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Healdsburg Wine Country Half Marathon Cancelled due to Fire

We are sad to announce that we must cancel the Hallowine Run on October 26th due to the Kincaid fire which has burned over 10,000 acres in Northeast Sonoma County and forced evacuations in Geyserville, near our race start venue at Coppola Winery. Local law enforcement and other vital resources are needed to help with evacuations, road closures, fire fighting and other support duties over the next few days.

We would like to support the fire victims and responders who work so tirelessly to save lives, homes, businesses and natural habitat in the area. One way to show our appreciation - and YOURS - is come to our Race Expo in Santa Rosa’s Historic Railroad Square from noon to 6:00pm tomorrow. We are asking all our exhibitors and other vendors to also show their support by coming to the expo tomorrow as planned. There will be wine and beer tasting, product sampling and demonstrations, food truck, music, a raffle, fun runs, games and more! Registered runners will be able to pick up their race shirt, wine glass, medal and even race bib if desired. We have plenty of product from our sponsors and exhibitors that will be offered to the race participants and also donated to those evacuated by the fire, and firefighters. Wine and beer tasting is complimentary for all registered runners and $15 for others (includes wine glass). The event is open to the public. Our staff and many of our volunteers will be there to manage the event.

While most of wine country in Northern California remains open and most wineries are not directly affected, those wineries in the Alexander Valley, including Coppola, are currently closed. Dry Creek Valley wineries and downtown Healdsburg tasting rooms are open today and not directly impacted. This weekend some of our participating wineries will be offering wine club member for a day benefits such as a complimentary wine tasting and a discount on wine purchases to registered runners. We will post those wineries on social and our website as soon as we learn which ones are open and making that offer. We hope this information is helpful for those of you traveling from out of town.

Once we’ve had a chance to confer with our charity partners, vendors, Active Network and suppliers, we’ll be sending another email next week explaining your options regarding your entry. Right now we are focused on dealing with logistics and communication to all our suppliers, wineries, hotels, etc. In times of crisis we have seen the local community, and the running community, come together to support those affected by this natural disaster that has become all too commonplace in recent years. Thanks again for your understanding, patience and support.

(10/26/2019) ⚡AMP
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The Hallowine Run

The Hallowine Run

The Hallowine Run (formerly Healdsburg Wine Country Half Marathon) originated in October of 2008 after Destination Races founder Matt Dockstader attended the popular Marathon du Medoc in France. His vision was to create a wine harvest themed race in one of America's most iconic wine regions , along with the flair and colorful themed costumeshe witnessed at the Medoc event....

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Gerry Fay will be taking on his 522nd Marathon at Dublin Marathon

Gerard Fay hopes to complete his 522nd marathon this Bank Holiday weekend to complete an astonishing 109 marathons in 365 days. 

Gerard is an accomplished marathoner. To date in this calendar year, the 48-year-old has done 86 Marathons. All these marathons were done in Ireland and all will be a minimum of 26.2 Miles each.

Aside from the marathons he also does numerous shorter distance races from 800m to half marathons as his training  during the week and on weekends when there are no marathons on.

Dublin City Marathon was Gerard's first Marathon back in 1998. This weekend will be his 22nd Dublin event. 

"A lot of miles have been done in the past 21 years and each an everyone has been done with thousands of people in my head pushing me along. 

"These people are of course those with Cystic Fibrosis both living and deceased. People constantly ask where do I get my motivation and it is simple Just look at a person with CF. 

"Learn what they have to go through day in day out with physic, medication and just basic breathing. Things we as healthy people take for granted. I have know some of these CF's over 30 years now and to see their achievements in their lives pushes me on to do what I do. 

"There are plenty others out there doing what I do and more but we all have the one goal to try and help the real warriors the Persons with CF. They are the ones who push me to achieve my dreams and if by doing so I can help them achieve their then I am happy. 

"The running is my pastime but this is their lives and with the support of their families they are doing their very best to achieve their potential. Please support those with CF if you can. Donation page is always open."

Gerard's chosen charity is Cystic Fibrosis Ireland who provide excellent and much needed support services to people with Cystic Fibrosis. The funds raised will be used for the purchase of vital equipment in the CF units around the country but also to assist Cystic Fibrosis Ireland with their Exercise Grant Scheme whereby they give a grant to persons with CF for part funding gym memberships or the purchase of home exercise equipment. The target for the fundraising is to raise a minimum of €50,000.

"I have been fundraising for Cystic Fibrosis over the past 30 years and in that time have raised in excess of €150,000 of which €100,000 was used for the purchase and refurbishment of the dedicated CF Outpatients unit in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Drogheda. All funds will go to Cystic Fibrosis Ireland and all expenses are borne by myself."

Cystic Fibrosis is a Genetic Disease which effects over 1,250 people in the Republic of Ireland which is the highest per head of population in the World. The Association is over 50 years in existence and over those years has contributed nearly 20 million to research and over 15 Million for the building of the dedicated centers around the country. These centers are invaluable to those with CF.

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gavan Becton
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KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

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Super grandma, 70, Collette O’Hagan is gearing up for her 695th marathon in dublin this weekend

The 70-year-old has no plans to stop there, as she’s aiming to bring her grand total to a cool 700 before the end of the year.

Colette has ran marathons all over the world including places such as Boston and New York.

Collette has run marathons all over the world, but Dublin holds a special place in her heart as it’s where she ran her first marathon 30 years ago.

She explained: “My running journey started in Dublin. I never looked back. I do love Dublin.”

While most runners spend months preparing for a big race, superfit Collette can easily clock up two or three marathons every weekend.

She has also completed all of the major marathons around the world including Boston 11 times and New York six times.

Her impressive list also includes Berlin, London, Chicago and Tokyo, making up the Big Six in marathon circles.

The Dundalk woman recalled how a small crowd joined her on her first Dublin marathon, but over the years the event has grown dramatically, “and now I am doing it with 22,500.”

She said: “I owe a lot to Dublin for getting me going and for my running journey.”

Collette began running with her husband Larry and as time passed her interest in it, and in running longer distances, outgrew his.

She gets a lot out of running and her advice is to “stay focused, keep yourself motivated and enjoy it.”

She said: “I particularly look forward to Dublin; the spectators are amazing, they bring you through it, they are just fantastic.

“Some of the women are out and ask do you want a cup of tea, they are so friendly, it is like a day out nearly going around Dublin, it is just fabulous, I’d say it will be a massive big party day on Sunday.

“It has special meaning and definitely is one of my favorites.”

While she doesn’t keep a close eye on the clock, Collette is happy now to complete a marathon within approximately five hours.

She explained: “I don’t push myself that I’m stressed, if you are stressing your body all the time, stress will bring on an injury.”

2019 is also a special year because it marked her golden wedding anniversary and she celebrated her 70th birthday.

She and Larry have five children and 10 grandchildren and that does not include over 80 children they have fostered over the years.

