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Former Portland Marathon Race Director agreed to pay $865,000 in penalties

Under a settlement with the Oregon Department of Justice, the former race director of the Portland Marathon agreed to pay $865,000 in penalties. The DOJ found that Lester Smith had taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in loans from the Marathon for himself or his companies. The practice is illegal and occurred at a time when the Portland Marathon nonprofit lacked adequate oversight of a board, as required of nonprofits. In all, $50,000 of the settlement covers costs for the state investigation. The rest will go back to the Portland Marathon, Inc. Smith disputed the findings, according to a copy of the settlement documents, provided by DOJ. But in addition to the monetary settlement, Smith has agreed not to lead or serve on the boards of any nonprofits, operate any foot races in the future, and, as a lawyer, will not seek to be reinstated to the state bar. He also agreed to dissolve his company, his for-profit company Next Events, LLC. The investigation into the nonprofit began around the time the race was facing an uncertain future in Portland. Under Smith's leadership, the permit for the race last year was initially rejected by the city. The race proceeded last year, and the Portland Marathon nonprofit is now under new leadership. (04/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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85-year-old Katherine Beiers was the oldest runner to battle the rain and wind Monday in Boston

All kinds of history was made Monday during the 122nd Boston Marathon. Among the record-breakers and head-turners was 85-year-old Katherine Beiers, who ran the 26.2-mile course in 7 hours and 50 minutes, and in the process, became the oldest woman to ever complete the race. Beiers battled through weather conditions so harsh that 25 elite runners dropped out, and more than 2,500 runners were treated by medical staff, most with symptoms of hypothermia. In fact, when the first gun went off at 8:40 a.m., it was 37 degrees, making it the coldest Boston Marathon start of all-time. It’s no wonder the winning men’s and women’s times were the slowest they’ve been in more than three decades. Still, Beiers, who now has 14 Boston Marathon finishes to her name, pressed on. Think she’s used to running in the cold? No way. She lives in Santa Cruz, California, and ran 45 warm miles per week to get ready for Bean Town. Preparing for the inclement race day weather certainly wasn’t feasible. (04/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Another look at the 2018 Boston Marathon Champion Yuki Kawauchi

Yuki Kawauchi’s improbable victory at the Boston Marathon on Monday is the crowning glory in the career of an amateur Japanese runner who has defied every convention in modern athletics and taken the road less travelled to make his mark. The 31-year-old from Saitama, who becomes the first Japanese man to win the Boston Marathon since Toshihiko Seko in 1987, holds down a full-time job working at a local school, and trains without the aid of a coach or sponsorship. And he has competed in more than 80 marathons. After splashing across the finish line through wind and rain ahead of defending champion Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya on Monday, Kawauchi was in no doubt he surprised a few people. “I don’t think there was a single person in Boston who thought I would win this today,” he said with a smile. “In the marathon you never know what could happen.” (editor’s note: we did think that Yuki was the best runner in the field winning other races in extreme weather conditions. This being posted Sunday on MBR.) Many of Kawauchi’s marathon wins have come in awful weather and he said being battered by wind and rain in Boston played right into his hands. “I think the conditions were instrumental in being able to win …” he added. He has won his last five marathons, including four in 2018 alone, and ran 12 last year. Kenya’s reigning Olympic champion Eluid Kipchoge by comparison ran only two. “I love to run races,” said Kawauchi. “Races gives me the opportunity to travel and in a more practical sense, because I train by myself if I didn’t put in a lot of races I wouldn’t be able to put in the same quality.” (04/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Southampton Marathon could bring £1million into the city

Southampton , UK could be set for a £1million ($1.42US) boost when runners hit the streets this weekend to compete in the ABP Marathon. More than 10,000 people have signed up to take part in the city’s biggest annual running event, on Sunday. And with an estimated 30,000 spectators coming to cheer them on, organisers predict as much as £1 million could be spent in the city over the weekend. Thousands of runners will be taking part to raise money for worthy causes and race organisers are hoping this could be the year they reach a milestone £1m raised for charity. The event also falls on the same day as Saints’ FA Cup semi final match against Chelsea at Wembley, and organisers are confident that the city will be as bustling as ever. (04/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian Gebretsadik and Kenyan Kipketer are favorites at the EDP Rock 'n' Roll Madrid Marathon

The Rock 'n' Roll Madrid Marathon is one of the most important races in Spain and is part of the Rock 'n' Roll series takes place this Sunday April 22. The course takes runners through the city of Madrid. In the elite field, Ethiopian's Gebretsadik Abraha and the Kenyan's Valentine Kipketer are the favorites in the men's and women's categories. Abraha and Kipketer have the best times, with 2:06:23, and 2:23:02. Over 40,000 participants have signed up for either the full marathon, half or 10K. (04/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Maybe the most beautiful and most challenging Marathon in the world, Big Sur

Sunday April 29 is the Big Sur Marathon on the Monterey Bay in Northern California. The course is 26.2 miles of the most beautiful coastline in the world - and, for runners, the most challenging. The athletes who participate in the Big Sur International Marathon may draw inspiration from the spectacular views, but it takes major discipline to conquer the hills of Highway One on the way to the finish line. Named "Best Marathon in North America" by The Ultimate Guide to Marathons, the Big Sur International Marathon continues to sell out earlier and earlier each year and, as a major destination marathon, draws entrants from all over the world. On their way from Big Sur to Carmel's Rio Road, runners wind through majestic redwoods and past Pacific Ocean views. If you have not entered put it on your bucket list for next year. It does sell out very quickly however. Check their website for details. (04/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Desiree Linden was wet, was cold and wanted to stop but she didn’t as marathoners do and won Boston and $150,000

The weather Monday in Boston was more than bad, it was terrible. Shalane Flanagan posted, “Those were the most brutal conditions I’ve ever run in.” One elite woman just kept putting one foot in front of the other faster than anyone else until the end. Desiree Linden even at one point waited for Shalane at a bathroom stop. This brief break, might have helped Desiree get life back in her legs as well. Desiree caught back up to the lead pack but Shalane couldn’t hang. In the end Desiree won by nearly four minutes and became the the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since Lisa Rainsberger in 1985. Afterwards she said there were many moments she wanted to drop out but she kept on going. Was it worth it? For her efforts she was given a check for $150,000. She could have easily not finished. It is interesting to note that according to the race director 95.5% of those who started finished. Very impressive but then again marathoners are a different breed. (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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By far this was the most emotional race (Boston) I have ever run says 4th place finisher Tyler Pennel

