchir and Yehualaw in the field, the world record is going to be under serious threat at the 2024 TCS London Marathon.

(03/05/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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TCS London Marathon

TCS London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Geoffrey Kamworor out to challenge six Ethiopians for the 2024 London Marathon crown

Multiple World Cross-country champion Geoffrey Kamworor will try his luck one more time at the 2024 London Marathon, going up against some of the greatest marathoners from Ethiopia.

The men’s elite field at the 2024 London Marathon will see Geoffrey Kamworor take on former clubmate Kenenisa Bekele.

Kamworor will be keen to improve on his second-place finish during last year’s edition of the event while Bekele will seek to have a great build-up toward the Olympic Games in Paris, France.

Bekele, widely regarded as one of the greatest marathoners the world has ever known, will be looking to cement his name further in the streets of London.

He recently changed his management and will be keen to impress them after finishing fourth at last year’s Valencia Marathon. He will also be looking to bounce back after failing to finish the race during last year’s edition of the race.

Meanwhile, the elite men’s race is headlined by reigning TCS New York City Marathon champion Tamirat Tola who will also be looking to continue his hot streak in the streets of the English capital.

The seventh-fastest man in history Mosinet Geremew of Ethiopia (2:02:55) and Kenya's Alexander Mutis, who was runner-up at the 2023 Valencia Marathon in a time of 2:03:11, have also confirmed to be on the start line on Sunday, April 21.

From a British perspective, Emile Cairess returns after becoming the third-fastest Brit in history when he ran 2:08:07 on his TCS London Marathon debut last year.

He will be joined by Callum Hawkins, who has twice finished fourth at the World Championships and will be making his first appearance at the London Marathon since setting his PB of 2:08:14 at the 2019 event.

(03/05/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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TCS London Marathon

TCS London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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David Bett Kiprotich wins the San Blas Half Marathon

David Bett Kiprotich did not climb the famous El Ajoguillo hill first, which almost always helps predict the winner of the San Blas Half Marathon. However, Kiprotich broke that routine by conquering the international test this Sunday, where the runners who won the local branch set new personal bests for the distance.

Kiprotich won with an advance in the descent after El Ajoguillo, the famous hill sector located at kilometer 15 of the 21-kilometer test. He climbed second in that sector and on the descent he overtook Kenyan Peter Njeru, who had been first since kilometer five and was unable to maintain his position in the final six kilometers of the race.

Meanwhile, Arnaldo Martinez from Coam and Paola Figueroa from Guaynab won the national category with new personal times, in addition to a top 10 for Martinez on the arrival list.

The pride of the town of San Blas crossed the finish line in ninth place overall.

“Push. I knew I could win the race because I trained well,” said Njeru, who crossed the finish line with a time of one hour, three minutes and 18 seconds (1:03:18). He escorted Mulatie to the finish line with 1:03.26.

Some 12 runners from the continent of Africa ran in Coamo, which registered a record number of 2,100 runners and which, as always, had the support of the Coamenos motivating the runners on both sides of the route to the finish line, which is located one block away. from the recreation square.

Among those Africans, Kenyan Yoyland Chemutay dominated the second half of the race and was the winner of the women’s event with a time of 1:14.19. She was followed by the Ethiopian Mercuria Alem.

Martinez, who ran the first kilometers with the group of Africans, finished with a time of 1:08.11, which is a personal best. His best time was 1:09.54. The Coameno felt satisfied, although he believes that he could have made a better record.

“It was a personal best, although it is not the time I expected. But I’m happy. I know that little by little I am reaching the positions,” Martinez said.

Martinez finished in ninth position overall. He was the second non-African in the top ten after Chilean Hugo Gatrileo.

Jose Gonzalez and Kenneth Figueroa finished second and third in the national category with 1:09.19 and 1:09.39, respectively.

For her part, Figueroa finished first after an advance in El Ajoguillo with a time of 1:19.34, which is also a personal best.

His best time was 1:21, he said.

“I improved a lot and I owe it to my coach, because last year was tough with injuries. But this year I am better, stronger,” said the 26-year-old runner, mentioning her coach Jose de los Santos Alvarez Mesa.

She was followed in the national category by Paola Ramos with 1:24.40 and Barbara Quiles with 1:26.24.

(03/05/2024) ⚡AMP
by Kumneger Media
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San Blas Half Marathon

San Blas Half Marathon

Join San Blas Half Marathon It is a pleasure to invite you to the annual edition of the world’s most famous half marathon, Medio Maratón San Blas, here in our beloved city of Coamo. It has been 54 years that the people of Coamo have ?proudly received thousands of visitors, especially the international and national athletes who grace this event....

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Joan Benoit Samuelson captures World Majors six-star medal at Tokyo Marathon

On Sunday morning, running icon Joan Benoit Samuelson claimed her sixth and final Abbott World Marathon Major star, clocking 3:42:18 at the Tokyo Marathon. The American distance running legend added another remarkable chapter to a storied career that includes wins at the 1979 and 1983 Boston Marathon and the 1985 Chicago Marathon.

The Abbott World Marathon Majors include the Tokyo Marathon, Boston Marathon, London Marathon, Berlin Marathon, Chicago Marathon and the New York City Marathon. In 2022, Benoit Samuelson checked her fifth major off her list, winning her age group at the London Marathon in 3:20:20; her daughter Abby ran as well, finishing just under three hours.