She said: “This is a special year, a lot of milestones this year and my ambition is to continue running and see how far the journey takes me.”

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by Elaine Keogh
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KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

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Olika Adugna of Ethiopia will be aiming to defend his title at the 41st edition of Marseille Cassis 20km

It’s been 12 years since Wilson Chebet retained his title in the race, the last runner to do so. Last year the 20-year-old Adugna defeated Amera Kuma following a fierce sprint. But Adugna, who clocked a half marathon PB of 1:01:43 one year ago, has a season’s best of just 1:04:23 from August, so doesn’t seem to his in his best shape.

One of Adugna’s rivals will be Vincent Gerald of Kenya, who also knows the challenging course along the French Mediterranean coastline. He rounded out the podium last year in 1:00:33, just four seconds behind Adugna.

Yasin Haji, who’ll be making his debut in this event, will be another strong contender. The Ethiopian, 23, is the fastest man on the field courtesy of a 1:01:19 half marathon career best, a time he ran just two weeks ago.

Josphat Kiproo Menjo should also be a threat, on paper, as he is the fastest man in the field over 10km, although his 27:04 came nine years ago.

The Kenyan, who turned 40 in August, set his half marathon best in March 2018 when running 1:01:36. In 2019 he clocked season’s best of 28:37 and 1:06:23.

Dennis Rutoh will have a role to play following his victory at the Montbéliard half marathon last September in a new lifetime best of 1:01:44. He also set his 10 km best in July with 28:21. 

French hopes will rest on Mohammed Serghini and Julien Devanne. The latter won within a month both half marathon and marathon national titles.

On the women’s side, Brillian Jepkorir Kipkoech looks to be the favourite to succeed to Gete Alemayehu. 

The Kenyan, 24, improved her half marathon best one month ago with a 1:07:12 run. She also bettered her 10km best to 31:04 in July. She seems to have a big margin over the rest of the field.

Compatriots Susan Kipsang Jeptoo and Lucy Macharia should be her main rivals. The former improved her 10km, half marathon and marathon bests in 2019 while the latter finished fourth at last year’s event.

French hopes will rest on the shoulders of Elodie Normand and Leonie Periault.

The start takes place near Marseille’s well-known Velodrome Stadium and then follows the Mediterranean coast before a tough 327-metre climb up to the Col de la Gineste halfway through the race. Runners then wind down a long descent towards the finish line in the port town of Cassis.

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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Marseille Cassis

Marseille Cassis

Once upon a time…How could we imagine one day of March 1979, the idea of organizing a race opened to everyone between Marseilles and Cassis could take such an International dimension? A very young athletic section, a group of close friends and the unfailing support of every sections of an “omnisport” club, the SCO Ste Marguerite, gave birth...

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Nairobi Standard Chartered Marathon´s race organizers have increased the prize money for this year

In a bid to have it promoted to the world's elite marathons, this year's Nairobi Standard Chartered Marathon will see over 200 technical officials deployed by Athletics Kenya (AK) to monitor the annual race that will run this weekend in the capital city.

Athletics Kenya Nairobi boss, Barnabas Korir said the event organizers are paying extra attention to the technical aspects of the city road race as they aspire to get the road race in the IAAF permit.

Over 20,000 participants have registered for the run that returns to its traditional venue, the Nyayo National Stadium.

For the first time in a long period, race organisers have increased the prize money from Sh1.5 million ($14,500) to Sh2 million ($19,400US). 

And in line with the international safety provisions, the Nairobi Traffic department on Tuesday released an elaborate road closure diversions schedule that will see traffic to and out of the city diverted to alternative roads between 4am and 2pm.

The affected roads include sections of Mombasa Road, Uhuru Highway, Upper Hill and Forest road while within the CBD, Kenyatta Avenue, Muindi Mbingu and sections of Haile Selasie and University Way will also be closed.

"We do not expect a major disruption in the flow of traffic. We have carefully organized traffic diversions to ensure that Nairobi County residents have alternative routes to critical locations in the city including hospitals, churches and airports," Traffic Commandant, Nairobi County, Joshua Omukata announced.

The event organizers have announced a few changes to the route for the six race categories largely due to relocation of the start and finish points back to in and around Nyayo Stadium.

Speaking during a press briefing, Peter Gitau, the Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee expressed optimism that the goal of raising Sh60 million this year for the FutureMakers initiative will be attained.

"We have increased the prize money from Sh1.5 to Sh2m for 42km, and from Sh150,000 to S 300,000 for 21km and we have noticed heightened interest from the elite and fun runners," Gitau underscored.

"So far, we have registered close to 20,000 participants and we are optimistic of reaching our target. There is a big uptake from both individuals and corporates entries. We expect this trend to boost the numbers towards achieving our target of 25 000 runners," Gitau added.

(10/25/2019) ⚡AMP
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STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank. The other three legs of this four-marathon race...

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German Katharina Steinruck and Kenyan Mark Kiptoo will headline the elite field at Mainova Frankfurt Marathon On Sunday

Mark Kiptoo goes hunting for Masters World Record and Katharina Steinruck chases Olympic qualifying time. Mark Kiptoo and Katharina Steinruck know that the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon on Sunday is the most important race of the year in pursuit of their respective goals. The Kenyan Masters world record holder and the leading woman runner among the home contingent aim to exploit the Frankfurt course, renowned for its fast times.

Last year Kiptoo, now 43, ran 2:07:50 for a M40 world record and he says he feels capable of improving on that time. Katharina Steinruck has shown excellent form this year after heel surgery and her eyes are on the qualifying time of 2:29:30. Her personal best is currently 2:28:34, set three years ago.

Around 14,000 runners are expected on the startline for the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon which is an IAAF Gold Label race, the highest category of road race. It is still possible to enter during the Marathon Expo on Friday and Saturday. Further details can be found at: www.frankfurt-marathon.com

Mark Kiptoo credits his longevity with a disciplined attitude not only to training but also his life in general:"What we put into our body, is what will come out. So the training we have been doing means I have confidence the body is capable of going through halfway in 62:30." That level of performance would put the 43-year-old on course for a major improvement on his age group world best.

Kiptoo’s story may well give other late developers hope, though not everyone perhaps has the ability at his level:"I am sure that the reason why I can run so fast these days is because I began late as a runner. It wasn’t until I was 28 that I realised I had talent." He made his marathon debut at 37 after a solid career on the track and cross-country." His preparation has gone flawlessly:"The key is that I don’t have any physical problems and have also been able to do good speedwork sessions. Age is only a number." His personal best of 2:06:00 goes back to his pre-Masters days.

Frankfurt has been a happy hunting ground for the runner from Eldoret. He made his marathon debut here in 2013 with second place in 2:06:16, just one second behind the winner. A year later he won, aged 38, in 2:06:49, then came last year’s age group world best.