Tyler Pennel place 4th in the Boston Marathon, second American. He posted this a few hours ago on Facebook. "We are different, in essence, from other men. If you want to win something, run 100 meters. If you want to experience something, run a marathon.” - Emil Zatopek. While I have always thought this quote to be true, yesterday’s Boston Marathon confirmed it. Only runners would have been out in what most people would describe as horrid conditions, let alone run 26.2 miles in it. We are a different breed. There is a level of persistence and stubbornness that distance runners of all ability possess, and yesterday’s race was all about grit and persistence. By far this was the most emotional race I have ever run. I went through times where I wanted to just stop; I was cold, wet, and miserable, only for a mile or two to pass and I would feel great. Crossing the line, the only thing I was happy about was that I had run the Boston Marathon and I was done. I could finally get some dry clothes on and warm up. Only after learning that Nicole placed 5th did I find out I was 4th. It was just the cap to an emotional two and a half hours. I would not have been on the starting line with out the support of ZAP Fitness. Five and a half years ago, they offered me a spot on the team, and I would not have made it to this level of running without them. Thank you! (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
by Tyler Pennel
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This ultra-marathoner is always decked out in brightly colored, punk-inspired outfits flashing a smile

Vegan ultramarathoner Catra Corbett placed first in the female division of this past week’s 72-hour Beyond Limits Ultra race. The plant-based athlete covered 192 miles, breaking a personal record. The ultramarathon took place over the course of three days at Pathfinder Ranch, a wildlife preserve situated in California’s San Jacinto mountains, just south of Palm Springs. Participating runners repeatedly traversed a two-mile trail loop over 72 hours. According to the website, the Beyond Limits Ultra is considered “one of the most unique ultra events in the southwest.” “This year my plan was to win 1st Female in the 72-hour race and beat my previous 72-hour record which was 174 miles,” the vegan runner told Great Vegan Athletes, declaring that “If you’re not having fun you’re doing it all wrong!” Having fun is clearly an essential part of this endurance challenge, at least for Corbett. In every photo, she can be seen decked out in brightly colored, punk-inspired outfits, flashing a smile. (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah knows that he must improve dramatically to be in the medal mix in Tokyo

Farah, 35, retired from the track last year in order to switch his focus to road running. He is ranked 27th in the world over the marathon distance but is targeting a top-three finish in London this weekend. "It's going to be different, but every race I go into I aim to fight for a podium place," he said. He is moving to marathon and has not ruled out a shot at Tokyo 2020. Many distance runners have transitioned to marathon, few have had a day at the world championships more-or-less dedicated to their final track appearance. Farah’s long-term goal is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in the marathon. He knows, however that he must improve dramatically to be in the medal mix in Tokyo. (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Walking up and down the stairs does not burn calories like running does

Your body's biggest muscles are all in your legs, and running benefits all of them: your inner and outer thighs, your gluteus maximus, get ready to turn some heads with your backside!, quads, hamstrings, and calves. It's like a dozen leg workouts in one. And besides Climbing stairs is a healthier option for you as compared to elevators and escalators because it keeps your body moving. But walking up and down the stairs does not burn calories; running does. Running up and down stairs increasing your heart rate and pumps more blood to all parts of your body. This induces high-calorie burn as compared to the number of calories you burn when you do the same on a flat surface. (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Firemen running the London Marathon to raise funds for the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire

Among the many thousands of runners taking part in the Virgin London Marathon this month will be a group a firefighters giving it their all for a very special cause. A group of 18 firefighters who attended the Grenfell Tower blaze are training to run the London Marathon in a bid to raise vital funds for groups supporting local people affected by the fire. Nine of the firefighters are from the Red Watch at North Kensington Fire Station and the other nine are from the Red Watch at Paddington Fire Station. The firefighters were among the first to arrive on the scene of the Grenfell Tower fire on June 14 2017. Seventy one people are now known to have died. “We’re doing circuits of Hyde Park as a group once a week and the rest of the time we’re having to do our training individually. “We’ve managed to run a few 13-milers already as a group. We are trying to ensure we’ve got the stamina we’re going to need.” Tom is one of only two runners with marathon experience. “I ran London in 2016 and did it in a little over four hours. I was aiming for 3:30 but I was carrying an injury. This time round we’re running as group. We’ve got runners of varying ability and we’re really focused on the fundraising so anything around five hours would be great.” (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Desiree Linden this year was all alone as she crossed the finish line in Boston unlike in 2011

Desiree Linden became the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since Lisa Rainsberger in 1985, ending the drought on a day when the runners faced a deluge of rain. Linden came two seconds from winning Boston in 2011. Before the race, Linden told Boston.com that her goal was to “compete up front and hopefully have that battle on Boylston again. And have a different outcome this time, for sure.” The first battle she was referring to came in 2011, when she matched Caroline Kilel stride for stride down the stretch but fell two seconds short of a laurel wreath. Linden, racing in her marathon debut, crossed the line in a personal best of 2:22:38. People expected her to feel ecstatic about the result, but she had spent four months convincing herself every day that she was going to win the race. “So when I crossed the finish line second, it was the first time in four months that I wasn’t the winner of the Boston Marathon and I was pretty pissed,” Linden said. There was no one to battle on Boylston this time around as she pulled away from the pack and raced alone to the finish line. (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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So who is Sarah Sellers who place second at this year’s Boston Marathon?