From Cape Elizabeth, Maine, Benoit Samuelson first gained international acclaim when she became the inaugural women’s Olympic marathon champion at the 1984 Summer Games in Los Angeles. Her groundbreaking victory set the stage for a career defined by trailblazing achievements. Benoit Samuelson held the fastest time for an American woman at the Chicago Marathon for 32 years after her 1985 victory, and her time at the Boston Marathon was the fastest time by an American woman at that race for 28 years Her personal best of 2:21:21 is still eighth on the U.S. all-time list.

Benoit Samuelson is the only woman in the world to have run sub-three-hour marathons in five consecutive decades, her first in 1979 and her most recent in 2010. At the 2019 Berlin Marathon, she ran 3:02, nearly becoming the first woman to clock a sub-three in six consecutive decades. In 2019, she ran the Boston Marathon to celebrate her then 40-year-old victory from 1979, wearing the same outfit she had worn four decades before—a backward ball cap and a Bowdoin College singlet (she won her age category, finishing in 3:04:00, only 28:45 minutes slower than her time in 1979).

Beyond her accomplishments on the road, Samuelson has been an advocate for women’s participation in sports and has played a pivotal role in advancing opportunities for women athletes. After the 2022 London Marathon, Benoit Samuelson told the media: “I’m blessed to have longevity in this sport. It doesn’t owe me anything, but I feel I owe my sport.”

(03/05/2024) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

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New Zealand’s Geordie Beamish shocks field for gold in men’s 1,500m final

Geordie Beamish of Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand, pulled off an incredible upset to take gold in the men’s 1,500m on the final day of competition at the 2024 World Indoor Championships in Glasgow.

Beamish was not expected to win, with the 1,500m not being his main event. However, he bided his time and entered the final lap in eighth place before surging down the final straight to become New Zealand’s first world indoor champion in the 1,500m event, clocking a personal best of 3:36.54.

“I trusted my closing speed against anyone,” said. Beamish to Canadian Running post-race.

Cole Hocker and Hobbs Kessler of Team USA claimed silver and bronze, respectively, with times of 3:36.69 and 3:36.72.

The door was open for a new champion in the men’s 1,500m with the absence of Jakob Ingebrigtsen due to injury and reigning world (outdoor) champion Josh Kerr, who ran and won the 3,000m distance instead.  

When asked if Beamish would run the 1,500m in Paris instead of the steeplechase, he declined. “I don’t think I can run a 1,500m in 3:29,” he said. “I enjoy the steeple a lot, and I think I have my best chance to medal in that event.”

Vancouver’s Kieran Lumb finished 13th in the 1,500m final. “I’m disappointed,” says Lumb. “I felt I was going to really do something special today, and that wasn’t the case.”

Beamish’s medal capped off a day to remember for New Zealand after Hamish Kerr earlier won gold in the high jump. The small Oceanic island nation finished with four medals (two gold, two silver), their most ever at an indoor world championship.

In the women’s 1,500m final, it was Ethiopia’s Freweyni Hailu who came out on top in a time of 4:01.46. This is Hailu’s first global title. Her best finish before Glasgow was a fourth-place finish at the Tokyo Olympics in the same event. Americans Nikki Hiltz and Emily MacKay ran personal bests to win silver and bronze. Canada’s Lucia Stafford finished 11th in 4:08.90.

(03/04/2024) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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World Athletics Indoor Championships Glagow 24

World Athletics Indoor Championships Glagow 24

Welcome or fáilte as the Gaelic speakers in Scotland would say, to the digital home of the 19th edition of the World Athletics Indoor Championships taking place in Glasgow in 2024. With the competition fast approaching it’s nearly time to take your seat for one of the hottest sporting tickets in Scotland this year. Glasgow has a proven track record...

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Former NFL player offers world champion Christian Coleman $100,000 to run a 40-yard dash

The newly crowned world 60m champion, Christian Coleman, has been offered USD $100,000 to run a 40-yard dash at full speed. The challenge comes after a University of Texas Longhorns football player Xavier Worthy broke the NFL’s 40-yard dash record (36 metres) at the 2024 NFL Draft Combine on Saturday in Indianapolis.

Worthy, a wide receiver prospect in the 2024 NFL Draft, ran a time of 4.21 seconds on his second of two attempts, breaking the record of 4.22 seconds set by former NFL wide receiver John Ross in 2017. Worthy’s time was instantly compared to the speed of the world’s fastest sprinters, and to prove a point, former NFL quarterback Robert Griffin III said he would give Coleman $100,000 to prove a point.

Coleman previously ran a 40-yard dash during his collegiate track career at the University of Tennessee in 2018, recording a mark of 4.12 seconds. Seven years later, Coleman now has three world sprint titles on his resume, and is widely considered one of the best starters in the world. The argument for Griffin III is that Coleman’s 40-yard dash would show the difference between NFL receivers and world-class sprinters.

On Friday, Coleman reclaimed his world 60m indoor title at the 2024 World Indoor Championships, beating Noah Lyles in the final in a world-leading time of 6.41 seconds. His winning time equates to an average speed of 21 mph (33 km/h) over 60m. When that speed is calculated for the 40-yard dash (36m), it equals a time of 3.90 seconds, well below Worthy’s mark.

Coleman has not come out and said whether he will take up Griffin III’s challenge, but considering it would be an easy way for him to make $100,000, I don’t see why he wouldn’t. Plus, he would settle the debate once and for all.