Everything points to Katharina Steinruck being in excellent form before she attempts to run the Olympic qualifying time of 2:29:30. After heel surgery in November 2018 she has set a clutch of personal bests recently which have put her on the right course:"I wouldn’t say I am in the form of my life but there has been a clear step forward." In preparation for the marathon Steinruck has run personal bests of 32:39 for 10km and 1:12:23 for the half marathon. „The Olympic qualifying time is of course my number one goal. However I am also looking for a personal best. To run sub 2:28 would be a dream come true.“

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
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Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

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Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso EDP announces that Sifan Hassan, Fancy Chemutai and Gudeta Kebede are focused to set a new women’s world record

The Valencia Half Marathon Trinidad Alfonso EDP announces that two international athletes are joining those already on the quest to set a new women’s world record on the 27th of October in Valencia Ciudad del Running. The city has had this lofty goal since 2017.

This injection of new blood comes from one outstanding athlete: Sifan Hassan, joining others who have already confirmed their participation in the trial — Fancy Chemutai and Sembere Teferi. 

Their quest is none other than to break the world record set by Joyciline Jepkosgei (1:04:51).

The Dutch athlete of Ethiopian origin, Sifan Hassan, comes to Valencia with a best time of 1 hour 05:15 (Copenhagen 2018) and is one of the favorites to win a place on the podium. She holds various European records, including those for the Half-Marathon, and for the mile world record (the latter won this year). Sifa is undoubtedly one of the star attractions in the Valencia race.

Gudeta Kebede, who won the gold in the past IAAF / Valencia World Marathon Media Championship held in 2018 (1h06: 11), with world registration for races of only women included, will also fight for the victory next 27th October Kebede has a better personal mark of 1h05:45, held in Ras Al-Khaimah in 2019. 

Another athlete competing with them will be the Ethiopian runner Sembere Teferi (1 hour 05:45, who will also run in Doha four weeks before the trial in Valencia), as will her fellow-countrywoman and last year’s winner Gelete Burka (1 hour 06:11), and the Kenyan athletes Fancy Chemutai (1 hour 04:52) and Joan Chelimo (1 hour 05:04). This bevy of elite athletes make up a women’s ‘Dream Team’.

The Organizers will offer a special €70,000 prize (which is in addition to the rewards set out in the Regulations) for those athletes who set a new men’s or women’s world record, and award a bonus of €30,000 if the winner sets a time of under 58:00 for men or of under 1 hour 04:30 for women.

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
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Valencia Half Marathon

Valencia Half Marathon

The Trinidad Alfonso Valencia Half Marathon has become one of the top running events in the world in its 25th year. For the second year running, Valencia is the fastest half marathon in the world. The race, organized by SD Correcaminos Athletics Club, celebrated its silver anniversary in style with record participation, record crowd numbers, Silver label IAAF accreditation and...

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BLOM BANK Beirut Marathon has been postponed

The BLOM BANK Beirut Marathon (LIB) has been postponed due to ongoing civil unrest in Lebanon.

After extensive discussions the organizers decided to cancel the race which had been planned to take place on November 10.

“The Beirut Marathon remains committed to its mission of moving and uniting Lebanon through running by placing our beloved country on the international map of sports and showing the true colors of Lebanon,” the organizers said in a statement.

“Keeping true to our mission, values and relations with our partners, runners, stakeholders, volunteers, international participants and friends, we have hereby decided to postpone the 17th edition of BLOM BANK Beirut Marathon to a later, more appropriate date.”

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
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Blom Bank Beirut Marathon

Blom Bank Beirut Marathon

On the morning of October 19th 2003, Lebanon witnessed a unique event in its history and hosted its first international Marathon. It all began with a dream that May El Khalil had of bringing the running culture to Lebanon. After surviving a near fatal accident while running, May El Khalil began to actualize her dream: from her hospital bed...

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New partnership for London Marathon in 2022

London Marathon Events Ltd announced on Tuesday that 2021 will be the last year of Virgin Money’s long-standing sponsorship of the London Marathon.

After a hugely successful partnership which dates back to 2010, first with Virgin and then with Virgin Money from 2014, Virgin Money has decided not to renew the current contract which comes to an end after the 2021 event.

Hugh Brasher, Event Director for London Marathon Events, said: “Our partnership with Virgin Money has been fantastic and together we have established London as the greatest marathon in the world. This year we celebrated a landmark in our history as we passed £1 billion raised for charity since our first race in 1981 and more than £560 million of that was raised since the first year of this partnership.

"We are very proud that this partnership led to the creation of Virgin Money Giving, the not-for-profit fundraising platform which has meant that so much more of the money raised by our runners goes to their chosen charity.

“Twelve years is a very long time in sports sponsorship and further illustration of the mutual success of this partnership. We would like to thank everyone at Virgin Money for their wonderful support of the London Marathon.”

Helen Page, Group Brand and Marketing Director at Virgin Money, said: “We are proud to have partnered with the London Marathon. Together we have raised more than £560 million for charities and built an enduring legacy that will benefit society and causes for decades to come – with £200 million of that raised on Virgin Money Giving, our not-for-profit fundraising platform.

"As a new organization with a new purpose we need to realign our future sponsorship and take a different direction. We remain committed to sponsoring the London Marathon until 2021 and look forward to playing a huge part in the London Marathon's 40th race celebrations in 2020."

The 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon, the 40th race, takes place on Sunday 26 April. It is the most popular marathon on the planet with a world record of more than 450,000 people applying for a place through the ballot.

(10/24/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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KBC Dublin Marathon is offering runners the chance to personalise their commemorative 40th anniversary medal with an iTAB medal insert

KBC Dublin Marathon Can Personalize Their 40th Anniversary Medal with iTAB. The small plate is laser-engraved with the runner’s name and unique finish time and is the perfect way to celebrate this memorable marathon or a hard-earned PB.

Taking place on Sunday 27th October, the iconic event is the fifth largest city marathon in Europe and has seen the number of participants grow from 2,100 in 1980 to 22,500 for their 40th event.

Race Director, Jim Aughney comments: “KBC Dublin Marathon has partnered with iTAB for the past 5 years and we are delighted with the runner's feedback.

The facility for runners to book an iTAB for their well-deserved medal adds greatly to the runner's experience in Dublin, which is celebrating its 40th year in 2019.”

iTAB Senior Account Manager, Kirsty Moulsley, will be flying to Dublin for the big day to run the marathon and says: “I’m excited to have been given the opportunity to run this great race in its 40th year! I’ve been told that the support and the Irish hospitality is second to none and I can’t wait to experience it for myself!”

(10/23/2019) ⚡AMP
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KBC Dublin Marathon

KBC Dublin Marathon

The KBC Dublin Marathon, which is run through the historic Georgian streets of Dublin, Ireland's largest and capital city.The course is largely flat and is a single lap, starting and finishing close to the City Centre. Conditions formarathon running are ideal....

