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Joshua Cheptegei will return to action at the Dam tot Damloop

Now recovered from the knee injury that has kept him out of racing since April, world silver medallist Joshua Cheptegei will return to action on Sunday at the Dam tot Damloop, a 10-mile IAAF Silver Label road race from Amsterdam to Zaandam. The 22-year-old Ugandan pushed Mo Farah all the way in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships London 2017, ultimately taking the silver medal just 0.43 behind the multiple world and Olympic champion. Earlier this year, Cheptegei won the 5000m and 10,000m at the Commonwealth Games and looked poised for a promising track season but was then side-lined by a knee injury. Cheptegei, who last year came within four seconds of the world best for 15km at the Zevenheuvelenloop in Nijmegen, will be making his second appearance at the Dam tot Damloop after finishing second in 2016. Belgium’s Bashir Abdi looks set to be Cheptegei’s main opponent on Sunday. The 29-year-old took the 10,000m silver medal at the recent European Championships and has competed at the Dam tot Damloop on four previous occasions. (09/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge says he handles pain by smiling - Part two of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Two: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. He began his move into road running in 2012 when he clocked 59:25 for the half marathon.  In 2013 Eliud ran his first marathon when he won the Hamburg Marathon clocking 2:05:30, setting a new course record. 

In 2016 he won the gold medal in the marathon at the Rio Olympics.  He has won 10 out of the 11 marathons he has run.  Wilson Kipsang beat him in 2013 in Berlin when setting the world record. 

We Eliud trains in Eldoret, the home of Champions.  His humbleness is seen when training with athletes.  Eliud keeps a low-profile and even does house chores in camp like washing toilets, utensils, cutting grass and cleaning the dining hall.  He uses public buses or bodaboda to travel despite having good cars.  

He has earned a lot of prize, bonus and sponsorship money from running especially since he moved to the road.  However, money hasn't changed his character. He says, "An athlete with 50 million Kenyan shillings ($500,000US) in his bank account can brag, but a farmer who uses the same amount to plant wheat is not even noticed as he walks around town." 

Eliud loves the simple life and when he travels he arrives without many people realizing it. He loves his Nike shoes and is comfortable with NN running and with his mentor and neighbor Patrick Sang. During the Nike project, he almost broke the two hour mark clocking 2:00:23 for the full Marathon.  Yes, the conditions were perfect and he was paced like in a time trial but his body ran the distance.  

He puts in a lot of hardwork, discipline and good training.  He also eats a healthy diet.  Before he lined up to run the Berlin Marathon this was the kind of workouts he was doing. 8x1600 (recovery 1:30) + 10x400m (recovery 45 seconds) in Eldoret altitude 2200m (7200 feet) above sea level.  His 1600m times were:  4:35, 4:33, 4:32, 4:34, 4:33, 4:32, 4:33, 4:33. His 400m times were: 62, 63, 63, 62, 62, 62, 61, 62, 61, 60.

He always does speedwork on the track wearing racing shoes with other fast athletes like Kamworor, Brimin kipruto and Conselsius.  "You can't train alone because you need others to push you higher to reach your best limit,"  Kipchoge told me last month at Kabarak university.  No marathoner has been more dominant in the marathon than Kipchoge.

The 5'6" 115 pound Eliud has never sustained a serious injury because he listens to his body and eats a healthy diet.  Even the greatest runners have days when they have a strained muscle or an upset stomach kept them from winning but not Kipchoge. 

He actually has a winning formula:  Motivation plus disipline equals consistency.  Pain, he says, is nothing more than a mind set so he distracts himself with other thoughts such as the joy of running and the finish line ahead, then the pain fades with a smile on his face. He has a habit of smiling whenever pain sets in.

Tomorrow in part three of this series we look closer at Eliud’s healthy diet and at the day he broke the world Marathon record.  We talk about  the prize money and how Eliud wants to help others.  

(09/21/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Ultra runner Kyle Curtin smashes Tahoe 200 Endurance Run record

Kyle Curtin and Courtney Dauwalter put on a show at the Tahoe 200 Endurance Run. Curtin of Durango and Dauwalter of Golden smashed the previous course record at the 200-mile ultramarathon in California. Daulwalter led all runners at the halfway point, with Curtin behind more than two hours before he started to gain ground on one of the best distance runners in the U.S., man or woman. Curtin would go on to win the Tahoe 200 on Sept. 7 in his first 200-plus-mile race. He finished in a record time of 49 hours, 27 minutes, 22 seconds. Dauwalter was second overall and the first woman to finish, as she crossed the line in 49:54:36. Dauwalter smashed the previous women’s record by more than 18 hours, while Curtin’s overall record time was nine hours better than the previous record of 58:29:16 set in 2017 by Sean Nakamura. “The first half went really smooth, hardly and highs or lows,” Curtin said. “It felt like a race the second half. I slowly kept reeling (Dauwalter) in.” Curtin was 100 minutes behind Dauwalter after 142 miles, 40 minutes back at 161½ miles and only 25 minutes behind through 175 miles. He finally caught Dauwalter at the Loon Lake aid station at 181½ miles. “I chased her for 181 miles,” Curtin said. “I was super amped up. I took a ton of energy drinks, but I think it was more the thrill of the chase and being neck-and-neck for two days into a race that really had me going. I didn’t mean to catch her that quickly. It was way easier to chase than to constantly look back to see how far ahead I was. “After the aid station, I could see her headlamp for at least another hour. So, thinking she was right behind, I pushed hard the whole way into the finish. It felt like such a relief and a monumental accomplishment at the finish. I didn’t know exactly what the course record was, but I knew we’d crush it from before the race started.” (09/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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88-year-old Bill Briggs ran his first race when he was 49 and can’t stop

Bill Briggs didn’t start running until he was nearly 50. But once he laced up for the first time, he didn’t stop. He’s run Boston four times, as well as many other marathons, 10Ks, and 5Ks. Recently, at age 88, he crossed his 600th finish line. “I had no idea what I was getting into when I started running in June 1979,” Briggs said. “I had recently retired as a meteorologist with the U.S. Weather Service and needed to regain control and structure to my life. One of my two adopted children was having substance abuse issues. Running helped me immensely. “Although I was significantly undertrained for the marathon, I finished in 5 hours and 30 minutes.” After 600 races, Briggs has the running and racing routine down pat. “I dutifully record each and every race in my running log as soon as possible,” he said. “That way, I don’t lose track. I don’t have another race goal set. I just want to enjoy life.” But it took some time for Briggs to fall in love with the sport. He grew up envying jocks and their athletic abilities—Briggs was the kid with the Coke-bottle-thick glasses who hated gym, and that set him up for decades of feeling like he wasn’t sporty. In 1979, though, he decided to give running a shot. He found it a pleasant surprise. “Finally, I had something I could do reasonably well,” he says. “That made me extremely happy.” (09/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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WMA Champion Charles Allie 71 year-old named USATF Athlete of the Week

Charles Allie (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) won five gold medals at the World Masters Athletics Championships in Malaga, Spain, and smashed his own world record in the 70-74 age group 400m to earn USATF Athlete of the Week. In the preliminary heats of the 400m, Allie blasted to a 57.26 to knock more than a second off the world record he set earlier in the year, and he went on to win the final in 58.67. The 71-year-old Allie also won the 100m (13.22) and 200m (26.06) and picked up two more golds on Team USATF relays in the M65 division. (09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge the early years - Part one of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part One: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. Eliud was born May 11, 1984 in a village called Kapsisiywa in Nandi county, Kenya.  His mother worked as a teacher. He lost his father while still young and this forced him to start looking after cattle and sell milk to help support his family. 

As a child, Eliud ran solely as a form of transport so he could get to and from school. The best athlete on the road who looks very discipline, relaxed, humble and full of wisdom today did not get past zonal level in school which is far from nationals. Due to his love for athletics, he went to his neighbor Patrick Sang, 1992 Olympics silver medalist in 3000m steeplechase, and asked for a training program. 

Sang had returned to Kapsisiywa to organize sport events after winning the Olympic silver medal while studying at the University of Texas.  He met Eliud at one of the events he organized in 2001 when Eliud was 16. 