(03/04/2024) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Nobert Kigen provisionally suspended by AIU for doping

Nobert Kigen is the latest Kenyan athlete to join the list of shame after being provisionally suspended by the AIU for the Presence/Use of Prohibited Substance (Testosterone).

The Athletics Integrity Unit has provisionally suspended Nobert Kigen for the Presence/Use of Prohibited Substance (Testosterone).

Kigen, the 2022 Prague Marathon champion, has not been very competitive in international races since 2018 when he competed in five races.

In 2019, he intended to compete at the Tokyo Marathon but he did not finish the race. He finished third at the 2021 Prague Marathon before proceeding to win the edition of the race in 2022.

The same year, he finished seventh at the Amsterdam Marathon and then finished fourth at the Bangsaen Half Marathon in 2023. He opened his 2024 season with a 10th place finish at the Xiamen Marathon.

Meanwhile, the AIU has also Agnes Mueni Mutua for the Presence/Use of Prohibited Substances (Testosterone, Trimetazidine).

As per the AIU, a Provisional Suspension is when an Athlete or other Person is suspended temporarily from participating in any competition or activity in Athletics prior to a final decision at a hearing conducted under the World Athletics Anti-Doping Rules or the Integrity Code of Conduct. The Kenyan duo are the latest to join the list of shame as they await their verdict.

(03/04/2024) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wafula
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Mary Ngugi, Emmanuel Wafula dazzle at 49th Roma-Ostia half marathon

Kenyans dominated the 49th Roma-Ostia Half Marathon, with victories in both men's and women's categories on Sunday.

Former world half marathon silver medalist, Mary Wacera Ngugi, showcased her enduring class and resolve by clinching victory at the 49th edition of the Roma-Ostia Half Marathon held on Sunday in Rome, Italy.

At 35, the seasoned athlete, who also holds the title of 2021 Boston Marathon silver medalist, entered the race with a personal best of 1:06.29, recorded eight years ago at the Houston Half Marathon. 

Ngugi outpaced her rivals to secure top honors with a commendable time of 1:07.38.

Caroline Korir rounded out the top three, crossing the finish line in 1:09.01, and solidifying the podium positions. 

Ngugi’s victory is not just a personal achievement but also a testament to her commitment to nurturing young talent through her initiative, the Nala Track Club. 

Based in her hometown of Nyahururu, the club aims to empower young girls by providing them with opportunities to engage in athletics, thereby fostering a new generation of champions.

In the men’s category, the competition was equally intense, with Kenya’s Emmanuel Wafula emerging victorious in his debut over the distance, clocking an impressive time of 1:01.10. 

The race was a nail-biter until the very end, with Ethiopia's Yegzaw Bayelign finishing a mere one second behind Wafula. 

Kenyan Kimakal Kipsambu secured the third spot with a time of 1:01.20, while compatriot Asbel Kiplimo finished fourth in 1:02.57.

(03/04/2024) ⚡AMP
by Festus Chuma
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Roma Ostia Half Marathon

Roma Ostia Half Marathon

Italy's most popular half marathon, this road race is a popular event for runners of all abilities. The Roma-Ostia Half Marathon is an annual half marathon road running event which takes place in the spring in Rome, Italy. The course begins in the EUR district of the city and follows a direct south-easterly route to the finish point near the...

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Elle St. Pierre Upsets World Record-Holder to Win First World Championship Title

A year after giving birth, St. Pierre won gold in the 3,000 meters at the World Indoor Championships.

On Saturday, March 2, Elle St. Pierre threw down an electrifying kick to beat two-time world champion Gudaf Tsegay for gold at the 2024 World Indoor Championships. Running for Team USA, St. Pierre won the women’s 3,000 meters in 8:20.87, breaking the American record and championship record. Ethiopia’s Tsegay finished second in 8:21.13, and Beatrice Chepkoech ran a Kenyan national record when she placed third in 8:22.68, rounding out the podium of a thrilling race at Commonwealth Arena in Glasgow, Scotland.

The event began with Tsegay setting an aggressive early pace. With the 5,000-meter world record-holder out in front, Chepkoech, St. Pierre, and Jessica Hull of Australia followed. Running patiently, St. Pierre maintained contact in fourth place for much of the race. Together, the pack passed through the first 1600 meters in 4:29.

By 2,000 meters, the top four created a gap between the rest of the field. With two laps remaining, Tsegay attempted to break away from her rivals but she couldn’t shake Chepkoech and St. Pierre, who looked ready to strike at any moment.

At the bell, St. Pierre began to make her move to the front. To the cheers of a roaring crowd, the 29-year-old passed the Olympic bronze medalist on the homestretch. St. Pierre is the first American in history to win gold in the event. She is now No. 3 on the world all-time list two years after earning silver at the 2022 World Indoor Championships.

“It’s a dream come true,” St. Pierre told reporters after the race. “I don’t think it’s fully sunk in quite yet, but it feels amazing to be here with my family and my teammate, Emily [Mackay], and my coach in Scotland.”

In the mixed zone, St. Pierre said she expected a fast race but knew she could use her miler speed to close well if she put herself in position with the leaders, and that’s exactly what she did.

The victory took place two days before her son, Ivan, celebrates his first birthday. St. Pierre said not racing much last summer allowed her to build up mileage, resulting in a stunning postpartum comeback. “Having a baby has only made me stronger,” she said.