Many of those who watched the Boston Marathon — even the ones who follow the sport of running — had the same question Monday: Who in the world is Sarah Sellers? Sellers crossed the finish line in second place at the prestigious 26.2-mile race, in rain-soaked conditions, as a virtual unknown. Few online road-race results existed for Sellers, and she was not listed among the elite field for Boston. In the wet and windy conditions, Sellers wore a nondescript outfit, with no visible sponsors, and crossed the finish line by simply clicking the timer on her watch. Her time of 2 hours 44 minutes 4 seconds put her second among the seven American women who placed in the top 10. Desiree Linden was the first American woman to win the race since 1985, a historic finish in a race full of surprises. But Sellers’s finish may have been the most improbable. “I mean, I still can’t believe I finished second,” Sellers, 26, said in a phone interview Monday afternoon. “I’m going to wake up and this will be a dream.” Sellers never planned to podium at Boston. Not when she was a standout runner at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, where she grew up. Not even when she qualified for Boston after winning the Huntsville Marathon last September in Utah in 2:44:27. She only signed up for Boston because her younger brother, 24-year-old Ryan Callister, was running it. (Ryan finished in 2:48:20.) Plus she’s also a nurse anesthetist who works full-time in Tucson. She doesn’t have an agent, or any sponsors, and has to fit in her workouts at either 4 a.m. before work or 7 p.m. after her 10-hour shifts at Banner Health Center. (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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I am very happy it is over and very proud that I finished says Rosaura at this year’s Boston Marathon

I did finish and with a decent time of 3:44:34 I think. Today was a very tough day for everybody. No matter what I did to stay dry nothing worked as I expected except for the shower cap on my hat. I was wet and cold way before getting in the bus, then at the village mud all over, so I have to add I had muddy shoes and I couldn't feel my toes. It was a brutal day, the rain never stopped and the wind was very strong, I never felt warm so I struggled a lot. I had to stop at mile 24 to walk for about 3 min because my lower back was getting stiff and painful. To recover our bags was a nightmare because they were running short of volunteers, I don't blame them for not sticking with their job, they were looking worst than we were; then when I got my bag it was almost impossible to open it since my hands were super cold, so little by little I was able to open it with my teeth (full of germs probably but I didn't care); from there I started a painful walk to meet my big supporter, my husband, who was also suffering from being cold. Overall an interesting day and a big new experience, One of the worst conditions I have run a marathon. Well done everybody. We never know what kind of surprise Boston's weather has for us. Until the next one! (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
by Rosaura Briceno-Tennant
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Unlike most professional runners, this year’s Boston Marathon champion has a full time job in Japan

Boston Marathon 2018 champion, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi has run many races in challenging weather conditions both hot and cold. He holds the world record for sub-2:20 marathons with 79 now. Unlike many professional runners he has a full time job. He works in the administration office of a high school. “This year the high school is celebrating its 100th anniversary, so I’ve been quite busy writing the commemorative magazine for that,’’ he said. And of all the marathons he has run and of all the places this sport has taken him, it was here, these spectators and avid Boston fans, that left an impression on him. “It’s the best crowd support I’ve had anywhere in the world,’’ he said. “Thank you, Boston.’’ (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
Boston Marathon, Yuki Kawauchi
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Kenya´s Defending champion Nancy Kiprop heads strong women’s field for Vienna Marathon

In one of the strongest women’s fields ever assembled for Austria’s number one road running event four athletes feature personal bests of sub 2:25. Kiprop is one of them with a PB of 2:24:20 but Helen Tola of Ethiopia has been well over a minute faster with a record of 2:22:51. In a thrilling battle for victory Nancy Kiprop was just five seconds ahead in the Vienna City Marathon 2017, clocking her personal best. It was the closest women’s finish in the history of the event. And it could well end similar on 22nd April. Despite the wind she ran the second fastest time ever recorded in the race. With 2:24:20 the Kenyan missed the course record by just 33 seconds. Italy’s Maura Viceconte clocked 2:23:47 back in the year 2000. Kiprop may have to further improve in Vienna to defend her title. Despite being already 38 years old she did just that last September in a half marathon. She was second in Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic, when she smashed her PB with a time of 67:22. (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Japan's Yuki Kawauchi was 91 seconds behind at 35K, then he made an unbelievable move to win Boston

It looked like last year's Boston Marathon winner, Geoffrey Kirui, was going to win again but he may not have realized how tough of a runner Japan's Yuki Kawauchi really is in challenging weather conditions.

Kirui had taken command at 30K opening up a 28 second lead on a pack of three behind including Japan's Yuki Kawauchi who lead the pack through the half marathon mark.

At this point Shadrack Biwott was the first American as Galen Rupp was not handling the weather well. Geoffrey stayed in control, hitting 35K in 1:50:49 after a 15:51 5K split.

Yuki was 91 seconds back. Then Yuki made an unbelievable move (running a 5:08 mile) and overtook Kirui and never looked back. Two America's were in the top four with just a mile to go (Biwott and Pennel) and stayed that way to the finish.

Yuki crossed the finish line first in 2:15:54 beating last year’s champion by over three minutes. Yuki became the first Japanese runner to win since 1987. Geoffrey finished second in 2:18:21, Biwot third in 2:18:32 and Pennel fourth in 2:18:57.

In the end there were six American's in the top ten. Tenth place being almost 12 minutes behind the winner. Kawauchi said through an interpreter after the windy, rainy race that "it was the best conditions possible" for him.

(04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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America’s Desiree Linden beats the weather and is first American to win the Boston Marathon in 33 years.

America's Desiree Linden took the lead at the 35K mark (2:12:22) with Kenya's Gladys Chesir right behind. Mamitu Daska from Ethiopian was elven seconds back in third place. Shalane Flanagan is not handling the weather well but is still hanging in there. There were four American's in the top ten at 35K. Des still lead the pack at the 40K mark of with an elapsed time of 2:31:13 and lead to the finish. Des went on to win in a time of 2:39:54. In the end seven American women finished in the top ten. Shalane Flanagan hung on to finish 7th. Desiree splashed her way through icy rain and a near-gale headwind to be the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since 1985. The two-time Olympian and 2011 Boston runner-up pulled away at the end of Heartbreak Hill and ran alone through Brookline to finish almost four minutes ahead of second place. That's the slowest time for a women's winner since 1978. (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya´s Daniel Kipchumba clocks 59:06, at the Lake Maggiore Half Marathon in Verbania