"There was this kid who would come and ask me for a training program," Sang remembers.  "Every two weeks I would give him a program to follow and this went on for months."  Currently Patrick Sang is Eliud Kipchoge's coach. 

"Patrick is a friend and a mentor. He changed my life," said Eliud who followed systematically Sang's advice. Through his dedication and commitment to running, doors opened for Eliud Kipchoge in 2003 when he won gold for Kenya at the World Championships in Paris. 

He out sprinted Hicham El Guerrouj who was the world record holder in the mile.  Eliud was just 18 at the time. He raced on the track, 1500m, 3000m, 5000m and 10000m with great success. (Photo 2003 World Championships 5000m).  The track build his speed and he graduated to the marathon after a few years. 

"Running is like stairs, you gain experience and maturity in every step." Kipchoge told me in February 2018 in Eldoret. Kipchoge trains in a training camp called Global based in Kaptagat.  Tomorrow in part two we will talk about his move to the roads, his training, why he has never sustained a serious injury and how he deals with pain.  

(09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Did you know that Ballet training can improve your running

Have you ever watched a ballet dancer soar through the air and wondered how they make it look so easy? It’s a ballet dancer’s training that gives them such athletic grace. Ballet has developed tremendously in recent years, in both demand and aesthetics. Dancers today are required to have a far greater range of dynamics, flexibility and style. Yet the fundamentals stay the same: continuous practice and repetition of technical exercises that are designed to develop control, strength, precision, a greater range of mobility, fluidity and kinaesthetic awareness (an internal knowledge of where each part of your own body is in movement). In fact, skills that would make the ideal trail runner. Ballet originates from the 16th century European courts. Ultimately, it is built upon precise alignment. Ballet is performed in ‘turnout’. This is the rotation of the leg at the hips that causes the feet (and knees) to turn outward, away from the front of the body. The result is that the lower trunk, pelvic region and upper thighs strengthen in order to maintain this healthy alignment. Core control is paramount, even when stationary. Without it, stabilisation of the pelvis and spine are lost. The upper back loses its strong base and postural errors, such as rounded shoulders, begin to appear. For the dancer, this means the loss of the ability to balance and to execute movements properly. For the runner this is also true, added to which a weak core causes greater stress for the pelvic floor muscles. (Both men and women have pelvic floor muscles between the legs which support the internal organs! The pelvic floor comes under greater stress during impact work such as running.) (09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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How to turn a bad workout into a good one, Running advice from Jeff Galloway

 I was looking forward to my running retreat in Carmel CA after 3 weeks of non-stop travel.  Intuitively I felt that a good run would “wake up” the circuit in my brain that improves motivation.  But it wasn’t happening.  During the first 10 minutes my legs felt heavy and un-responsive--the switch wasn’t turning on.  I thought about turning around.  But then I remembered what I learned when researching for my book MENTAL TRAINING:  If you activate the human brain with a “checklist” of cognitive thoughts and questions, and make strategic adjustments, a bad run can turn into a good one. We have two brain operating systems. The ancient, subconscious (monkey) brain has thousands of stimulus-response behavior patterns embedded. We will usually start our workouts with a standard routine that is conducted by this brain control center. Our human brain is a different entity which we activate by consciously focusing on what we are doing and setting  up a strategy. If we default to the ancient reflex brain, motivation is often influenced by stress:: stress from weather, time crunch, fatigue, life, etc., will trigger anxiety and then negative hormones when the “monkey brain” is in control.  But if you have a strategy, you can activate the human brain which over-rides the “monkey” and stops the flow of negative hormones that bring your motivation down. Here are some questions and tips that can activate your conscious brain and take control over motivation.  How to be motivated when you might not feel like running? 1. Pick a short amount of running which seems really easy, followed by a longer walk break.  Once you start, you can adjust or enjoy the original strategy. 2.Run with a friend, talk, and pull one another along. 3. Have a positive or funny friend who you can text or call before, during and after a run. 4. Tell  yourself that you are only going to run for 5 minutes—once started, you will tend  to continue. 5. Make sure your blood sugar is adequate.  Within 30 minutes before a run, eat a 100 calorie snack such as an energy bar or the proven sports drink. (09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
by Jeff Galloway
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Altra Elite runner Jason Schlarb won the ultra Run Rabbit Run 100-mile race for the third time

Jason Schlarb won the Run Rabbit Run 100-mile race in Steamboat Springs, Colorado for the third time clocking 18:48:08.  His previous wins were in 2015 and in 2013 when he set the course record with a time of 17:15:20, which still stands. Joining him on the podium was Mark Hammond in second at 19:33:20 and Jeff Browning in third at 19:51:44 after a Hardrock 100 win a few weeks prior. Kyle Pietari grabbed fourth with 20:00:48 on his first ever Run Rabbit Run experience. On the women’s side, Emma Roca finished second female with a time of 23:23:55. Shortly behind her was Meredith Edwards in fifth with 25:46:15 in her first time racing the 100-mile option at Run Rabbit Run. Schlarb ran his way to victory in the Altra Duo, along with Browning and Edwards. Hammond ran in the Altra Paradigm 4, Pietari ran in the Altra Superior 3.5 and Roca ran in the Altra Olympus 3.0. (09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Women’s elite field at the Toronto Waterfront Marathon just got stronger

Ethiopia’s representation at this year’s Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon just got stronger with the addition of Amane Beriso to the elite women’s field. With a personal best of 2:20:48, recorded when finishing second at the 2016 Dubai Marathon, the Ethiopian has the fastest personal best of any woman who has ever lined up at this IAAF Gold Label road race. And it is apparent she also possesses the mindset to challenge her compatriot and defending champion, Marta Megra. Victory is her primary objective, though she warns her rivals that the Toronto course record of 2:22:43, held jointly by Kenyan Sharon Cherop and Koren Jelala Yal of Ethiopia, could also be in jeopardy when the race goes off on 21 October 21. “Absolutely, nothing is impossible, I believe,” says Beriso, who celebrates her 27th birthday on 13 October. “I think with Marta Megra it’s going to be a little difficult, but it is possible and I am in it to win it.” “We have one month of training remaining, so I am willing to take on any challenge in front of me and I will try to improve the course record.” This is no idle boast. Besides her brilliant run in Dubai a year ago, Beriso ran 2:22:15 in Prague in May 2017 which earned her second place in that IAAF Gold Label event. It was another eye-catching performance and if it wasn’t for an ankle injury which plagued her over the past year, she may have piled up additional credentials. Now healthy and fully fit after seeking treatment in Germany, she looks ahead to the battle for glory and an $80,000 pay day. Despite having twice run well under the Toronto Waterfront course record, she is a novice at the distance. Dubai, in fact, was her debut. (09/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Grace Brock a 17-year-old British girl runs 34:24 10K in her debut

British runner Grace Brock, who turned 17 six months ago, has debuted the 10K as a new U20 athlete with blazing 34:24. The Cornwall resident, who trains with the Cornwall Athletic Club, ran her first 10K at the Worcester City 10K last Sunday. It was the fastest 10K for a 17-year-old “in at least a decade,” according to the FastRunning.com site. She also set a new track PB of 4:33 in the 1,500 earlier this year. To put her achievement in perspective, Brock’s time is only 33 seconds off Sylvia Ruegger‘s U20 record, set way back in 1961. Brock likes to train on the beach once a week, one of the benefits of living near the ocean. (Or as they say in Britain, the seaside.) Brock attends Penwith College, and hopes to go to an American university next year. She has visited Portland University in Oregon and plans to also visit Providence College in Rhode Island and Boise State University in Idaho. (09/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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2020 Tokyo Olympic Marathon officials are collecting data by drones and body monitors to better understand racing in hot weather

Tokyo is set to host the 2020 Summer Olympics for the first time since 1964. But researchers in Japan and the United States have raised concerns about how the city’s high July and August temperatures, which have grown increasingly common in recent years, will affect athletes competing in endurance sports such as the marathon. According to NHK, Japan’s national public broadcasting organization, researchers from Hosei University and the Japan Weather Association (JWA) are using drones and body monitors to gather data from the course in an effort to minimize exposure to heat for both athletes and spectators. The drones, which use a camera to measure heat through infrared light, collected temperatures at different heights, over various surfaces, and in and out of the sun. Students then measured their heart rates and how much they sweated in the same areas. The Hosei and JWA effort comes after the work of several other groups of researchers on the effects extreme heat might have on the Olympic marathon. (09/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Some Saudi women are starting to run even on the streets but most women and men do no physical exercise