St. Pierre’s increased strength was evident three weeks prior to the World Championships. At the 2024 Millrose Games on February 11, the two-time world indoor medalist broke her own American record when she won the women’s Wanamaker mile in 4:16.41.

With the 2024 Paris Olympics fast approaching, St. Pierre looks poised to make a major leap from her 10th-place finish in the 1500 meters at the Tokyo Games.

(03/03/2024) ⚡AMP
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Kerr delights Glasgow crowd with world indoor 3000m win

Just before the bell sounded in the men’s 3000m final, Josh Kerr made his move, sweeping through to join Selemon Barega at the front of the field with one lap of the track remaining.

Could the Scot who brought down Jakob Ingebrigtsen, the Norwegian prince of the middle distances, in the last 200m of the stunning men’s 1500m final at the outdoor World Championships in Budapest last August do the same to the defending 3000m champion back on home ground at the World Athletics Indoor Championships Glasgow 24?

Indeed, he could. And then some.

The noise threatened to raise the roof in the Glasgow Arena as the pride of Glasgow kicked again halfway down the back straight. Barega, the Olympic champion at 10,000m, was unable to respond.

As Kerr rounded into the home straight, the gold medal was in the bag. He still dipped for the line but with 0.61 to spare.

The time, 7:42.98, was a statistical irrelevance as the double world champion savoured his victory ahead of his US rival Yared Nuguse, who came through to snatch silver in 7:43.59, Barega fading to third in 7:43.64.

Kerr had become the first British man to win the world indoor 3000m title and only the third Scottish athlete to strike world indoor gold in any event.

He wasn’t even born when the Bellshill Bullet Tom McKean hit the bullseye in the men’s 800m and his training partner Yvonne Murray did likewise in the women’s 3000m in Toronto back in the mists of 1993.

Fittingly, McKean and Murray were both in the house to join in the celebrations as Kerr soaked up the applause wrapped in a Scottish Saltire flag.

“For Scotland and for the UK, this is a huge championships,” said the Tokyo Olympic 1500m bronze medallist, who has been based in the United States in Albuquerque since the age of 17.

“I needed to be at my best. It was a hard-fought race.”

It was indeed and Kerr fought the smartest, judging his effort to absolute perfection, as he had in that wonderful world outdoor 1500m final seven months ago.

He was happy to sit back in the pack as Barega and his Ethiopian teammate Getnet Wale toyed with the pace at the front, injecting fleeting surges.

The field remained bunched with 800m remaining, at which point Kerr coolly drifted up into second, behind Wale. It was the perfect position to react to any major move.

That came with 500m remaining, Barega making his way past into the lead. Nuguse’s US teammate Olin Hocker entered the equation too before Kerr closed down Barega at the bell – and proceeded to break not just the Ethiopian runner but the Ethiopian stranglehold on the event.

After wins by Yomif Kejelcha in Portland in 2016 and in Birmingham in 2018, and Barega’s success in Belgrade two years ago, Kerr became the first European winner since Italy’s Gennaro Di Napoli retained the title in Toronto in 1993.

“I just didn't want to short change anyone because I knew I had the support of all Scotland and the UK tonight,” added Kerr, who has raced sparingly on the boards but set a brilliant world indoor two mile best of 8:00.67 in New York on 6 February.

Behind the three medal winners, Wale finished fourth in 7:44.77 and Hacker fifth in 7:45.40.

(03/03/2024) ⚡AMP
by Simon Turnbull for World Athletics
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Tefera takes down Ingebrigtsen to retain world indoor 1500m title

When the Olympic champion met the world indoor champion, something was always going to give. In the end, as Jakob Ingebrigtsen and Samuel Tefera fought towards the line in the men’s 1500m final at the World Athletics Indoor Championships Belgrade 22 on Sunday (20), it was the Norwegian star who had no choice but to concede. 

Not that Ingebrigtsen ever gave up, the 21-year-old trying to summon something – anything – to repel the late charge of Tefera, but it was no use, with the 22-year-old Ethiopian taking gold in 3:32.77, Ingebrigtsen taking silver in 3:33.02, and Kenya’s Abel Kipsang the bronze in 3:33.36. 

Before the race, the head-to-head record between the big two was 11-0 in favour of Ingebrigtsen, but no one beats Samuel Tefera 12 times in a row, not when this is a distance at which he held the world indoor record at 3:31.04 for the past three years, until Ingebrigtsen broke it earlier this year with 3:30.60. 

That race in Lievin, France, in mid-February made the Norwegian the hot favourite for the title in Belgrade, and when the gun fired he adopted similar tactics to the Olympic final in Tokyo, or indeed most races on the circuit. 

He made sure it was fast. 

With Kipsang rocketing through the opening lap in 27.60, Ingebrigtsen waited until the second to hit the front, stringing the field out behind as he passed 400m in 55.81, 800m in 1:53.9 and 1200m in 2:51.16. 

But tracking him all the way, keeping his powder dry, was Tefera, the slightly more measured pace compared to the race in Lievin allowing him to sit in his slipstream into the final bend. Tefera then moved wide off the turn and emptied the tank to edge past his rival up the home straight, retaining his world indoor title with a championship record of 3:32.77. 

“The race was very tough, but I feel very happy now because I became the champion,” said Tefera, who said he had surgery on his achilles tendon last year, an injury picked up during the Tokyo Olympics. 

“I could not do many activities within the training but now I am completely fit,” he said. “I feel normal and I am ready for any kind of races and championships.”

Ingebrigtsen was gracious in defeat, not that he was too pleased about his silver.