Kenyan trio Daniel Kipchumba, Mangata Kimai Ndiwa and Josphat Kiptoo Boit finished inside 59:20 on their half marathon debuts at the 11th edition of the Nexia Audirevi Lake Maggiore Half Marathon. Held on a spectacular course from Verbania to Stresa in perfect weather conditions and with no wind, the previous course record of 1:00:00 was bettered by all three men. One week after pacing training partner Erick Kiptanui to a world-leading time of 58:42 in Berlin, Kipchumba crossed the finish-line here first in 59:06, holding off compatriot Ndiwa by just one second. Boit completed the all-Kenyan podium in third place in 59:19. Kipchumba, Ndiwa Ndiwa and Boit broke away from the rest of the field after three kilometres. Running at 2:46-per-kilometre pace, they passed through 10 kilometres in 27:47. The following five-kilometre section was covered in 14:16, then they upped the pace again with a 14:05 split between 15 and 20 kilometres. (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Aidan Puffer broke the world 5k record clocking 15:47 for 13 year-olds

A 13-year-old youngster from Manchester (United Kingdom), accustomed to youth records, showed himself on Saturday in Boston, as part of the B.A.A. 5K through the streets of Boston, two days before the Boston Marathon. His time is amazing: 15:47! This is the world record in this category. Aidan Puffer started running at age 10 and in just three years he managed to do 4:18 in 1500 meters, 9:22 in 3000 and now 15:47 in 5000. This young athlete has as idol one of the most great of history. "My idol is Mo Farah, but I still do not have his autograph," says Aidan Puffer. In a typical week, Aidan runs 40 miles over six days, with one day of cross-training (35 minutes on the elliptical). If he does a long run on the weekends, his dad will often ride a bike alongside him. (04/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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New record set for pushing a triple stroller for Half Marathon in San Jose

When Ann Marie Cody’s 16-month-old triplets get fussy, instead of taking them for a spin in the car to calm them, she straps them into their 4-foot-wide triple stroller and takes them out for a run. It works like a charm, the mother from Sunnyvale says, because the two boys and one girl seem to like being pushed while she jogs. Cody used her kids’ calm temperament while in the stroller to her advantage Sunday morning as she bested the Guinness World Record time for fastest half-marathon while pushing a triple pram, running in the inaugural Silicon Valley Half-Marathon in downtown San Jose today April 15. She finished in 1:46:13, beating her previous time by nearly two minutes, which she set in the Fresno California Classic Half-Marathon last year. The time will still need to be ratified by Guinness before becoming official. Even with the stroller, Cody placed 49th out of 753 women registered for the event, and 153rd overall out of 1,474 entrants. “I went out hard, I tried to not leave any gas in the tank,” Cody said after finishing the race Sunday morning, still dripping in sweat and fighting off cramps in her feet. “It was awesome.” (04/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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One elite Boston Marathon runner, Yuki Kawauchi handles extreme weather well

Maybe the one elite runner in the Boston Marathon field that has performed the best in extreme weather conditions is Japan's Yuki Kawauchi. He is running his first Boston. He was one of just three runners in the Marshfield Road Runner's 37th New Year's Day Marathon. He was attempting to break the world record of 75 sub 2:20 marathons he co-held with Doug Kurtis which he did. It was very cold and windy. The temperature was 4 degrees and he ran 2:18:59. Colder than what is predicted for Monday. Most Runners would not have run on News Year Day but it didn’t stop Yuki. The 31-year-old, who has won more than 30 international marathons, has a best of 2:08:14. What will the weather be like race morning? As of late Sunday morning, Boston was just a couple of degrees above freezing, and it won’t be much better early Monday. Should be a little warmer but most likely there will be rain and wind. How will this play out? We will know in 24 hours. (04/15/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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The weather most likely will be a factory on Marathon Monday, Here is what you need to know

There are going to be showers the entire day, and, at times, there could be some heavy downpours for the Boston Marathon. However this could change. The good news is that cold and wet is better than hot weather. David Epstein, a 30 year meteorologist just posted this today. "On April 15, 1881, the temperature in Boston only reached 40 degrees. Until today, that marked the coldest April 15 in the record books. While the cold is certainly notable, it’s the rain that will really affect Patriots Day and impact the most number of folks outside. As of late Sunday morning, Boston was just a couple of degrees above freezing, and it won’t be much better early Monday. Sunday night will be raw and chilly, and there could be some very light freezing rain or sleet showers before everything trends over toward just a drizzle by morning. It will remain breezy from the east all night. Monday will be a raw and cold day to start, but it will turn a bit milder as the rain pushes into the region, especially in the afternoon. Hopkinton will be about 37 or 38 degrees when the wheelchair racers begin and only a degree or two higher for the first couple of waves. This will be the coldest running of the marathon in many years. There are going to be showers the entire day, and, at times, there could be some heavy downpours. There’s even the risk of thunderstorms in the afternoon as a frontal system pushes through the region. Wind is going to be another factor. A headwind in the morning will turn to a crosswind during the day. At times, especially during some of the heavy downpours, the winds could gust over 25 mph, and that’s enough to create a little bit of instability for the runners. (04/15/2018) ⚡AMP
by David Epstein
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Don Cuddy qualified for his first of nine Boston Marathons running on a certified course in a Prison

"My first Boston marathon was in 1992." says Don Cuddy. "I’d sailed my boat to New England from San Diego, arriving in the fall of 1990 and running Boston ranked very high on the list of things I wished to accomplish. I was 39 and to obtain a number, the BAA required me to run a sub-3:15 qualifier. So 1991 became all about running. I targeted the Marine Corps marathon in D.C. that November for my qualifying race. Alas, my inexperience proved costly. I ran too fast, too early and finished in 3:19. On my return I discovered there was to be another marathon just two weeks later on a .44-mile running track at Bridgewater State Prison. Apparently the warden was an enthusiast. So I went inside the walls for the Chain Gang marathon. It wasn’t even an oval track. There was a dogleg on the back stretch around a guard tower. It was a certified course however and a prisoner with a clipboard was assigned to tally the required 58 3/4 laps. I can only marvel now at the fact that I managed to run a 3:12. The warden also had a sense of humor. The race shirt pictured a runner with a ball and chain on one leg. Unlike the chap with the clipboard, they let me out after the race and I was on my way to Hopkinton." (04/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Update on Callum Hawkins who callasped with just over a mile to go at the Commonwealth Games Marathon Sunday Morning