Saudi women want to improve their physical health, de-stress, or simply find a new outlet to bond with likeminded women.  The Riyadh Urban Runners group encourages women and men to lace up and get running. The crew’s captain Amal Maghazil is at the forefront of the country’s rapidly developing new running scene. The runners movement started with the Jeddah Running Collective (JRC), which was founded in 2013 by three expatriates who used to run in their countries and wanted to continue running in the Saudi city of Jeddah. The goal was to spread the running culture in the community by making it accessible to anyone, in addition to developing the skills of their growing members. Riyadh Urban Runners was founded by Duaa and Eslam, who moved to Riyadh in 2016 and wanted to stay a part of the emerging running culture in Saudi.   The running culture in Saudi is relatively new, but has become more popular in the last few years. Now you see more people running on the streets, but they are mostly male runners. We also see increasing numbers of females interested in trying running outdoors for the first time. In February 2018, Riyadh held Saudi’s first half marathon, which attracted hundreds of local runners of all age groups and fitness levels. It was amazing to see such a well-organized community sport event being held in Saudi and supported by the government!   The General Sports Authority (GSA) conducted a survey two years ago which found that fewer than 13 percent of Saudis perform any type of physical activity on a weekly basis. Their goal is to increase the weekly activity rate of Saudis to 20 percent by 2020.    (09/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Two-time Chicago Marathon champ Florence Kiplagat is ready to reclaim her title after recovering from an injury

Kiplagat announced her recovery from a muscular cramp, which ruled her out of competition for nine months. The 31-year-old sustained the injury in Chicago last year in October, failing to complete the race. Kiplagat has not raced since. "The injury is over. I am back to my normal training schedule. I have been in rehabilitation to get the muscular cramp better and it has kept me away from competing in many events. Last year, my body didn't respond well in Chicago and I have had enough time to rest," she said. Kiplagat will be among the elite women, who will be lining up at the start of the race. However, last year's bronze medalist Jordan Hasay has pulled out. Kiplagat, who has a personal best time of 2:19:44, won the Chicago marathon in 2015 and 2016, with times of 2:23:33 and 2:21:32, respectively and will be eyeing her third title in four attempts. Mexico's Madai Perez has also pulled out. The men's race defending champion Galen Rupp of the USA will return to seek a second win, but Abel Kirui, who was second last year, is keen to return to winning, especially after seeing his training partner Eliud Kipchoge obliterate the opposition to win the Berlin marathon in 2:01.39 and set a new world record. "I have since moved in with the Global Sports Communications management team and we train together with Kipchoge. I have improved a lot and ran my personal best time during the London Marathon in April," said Kirui, who trains under Richard Metto and Patrick Sang. (09/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is not sure when will be his next race before Tokyo

Kenyan world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge will not confirm his next race, but says he remains focused on defending his title at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Kipchoge, 33, will consider competing at the Doha World Championships in October 2019, but that will depend on his management. However the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo is already at the back of his mind. "It's about the gold medal but the preparation is the same - you should be comfortable with pacemakers and without pacemakers. Tokyo seems far away but it's at the back of my mind that I will really assemble myself in Tokyo," said Kipchoge on Tuesday. On what it will take for his record to go down, Kipchoge was hesitant. "It's too early to do that because it's only a few hours since I ran the fastest time ever," he said. "I don't think it's good to think about it - the core thing now is to make sure I recover fully," he said. Three more races in Boston, Tokyo and New York remain of interest to Kipchoge in his quest to become the greatest marathon runner. Already Kipchoge has won in London, Chicago and Berlin. In fact his win in Berlin was the third in four attempts. After smashing the world marathon record with a time of 2:01:39 in the Berlin Marathon on Sunday - the biggest improvement since 1967 - only the world marathon championships remain on his wish list. "In sport you need to have a good team. That's why, in terms of where I'm going to run next, I'm going to have a full discussion with the management, with the sponsors, technical team and the coaching team," he said. (09/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Let’s not forget Gladys Cherono’s performance at the Berlin Marathon 2:18:11

Kenya’s Gladys Cherono smashed her personal best and course record when she claimed her third Berlin Marathon victory on Sunday. Cherono, who broke away from the pack at the 25km mark, swept the course to victory in 2 hours, 18 minutes and 11 seconds, becoming the fourth fastest woman in the history of women’s marathon. She broke Japanese Mizuki Noguchi’s 13-year-old course record by 61 seconds besides improving her personal best of 2:19:25 set with victory in 2015 in Berlin. Noguchi won the 2005 Berlin in a course record time of 2:19:12. “My target was to break the course record and improve on my personal best and I am happy I did it,” said Cherono, who retained her title for her third success in Berlin. She won in Berlin in 2015 in personal best 2:19:25 before reclaiming the title last year in 2:20:23. (09/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Toronto Waterfront Marathon elite field is lead by last year's winner Philemon Rono

Philemon Rono, will be aiming for third Toronto title. He made further history a year ago when he also ran the fastest marathon ever on Canadian soil. His time of 2:06:52 was also a personal best. “I’m very happy to come to Toronto again,” said the 27-year-old. “What comes to my mind is that it was a nice race (last year) because I set my personal best and it was a good chance for me. I took the lead between 32 and 35K and I said to myself ‘today is my day’ and I felt good,” Rono reminisced.   Under the guidance of coach Patrick Sang, the 1992 Olympic steeplechase silver medallist, Rono has thoroughly blossomed. Sang’s training team includes a large group of elite marathon runners represented by Netherlands-based Global Sports Communication, including world record holder Eliud Kipchoge. They are also members of the NN Running Team, a unique professional group sponsored by NN, an insurance and asset management company.  "I am really happy, training hard and looking forward to competing in this big race in Toronto,” said Kiprotich, who also won the marathon title at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, joining Ethiopia’s Gezehegne Abera as the only man to ever win both major competitions.  (09/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jordan Hasay will not compete at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon due to unspecified injuries

The 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced that Jordan Hasay will no longer be competing at this year’s event due to unspecified injuries.

In the past few weeks, discussions of her dropping out had plagued the message boards, and the running community seemed to lack trust in the 26-year-old. While many predicted this outcome, we were still hopeful that we’d get to watch her line up this October.

In 2017, the Nike Oregon Project athlete debuted at the Boston Marathon and placed third overall with a time of 2:23:00, securing the fastest debut ever by an American woman. Six months later, she took third at the Chicago Marathon with a finish time of 2:20:57 and improved her PR by just over two minutes. With those stats under her belt, all eyes were on her during the 2018 Boston Marathon as she was a clear favorite to win the race.

The day before Boston, Hasay announced she’d no longer be competing due to “a stress reaction in the heel.” Since that time, Hasay has been working to get back on track and compete at this year’s Chicago Marathon, citing cross-training, yoga and swimming as her go-to recovery activities.