“I came here to fight for the gold and it was a good fight,” he said. “I didn’t feel that great. Usually I feel a bit tired from 600 to 800 then it starts to loosen up but that didn’t happen tonight so I’m not 100 percent. Tefera was better than me tonight. I thought I was better than him, having run the record.”

Asked if he would do anything different if the race was run again, he said: “If I knew that I was completely s*** tonight, then of course I’d do a lot of things different, but I didn’t have any factors telling me that before the race.”In third, Kipsang claimed the first global medal of his career, having been edged into fourth at the Olympics last year. Ethiopia’s Teddese Lemi finished fourth in 3:33.59, with Australia’s Ollie Hoare fifth and Britain’s Neil Gourley sixth.

The following day, on his return home after not feeling fully fit, Ingebrigtsen shared a photo of a positive Covid test on his social media and wrote: "Just arrived home in Sandnes, and decided to take a health check after a strange feeling last night. Leading up to the race, everything felt normal, with negative PCR test and several rapid tests. Bad timing but in some way unavoidable. Now it's all about recovering and getting back to training."

(03/03/2024) ⚡AMP
by Cathal Dennehy for World Athletics
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World Athletics Indoor Championships Glagow 24

World Athletics Indoor Championships Glagow 24

Welcome or fáilte as the Gaelic speakers in Scotland would say, to the digital home of the 19th edition of the World Athletics Indoor Championships taking place in Glasgow in 2024. With the competition fast approaching it’s nearly time to take your seat for one of the hottest sporting tickets in Scotland this year. Glasgow has a proven track record...

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Men and women course records set at Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon—the first World Marathon Major of 2024—took place Sunday morning in Japan. In near-perfect conditions, with a starting temperature of about 42 degrees, more than 37,000 runners took to the streets in Japan’s capital city. Course records fell, although several notable pre-race favorites fell short.

Benson Kipruto wins men’s race in a course record

It was a Kenyan sweep in the men’s race: Boston and Chicago Marathon champion Benson Kipruto, 32, of Kenya, won in 2:02:16, a course record by 24 seconds. Timothy Kiplagat, 30, placed second in a personal-best 2:02:55, while Vincent Kipkemoi Ngetich, 25, was third in 2:04:18.

Led by a trio of pacers, a pack of seven men blazed out at world record pace, traveling the first 5K in 14:16 (4:36 pace). By 15K, the pace had slowed, but only four men (and two pacers) remained: Kipruto, Kiplagat, and Ngetich, and Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge, 39, the two-time Olympic champion and former world record holder.

Unlike the men, the women started more conservatively, then picked up the pace. The lead pack covered the first 5K in 16:16, a 5:12 pace. Shankule led much of the race as competitors dropped off; the pack thinned to seven by 15K, four by 25K, and the top three by 30K as the pace ratcheted down (Shankule, Wanjiru,and Kebede covered 25K to 30K in 15:59, 5:09 pace).

Just before the 40K mark, Shankule fell back. Then, at the fluid stop just after the 40K mark, Kebede pulled ahead of Wanjiru, battling to the clock to better the 2:16:02 Brigid Kosgei ran here in 2021. 

Sifan Hassan, 31, of the Netherlands, was fourth in 2:18:05—it was her third marathon, and her first loss. However, her time was still faster than the 2:18:33 she ran in her victorious London debut.

Saina shines after disappointment at Trials

Four weeks ago, American marathoner Betsy Saina, 35, who had been a favorite to make the U.S. Olympic team, dropped out of the Olympic Marathon Trials in Orlando, Florida, after the 21-mile mark of the race. Even though Saina had been in contention for the third spot, she suddenly pulled off the course and flopped in the grass at the side of the road, a victim of the rising temperatures.

Saina quickly regrouped and was a late addition to the field for the Tokyo Marathon on March 3. In much cooler weather, Saina finished fifth in 2:19:17. It was a PR by 2:23, the third-fastest time by an American woman (behind Emily Sisson and Keira D’Amato), and some measure of redemption after the disappointment of the Trials. She averaged 5:18.7 per mile.

Benson Kipruto and Sutume Asefa Kebede both won in course records, and American Betsy Saina ran a big PR to take fifth.

 

(03/03/2024) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World
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Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

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Training through the seasons: injury prevention tips

The start of a new season marks a shift in the training environment for competitive runners across Canada. Distinct challenges arise as runners shift their focus to new racing distances or terrains. As runners transition from outdoor to indoor running in winter, and switch into cross-country running in the fall, the ligaments and tendons of the lower extremities are put to the test. New running environments place demands on these structures and may leave runners vulnerable to injury.

Clinically, my treatment approach is to support these structures with targeted strength training. Loading the joints of the lower extremity with running-specific single-leg movements can help prepare them for the demands of new surfaces and terrains. Single-leg squats, lunges and calf-based loading strategies can be done with the goal of preventing long-term injuries. Jumping-based exercises on uneven surfaces are another great option, because they mimic the demands that runners may experience during races over grass, hills, and mud.

As the weather gets colder, many athletes across Canada turn to doing at least some of their training indoors. An indoor track presents a unique challenge to the athlete’s body, as everyone runs in a counterclockwise direction only. The repetitive nature of running, combined with consistently turning in one direction, can lead to various loading challenges, which can be amplified on the tighter turns of indoor tracks. Researchers from Western University found that the ankle-stabilizing muscles on the left leg on the inside edge of the turn developed strength changes distinctly different from those on the opposite leg, which they suspect are from athletes constantly turning to the left on an indoor track. 