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Kenyan Joshua Kipkorir is confident of recapturing the Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon title on Sunday

Fresh from a third-place finish at Gyeongju Marathon in Korea on Mashujaa Day, Joshua Kipkorir is confident of recapturing the Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon title this weekend.

Kipkorir, who has finished three of his marathons this year, is among over 15,000 participants, who had registered for the Standard Chartered Nairobi Marathon by Tuesday evening.

Nairobi has six races but the highlight is the men and women’s marathon race where the winners will get to pocket Sh2 million each. This makes it the second richest race in the country, with the prize money up from Sh1.5 million. The Eldoret City Marathon has the highest prize for winners in the country at Sh3.5 million.

In total, the prize fund has been increased from Sh8.5 million from last year to Sh10.5 million this year with the race also being moved from Uhuru Park to its traditional ground of Nyayo National Stadium.

Kipkorir launched his season on February 2 with a second place finish at Lagos Marathon in 2 hours, 18 minutes and 16 seconds, and would then fail to finish Daegu International Marathon on April 7 in Korea.

Kipkorir finished third at Gyeongju Marathon is his second career best time over the distance of 2:09:50 on Sunday.

“I still feel strong. I will just take is easy and slow and see how the first 20km will go,” said the 25-year-old Kipkorir, who will be making his third appearance at Standard Chartered Nairobi after finishing third in 2017 in 2:13:27 in a race won by Brimin Kipkorir in 2:12:39.

“This event is more or less like training for me also ahead of the 2020 season where I will be targeting other majors races. Most of these races are won mentally,” said Kipkorir, who has been training in Kaptagat, Elgeyo Marakwet along he likes of this year’s Boston and Chicago Marathon champion Lawrence Cherono.

(10/23/2019) ⚡AMP
by Ayumba Ayodi
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STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank. The other three legs of this four-marathon race...

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Nike announces Mark Parker will step down as CEO in 2020, He will be replaced by John Donahoe, a Nike board member and the CEO of ServiceNow

Nike said Tuesday afternoon its longtime CEO Mark Parker is stepping down, effective January of next year.

In a sign of the company’s focus on digital, he will be replaced by John Donahoe, a Nike board member and the CEO of ServiceNow. Donahoe was formerly the CEO of eBay and is chairman of the board at PayPal.

Nike shares seesawed in after-hours trading on the news and were last up less than 1%. ServiceNow shares tumbled more than 10%.

Parker, who has been Nike’s CEO since he took over from founder Phil Knight in 2006, will become the company’s executive chairman, according to the press release. He has worked with Nike for four decades, including as vice president of global footwear and co-president.

Parker said in an interview with CNBC’s Wilfred Frost that Donahoe is “no stranger” at Nike and decidedly is “the best choice to come in.” He said Donahoe should “enable this next level of growth,” digitally, for the company. And he added Nike’s board has spent “many months working on succession planning. ... This is not something that happens in a matter of weeks.”

He also said the decision wasn’t prompted by recent doping allegations connected to Nike’s Oregon Project.

At the end of September, Nike’s head running coach, Alberto Salazar, was banned amid doping allegations, which reportedly included ties back to Parker. The New York Times reviewed emails from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that showed Parker had been briefed on Salazar’s various experiments to use testosterone cream for track-and-field athletes.

In an email to employees at the time, Parker said: “Nike did not participate in any effort to systematically dope any runners ever; the very idea makes me sick.” He also said Nike looked into the allegations against Salazar and found no violations.

“We are staying very close to the situation,” Parker told CNBC on Tuesday. “We are in the midst of complex times.”

Nike’s announcement came the same day Under Armour announced its CEO Kevin Plank will be stepping down from the role on Jan. 1.

Under Parker’s leadership, Nike has seen its stock surge and sales climb. But the company has also faced its share of corporate culture scandals and backlash over controversial marketing campaigns.

In 2018, President Trevor Edwards, who many saw as Parker’s likely successor one day, retired.

The retirement came after complaints surfaced at Nike in March 2018, when a group of women presented Parker with a survey on gender discrimination. Edwards was blamed in the lawsuit for creating and exacerbating a “hostile work environment.” Parker responded by restructuring his leadership team, which included ousting Edwards.

Nike in 2018 admitted it failed in hiring and promoting women, and the company ousted at least 11 executives and announced raises for 7,000 employees after conducting an internal review of its pay practices. Parker apologized to employees at large in May.

But the hurdles haven’t stopped there.

Nike, spearheaded by Parker, has had a history of using controversial marketing campaigns to boost its brand.

In September 2018, it dropped a new ad campaign for the 30th anniversary of “Just Do It,” featuring former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick. This pulled in a wave of responses, both for and against the commercial slot. But Nike’s “Dream Crazy” campaign ultimately won the “outstanding commercial” award at the Creative Arts Emmy Awards this year, marking the first time a Nike commercial had won the award since 2002.

(10/23/2019) ⚡AMP
by Lauren Thomas
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Defending champion Emily Sisson and Shannon Rowbury to highlight women’s field at USATF 5 km Championships

The 2019 Abbott Dash to the Finish Line 5K and USA Track & Field (USATF) 5 km Championships on Saturday, November 2, will feature seven Olympians and two past champions the day prior to the TCS New York City Marathon and will be broadcast live on USATF.TV as part of the 2019 USATF Running Circuit. Abbott will return as the title partner of the event which features a $60,000 prize purse – the largest of any 5K race in the world.

Emily Sisson is looking to defend her USATF 5 km title after storming to victory last year in a solo run to the finish in 15:38. The two-time United Airlines NYC Half runner-up clocked the fastest-ever debut by an American on a record-eligible course at this year’s Virgin Money London Marathon, finishing sixth place in 2:23:08.

She will line up in Central Park against three-time Olympian and World Championship medalist Shannon Rowbury and Olympian and World Championship medalist Emily Infeld.

“I loved my experience at the Abbott Dash and USATF 5 km Championships last year,” Sisson said. “There’s no place like New York City on marathon weekend, and I’m excited to help kick everything off by defending my 5K title on the streets of New York.”

In the men’s field, Olympian Shadrack Kipchirchir will attempt to reclaim his title after taking second in a photo-finish last year. At the 2017 edition of the event, he won his third national title in 13:57.

He will be challenged by Rio 2016 Olympic gold medalist and seven-time national champion Matthew Centrowitz, who has had previous success in New York, winning the NYRR Millrose Games Wanamaker mile three times and the 5th Avenue Mile once. Reid Buchanan, a 2019 Pan American Games silver medalist, and Eric Jenkins, the 2017 NYRR Wanamaker Mile and 5th Avenue Mile champion, will also line up.