From Team Scotland posted at 7pm (PST) Saturday: CALLUM HAWKINS UPDATE: We are very pleased to report that Callum is sitting up and speaking with his Dad and Team Scotland medical staff. He is undergoing further tests as a precaution and we all wish him a speedy recovery. (The temperature at the time when he callasped was 82 degrees. See our story with more details below.) His brother Derek posted this an hour earlier: “Thanks everyone for your messages of support. As reported Callum's in hospital, is conscious/talking and getting appropriate medical attention. Can't describe how upsetting and distressing it was to watch but just glad he's alright.” (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Former NFL offensive Lineman is ready to run Boston Monday

The job of an NFL offensive lineman is to protect his quarterback, so there wasn’t a lot of running involved for Ryan Wendell throughout his eight-year career. Sure, there were sprints in training camp and he would occasionally have to jog up to five yards, but running was never really his forte. He would much rather block a fellow 300-pounder than run. But all of that has changed now that the 32-year-old is done keeping Tom Brady on his feet. The former New England Patriot and Super Bowl champ is getting ready for a 26.2 mile run from Hopkinton to Boston on Marathon Monday. Once a 6-foot-2, 305-pound behemoth, you may not recognize Wendell when he races (or trots) by on Monday. He’s dropped 45 pounds while training for this year’s race, which included a 20-mile run last weekend. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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With just a little over a mile to go and leading by two minutes Callum Hawkins collapsed at Commonwealth Games Marathon

Callum Hawkins has been taken to the hospital for medical review following his collapse in the Commonwealth Games Marathon as is standard procedure. He is being supported by Team Scotland medical staff and there are no major concerns at this stage. Here is what happened Sunday morning in Australia. Scotland's Callum Hawkins collapsed just over one mile from the end of the marathon at the Commonwealth Games when leading by almost two minutes. In hot conditions (83 degrees) in the Gold Coast, Hawkins looked set for gold but he began weaving across the road before falling over the curb. He continued for another couple of hundred meters before collapsing again, hitting his head on a roadside barrier this time. Hawkins was conscious, sitting up and talking when helped into an ambulance. Peter Jardine of Scottish Athletics told BBC Scotland that Callum Hawkins "initially refused medical treatment after collapsing" because he "feared he would be disqualified.” It had taken a couple of minutes for any medical staff to attend to the Scotsman, who was lying on the road in clear distress with spectators looking on. BBC Sport commentator Steve Cram said it was "a disgrace" that it took so long for any paramedics to attend to Hawkins. When asked to explain why it took so long for paramedics to attend to Hawkins, Gold Coast 2018 chief executive Mark Peters said: "We need to check the facts out. You can't have medical people on every kilometer of the road. Australia's Mike Shelley won the race(2:16:46), defending the title he won in Glasgow in 2014. He ran past the stricken Hawkins just as help arrived and the Gold Coast-born athlete went on to claim the victory with Uganda's Munyo Solomon Mutai in second (2:19:02) , with Robbie Simpson of Scotland claiming the bronze. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Moroccan Rachid claimed his sixth victory in the Marathon Des Sables

El Morabity won the marathon with a time of 19:35:49, ahead of his brother Mohamed El Morabity with 20:01:28 and France's Robert Merile by 20:41:00. In the women's category, American athlete Magdalena Boulet won with a time of 25:11:19 followed by Danish Bouchra Eriksen 26:36:00 and British Gemma Game 27:00:23. Marathon Des Sables is an annual ultra-marathon that brings together more than 1,000 runners, who run six regular marathons over six days, with only one rest day. The combined distance over the six races is a massive 254km with the longest stage 91km. Each participant must carry his/her own backpack containing food, sleeping gear and other materials. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Rob de Castella set an Australia's marathon record for men hasn't been broken since 1986

For years Australian elite marathoners were getting faster and faster. In 1950, the fastest marathon time was two hours, 40 minutes and 49 seconds. By 1986, more than half-an-hour had been knocked off the time. That was the year Rob de Castella, also known as Deek, ran the marathon in two hours, seven minutes and 51 seconds. It was an Australian national record — that is, the fastest marathon time anywhere in the world, run by an Australian. But that was the last time the record was broken in Australia and to this day de Castella holds it. Despite all the advances in technology, sport science, nutrition, materials and understanding of human physiology, not a single male Australian runner has been able to beat it. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Your training for Boston is done and now the only thing left to do is run the 26.2 miles on Monday

The Boston Marathon is just two days from now. Your training is done. Now you just need to run the 26.2 miles on Monday. That’s all. There are many decisions that need to be made for race day and each can make the difference between running a good race or a bad one. Decisions like what do you eat, wear, how fast do you start and how should you deal with the weather? “You have done the training. For race day don’t do anything new,” says Bob Anderson who ran the 2013 Boston Marathon. “However, Boston does start later than most marathons and there is a lot of waiting at the starting area. So I had to do two things a little different. I did bring some warm clothes (it was cold) to the start to stay warm which I left on the bus and one shirt I tossed away right before the start. Secondly, I normally don’t eat much before a race (except for half a banana and a GU pack). For Boston (because of the later start I wanted to make sure I had enough fuel) I ate a light breakfast (pancake with honey and a banana) at around 6am. I ran 3:32:17 (age 65) that day and everything worked. I drank water or Gatorade at each water station and I carried five GU’s that I started eating at mile five. I knew I had gotten in most of the training miles I wanted. The main thing left, was dealing with the mental side of things. Ty Velde a Boston Globe writer wrapped up his training for this year’s race on Wednesday with a ten mile run. Ty wrote, “ While my physical training may be done, I wish I could say that same about my mind. The interesting thing about marathon training is that when it comes to running, it’s easy to set parameters in terms of mileage, time, routes and frequency. But the parameters associated with mental training are not so defined. That’s something that does not end until I cross the finish line.” (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Jake Robertson talks about the 10000m last night at the Commonwealth Games