(09/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Two world records were set Sunday September 16, the Marathon and the Decathlon

Two world records were broken on Sunday, September 16th. Eliud Kipchoge set the world record in the marathon, running a shocking 2:01:39. Hours after that record was set, Kevin Mayer of France followed in the decathlon, scoring 9,126 points and breaking Ashton Eaton’s former record by 81 points. The record was set at the Décastar meet in Talence, France. Mayer told the IAAF post-race, “I’ve been waiting for this moment for a long time. I couldn’t cry. I don’t have any more tears left because I was crying so much before the 1,500m.” Mayer achieved personal bests in three of the 10 events. He’s the reigning world champion, and was second to Eaton at the 2016 Olympics. Since the 2016 Olympics, Eaton and his wife, Brianne Theisen-Eaton have both retired from professional athletics. Both Olympics medallists in the multi-events, the Eatons said after Rio, that they had achieved everything they wanted to in sport. (09/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia's Shura Kitata runs fastest half in US and Linden are winners at Rock ’N’ Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon

Fall marathon season is in full swing, and the elites have started their tune-up races in preparation. So far, it’s been successful: Reigning Boston Marathon champion Desiree Linden took first at the Rock ’N’ Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon this weekend. The women’s field was stacked, and included Linden, Sarah Sellers, who finished second at Boston, and Kellyn Taylor. In the race, Linden was neck and neck with Taylor, until Linden pulled away late. Linden topped the podium with a time of 1:11:49, while Taylor took second with a 1:12:07. Taylor captured the attention of the running world in June when she won the Grandma’s Marathon in Duluth, Minnesota in 2:24:28, the seventh-fastest marathon time ever for an American woman. The men’s race was won by Ethiopia's Shura Kitata in a stunning 59:17.  This is the fastest half marathon run in the United States and the 6th best winning time in the world in the last 12 months.  Parker Stinson finished second, in 1:03:02, and Canada’s Cam Levins was third, in 1:03:10. Cam Levins also raced Philadelphia as a tune-up, in his case for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon on October 21. Stinson will run Chicago on October 7. (09/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya´s Elijah Kemboi was victorious in the Blackmores Sydney Marathon

Kemboi broke a run of three successive wins by Japanese athletes in taking the men’s race while Kibarus produced the third-fastest winning women’s time on the Sydney course, which starts with an up-and-over run over Sydney Harbour Bridge and produces several other tough challenges along the route to the finish at the Opera House. Favouritism is often a heavy burden in a marathon, but Kemboi and Kibarus bore the mantle lightly. Each had seen off their closest rivals by the 35-kilometre point and ran to victory unchallenged over the final stages. With three sub-2:08 marathons to his name among seven sub-2:10 performances, Kemboi looked the class of the men’s field. In the marathon, however, you have to execute your race plan before the race executes you. The just-turned 34-year-old dominated the race from the start in North Sydney to the finish at the Opera House. It had come down to a race of three very shortly after the start as the lead group was whittled down from 10, to six and then to Kemboi, Uganda’s Thomas Ayeko, and Birhanu Addisie of Ethiopia. Addisie never looked too interested in sharing the leading duties, but Kemboi motioned the younger Ayeko, the Commonwealth Games 5000m fourth-place finisher and with a 1:00:26 half marathon to his credit, to the front several times in the first 30 kilometres. (09/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Valary Jemeli Aiyabei from Kenya becomes the first ever Kenyan winner of the women’s race at Beijing Marathon

The women’s race was first introduced to the Beijing Marathon in 1989, but Kenyan runners had never previously managed to reach the top step of the women’s podium. Aiyabei, the fastest entrant and the only Kenyan in the elite women’s field, broke clear after 20 kilometres and kept pushing ahead until hitting the line in 2:21:38, ending a four-year winning run by Ethiopian runners. Her winning mark is the fourth fastest in the history of the race and the quickest mark since 2005, but is two minutes shy of the 2:19:39 course record set by Sun Yingjie in 2003. “This is my first time running the Beijing Marathon,” said the 27-year-old, who set her PB of 2:20:53 when finishing third at last year’s Berlin Marathon. “The race today was good and the weather was good. Everything was good. I want to say thanks to my pacemaker and my husband, he did the best job. I am very happy.” The race was staged under cool ad breezing conditions and the in-form Aiyabei tried to break away soon after the gun. After passing the water station at five kilometres, only Bahrain’s Eunice Chebichi Chumba, with a PB of 2:24:27 set last year in Rotterdam, managed to keep up with Aiyabei’s pace. The duo remained together for another 15 kilometres before Aiyabei finally broke free from Chumba. Paced by her husband Kenneth Kiplagat Tarus, Aiyabei kept widening the gap between her and Chumba. When Tarus stepped out of the course at 40 kilometres, Aiyabei had already built a lead of more than four minutes. (09/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan athlete Joseph Kiprono was knocked down by a car leading a half-marathon in Colombia

Kenyan athlete Joseph Kiprono was knocked down by a car Sunday as he was leading a half-marathon in Colombia.  Kiprono, a previous winner of the event, was leading the 21 kilometer race in Medellin when he was struck by a car that authorities said had "violated a road closure." After being treated by medics on the spot, he was taken to hospital with cuts and bruises and later reported by doctors to be in good condition.  (09/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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The stage was set for a World Half Marathon record in Copenhagen however they do not come that easy

The Danish organizers had hoped for a world record in the Copenhagen Half Marathon men’s race today September 16.  World records, however, do not come that easy. The first 10K proved to be too slow with a big leading group clocking  28:10. At the finish Daniel Kipchumba (KEN) won in 59:06, equalizing his best time set back in April when he won in Lago Maggiore Half Marathon.  “I am very happy. I wanted to push the pace at 15K, but I found conditions to be too windy, and so I stayed in the group,” said the 21-year-old Kenyan, who will be attempting a new fast half marathon time in New Delhi on October 21st. With the first eight men finishing in a time below one hour, CPH Half once again proved to be one of fastest half marathon races in the world.  “This is a fantastic race. I was here in 2014 for the Worlds and it has grown even bigger since then. Great course, very fast course and with a European record by Sifan, which is absolutely stunning. And 22,000 runners enjoyed it. That’s what it is all about!” says Norrie Williamson, technical delegate from IAAF for the CPH Half.  (09/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sudan Hassan sets European record at the Copenhagen Half Marathon

European 5000m champion Sifan Hassan took more than a minute off the European record at the Copenhagen Half Marathon on Sunday (16), winning the IAAF Gold Label road race in a course record of 1:05:15. The Dutch runner showed that she is not only a world-class runner on the track but also on the road, improving on the European mark of 1:06:25 set 11 years ago by her compatriot Lornah Kiplagat in Udine. In near perfect weather conditions, the 25-year-old was ultimately just 24 seconds shy of the world record in her first attempt at the distance.   Hassan started out fast and stuck to pre-race favourite Joan Chelimo Melly, who had announced beforehand that she would be targeting the world record. The Kenyan appeared to be on course for her goal after passing through five kilometres in 15:06 and 10 kilometres in 30:36. Two-time world bronze medallist Hassan was the only woman who could match that pace, but even she lost grip on the Kenyan at several points throughout the race. She finally settled into a rhythm, though, and passed 15 kilometres in 46:09, still with Melly for company. Hassan, who last week won the 3000m at the IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 in a world-leading 8:27.50, broke free from Melly in the closing stages and went on to win in 1:05:15. Ababel Yeshaneh came through for second place in 1:05:46 with Melly finishing third in 1:06:15. “I often thought I was going to die!” said Hassan, whose only previous attempt at the distance was as a teenager back in 2011 when she ran 1:17:10. “The pace was so hard, but I just kept coming back.” With four women finishing inside 67 minutes and another four finishing within 68, it was the deepest half marathon ever held on European soil. (09/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge smashed the World Marathon Record clocking 2:01:39 in Berlin

33-year-old Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya smashed the world marathon record in Berlin today (September 16, 2018) clocking 2:01:39, breaking the record by over a minute. 

According to MBR's Willie Korir reporting from Kenya, "the pace was so high.  Eliud started well and maintained 2:52-2:55/k pace.  Two of the pacers dropped at 14k.  Sammy Sitwara, Kipkemboe and Boit remained up to 25k.  Eliud was alone from 25k to the end. 

It is a big celebration all over Kenya especially in Eliud's home town of Kapsabet and in Eldoret, home of Champions." 

Amos Kipruto (2:06:23) passed Wilson Kipsang to place second and Wilson placed third (2:06:48).    

Kipchoge maintained his form well in the closing stages and crossed the finish line in 2:01:39, taking one minute and 18 seconds off the previous world record set four years ago by Dennis Kimetto.

This is the largest single improvement on the marathon world record since Derek Clayton improved the mark by two minutes and 23 seconds in 1967.

"I lack the words to describe how I feel," said Kipchoge. "It was really hard [during the last 17 kilometers] but I was truly prepared to run my own race.

I had to focus on the work I had put in in Kenya and that is what helped push me. I’m really grateful to my coaching team, my management, the organisation."

For the women, Gladys Cherono set a course record clocking 2:18:11.  Second woman was Ruti Aga 2:18:34 and Trunesh Dibaba 2:18:55.