Following in the footsteps of the professional athletes will be more than 10,000 runners participating in the Abbott Dash to the Finish Line 5K, including top local athletes and runners visiting from around the world. The mass race will offer a $13,000 NYRR member prize purse. John Raneri of New Fairfield, CT and Grace Kahura of High Falls, NY won last year’s Abbott Dash to the Finish Line 5K.

Abbott, the title sponsor of the Abbott World Marathon Majors, will be the sponsor of the Abbott Dash to the Finish Line 5K for the fourth consecutive year. Abbott, a global healthcare company, helps people live fully with life-changing technology and celebrates what’s possible with good health.

The Abbott Dash to the Finish Line 5K annually provides TCS New York City Marathon supporters, friends and families the opportunity to join in on the thrill of marathon race week. The course begins on Manhattan’s east side by the United Nations, then takes runners along 42nd Street past historic Grand Central Terminal and up the world-famous Avenue of the Americas past Radio City Music Hall. It then passes through the rolling hills of Central Park before finishing at the iconic TCS New York City Marathon finish line.

(10/23/2019) ⚡AMP
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Dash to the Finish Line

Dash to the Finish Line

Be a part of the world-famous TCS New York City Marathon excitement, run through the streets of Manhattan, and finish at the famed Marathon finish line in Central Park—without running 26.2 miles! On TCS New York City Marathon Saturday, our NYRR Dash to the Finish Line 5K (3.1 miles) will take place for all runners who want to join in...

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Daniel Simiyu and Nancy Jelagat will be chasing their maiden Standard Chartered Half Marathon titles in Nairobi on Sunday

The winners of 2019 Family Bank Eldoret half marathon will be running for the first time on one of the most celebrated half marathons and the duo has vowed to make a difference when they line up on Sunday.

Simiyu, the national 5,000m champion failed to represent the country at the just concluded IAAF World Championships after failing to meet anti-doping regulations of being drug-tested for a minimum of three times out of the competition.

But that has not bothered his coach, Erick Kogo, who insists the runner has better chances going forward.

“When he was ejected from the team, I had to think very fast and organise a race for him. That was a good consolation when he won the Kisii 10km road race and went ahead to win at Family Bank. The two wins have consoled him enough,” said Kogo.

“I want to run well in the Standard Chartered 21km race but my real focus is the 2020 Olympic Games. I have to do what is needed to make the team,” said Simiyu, who trains in Iten.

Another upstart, Jelagat, who has dominated local races lately, said: “My training is going on well. I want to run well at the lucrative Standard Chartered half marathon.” 

(10/22/2019) ⚡AMP
by Emmanuel Sabani
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STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank. The other three legs of this four-marathon race...

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Anna Bracegirdle will be back to defend her Snowdonia Marathon title

Anna Bracegirdle will be back to defend her Snowdonia Marathon title this year – after storming to victory in 2018 in only her second ever run.

Bracegirdle, aged 26, who hails from Cemaes, Anglesey, is returning to try and repeat her stunning victory in one of the toughest, but most breath-taking races on the UK marathon circuit.

This year’s race is only the fifth ever run at the distance for Bracegirdle, which takes place on Saturday, October 26.

Highlights will be shown on S4C the following day at 6pm.

The demanding 26.2 mile (42km) course consists of 2,750ft (838m) of climbs, including the Llanberis Pass - as well as some trail track to go with the tarmac – and is not for the faint-hearted.

But that didn’t stop Bracegirdle, who is a rare thing in women’s distance running – a sub three-hour marathon runner who is neither a member of a club, or even has a coach.

The Liverpool-based radiographer, said: "I haven’t run for a club, or even trained with one, for about 13 years.

"I just like to run by myself. I quite like training on my own, although I will sometimes also run with other people.

“I don’t have a coach, either. It’s not really my motivation to win races. I just get a buzz from doing it and never feel that competitive about things."

Bracegirdle spent most of last year’s race chatting with other runners before suddenly realizing most of them were struggling to keep pace with her.

"Last year was actually just an excuse to get together with friends and go home for the weekend,” she added.

“I knew I must have been fairly high up in the women’s race, but I didn’t actually know what position I was in.

"It was only in the last climb, when I passed a few other girls, and I felt quite strong, that I realized where I was. I’d rather not know where I am in the race, to be honest.

"People were shouting that I was in the lead, but it gets so noisy and you’re feeling so tired, that you tend to zone everything out and just concentrate on trying to run to the finish.

"But it was an amazing feeling at the end of the race to know that I’d won it."

(10/22/2019) ⚡AMP
by Dean Jones
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Snowdonia Marathon

Snowdonia Marathon

The Snowdonia Marathon has been voted best British marathon twice. The demanding and spectacular route, encircling Snowdon, Wales’ and England’s highest peak, gives the event a unique place in the annual marathon calendar. The inaugural Snowdonia Marathon was held in 1982, and was conceived as a dramatic alternative to the numerous city and town races becoming so popular. The demanding...

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Israeli Lonah Salpeter is the latest addition to the elite field at the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

The addition of Lonah Salpeter completes the elite field for the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon which takes place next Sunday. The Kenyan-born runner who competes for Israel has a personal best of 2:19:46 which makes her the fastest woman ever to be on the start list of the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon.

Given the extraordinary strength in depth of the women’s race, the course record could well fall after just one year in existence – and the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon might record the first sub-2:20 women’s time in its history.

Four women who have run under 2:22 will be on the start line: alongside Salpeter (2:19:46) will be the title holder Meskerem Assefa of Ethiopia, who set the course record of 2:20:36 last year, the Kenyan Valary Aiyabei with a best of 2:20:53 and the Ethiopian Bedatu Hirpa (2:21:32).

The latter finished third in Frankfurt last year. Another expected to produce a strong performance is the Ethiopian Megertu Kebede whose best is 2:22:52.

The men’s race on Sunday features a rare, perhaps unique contest over the marathon distance: junior against veteran or masters world record holder – Tsegaye Mekonnen against Mark Kiptoo.

Mekonnen of Ethiopia has a best of 2:04:32 which means he is the fastest man in the field, while the Kenyan Kiptoo’s personal best is 2:06:00.

Many athletes competing in Frankfurt will have their eyes on the qualifying times for the Olympic Games in Tokyo next year. The target for the men is 2:11:30 and 2:29:30 for the women.

Eight men with best times under 2:08 will be on the start line which suggests yet another high quality and exciting race for top honors in Frankfurt with finishing times to match. Tsegaye Mekonnen is looking to re-establish himself with a fast time after injury problems on a Mainova Frankfurt Marathon course renowned for speedy performances.

The world masters record holder Mark Kiptoo, who set an age group record here last year, should also have a say in the outcome this time. If he can match his younger rivals, his own masters world record will be under pressure.

Two Europeans seeking both big improvements on their personal bests and the Olympic qualifying times will be Britain’s Stephanie Twell (2:30:14) and the local runner Katharina Steinruck (2:28:34).