New Zealand’s Jake Robertson posted this on Instagram today, “what a race last night in the 10000m. I broke the CG games record & NZ national record 27.30.90 though these four track stars showed me up, congratulations guys I loved competing with you'll”. Six runners finished in under the Commonwealth Games Record which was set in 2002. It was good to see these guys push it. “At 7000m Jake took the lead and held it for four laps,” says Bob Anderson. “This type of aggressive running is going to bring us faster times. It is not only about winning. It is about winning in the fastest time possible.” (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tyler Andrews sets new 50k World Record on a Track, that’s 125 laps

Tyler Andrews, 27, ran a world all-time best for 125 laps (50k) on the track at the HOKA ONE ONE Santa Barbara Elite 50K in California, clocking 2 hours, 46 minutes, 6.8 seconds at Santa Barbara City College’s La Playa Stadium on Friday. His performance eclipsed the 1980 global track standard for 31.1 miles of 2:48:06 produced by Great Britain’s Jeff Norman and fell just short of the overall 50K world record of 2:43:38 established in a road race in 1988 by South Africa’s Thompson Magawana. “We’re not done. We’ll come back for it, for sure,” said Andrews, who remained under overall world-record pace through 35K with a split of 1:54:19.9. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Just six days after Boston is the London Marathon and all eyes will be on Mo Farah

All eyes will be on Sir Mo Farah on Sunday April 22 as he strives to end Britain’s 25-year drought in the London Marathon men’s race and break Steve Jones’s 33-year-old British record. Four years ago Farah made his marathon debut in London amid high expectations and, despite finishing ‘only’ eighth, came home with an English record of 2:08:21 and the second fastest time in British marathon history. Now with his glittering track career behind him, the quadruple Olympic champion will be looking to make his mark on the roads in the company of some of the greatest marathon runners of all time. It remains to be seen whether Farah can live with the speed of the world record-chasing east Africans and become the first British men’s winner since Eamonn Martin in 1993, but the 35-year-old will certainly have Jones’s 1985 UK mark of 2:07:13 in his sights and possibly even the new European all-time best of 2:05:48. “I am thrilled to be starting this new chapter in my career with the London Marathon,” said Farah. “The London Marathon is my home race and it is so special to me. “When I decided to concentrate solely on the roads from 2018 I knew that I wanted this to be my first marathon.” (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Many of the top runners in the world come from Kenya and here is a good answer why

Kenya is known around the world as the home of champions and we wanted to know why. One tribe in Kenya that stands out more than others is the Kalenjins. At the 1968 Olympics Kalenjin runner Kipchoge Keino defeated world-record holder Jim Ryun. That day Keino not only won gold, but he also ushered in an era of Kenyan dominance. Since then a considerable number of the races are won by Kenyans and many world records are held by Kenyans. Many of these runners are of the Kalenjin tribe. The feats have just bafflled the world. David Epstein a renown sports editor who authored a book called “The Sports Gene'” noted that many world-class runners in Kenya come from the tribe of Kalenjins. In his book, he explores possible genetic factors that might be the reason behind this. He notes that Kalenjins have thin ankles and calves which makes their legs resemble a pendulum and eases their movement. According to his explanation, the more weight you have farther away from your center of gravity, the more difficult it is to swing. The vice versa applies to Kalenjins. Some studies have also discovered that Kenyans, in general, have less mass for their height, longer legs, shorter torsos and more slender limbs. These physical traits can be viewed as relatively “streamlined” and improve efficiency while running. Lastly, there is a controversial cultural argument that Kalenjins become great runners because they ran several miles to and from school barefoot on a daily basis. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Field set for 2018 USATF One Mile Road Championships with $30,000 in prize money

Grand Blue Mile race officials announced the fields for the 2018 USA Track & Field 1 Mile Road Championships set for Tuesday, April 24, in Des Moines, Iowa. A world-class group of elite runners will headline the event along with approximately 3,000 participants from across the nation who will compete among the recreational and amateur competitive divisions. This year's race features a top prize of $5,000 each for the men's and women's champions with the potential to earn an additional $2,500 for setting a new course record — currently 4.00.0 (2017) and 4:32.7 (2014), respectively. Overall, $30,000 in prize money will be contested across the men's and women's championship divisions. Leo Manzano leads the men's field with a PB of 3:50.64. Brenda Martinez leads the women's field with a PB of 4:18.4. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Master Runner Kenyan´s Mungara knows the course well and hopes to win the Commonwealth Games Marathon

Kenneth Mungara will be one of the oldest competitors in the Commonwealth Games Marathon but irrespective of his 44 years, Kenya’s Mungara will be the one to beat on the streets Sunday in Australia. The current Gold Coast Marathon race record holder (2:08:42), Mungara made a late start to marathon taking up the sport 11 years ago. A former barber, the veteran runner swapped the scissors with joggers after cutting the hair of other athletes. “I believed I could run well,” Mungara says. “I watched other runners coming to my barber shop, I observed them, and I thought I can beat them in running. “That is how it all started.” However the modest Kenyan doesn't believe that experience will give him a significant advantage saying: “Everyone running is a winner and this is the game in which one needs to play well all the time, otherwise winning is not possible. It is about the training for the race and then racing well. He has run 20 marathons since his debut in 2006. Three of the races have been on the stretch of road between Runaway Bay and Burleigh with his first win coming in 2015. The world masters record holder (40-45), also claimed first place on the Gold Coast upon his return in 2016 before settling for second place last year. The Commonwealth Games marathon course runs on the same roads he knows well. Everything will have to go right for Mungara since there is a very strong elite field. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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The first American to win Boston since 1983, Meb Keflezighi is running Monday for Team MR8