(09/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Paul Kios Kangogo wants to win and break the course record at Beijing Marathon

Kangogo who has a best time of 2:09:20, said he has overcome his injury concerns and is ready to return to the winner's podium in the Chinese capital. However, it will not only be the win he is targeting but to improve on his best time and attack the course record of 2:07:16, which was set five years ago by Ethiopia's Tadese Tola. My training has gone well and everything is fine. I have pushed my body to the limit and am happy, I have come through without any problems. I can say am in-form. I know there will be a strong Ethiopian challenge including the past champions, but running a marathon is down to your own strength and strategy and past record count for less," Kangogo told Xinhua, Thursday in Nairobi. The Kenyan has blown hot and cold in the last two years, mainly due to injury and hopeful, after returning to fitness in April, he will be consistent to string together another podium finish. He however, will be up against the 2014 Beijing marathon champion Fatuma Sado, Tola Dibaba (2:06:17) and Abayneh Ayele (2:06:45) who will be running his third race in China this year. He finished second in 2:14:13 at the Chongqing marathon in March and went on to take third place in Dongying in 2:13:47. There is also Ethiopia's Seboka Negusse (2:09:44) winner at the Hannover marathon in April and Xiamen marathon champion Dejene Debela (2:07:10). (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan´s Joan Chelimo Kelly is looking forward to running her personal best at Copenhagen Half Marathon

The road race, which is a IAAF Gold Label race, has attracted the finest half marathon distance runners in the world as they look forward to running their personal bests. Joan Chelimo, who is the fourth-fastest half marathon runner and was second in last year's edition, will be eyeing the top prize after vigorous training for the last two months. Chelimo, who is fresh from winning the Kisii Half Marathon, told Nation Sport that she will be expecting a competitive race. “My training has been good and my participation in Kisii Half Marathon was just to taste waters and I was able to do some fine tuning before the race,” said Chelimo. The athlete admitted that her competitors are good and she will be giving her best in Sunday's race. “The line up has very good athletes including the World Half Marathon champion Netsanet Guneta, but I believe in my training and my goal is to be on the podium,” said the athlete, who is coached by Erick Kogo. Chelimo will be competing against compatriots Edith Chelimo (65:52), Ruth Chepngetich (66:19), former World Half Marathon bronze medallist Mary Wacera Ngugi (66:29), Ethiopia's Meskerem Assefa (67:42), Ababel Yeshaneh Brihane (66:22 among others. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Tata Mumbai Marathon gets IAAF gold label

The Tata Mumbai Marathon, to be held on January 20, 2019, was accorded the gold label by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). The 16th edition of the race became the only gold label marathon in the country and joined the elite list of marathons in Asia, race organisers Procam International announced on Saturday. The USD 405,000 event is set to witness over 46,000 participants running across six race categories, according to the organisers. The IAAF gold label is granted to races based on stringent criteria, including organisational excellence, world-class elite field representation, prize money for male and female runners, exhaustive medical support system, live television coverage for an enhanced reach of the race, media facilities, timing and qualified personnel to ensure smooth conduct of the event across departments,among others, the release added. Vivek Singh, Joint MD, Procam International, said it was a result of solid teamwork. “We are honoured to receive the IAAF Gold Label for the Tata Mumbai Marathon. This achievement is symbolic of the collective efforts of a team that works tirelessly for months to ensure a Race Day that we all look forward to,” Mr. Singh said. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  

The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world.

Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  

Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants.

The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September.

Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record.

For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January.

The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday.

"I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck.

In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions. 

The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13.

The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched.

Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. 

"This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km.

(09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Meselech Beyene of Ethiopia aiming to capture another title at the Beijing Marathon

The 24-year-old Beyene enjoyed a comfortable solo lead in the final 10 kilometers en route to her 2:27:44 victory last year, one minute shy of her personal best set six months earlier in Barcelona. It will be the third race of the year for Beyene following a third place finish in Houston with a season’s best of 2:27:21 in January and a second place showing at the Vienna City Marathon in 2:29:51 three months later. Beyene will once again face a deep field in Beijing, as she did here last year, which includes several sub-2:25 runners including the 26-year-old Sado. The Ethiopian achieved her career best of 2:24:16 at the 2015 Toronto Waterfront Marathon, one year after her 2:30:03 victory in Beijing, where she ended a 22-year winning streak by local runners in the women’s race. Although she failed to dip under the 2:30 the past two years, Sado proved her competitiveness in Xiamen this January as she shrugged off the heavy rain and overcame a stomach problem in the latter stages to win her second title there in 2:26:41. Beyene and Sado are more familiar with the course that stretches from the landmark Tian’anmen Square and ends outside the National Stadium, better known as the “Birds Nest”, but the top favorite should be Kenya’s Valary Jemeli Aiyabei. The 27-year-old is the fastest woman on paper with a career best of 2:20:53 from her third finish at the 2017 Berlin Marathon. Prior to that performance in the German capital, the rising Kenyan emerged triumphant in four straight marathons in Eldoret, Barcelona, Valencia and Prague, improving her PB on each occasion. Her winning marks in Valencia and Prague remains as the course records and she also proved her worth in 2018 with a 2:22:48 clocking in Nagoya where she finish second. The field also includes two sub-2:22 runners, Mulu Seboka and Amane Gobena, who are both from Ethiopia. Gobena recorded her PB of 2:21:51 in Tokyo two years ago while Seboka set her lifetime best of 2:21:56 in Dubai in 2015. The duo will both arrive in Beijing with high spirits following their newly claimed titles this year in Mumbai and Dalian respectively. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Zimbabwean’s Canisious Nyamutsita is set to race the Copenhagen Half Marathon

Promising Zimbabwean long distance runner Canisious Nyamutsita (left), will be hoping to carry his fine run of form on the local circuit on to the international stage when he takes part in the biggest race of his career at the Copenhagen Half Marathon in Denmark on Sunday. The 27-year-old Nyanga-born athlete has been in brilliant form on the local circuit, winning almost all the country’s major road races over the last two years, including the recent Old Mutual Westgate Half Marathon. Nyamutsita is set to rub shoulders with some of the world’s finest runners over the distance including Kenyan born Bahraini Abraham Cheroben, who will be seeking to defend his title, having won last year in a world-leading 58:40. Other top runners in the field include Berlin Half Marathon champion Kenyan Erick Kiptanui, who has announced that he will be attacking the world record in Copenhagen. Nyamutsita will be joined by his teammate at the Chitungwiza-based Mr Pace Athletics Club Bertha Chikanga, who will line up in the women’s race of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Gold Label. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Val Zajac became one of only seven women in the US this year to complete the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning, a set of 100-mile trail races over some tough terrian

On Sunday afternoon, Val Zajac, a Poland native, finished her fourth ultrarunning race of the summer, 100 miles through the Wasatch Mountains. Her boyfriend greeted her with a hug. "This is trail -- dirt roads with a little bit of road in between, like checkpoints -- but mostly trail and dirt road," Zajac said. But, it's 100 miles worth of trail and dirt roads. To complete the Grand Slam, participants must finish three of the four 100-mile races -- one in Virginia, California, Vermont and Colorado -- plus the race through the Wasatch Mountains in Utah, all in the same year. Along with finishing the Wasatch Mountains race this summer, Zajac also ran through the Sierra Nevadas of California, the Rockies of Colorado and the Green Mountains of Vermont to complete the Grand Slam. It was up and down mountains and through rivers. "There are people actually in the water with wetsuits with glow sticks telling you where to put your feet cause you're doing it in the middle of the night," Zajac said. She had to complete the races in under 30 hours -- one under 36 hours -- to actually say she finished. That meant running at night with headlamps and not resting. (09/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Strengthening your feet and toes will improve your marathon experience