(10/22/2019) ⚡AMP
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Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

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2020 Chicago Marathon entries opens at 10 a.m. on Monday, October 28

If you're looking to run in the 2020 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, the random drawing for 43rd running of the marathon opened Monday.Individuals unable to meet the criteria for a guaranteed entry may apply through non-guaranteed entry drawing.

Registration for guaranteed entries opens at 10 a.m. on Monday, October 28.

Runners will have until Tuesday, December 3, to apply for either a guaranteed or non-guaranteed entry.

Entry cost is $205 for United States residents and $230 for those residing outside of the United States.

More than 45,000 runners, from across the United States and around the world, finished this year's Chicago Marathon, which was held on Oct. 13.

Runners will have until December 3 to apply for either a guaranteed or non-guaranteed entry into the 2020 Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

(10/22/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Serial cheater Emily Clark booted from AppleTree Half Marathon and questioned again

It appears a serial cheater who was disqualified from this year’s AppleTree Half Marathon in Vancouver is under suspicion again.

Emily Clark’s latest suspicious result came at the Chicago Marathon, a race she recently admitted to course-cutting in 2013.  Clark, a 28-year-old Portland resident, crossed the Chicago Marathon finish line in 3 hours, 59 minutes, 8 seconds.

But Clark’s recorded time splits and pace bring into question whether she actually ran all 26.2 miles.

Her pace between the half-marathon mark and 25 kilometers was 12:16 per mile. But from 25K to 30K, she clocked 6:13 per mile. That’s a pace maintained by only the top 50 females in the 33,000-strong field at Chicago, the nation’s second-largest marathon.

From 30K to 35K, her pace slowed to 9:27 per mile, only to spike again to 6:10 per mile from 35K to 40K.  Such disparities in pace are consistent with course-cutting, a practice she admitted to after the AppleTree Half Marathon on Sept. 15.

In that race, Clark apparently finished as the second-fastest woman. But race organizers confronted her after top runners and on-course photographers said Clark was not among the leaders for most of the race.

Reached by phone on Monday, Clark denied cheating in Chicago.  She claimed she had two asthma attacks during the race, causing her to stop running multiple times. She also said she was unable to reach a 6:10 per mile pace until the second half of the race because she started near the rear of the field and had to weave around other runners. However, even in large marathons, runners typically become spaced out after the first few miles.

When pressed on her claims, Clark responded: “I called to set the record straight, not get into an argument over the facts.”

In a phone conversation with The Columbian last month, AppleTree race organizer Sherri McMillan said Clark initially denied cheating in that race. This came despite McMillan, founder of Vancouver-based WHY Racing Events, witnessing Clark riding her bicycle during the race.

Clark initially claimed the woman on the bike was her “twin sister,” but later admitted to riding her bicycle  before stashing it and running the race’s final segment.

McMillan said she recognized Clark because she had biked the course with McMillan and others the day before the race.

In a statement shared by WHY Racing Events, Clark admitted to cheating at multiple events dating back to the 2013 Chicago Marathon.

That includes the Eugene Marathon in April, where Clark supposedly finished in 2:52:43 as the eighth-fastest woman. In reality, Clark ran a short distance of the race, returned to her hotel, then jumped back on the course for the last few miles.

Clark blamed an anxiety disorder for her behavior. She said posting fast times in road races helped her fight against insecurities she had about her weight.

Clark, who operates a Portland counseling service that helps women overcome trauma and eating disorders, promised to stop cheating.

“I’ve chosen to come clean about it because the truth eventually catches up to you, no matter what,” Clark’s statement read.

But since then, Clark has disavowed her apology. She posted a message on her Instagram page that read “I’ve been disqualified from races because they ‘found it impossible to believe someone of my build could hold those paces.’”

Asked if she stood by her statement in September, Clark said “I don’t want to talk about previous statements. I’m focused on spending time with healthy, supportive people.”

Clark’s suspicious splits at the 2019 Chicago Marathon were first flagged by Marathon Investigation, an online group launched in 2015 that aims to crack down on cheaters in road races.

(10/21/2019) ⚡AMP
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Appletree  Marathon, Half  & 5K

Appletree Marathon, Half & 5K

Join us for the 2nd Annual APPLETREE Boston-Qualifying Marathon, Half Marathon & Sunset 5K. This "Run Through History" will take you on a flat, fast and scenic course through Fort Vancouver, Officer's Row, the Army Barracks, Pearson Airport - the oldest operating airport in the USA, the Historical Old Apple Tree, along the majestic Columbia River and many other historical...

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Eric Hamer won the Rock N Roll Denver Half Marathon clocking 1:08:08

More than 7,500 registered participants from age 12 to 81 took to the beautiful downtown of the Mile-High City this weekend to run in the 10th running of the Humana Rock ‘n’ Roll Denver Half Marathon. With a continued focus on great music within the Denver community, participants of all athletic levels enjoyed the sights and sounds of Colorado’s capital city.

In the half marathon, Eric Hamer (Fort Collins, Colo.) won the race with his first-place effort clocking a time of 1:08:08. Bryn Morales (Boulder, Colo.) was second finishing in 1:08:36. Dan Feeney (Boulder, Colorado) came in third place with a time of 1:08:45.

Alexis Wilbert (Colorado Springs, Colo.) was the women’s champion with a final time of 1:19:09 with Mackenzie Caldwell (Boulder, Colo.) next behind her at 1:19:16. Amanda Scott (Boulder, Colo.) rounded out the podium in 1:19:39.

The best-in-class running event kicked off on Saturday morning with a 5K presented by Brooks starting and finishing at Civic Center Park in downtown Denver. The half marathon and 10K took place on Sunday, with runners from all 50 states and 17 countries, regions and territories receiving a first-class tour of the busy and refreshing downtown Denver.

Participants started on Civic Center Park headed north on Bannock St. toward 14th Street where participants circled the LoDo neighborhood, made their way down North Capitol Hill and through City Park before crossing the finish line back at Civic Center Park.

Elite runners and fast times aside, Sunday’s races were all about the party atmosphere. Several local bands, including Colorado’s own The Williams Brothers Band, Silver And Smoke and 78 Bombs performed live on band stages along the route.

The musically themed road race celebrated the day’s accomplishments with the sounds of Canadian-based indie-funk band, Bombargo taking to the main stage of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Concert Series at the finish line festival held at Civic Center Park which was free and open to the public.

The Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series® is the world’s largest running series taking part in over 30 destination events around the world every year. Established in 1998, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series simple idea of making running fun has transformed both the U.S. and global running landscape by infusing the course with live bands, cheer teams and entertaining water stations, creating a block-party atmosphere for participants and spectators alike. Focused on running, music and community, race weekend kicks off with a free Health & Fitness Expo showcasing the latest in running gear, sports apparel, health and nutritional information and much more.

Events culminate with an entertaining finish-line festival featuring some of the biggest names in music, with past performances including Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, O.A.R. Aloe Blacc, Pitbull, Flo Rida, The Band Perry, Fitz and the Tantrums, the Goo Goo Dolls and Bret Michaels.