In our work with runners at the Runner’s Academy in Toronto, we have found that this type of asymmetrical loading pattern can contribute to muscular imbalances and running-related injuries affecting the ankle, knee, hip and pelvis. Clinically, I use hands-on manual therapies with targeted rehabilitation exercises to address areas of muscular compensation and joint overuse. 

If you are training on a running track indoors or outdoors, varying your direction between clockwise and counterclockwise is essential to reduce the amount of rotational force the body is subjected to.

To optimize your faster-paced workouts indoors, I recommend doing your warm-up and cool-down jogs outdoors, away from the indoor track. This allows your body to reset and adapt after the repetitive stresses of indoor running, enhancing overall performance and reducing the risk of injury. This promotes variability and gradually exposes the body to stress on a range of surfaces and conditions. If I am training for an indoor track race or coaching, I practice these training modifications and encourage everyone else to try them.

Dr. Robert Lawand is a chiropractor at The Runner’s Academy in Toronto. He can be found training and racing in events from the 1,500m up to the half-marathon with the Royal City Athletic Club, and coaching high school track and field with the University of Toronto Track and Field Club.

(03/02/2024) ⚡AMP
by Dr. Robert Lawand
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Kipruto eyes podium, personal best at Sunday's Tokyo Marathon

The 2021 Boston Marathon champion Benson Kipruto is targeting a podium finish at Sunday’s Tokyo Marathon.

Kipruto trains in his backyard in Kapsabet, Nandi County, ahead of the much-awaited, starstudded showdown in the Japanese capital.

Other top athletes enlisted for the race are former world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge (2:01:09), Vincent Kipkemoi (2:03:13), Timothy Kiplagat (2:03:50), Hailemaryam Kiros (2:04:41) and Andualem Belay (2:04:44).

“My training and preparations for the Tokyo Marathon have been going on very well. I hope my hard training will yield great results,” said Kipruto, the 2016 Athens Classic Marathon silver medalist.

Kipruto was a surprise 2022 Chicago Marathon winner and silver medallist a year later­— behind the late Kelvin Kiptum, who set the world record of 2:00:35.

He said Tokyo was a a late destination after initially settling on a return to Boston.

“I was to compete at the Boston Marathon but I had to change to Tokyo since it gives me enough time to prepare for the Olympics Games,” said the 2017 Gongju Dong-A Marathon silver medalist.

He is unfazed by the calibre of competition.

“I have prepared well enough to run finish on the podium as well as lower my personal best,” said Kipruto.

Kipruto is also looking forward to representing the country at the Paris Olympic Games.

He was named in the provisional marathon team to Paris alongside Kipruto former world record holder Eliud Kipchoge, Vincent Kipkemoi, Timothy Kiplagat, Bernard Koech, Geoffrey Kamworor, Cyprian Kotut, Amos Kipruto, Titus Kipruto and the late Kelvin Kiptum.

“I have never represented my country in any competition and making the team to Paris would be a dream come true,” said Kipruto.

Meanwhile, Ugandan Victor Kiplang’at said he is well prepared for Tokyo.

Kiplangat, who has already hit the qualifying time for the Paris Olympic Games, told Xinhua that he has put in a lot of work during preparations as he seeks to improve on his time.

“I have trained well under coach Addy Ruiter and I can’t wait to go and prove a point in Japan,” said Kiplang’at.

The Tokyo Marathon is a good platform for his preparations for the Olympic Games in France in August.

Kiplang’at, who will follow Ugandan pace-setter Abel Boniface, said competing against Kipchoge will be a tough but great challenge.

(03/02/2024) ⚡AMP
by Emmanuel Sabuni
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Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

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Noah Lyles denied world indoor sprint title in Glasgow

Noah Lyles’s bid to win the indoor/outdoor sprint triple came up short on Friday evening in Glasgow as he finished three-hundredths of a second behind his Team USA rival Christian Coleman in the men’s 60m final at the 2024 World Indoor Championships.

Coleman ran a world-leading time of 6.41 seconds to win the gold. Lyles finished second with a time of 6.44 seconds. Jamaica’s Ackeem Blake came third, running 6.46.

This is Coleman’s second career world indoor 60m title, and also redemption after losing to Lyles at last month’s U.S. Indoor Championships. Coleman got out to an explosive start and never looked back, holding off a charging Lyles in the final 10 meters.

This is Coleman’s second career world indoor 60m title, and also redemption after losing to Lyles at last month’s U.S. Indoor Championships. Coleman got out to an explosive start and never looked back, holding off a charging Lyles in the final 10 meters.

Despite losing to Coleman, Lyles was proud of his 60m world indoor silver medal. “I ran a PR and improved my 60m time; I am OK with this 6.44,” Lyles told Canadian Running. “This is the second-fastest time I’ve ever run, and people were saying I wasn’t a 60m guy–look at me now.”

Despite losing to Coleman, Lyles was proud of his 60m world indoor silver medal. “I ran a PR and improved my 60m time; I am OK with this 6.44,” Lyles told Canadian Running. “This is the second-fastest time I’ve ever run, and people were saying I wasn’t a 60m guy–look at me now.”

Coleman and Lyles will likely be the favourites to win the men’s 100m title in Paris, but Lyles wants more. “I want to win everything and break world records while doing it,” says Lyles. “That’s the goal.”