While training for a marathon, your feet take a major pounding. Many runners forget about their feet in their strengthening and stretching programs, but as every runner knows, those feet will make some noise when there is a problem. And when they’re being stuffed into sneakers and forced to hit the pavement over and over again, problems are likely. Since your feet are the only contact point between your body and the ground, that connection needs to feel good and strong or you, your feet, and your running performance will suffer.   Here are five things to do regularly.  1. Do some simple toe stretches when your feet feel tight. The flexor hallucis longus is a muscle that extends from the lower part of your leg all the way to the tip of your big toe. You need your big toe to balance and to help propel you forward when you run. Weakness or repetitive straining of this muscle, can cause it to feel tight or painful. Stretching it out can help ease discomfort. 2. Incorporate toe-strengthening exercises into your daily routine. Strengthening is a necessary and critical part of marathon training. The feet should be no exception. By strengthening the feet and toes, you can create a more sturdy foundation for your running and improve the propulsion capabilities of your feet while you run.  3. Make the “legs up the wall” stretch part of your post-run ritual. When you run, your heart rate goes up, increasing blood flow to the muscles. When you stop running, blood, lymph fluid, and extracellular fluid can pool in your legs and feet, causing swelling and pain. While the gastrocnemius (what’s known as the calf muscle) acts as a muscle pump to return fluid from your feet back up to your heart, it can’t always keep up. Compression garments may help minimize swelling (though evidence on their effectiveness remains mixed). 4. Roll it out with a lacrosse ball. If you don’t have the time to get regular foot massages, try self-massaging your feet with a lacrosse ball. By stretching and releasing restrictions in the soft tissue of the arch of your foot, you can help ease soreness and prevent inflammation and pain caused by repetitive straining of this fascia. 5. Give your feet a stability challenge. Imagine your hands are in mittens every day, and then you decide you want to go rock climbing. This isn’t too different from having your feet in cushy, supportive sneakers every day. When you surround the feet with tons of support, they may become weaker because they don’t have to work as hard to do their job. As advanced as running footwear technology has become, our feet are begging to be naked and free so they can adapt to different surfaces and grip onto uneven terrain. (09/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Uganda’s Thomas Ayeko will be chasing the race course record at Sydney Marathon

Uganda’s Thomas Ayeko best marathon is only 2:12:04, but he has a 1:00:26 half-marathon and a 27:40.96 10,000m (11th in the 2013 World Championships) to his name and was fourth in the 5000m at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. The elite men at the upcoming Syndey marathon will be chasing the race record of 2:11:18 set by Ethiopia’s Gebo Gameda Burka in winning the 2014 race. The race records are modest by the highest international standards, but any road course in Australia’s biggest city is a compromise between aesthetics and degree of difficulty. If you want pancake-flat, better look somewhere else. There are faster runners, but recent history of the men’s race suggests Japanese duo Norikazu Kato and Takumi Honda should be in the lead pack. Since Burka’s record winning performance, there have been three successive Japanese winners. Hisanori Kitajima won in 2015, followed by Tomohiro Tanigawa a year later and then Shota Hattori last year. Sydney will be just the second marathon for Honda. He made his debut in Nobeoka earlier this year, finishing second in 2:12:18. Several others in the field have faster personal bests, but he looks competitive on 2018 performances. Likewise, Kato’s personal best of 2:12:48 came in this year’s Beppu-Oita race in Japan. Sydney will be his first significant race outside Japan. Kenya’s Elija Kemboi is entitled to race favouritism, however. Kemboi has run 2:11:15 or faster each year from 2011 to 2017 and was second in Linz this year in 2:11:30. He has run three sub-2:08 marathons, with a best of 2:07:34, among his seven sub-2:10 performances. If he is in that sort of form again now, he will be very hard to beat and might be the most likely to try an early breakaway. The other sub-2:10 men in the field are Ethiopia’s Birhanu Addisie, who ran 2:09:27 in finishing second in Rome in 2016, and Kenya’s Cosmas Kimutai, who ran 2:09:25 on debut back in 2010, but nothing of similar quality since. (09/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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BMW Berlin Marathon, fast times and intense battles, maybe a world record

Eliud Kipchoge is just like the rest of us runners. All he wants from his next race is to beat his personal best. The only difference is that his next event is the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16 and a Kipchoge PR could mean a new world record!, Eliud Kipchoge is the marquee signing for the 45th edition of BMW Berlin Marathon as the current Olympic champion and undisputed number one for consistency and quality in recent years. His PR, set in London 2016 (2:03:05), prefaced his Olympic marathon gold in Rio the same year. Meanwhile, Denis Kimetto's world record (2:02:57) remains tantalisingly just out of reach for the three-time London champion and double Berlin winner. Kipchoge surely has pace to burn as his brilliant 2:00:25 in 'laboratory' conditions at Monza motor racing circuit in May last year demonstrates. This was never going to be ratified as a record but serves to indicate there is much more to come from the 33-year-old Kenyan, who said: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.” The women's field in Berlin is the best for many years and is headlined by the third fastest in history, Tirunesh Dibaba, from Ethiopia (2:17:56) who set her PB in London last year chasing Paula Radcliffe's legendary 2:15:25 from 2003. Dibaba will face the defending champion Gladys Cherono (Kenya) and former double Berlin winner Edna Kiplagat (Kenya), who is the oldest of the leading trio at 38 years old. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Canada's second fastest marathoner Reid Coolsaet is eyeing Jerome Drayton's record

Reid Coolsaet is the fastest Canadian in the field at this year’s Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. It’s a race Reid knows well having run it several times before. In 2011 he qualified for the 2012 Summer Olympics by running 2:10:55. He has since lowered his PB to 2:10:26 making him Canada’s second fastest ever marathoner. The two-time Olympian, Coolsaet has had his eye on Jerome Drayton’s 2:10:09 Canadian record for some time. And no Canadian has run Scotiabank–or any other marathon on Canadian soil–faster. Coolsaet set that record (2:10:55) here in 2011. An interesting coincidence: Drayton’s record was set in 1975 at Fukuoka, Japan, a race Coolsaet has run twice, achieving an excellent time here in 2016 (2:10:55–the same time he ran at Scotia in 2011). With a PB of 2:10:28, set at the Berlin Marathon in 2015, Coolsaet has been tantalizingly close to this goal for a while. He’s had to be patient through a series of setbacks, most significantly a painful foot condition in early 2017 that took him out of competition for almost a year. He came back in time for the Canadian National Cross-Country Championships in November, placing ninth.   Jerome Drayton has held the Canadain record since 1969.  Jerome won the Fukuoka Marathon in 1969, 1975, and 1976, as well as the Boston Marathon in 1977. He  has held the Canadian record since 1969, after breaking the then record of 2:18:55 set by Robert Moore a month earlier. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Former marathon world record holder Patrick Makau of Kenya has announced his retirement from professional running

Patrick Makau, 33, has lost his fight to gain fitness after persistent patella-tendon injury, forced him off training and competition since 2017. With doctors warning against him running, Makau has opted to throw in the towel. "With the age catching up, with persistent patella-tendon injury due to which I was forced to cancel competition in 2017 for both Boston and Berlin marathons, I know this is the right time to say it is enough," Makau said Thursday in Nairobi. The two time Berlin marathon champion is credited for reclaiming the world marathon record from the grip of Ethiopian Haile Gebreselassie in 2011 when he clocked 2:03:38 eclipsing the Ethiopian's time of 2:03:59. Gebreselassie had beaten Paul Tergat's record of 2:04:54 set in 2004. Wilson Kipsang improved Makau's record after two years to 2:03:23, but that has also been shuttered to 2:02:57 by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto, which is the current record. "I have had a wonderful career as an athlete. My life is defined by athletics, what I have today is because of the sport I love. Athletics has literally changed me, allowing me to grow and to make positive impact on lives of my family and our community," said Makau, the 2007 World Half Marathon champion. "For this I am truly grateful." However, Makau will not be taking a long walk away from athletics completely. To remain busy, he intends to help guide a new generation of young distance runners realize their dreams and develop their careers, especially from the southern part of Kenya where he comes from. "I want to coach some athletes who have no guides. I want to continue giving back to the community," he said. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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2012 Olympic champion Uganda’s Stephen Kiprotich will target fast time in Toronto

Over its decades-long history, the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon has been graced by some of the world’s greatest marathoners, but never an Olympic champion. That will all change on October 21, when Uganda’s Stephen Kiprotich will race in this IAAF Gold Label event. The 2012 Olympic marathon champion will accompany two-time Toronto champion Philemon Rono from their mutual training base in Iten, Kenya in what should be an intense battle between the two accomplished marathon runners. The pair are both friends and training partners, but each will want to take home the CAD$30,000 first-place prize money. “I am really happy and training hard and looking forward to competing in this big race in Toronto,” says Kiprotich, who also won the marathon title at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, joining Ethiopia’s Gezehegne Abera as the only men to ever win both major competitions. “I was speaking with Rono and I asked him what is the course like,” he says of the man who set a Canadian all-comers’ record of 2:06:52 in Toronto a year ago. “He said the course is good and nice. I was telling him if we go fast and run the first half in 63 minutes, we can push at the end to 2:05. He told me it is possible.” Kiprotich’s major championship success is outstanding and all the more remarkable since he chose to make Iten his training base. There he lives in the camp built by Dutch based management company Global Sport Communications with a group which includes not only Rono but the world’s No.1 marathon runner, Eliud Kipchoge. They are coached by 1992 Olympic steeplechase silver medallist Patrick Sang. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge Profile: Joel Maina Mwangi wants to be the best of the best

Joel maina Mwangi was born in a small village of Thika town, about one hour outside of Nairobi, Kenya.  Joel says, "I was raised up in a difficult situation.  Eating was 50-50 but by the grace of God i was sponsored for secondary education."  