(10/21/2019) ⚡AMP
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Denver Rock N Roll Half Marathon

Denver Rock N Roll Half Marathon

Throughout the years Denver runners have combined their love of the great outdoors, culture and music as they’ve chased the ultimate runner’s high through the city streets, at an altitude of one mile. No wimps here! Join us in Denver for our series-wide celebration of more than 20 Years Running! ...

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Does the International Association of Athletics Federations need a more stringent rule to define legal running shoes?

It appears that running, the original and most elemental of sports, now faces the same tradition vs. scientific innovation challenge that other sports have encountered. Think: tennis rackets, baseball bats and, perhaps most similar, competition swimwear — those polyurethane-based suits that were banned starting in 2010. The outcome of the current running-shoe debate could affect everything from stock prices of global footwear companies to who wins the Olympic marathon in Japan next summer.

Kipchoge, who became the first person to run the 26.2-mile distance in under two hours, and Kosgei, who set a women’s world record, raced in a revolutionary and bizarrely tall Nike shoe that has taken the marathon world by storm since 2016. In the last 13 months alone, male runners in the Nike shoes have recorded the five fastest marathon times ever. Other running-shoe companies are struggling to catch up, and may face patent hurdles.

The current I.A.A.F. rules state only that shoes may not confer an “unfair advantage” and must be “reasonably available” to all. The rule does not explain how these two values can be measured.

This week, the British Journal of Sports Medicine published a commentary that is likely to guide the debate. In it, Geoffrey Burns, a 2:24 marathoner and University of Michigan doctoral candidate in biomechanics, argued for “a single standard in competition running shoes: regulate the shoe midsole thickness.”

With the right material, a thicker sole produces more spring. Without clear restrictions, it is likely only a matter of time before someone comes up with a way to make a shoe with more powerful springs.

Burns called for an upper limit of 31 millimeters — about 1.2 inches — of midsole. Nike’s current Vaporfly 4% and Vaporfly Next% shoes have a 36-millimeter midsole, or about 1.4 inches. Why 31 millimeters? That’s a fairly common midsole height for previous models.

Until 2016, marathon racing shoes were constructed from thin slabs of rubber. In 1960, an Ethiopian runner named Abebe Bikila even managed to win the Olympic Marathon in his bare feet. Everyone understood that less was more; you ran more efficiently when you carried minimal weight on your feet.

In 1968, when shopping for the shoes that carried me to victory in that year’s Boston Marathon, I had only two criteria. They had to be light and thin, and they had to be cheap. I was still in college. I paid $9.95 for my lucky shoes — a pair of Onitsuka Tiger TG-4 Marathons.

Little changed in the footwear for elite marathoners in the next five decades, until Nike introduced its Vaporfly 4% shoes in 2016. These shoes contained a new midsole foam, Pebax, so lightweight that it is almost like running barefoot. Pebax also delivers 30 percent more energy return than the foams used in most running shoes since the 1970s. This allows Pebax to function almost like leg muscles, but without the fatigue that can debilitate the legs after 20 miles.

The Nike shoes also include a carbon fiber plate in the midsole. This plate might increase energy return, or it might improve foot function during the running stride. Either way, the plate is prominently mentioned in Nike’s patent application.

A 2018 New York Times data analysis based on public race results uploaded to Strava, the athlete-tracking and networking company, found that runners in Vaporflys ran 3 to 4 percent faster than similar runners wearing other shoes.

To be fair, Kipchoge, 34, is an otherworldly talent who has beaten the best in the world in last-generation shoes. There probably isn’t another marathoner who could break two hours in the shoes he wore last weekend.

 

(10/21/2019) ⚡AMP
by Amby Burfoot
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INEOS 1:59 Challenge

INEOS 1:59 Challenge

Mankind have constantly sought to reach new frontiers and to achieve the impossible. From Edmund Hillary reaching the summit of Mount Everest to Roger Bannister’s four-minute mile to Felix Baumgartner jumping from space we have frequently redefined the limits of human achievement and broken new barriers previously seen as simply impossible. After the four-minute mile and the ten second 100m...

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Shalane Flanagan has announced her retiring from professional running

With happy tears I announce today that I am retiring from professional running. From 2004 to 2019 I’ve given everything that’s within me to this sport and wow it’s been an incredible ride! I’ve broken bones, torn tendons, and lost too many toenails to count. I've experienced otherworldly highs and abysmal lows. I've loved (and learned from) it all.

Over the last 15 years I found out what I was capable of, and it was more than I ever dreamed possible.  Now that all is said and done, I am most proud of the consistently high level of running I produced year after year. No matter what I accomplished the year before, it never got any easier. Each season, each race was hard, so hard. But this I know to be true: hard things are wonderful, beautiful, and give meaning to life.  I’ve loved having an intense sense of purpose.  For 15 years I've woken up every day knowing I was exactly where I needed to be.

The feeling of pressing the threshold of my mental and physical limits has been bliss. I've gone to bed with a giant tired smile on my face and woken up with the same smile.  My obsession to put one foot in front of the other, as quickly as I can, has given me so much joy.

However, I have felt my North Star shifting, my passion and purpose is no longer about MY running; it's more and more about those around me.  All I’ve ever known, in my approach to anything, is going ALL IN.

So I’m carrying this to coaching. I want to be consumed with serving others the way I have been consumed with being the best athlete I can be.

I am privileged to announce I am now a professional coach of the Nike Bowerman Track Club.  This amazing opportunity in front of me, to give back to the sport, that gave me so much, is not lost on me.  I’ve pinched myself numerous times to make sure this is real. I am well aware that retirement for professional athletes can be an extremely hard transition. I am lucky, as I know already, that coaching will bring me as much joy and heartache that my own running career gave me.

I believe we are meant to inspire one another, we are meant to learn from one another. Sharing everything I’ve learned about and from running is what I’m meant to do now.I would like to thank: The 5 coaches who guided me throughout my career, Michael Whittlesey and Dennis Craddock (2004-2005), John Cook (2006-2008), Jerry Schumacher (2009-2019), and Pascal Dobert (2009-2019). Each man was instrumental in developing me into the best version of myself.

Jerry, Pascal and I will continue to work together in this next chapter and I couldn’t be more grateful.

Jerry has been my life coach, running coach and now will mentor me towards my next goal of becoming a world-class coach myself. I’m thankful for his unending belief in me.

My family and husband who have traveled the world supporting my running and understanding the sacrifices I needed to make. Their unconditional love is what fueled my training.My longtime friend, Elyse Kopecky who taught me to love cooking and indulge in nourishing food. Run Fast. Eat Slow. has been a gift to my running and to the thousands of athletes.