The first American man to win the Boston Marathon since 1983 crossed the finish line April 21 in 2:08:37, triumphant in a storied race that has become a national symbol of resiliency and determination. A year after the bombings, Meb Keflezighi (Eritean-born Meb became an American citizen in 1998) wrote the names of the victims -- Martin, Krystle, Lingzi and Sean — on his race bib. He crossed the finish line wearing it as he won the 2014 Boston Marathon. Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lingzi Lu were killed when the bombs exploded on Boylston Street on April 15, 2013. Sean Collier, an MIT police officer, was murdered a few days later by the marathon bombers. Keflezighi's emotional marathon victory was the first win by an American man since 1983. It also came two weeks before his 39th birthday, making him the oldest winner in decades. The elite runner retired from competitive marathoning last year after running Boston and New York, the 25th and 26th marathons of his storied career. But, on April 16, Keflezighi is coming back to Boston to run the marathon once again. This time he'll be running as part of Team MR8 -- so named for the 8-year-old boy from Dorchester's initials and sports number — alongside the other men and women running to raise money for the Martin Richard Foundation. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Uganda's Cheptegei pulls off double, sets Games Record and Robertson sets New Zealand National Record

The much talked about 10000m at the Commonwealth Games today was one of the best events of the Games so far. Joshua Kiprui Cheptegei (UGA) fresh off his 5000m win not only won the 10000m too but set a Games Record breaking Wilberforce Talel (KEN) record of 27:45 set in 2002. Cheptegeie clocked 27:19 running his last 5000m in 13:25, 25 seconds faster than his 5000m winning time. The 10000m was a fast race as six runners got under the Games Record. Jake Robertson (NZ) finished fifth in a new national record for New Zealand clocking 27:30. He took the lead at the 7K mark coming up from eight and lead for four laps but he could not hold it but he still ran 13:36 for his last 5000m. Canada's Mohammed Ahmed and Cheptegei battled back and forth for the lead the last two kilometers. In the end the Canadian was out sprinted placing second in 27:20. Third was Rodgers Kwemoi (KEN) in 27:28. Eight runners finished under 28 minutes. It does not get much better than this. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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85-year-old Bob Emmerson has run 96 marathons and have logged in more than 110,000 miles

Bob Emmerson might have had both hips replaced, but that hasn't stopped him from finishing nearly 200 marathons and ultra-marathons in the last 35 years. Now, Bob has set another personal best and has joined in at the weekly Parkrun and has run the community run 300 times since it kicked off five years ago. Last Saturday (April 7), he crossed the line together with 83-year-old Diana Mary Green as she completed her 250th Park Run. “I insist that 300 is nothing special, it's just to prove my determination to keep going,” says Bob. "The Parkrun has kept me going. I've met so many friends there.” Since he took up running at 49, Bob has run 96 marathons and 96 ultra Marathons from 30 to 60 miles each. He has had both hips replaced since he was 70 and has run the London Marathon 17 times. Through careful log-keeping, he estimates he has run 110,000 miles so far. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah will race the Vitality London 10000 five weeks after the London Marathon

Following the London Marathon, Mo Farah will race in the 2018 Vitality London 10000 on Monday May 28. The multiple Olympic and world champion last ran in the Vitality London 10000 in 2013 and has competed in the event on five occasions, winning in 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013, finishing runner-up in the first edition of the race in 2008. “It has been a while since I last raced the Vitality London 10000 and I’m looking forward to returning again this year,” said Farah. “I have got many happy memories of the race and of the course which is a spectacular one and one that I’ve been able to run fast on in the past. “The race has always been a preparation for the track season in the past while this year I will have run the Virgin Money London Marathon just five weeks before so it will be a bit different but I am looking forward to it. As I always say, running in my home town is always special.” The 35-year-old set the 10km course record of 27:44, which is also his road personal best, in 2010 when he beat the Kenyan Micah Kogo by five seconds. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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New Zealand’s Jake Robertson could win the Commonweath Games 10000m Friday

Jake and his twin brother Zane Robertson were not going to run in the Commonwealth Games in Australia. But they changed their minds and said they would be there representing New Zealand. Most recently Jake travelled to New Orelans and won the Crescent City 10K classic clocking 27:28 March 31. Zane however was injured while getting a deep tissue massage by a massage therapist. The details are not very clear but Zane had to withdraw from the Games. Tonight Jake posted on Instagram: “Track, it's been awhile,10000m final tonight, 25 laps on the grill. It's time to burn.” “Jake has been running well,” says Bob Anderson. “There is some strong competition and it has been awhile since Jake has raced on the track but I think he can win it. He and his brother has been training in Kenya the last ten years and have been doing some impressive workouts.” The race starts Friday at 9:10pm in Australia which is 4:10am in California or 7:10am in New York. (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Inspired by the Boston Marathon bombing survivors, incredible medical advances were achieved

Five years ago, 17 people lost limbs in the Boston Marathon bombing, fueling efforts to improve amputations and artificial limbs. On April 15, 2013, two homemade bombs exploded near the marathon finish line in Boston, Massachusetts, firing shrapnel into the crowds that killed three and injured 260. Following the attack hundreds of thousands of dollars were donated to research for technology that would help get the 17 amputees back on their feet. The lessons learned by working with those survivors have been integral to developing better prosthetics for them and all other amputees. Each of these survivors have undergone multiple surgeries and many of them continue to experience severe pain even five years later. However, the doctors and researchers who helped them get back on their feet say the advances in prosthetic technology that resulted from working with the survivors is a silver lining of the bombing. (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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American marathon record holder Deena Kastor has been writing and decided in December to run Boston

At 45, Deena Kastor has been writing and training at her high-altitude home in Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Her newly-released book, "Let Your Mind Run, A Memoir of Thinking My Way To Victory" (Crown Archetype), is a gem. She's also in the final stages of her training for the Boston Marathon on Monday, a race she has only run once before. At her last Boston Marathon in 2007, she battled the rain and wind which was so strong that organizers nearly canceled the race. Kastor sloshed her way to fifth place and won the USA marathon title, a prelude to her victory one year later at the USA Olympic Trials Marathon which were also held in Boston, but on a different course. "It wasn't my intention to be part of this phenomenal American field that is being put together," said Kastor, who admitted that she only got the idea to run Boston at the end of December after finishing up the bulk of her writing on the book. "It was my intention, when I finished with this book, I couldn't wait to get in shape again because I had spent so much time in front of that computer." She added: "I needed to put something on the calendar again. Why not go big and choose the most historic marathon in our country?" (She was speaking with David Monti from Race Results Weekly) (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Could be wet and windy for Boston Monday, how to prepare