Today the 33-year-old Joel is married and has two boys.  "I always work hard to raise my boys in a good and better environment than i got," he says.  "My school was 6km from home and I used to run to school for eight years (6-14) to avoid being late...otherwise I would be punished."  

In 1998 he took part in a 10000m and won it.  "My sport teacher noticed I could run," Joel remembers.  "He encourage me to start training and from there I started training every morning before school."  He did not stop there.

"I was the king of athletics."  Joel is now a professional runner. "Racing sustain me and my family.  It has enabled me to build a house and travel."  Running has given him the opportunity to travel to different countries. 

"My first trip abroad was to Belgium.  i stayed there for one and half month.  I had a difficult time because i was not in good condition.  I came back home with 10€ ($15). That day I will never forget. I lost money but I learned a lesson." 

Asked what is his secret to success Joel says, "I believe even if you are in good shape but mentally weak, I will defeat you.  So I always tell my running mates to be strong mentally to conquer."  He has been training in Austria, Hungary and now Italy.  He says this about Italy.

"Despite its low altitude I like it.  The advantage for me is because I complete in many races and train with Italian runners here."  He runs for the Dinamo Running Club. Asked why he joined the Run The World Challenge for a second time.  "I like it...it motivates me.  It brings runners from different corners of the world together.  It helped me a lot this season as I worked more to try to be the leader.  But Korir managed to be the leader for Challenge 1.  Due to that...I will sponsor Willie Korir for his start number and transport from wherever he will be within Kenya for the 2018 Nairobi marathon," he says.  

Joel's personal records are: Marathon 2:14, 30kms 1:31, Half Marathon 1:01:16, 10km-28:26 (track), 5km 13:46, 3km 8:07 1-mile 4:06, 1km 2:28.  "I am looking forward to be the best of the best.  Don't tell me I am getting old..."old is Gold." 

In the first Run The World Challenge Joel logged 511.36 miles placing him third. So far on Challenge 2 he has logged 224.9 miles and he is in fourth place. Most recently (September 9) he placed third at the Minski Half Marathon clocking 1:02:55. Photo: Joel (white jersey) running along side Charles Cheruiiyot Toroitich at the 2014 (Half) Marathon Solidarności in Poland.  Joel clocked 1:01:16

(09/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dean Karnazes is once again running the 246K Spartathlon which follows in the footsteps of Pheidippides

The 36th Spartathlon will once again welcome American Dean Karnazes. This year’s Spartathlon race will take place on September 28-29. Some 400 runners from 50 countries around the world, including 60 Greeks, will follow Pheidippides’ steps in the 36-hour long run to reach the statue of ancient King Leonidas in Sparta. In 490 BC, Pheidippides ran for 36 hours straight from Athens to Sparta to seek help in defending Athens from a Persian invasion in the Battle of Marathon. In doing so, he saved the development of Western civilization and inspired the birth of the marathon as we know it. This year’s Spartathlon race will welcome champions of previous events such as Czech athlete Radek Brunner (second in 2017), Greek Nikos Sideridis (third in 2017), Japanese Ishikawa Yoshihiko (fourth last year), Italian Marco Bonfiglio (second in 2016), Protuguese Joao Oliveira (winner in 2013), German Florian Reus (winner in 2015) and Zsuzsanna Maraz (second last year in females) from Hungary. Greek and foreign ultra marathoners will once again gather at the Acropolis in Athens to to begin the 246K (152 miles) marathon journey to Sparta.  That run in 490 BC stands enduringly as one of greatest physical accomplishments in the history of mankind. Dean Karnazes personally honors Pheidippides and his own Greek heritage by recreating this ancient journey in modern times. Dean even abstains from contemporary endurance nutrition like sports drinks and energy gels and only eats what was available in 490 BC, such as figs, olives, and cured meats. (09/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ultra marathon mom, stopped to breast feed her baby during the 106-mile Mont-Blanc Trail Race

A British mom has made headlines all over the world after being photographed taking a break to breast feed her baby son during a 43-hour ultra marathon.

Sophie Power, who recently competed in the 106-mile, high-elevation Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc trail run through France, Italy, and Switzerland, has been applauded for showing “motherhood endurance” and “the strength of the human body” in the snap, which was taken by photographer Alexis Berg.

The 36-year-old mother of two and avid runner took time to nurse her 3-month-old infant, Cormac, during the challenging race.

“Cormac usually feeds every three hours, “This isn’t a story about me,” she wrote. “It’s a story about the daily struggle of being a new Mum. A story about the need to nurture our babies the best we can. And the importance to priorities our physical and mental health — to be ourselves as well as be a mother.

“I have been overwhelmed by the positivity and supportive messages. They are for all mothers for we are all in this together.” Despite having to stop to feed her son, Power managed to complete the marathon in 43 hours and 33 minutes. 

She believes that keeping active and maintaining a healthy lifestyle during pregnancy is really important.  She has logged 273 miles on Strava so far this year, 27 races. 

"In a typical race I would get in and out of the aid stations as quickly as possible," she says.  "But here I had to focus on keeping down enough food for me and for Cormac, and resting."

(09/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Linda Sereno says she finds her inner peace when running out in the mountains

Linda Sereno grew up with two older and two younger brothers.  "I copied them, playing football, baseball and basketball.  Later my oldest brother helped me take on running.  I loved it," Linda says.  "In high school, we had a fund raising event for our band to go to Ireland to compete in the Saint Patrick's Day parade in Dublin.  We were sponsored for each lap we could run/walk in two hours," Linda remembers.  She never stopped running for 2 hours and did 52 laps around the quarter mile track.  "I love running, especially on trails, up and down mountains. I love the wind, the animals, and the scenery.  I think, I space out, and I dream on those runs. I find my inner peace out in the mountains," she says.  Asked about what is her secret to her success.   "I think it's important to keep your core strong, stretch daily, and do strength exercises.  I use my body weight to improve muscle tone rather than using weights.  I do push ups, sit ups, planks, burpees, squats lunges, and stretches," 58-year-old Linda Sereno says.  She tries to run three times per week, two days of track workouts and one long run."  Last year she finished a 50 miler.  "I was the second woman overall on a challenging hilly race with 9,500 feet of elevation change.  Another challenge I accomplished was Boston to Big Sur.  I wondered if I would have the endurance to complete both marathons without any injuries, and I did in 2011.  The times were not exceptional, but I was pleased to have accomplished my goal," she says.  Her husband, Kirk, is a surfer.  He was a competitive swimmer and diver in high school and community college.  Her daughter, Amy, is a successful runner and is an assistant coach at a local community college.  Linda is currently a 1st/2nd grade Dual Immersion teacher, teaching English and Spanish.  Why did she enter the Challenge for a second time. "Run the World Challenge can help motivate many people become more active in order to fulfill a global goal," Linda says.  Linda has already posted 51 miles for this challenge. She also has run a lot of Double Racing Events.  One of her best performances at age 55 was clocking 1:04:04 for the Pacific Grove Double Road Race 15k in 2015.  She clocked 43:40 for the 10K leg and 20:23 for the 5k leg.  This was age-graded at 87.07%.   Photo: Linda with a dear friend and running buddy Lidia Santos (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Cross-Country is making its debut at the Buenos Aires 2018 Youth Olympic Games