(03/02/2024) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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World Athletics Indoor Championships Glagow 24

World Athletics Indoor Championships Glagow 24

Welcome or fáilte as the Gaelic speakers in Scotland would say, to the digital home of the 19th edition of the World Athletics Indoor Championships taking place in Glasgow in 2024. With the competition fast approaching it’s nearly time to take your seat for one of the hottest sporting tickets in Scotland this year. Glasgow has a proven track record...

more...
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Runners Are Racing More than Ever

Strava’s year-end report shows that more runners are turning to competition and how different generations compete differently

This month, Strava released its annual Year in Sport, with fascinating insights about where running might be headed. Running was the most-uploaded sport in 2023. (Hear that? That’s the sound of job security!) Most runners log their miles solo, 9 percent are in groups of three or more people, and an additional 9 percent are logged running in a pair.

Trail running, specifically, continues its trend upwards, with the share of athletes running off-road up 6 percent year over year. Almost half (47 percent!) of runners took at least one trail run. Friends, welcome to the club. We have jackets! (Haha, no we don’t.)

Many runners use competition as motivation and inspiration. Plus, athletes who race are 5.3 times more likely to set a distance PR. While men are currently more likely to compete than women, the rate at which men and women are participating is increasing at the same speed.

When life after the COVID lockdowns stabilized for many folks, the Strava Year in Sport review shows that they laced up their running shoes to compete. Twenty-one percent of runners on Strava ran at least one race in 2023, a 24 percent increase over 2022.

Racing was equally split across genders, with 21 percent of men and women competing at least once. Runners from Gen X (born between 1965 and 1980) were the most likely to race, with 26 percent logging at least one competition on Strava. Twenty-two percent of millennials (born between 1981 and 1996) raced, and 24 percent of boomers (born before 1965) pinned on a bib in 2023.

Ultramarathons, while still less popular than shorter distances, are steadily becoming more popular, too, according to statistics. While just 2 percent of runners on Strava completed an ultra in 2023, that’s still up 11 percent from 2022.

Out of all ultrarunners on the app, two-thirds completed at least one 50K, meaning plenty of runners double-dipped on super long-distance runs in 2023. Women were 43 percent less likely to have run an ultra of any distance (so, yeah, we might have a problem). Participation in ultras may be growing at the same rate among men and women, but there is still plenty of work to be done—for instance, addressing childcare disparities that leave women with three to four fewer hours per week to train—in order to reach equity. The longer the distance, the greater the gender gap tends to be, with half marathons having the smallest disparity—7 percent of women completing a half and 8 percent of men.

Longer races are less popular this year, sure, but participation is growing by about 10 to 15 percent. Less than 1 percent of runners on Strava completed an ultra over 50K, though this distance remains the most popular to run. Participation in 50 miles is roughly half that of 50Ks, and 100K participation is roughly half that. So, if you ran a 100K this year, pat yourself on the back, as you’re part of the 1 percent (.0025 percent, to be exact).

Marathons remain a popular distance for runners. Five percent of runners on Strava ran a 26.2-mile race in 2023, up 20 percent from last year. Again, women were 32 percent less likely to have run a marathon than men (4 percent of women on Strava ran a marathon versus. 5 percent of men), but both groups saw participation jump 20 percent compared to last year.

Gen Zers are not running as much as previous generations did at their age. Running, while less cost-prohibitive than, say, surfing, skiing, or mountain biking, still requires some financial investment. A 2020 survey by the Running Shoes Guru pinned the “average” run budget to between $937 and $1,132 annually. I guess those gels really do add up!

And when you consider that 60 percent of young adults don’t feel their basic needs are met, a decline in participation makes sense. According to Running USA, an independent group that produces industry surveys, the number of runners in the 35-44 and 45-54 age groups has dropped significantly since 2015, while participation in the 25-34 age group only increased slightly. According to the report, Gen Z runners prefer to run for experiential benefits like socializing, fun, and mental health.

Interestingly, data about Gen Z runners on the Strava Year in Sport says the opposite, reporting that this generation is 31 percent less likely to exercise primarily for their health compared to millennial and Gen X counterparts. The difference could be that runners committed enough to sign up for an activity tracking app are already a self-select group. Zoomers on Strava report that their primary motivation for exercise is athletic performance. This is echoed by the speed of their training runs, which average out to be a pace of 8:59 a mile. Zoinks!

Interestingly, data about Gen Z runners on the Strava Year in Sport says the opposite, reporting that this generation is 31 percent less likely to exercise primarily for their health compared to millennial and Gen X counterparts. The difference could be that runners committed enough to sign up for an activity tracking app are already a self-select group. Zoomers on Strava report that their primary motivation for exercise is athletic performance. This is echoed by the speed of their training runs, which average out to be a pace of 8:59 a mile. Zoinks!

Gen Z runners are also more run-dominant than other generations. Seventy percent of the generation’s Strava users uploaded runs onto the app versus 52 percent of Gen X, a 35 percent higher likelihood (this might as well be the likelihood to Google “What is a Zendaya?”) Gen Z runners saw the greatest percentage of growth in race participation this year, with a 60 percent jump in attendance at the marathon distance and a 68 percent increase at 13.1. (My mind would fully melt if I lined up against someone born in 2004, but also, welcome! Please be gentle.) According to Running USA, Gen Z runners gravitate towards races with a compelling theme or cause that resonates with their values.