The current weather forecast for Boston Monday is not looking very good. But New England weather can change in an instant. Conditions for the 122nd Boston Marathon on April 16 may be wet, windy and cold. The temperature should be okay once you get going but how should you prepare yourself for Monday? Toni Reavis has covered races all over the world and writes about running regularly. Here are some tips for Monday. "It’s important to stay with your fueling and hydration plan. Just because it’s wet and chilly outside, doesn’t mean your fueling and hydration needs change on the inside. Also, bring old clothes you don’t mind losing, and maybe a trash bag to the start to keep yourself warm and dry before the race – especially if you find yourself stuck outside for several hours. Then, wear arm warmers, a light pair of gloves and a skullcap during the race. The energy needed to keep you warm is energy that’s taken away from muscles working for performance. Tights are also an option, although those you can’t easily remove." (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
by Toni Reavis
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Stuart Kolb, prepares for his 100th marathon in boston this monday

Stuart Kolb will turn 56 on Monday. He is celebrating by running the Boston Marathon for the eighth time, which also will mark his 100th career marathon. Stuart Kolb says he just feels blessed. “Running allows you to relieve stresses in your day, and from a work-life balance, this is the best thing to do for yourself, to take care of yourself, take care of your health, and running has been my outlet for that,” said Kolb. After over 30 years and six destinations, including Ireland, not to mention some ultra-events with 100-mile runs, Kolb said he is feeling humbled to celebrate his 100th venture as a marathon runner. “Distance runners will tell you it's as much the nutrition and execution. Pacing of course is huge. You can run a great half marathon and really struggle. For me it's always thinking about how your body feels,” said Kolb. Kolb Is hoping to get it done in under three hours. (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Shalane Flanagan’s Mother once held the World Record in the Marathon

DID YOU KNOW: Cheryl Bridges, now Cheryl Treworgy, once held the American and world record in the marathon. Cheryl Bridges was born December 25, 1947 in Indiana. She began her running career as a sophomore at North Central High School in Indianapolis. In her senior year in high school, she competed in the national cross-country championships. In 1966, she became the first female athlete in the U.S. to receive an athletic scholarship to a public university — Indiana State University. She graduated in three years with a degree in physical education. In 1969, she finished fourth in the World Cross Country Championships in Scotland. She set the American records in the 3 mile and 5,000 meter distances. On December 7, 1971, Bridges ran her first marathon, finishing the Culver City Marathon in a world record time of 2:49:40. She had a lot of ideas and ambitions. She was the holder of a patent on utility sports bras and was the former buyer and part-owner of Frank Shorter Sports stores. Cheryl, now 70, is a professional photographer for her own company, Pretty Sporty, and was recognized in 2010 as Track and Field Writers of America Photographer of the year. Cheryl is the mother of Shalane Flanagan, who among other achievements set an American record in the 2008 Summer Olympics Beijing in the 10,000m and won the New York City marathon on November 5, 2017. Shalane is going after a dream on Monday. This dream is to win the Boston Marathon. Her mom would be proud. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Commonwealth Games 5000m Champion has decided to also run the 10000m

Uganda's Joshua Cheptegei, fresh from winning the 5,000m gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in Australia, has changed his mind and will compete in the 10,000m final as well. He won his first-ever Commonwealth Games gold on Sunday April 8 in a time of 13:50.83, ahead of Canada's Mohammed Ahmed at the Carrara Stadium Track. The other two Ugandans in the race, Thomas Ayeko and Phillip Kipyeko, finished fourth and sixth respectively. Cheptegei had, according to the country's athletics federation, initially ruled himself out of the longer distance as he didn't want to overload himself, but will now contest the 10km final on 13 April. "We have managed to convince Cheptegei," said Dominic Otuchet, chairman of the Uganda Athletics Federation. "This is very good for Uganda as a country and for the athlete himself because he is now better motivated to even perform well after winning gold on Sunday." Otuchet explained that Cheptegei initially did not want to overextend himself with two races, even though he had qualified for both, adding: "But we left him entered for the two events and only kept hoping that he changes his mind. "We are glad he has now allowed to stay back and compete in the 10,000m final." (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jon Hendershott spent nearly 50 years writing about Track and Field has died

We are saddened by the news that Jon Hendershott, one of the most respected track and field journalists in America, died Monday April 9 at his home in Salem, Oregon due to complications from a stroke he suffered on Sunday. Hendershott, who spent nearly 50 years working for Track & Field News, was 71. Born July 20, 1946 in Bend, Oregon, Hendershott spent much of youth surrounded by track and field. His father was a high school and college track coach, a passion that was picked up by Jon. Hendershott learned of Track & Field News for the first time in 1962 at age 16 when his high school track coach shared the magazine with members of his team. He subscribed immediately, beginning a relationship that would last the rest of his life. He started working for Track & Field News in 1967 while studying at the University of Washington. Over the course of the next five decades, Hendershott covered hundreds of regional, national and international competitions, including nine Olympic Games and 15 world championships. Hendershott retired from Track & Field News in 2016 but continued to report on the sport on a freelance basis for several outlets, literally until his final days. On Saturday, the day before he suffered his fatal stroke, he traveled to Eugene to cover the Oregon Team Invitational. Respected by his colleagues, Hendershott was twice elected president of the Track and Field Writers of America. He also authored several books on the sport. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Brad Caswell is running Boston again after losing 90 pounds and feeling better than ever

Running has given me a new love. I volunteered at the Boston Marathon finish line three years ago and was blown away by the energy. The runners had done something amazing, their friends and family all supported them in it, and it was truly touching. At the time, I weighed about 275 pounds. I couldn’t run more than a mile at a time, but I went home and signed up for a half marathon that day just to feel a small part of that. I ran the Old Port half and fell in love. Since then I have run another 13 half marathons, the Boston Marathon for the first time last year, and, most importantly, gotten my weight under control. Through my new love of running, I’ve lost about 90 pounds, and feel better than I ever have before. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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