The IAAF World Cross Country Championships Aarhus 2019 will take place in 200 days’ time, but Tuesday 11 September marks another important milestone for cross country. In one month from today (October 6-18), the athletics program will get under way at the Buenos Aires 2018 Youth Olympic Games, where cross-country running will make its debut. Cross-country running last appeared in the Olympic arena back in 1924 at the summer Games in Paris, but it will feature in the Argentinean capital next month in a new and innovative format. As is the case with all individual athletics disciplines at the Youth Olympic Games, there will be two stages to the distances events, in which 48 boys and 48 girls will be entered. In stage one of the 1500m, 3000m and 2000m steeplechase, all athletes will compete in a heat of their individual event. In the second stage of the competition, all athletes from those three events will compete in a cross-country race – one race for boys and one race for girls.  The placings of athletes in each individual event and in the cross-country race will be added to determine the overall final placings with the athlete having the lowest total score being the overall winner. The results of the cross-country race will be adjusted to reflect separate rankings for the 1500m, 3000m and 2000m steeplechase respectively with medals being allocated accordingly in the three individual track disciplines. For example, an athlete placing second in the 3000m and fourth of the 3000m runners in the cross-country race will receive a final score of six points. “It has long been our desire to see cross country running back in the Olympic Games,” said IAAF President Sebastian Coe. “We see the inclusion of cross country in the program for the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires as the first step towards its return to the main program of the Olympic Games." "Cross country is the endurance bedrock on which all middle and long distance running is based and we believe it deserves this recognition,” Coe added. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Commonwealth champion Joshua Cheptegei will be the runner to beat at the Dam tot Damloop 10 Miler

Joshua Cheptegei from Ugandan won silver last year at the 10,000 meters at the World Championships in London and this year was the fastest in the 5000 and 10,000 meters at the Commonwealth Games in Australia.  He will be going for gold at the up coming Dam tot Damloop ten mile race. Belgian's Bashir Abdi (silver 10,000 meters EK Berlin) and Ethiopian's Ayele Abshero are also candidates for the victory for the race that runs from Amsterdam to Zaandam.  The Dutch toppers Khalid Choukoud and Michel Butter are also running. In total, 46,000 runners will participate at the Dam tot Damloop race. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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South Africa´s Mapaseka Makhanya has set her sights on winning the Cape Town Marathon

Mapaseka Makhanya would like to add a Cape Town Marathon winners’ gold medal to her impressive collection of running accolades. “Of course I would like to win it,” the Soweto-born athlete said of the race she has never competed in “It is the only one (marathon) in Africa with that status of IAAF Gold Label.   It is a big race in South Africa and I cannot miss it.” And so Makhanya will line up alongside the likes of Mother City favorite Nolene Conrad eager to reclaim the female’s title for the country. Back in 2016, Tish Jones reigned supreme in an impressive time of 2:36:13. Her time though was pretty slow in comparison to the winning times of Kenya’s Isabella Ochichi and Ethiopian Betelhem Moges Cherenet.  The east Africans ran 2:30:20 and 2:30:23. This year’s race promises to be a little faster particularly given the quality of the men’s elite field.   Makhanya is determined to see her name in stars, the fact she has only recently recovered from injury notwithstanding. “I think I will be ready to compete in that race. I’ve recovered from the calf injury that kept me out of action for two months.  I will be there to compete to win just like in any other race.” But with the east Africans coming through in their numbers once again, Makhanya and all her other compatriots will need to be at their best to keep the title on home soil. She, in particular, will have to run close to, if not better than, her PB of 2:31:02. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Will an extra does of Vitamin D boost your running performance?

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient that regulates some 1,000 processes in the body, and doctors have long known its importance to bone density and preventing the related illnesses like rickets and osteoporosis. Now researchers are beginning to study its role in athletic performance. While an extra dose of vitamin D might increase muscle strength and endurance, the science is far from settled. Still, many athletes are eyeing the vitamin for possible performance gains. Given that the science is still young, is it worth hitting the drugstore?  The main sources of vitamin D are sunshine and certain foods, including salmon, cod liver oil, and fortified cereal and dairy products. The USDA suggests an intake of 600 International Units per day, or 800 IU for adults over 70. You can easily meet that recommendation by spending 15 minutes outside on a sunny day. In athletes, a vitamin D deficiency increases your risk of stress fractures, anemia, and a weakened immune system—all of which can hurt performance. In a study of 214 NFL players, scientists observed more muscle injuries in athletes with lower vitamin D levels. There’s no clear consensus about how widespread the deficiency is. In 2015 review, scientists found that about 56 percent of athletes had inadequate levels of the vitamin. Still, in a large-scale review, researchers at the National Academy of Medicine (then the U.S. Institute of Medicine) observed that, on average, Americans’ vitamin D levels appeared fine. One cause of this discrepancy is that scientists don’t agree on the definition of “adequate” when it comes to vitamin D levels. The most common test for the nutrient measures a precursor version of its hormone form—the form of the vitamin that is actually used by the body. Sometimes this precursor doesn’t predict how much vitamin D exists in hormone form. Certain researchers, like those with the Endocrine Society, argue for higher concentration thresholds than than those of the National Academy of Medicine.  The effects of vitamin D supplementation on health are uncertain.  A 2013 review did not find any effect from supplementation on the rates of disease, other than a tentative decrease in mortality in the elderly. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei says she will be ready for a full marathon debut

World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei says she will be ready for a full marathon debut, probably in December. Jepkosgei, who has had injury trouble since her world half-marathon record of 64:51 in Valencia last October, believes she still has more to do to return to her top performance and believes venturing into full marathon is her next target. "My coach is preparing me for a marathon. He told me that I will go for training and then he will see how my body is. It might be end of this year or next year," said the 25-year-old on Tuesday. "China marathons are good, though I have no particular race I have lined up now. But I know it will be good to test myself there." Shanghai Marathon in November might be too soon for the Kenyan star. However, there is a possibility of her running at the Xiamen Marathon in January if her management gets an invite from the organizers. Jepkosgei was third in 68:10 at last week's Great North Run in Newcastle, England, her third race this year. Injury concerns have limited the Kenyan participation in international competition, but she believes she is getting better. In May, Jepkosgei was second at the Manchester 10km run behind Ethiopia's Tirunesh Dibaba. Meanwhile, London Marathon silver medalist Brigit Kosgei is intensifying her training ahead of her race in Chicago in October. However, the Kenyan has injury concerns after she pulled a hamstring problem in Newcastle in the last stages of the 21km Great North Run. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge is focused on only one thing as he gets ready for the Berlin Marathon Sunday

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya says he has a crazy dream to be the fastest man in history. He hopes will inspire his quest to shutter the world marathon record in Berlin on Sunday.

Kipchoge, 33, will be racing in his 10th marathon since he graduated from the track back in 2012. The London champion has only one loss in his career back in 2013 against compatriot Wilson Kipsang.

He has won in Hamburg, Chicago, London, Rio (Olympics) and Berlin. "It's only a crazy dream until you do it. Don't be the fastest runner in the world, but strive to be the fastest runner in history," said Kipchoge on Monday in Nairobi.

Kipchoge will be running his fourth Berlin marathon on Sunday and has sounded out world marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto (2:02.57) saying he will be focused on lowering his personal best time, which is only eight seconds off the mark.

"Don't ask if your dreams are crazy. Ask if they are crazy enough," he added. "In Berlin the focus will be to improve on my personal best time of 2:03.05. Last year the weather was not good but I managed strongly to finish the race," he said.

(09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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The world record will be under attack at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon on September 16

Kenya’s Jorum Okombo and Alex Korio will be hoping to improve on their respective second and third finishes at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon on September 16. Organizers have assembled one of the deepest half marathon fields in history of the road race. “An elite field boasting 17 sub-60-minute men, including three of the four fastest half marathon runners over the past six years, is proof of an extremely high level,” says Jakob Larsen, director of the Danish Athletics Federation. Abraham Cheroben will be back to defend his title, having won last year in a world-leading 58:40. His main opposition looks set to come from Berlin Half Marathon champion Erick Kiptanui, Okombo and Korio. Kiptanui has announced that he will be attacking the world record in Copenhagen. The women’s race also boasts superb depth as it contains seven runners with PBs faster than 68:00. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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