Trends are different across training habits, too. Gen Z runners are twice as likely as boomers to have weekday activity after 4 P.M. and are 31 percent less likely to exercise before 10 A.M.. Fascinatingly, 39 percent of Gen Z Strava athletes started a new job, and a third of the cohort reported relocating in 2023, which could speak to flexibility or economic instability for younger runners.

Over the year, Gen Z runners logged 17 percent less mileage than Gen X athletes, explained primarily with a shorter average run length. Plus, Gen Z athletes have slightly fewer running weeks in a year. (Maybe if they weren’t so busy eating all that avocado toast, they could run more!) JK, as the kids on TikTok say. In truth, Gen Z runners might train less because they are shooting for shorter distances, or the other way around—it’s impossible to disentangle causation here.

It’s not only a fun pastime to browse the year-in-review data, poking fun at the generations before or after us like they’re siblings (“No, I run more!” “Well, I run faster!”), but it’s also a way to see where the industry is lacking.

The Strava Year in Sport data shows that the running industry will have to work to bring in more Gen Z athletes. This might mean that race directors and event organizers will have to continue tailoring their offerings to speak to a younger, more experience-driven demographic. Numbers also prove that, while the female section of the running pie has grown overall, more changes need to be made to reach gender equity. The statistics tell us a lot, but one of the biggest, if not the biggest, takeaways is that people are running more now than ever. And that? Well, that’s pretty rad.

(03/02/2024) ⚡AMP
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Women are dropping out of sports at alarming rates, new study finds

The largest-ever study on the gender exercise gap, conducted by ASICS, has revealed a strong positive link between exercise and women’s mental health. Alarmingly, the study also brought to light the fact that more than half of women globally are dropping out of sports or completely stopping exercise, Forbes reported.

The study, conducted on over 25,000 people and led by Dr Dee Dlugonski and Professor Brendon Stubbs, underscores the profound link between women’s exercise levels and mental well-being. Women report being 52 per cent happier, 50 per cent more energized, 48 per cent more confident, 67 per cent less stressed, and 80 per cent less frustrated during exercise.

Barriers and disparities

The global study found that more than half of women express dissatisfaction with their exercise levels, encountering barriers throughout their lives. Pressing challenges include time constraints (74 per cent), low self-confidence (35 per cent), intimidating environments (44 per cent), and not feeling sporty enough (42 per cent). Motherhood emerges as a significant factor, with 61 per cent of mothers attributing their discontinuation of regular exercise or sports to it, shedding light on the impact of caregiving responsibilities and societal expectations.

Men’s perceptions of the challenges women face differ quite widely from the reality faced by women. Only 34 per cent of men recognized time constraints as a barrier to exercise for women, compared to the three-quarters of women who cited it as a major issue. Men predominantly identified body insecurities (58 per cent) as what they thought was the main hindrance, while only 36 per cent of women said this was their dominant obstacle.

Friendship and health as motivation

The study reveals that over a third of women consider friends as their most crucial exercise influencers, emphasizing the importance of relatability over celebrity influence. Women universally express motivation for exercise based on mental (92 per cent) and physical (96 per cent) health rather than aesthetics.

Dlugonski emphasizes the complexity of the gender exercise gap, suggesting that a multifaceted approach is needed. “Given it has no sole cause, it [the gender gap] will not be solved with one single solution, but when asked what could help, women noted that making movement more accessible, inclusive and recognised in all forms, while challenging society’s gendered expectations, would support them in moving more,” she said.

Spotlighting change-makers

In light of this research, ASICS aims to recognize and celebrate individuals and organizations dismantling barriers for women in exercise and sports. The ASICS Move Her Mind platform showcases stories of impact, along with resources, activities, and tips to support more women in staying active.

(03/02/2024) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Can caffeinated gum help run faster

Hoping to smash your 5K PB at your local parkrun event? A recent study published in the European Journal of Nutrition delves into the impact of caffeine gum on the performance of runners participating in parkrun. The results may help you speed to your goals.Parkrun is the world’s largest free weekly 5K event, originating in the U.K., and attracts participants of all abilities to parks, trails and open spaces every Saturday morning.Caffeine as a performance enhancer

Caffeine, known for its stimulating effects on the central nervous system, has long been recognized for its potential to enhance athletic performance. World Athletics even recommends it as a performance enhancer. In the past, most research on caffeine and performance was done on cyclists, with studies on sprinters and endurance runners only recently (with positive results).

In this context, the study focused on 36 recreational runners capable of completing a 5K run in under 25 minutes. The runners were part of a double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention, exploring whether chewing caffeine-infused gum could contribute to improved parkrun performance.Chewing toward a PB

The runners, randomly assigned to either caffeine or placebo gum groups, engaged in a five-minute gum-chewing session 30 minutes before each parkrun, to allow the caffeine to take effect. The results revealed a noteworthy improvement in 5K performance, with an average time reduction of 17.28 seconds among those chewing the caffeine gum.

This enhancement in performance was further reflected in a decrease in the runners’ RPE (rate of perceived exertion) by 1.21 units compared to the placebo group. This aligns with research on caffeine and endurance athletes, where scientists observed that caffeine may “inhibit perceptual response during exercise,” meaning participants had an increased ability to tolerate discomfort associated with fatigue while running.

While more research needs to be done to determine the maximum best effective doses for runners, it’s clear that adding a caffeinated boost to your parkrun race prep may help you as you chase that PB.

(03/02/2024) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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