My teammates, and all the women I've trained with, for pushing me daily, and the endless smiles and miles. They include: Erin Donahue, Shannon Rowbury, Kara Goucher, Lisa Uhl, Emily Infeld, Amy Cragg, Colleen Quigley, Courtney Frerichs, Shelby Houlihan, Betsy Saina, Marielle Hall, Gwen Jorgensen, Kate Grace.

My sponsor Nike for believing in me since 2004 and for continuing to support my new dream as a professional coach.  I hope I made myself a better person by running. I hope I made those around me better. I hope I made my competition better. I hope I left the sport better because I was a part of it.

My personal motto through out my career has been to make decisions that leave me with “no regrets”.....but to be honest, I have one.  I regret I can’t do it all over again.

(10/21/2019) ⚡AMP
by Shalane Flanagan
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TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

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Course Records were broken in Lisbon on Sunday

Perfect weather conditions resulted in three course records from the two IAAF Label road races in the Portuguese capital on Sunday with Andualem Shiferaw winning the EDP Lisbon Marathon in 2:06:00 while Titus Ekiru and Peres Jepchirchir won the Luso Lisbon Half Marathon in 1:00:10 and 1:06:54 respectively.

Pacemakers ensured the elite men were on course record schedule from the early stages. Five men – Stephen Chemlany, Samuel Wanjiku, Barnabas Kiptum, Birhan Nebebew and Andualem Shiferaw – were still in contention as the lead pack approached the final five kilometers.

It was only in the last two kilometers that Shiferaw and Wanjiku, the 2014 winner and former course record-holder, made a break. With a strong sprint, Shiferaw managed to edge ahead of Wanjiku to win in 2:06.00, taking 94 seconds off the course record and more than two minutes from his PB.

“I didn’t expect or plan to win today, especially after the rain fall on Saturday – that worried me,” said Shiferaw. “But today I felt very good and after the half-way point I felt I could contend for the win. The personal best is a bonus.”

Wanjiku finished just one second behind Shiferaw and was extremely happy with his personal best, while Chelmany finished third in 2:06:22, also a PB. Kiptum (2:06:32) and Nebebew (2:06:49) also finished inside 2:07 with PB performances and were well inside the previous course record of 2:07:34.

In the women’s race, Ethiopia’s Sechale Dalasa win in 2:29:51, a few minutes outside her PB but enough to finish six seconds ahead of Kenya’s Helen Jepkurgat. Ethiopia’s Sule Utura was third (2:32:16).

Two more records came in the half marathon, held in a different part of the city.

Kenya’s Peres Jepchirchir and Vivian Kiplagat were involved in a great sprint to the finish line in the women’s race. Jepchirchir, the 2016 world half marathon champion, got there first in 1:06.54, taking 24 seconds off the course record set last year.

“This was a good day,” said Jepchirchir. “I expected to produce a good time, and I’m happy with this win.”

Kiplagat finished just one second adrift in 1:06:55 with Dorcas Kimeli further back in third, clocking 1:07:43. Yebrgual Melese, who held the course record up until today, was fourth in 1:09:02. Catarina Ribeiro was the first Portuguese athlete to finish, placing seventh in 1:11:36, just outside her PB.

Kenya’s Titus Ekiru ran alone for the final few kilometers of the men’s race and took one second off the course record to win in 1:00:12.

“I intended to run faster, but without more opposition it was impossible,” said Ekiru after taking 50 seconds off his PB. “Of course I’m happy with this spectacular race, with my win and the good weather.”

(10/21/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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EDP Lisbon Marathon

EDP Lisbon Marathon

In its 7th edition, the EDP Lisbon Marathon is already considered as one of the most beautiful races in the world and acclaimed by international media such as the Forbes Magazine, the Huffington Post and American Express. Starting in Cascais and finishing at Praça do Comércio, the EDP Marathon course is 100% sea and river side, providing to the runners...

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Philemon Rono won the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon for the third time on Sunday

The Kenyan, nicknamed ‘Baby Police’ for his role as a policeman, smashed his own Canadian all-comers’ record with a time of 2:05:00 at the IAAF Gold Label road race.

Behind him, Lemi Bernahu of Ethiopia, who had been leading until the final kilometer, took second in 2:05:09, Uganda’s Felix Chemonges third in 2:05:12 and defending champion Benson Kipruto of Kenya fourth in 2:05:13.

“It was important to win three times, because Toronto is like my home,” said Rono. “When I come here, I enjoy myself. I have a lot of friends from Kenya here. I am really, really happy to win today.”

While Rono achieved an incredible record, earning CDN$30,000 for the victory along with CDN$50,000 for the all-comers’ record, it was his compatriot Magdalyne Masai-Robertson who claimed the women’s victory with an enormous personal best of 2:22:16. That beat the course record set by Mimi Belete last year by 13 seconds and improved the Canadian all-comers' record by one second.

For the first time in its 30-year history, conditions were near perfect (8C and 5km/hr wind at the start).

A trio of pacemakers took a pack of six men through the halfway point in 1:03:08 and 30 kilometers in 1:29:24 before Lemi Berhanu hinted that the tightness in his legs, which had bothered him in the days immediately preceding the race, had vanished. By 38 kilometres he had surged to a lead of more than 15 seconds. But incredibly Rono closed the gap in the final two kilometres to snatch victory.

“I was running at my own pace,” Rono explained. “The pace at the front was really moving so I maintained my own pace. At 38km when he ran away I said ‘let me maintain my pace’. And I knew I could catch him.”

For his part, Berhanu, who was the 2016 Boston champion, complained of a stitch in his right side and was in distress. Disappointment registered on his face at the finish where he sat alone on the ground for 10 minutes before his coach Gemedu Dedefo collected him for the awards ceremony.

“I was thinking when I made the break I could run sub 2:05 and keep pushing, but after 40km I could not really move because of a stitch,” he explained.

Felix Chemonges took four minutes off his personal best to break 2012 Olympic champion Stephen Kiprotich’s Ugandan record with his 2:05:12.

The women’s race was equally compelling as eight women ran together through 30km. Five survived Birktuyat Eshetu’s surges up until 35km including Kenya’s Betsy Saina, Rachel Mutgaa and Masai-Robertson and then the race blew up. The latter took off, fearful of being caught. At 40km she spared a look over her shoulder and realised her nearest pursuer was Eshetu and quite a distance separated them.

(10/21/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

The Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, Half-Marathon & 5k Run / Walk is organized by Canada Running Series Inc., organizers of the Canada Running Series, "A selection of Canada's best runs!" Canada Running Series annually organizes eight events in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver that vary in distance from the 5k to the marathon. The Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon and Half-Marathon are...

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Course records smashed in Amsterdam

Ethiopia’s Degitu Azmeraw smashed the women’s course record at the TCS Amsterdam Marathon with 2:19:26, the second-fastest debut in history for the distance, while Kenya’s Vincent Kipchumba won a close men’s contest in 2:05:09 at the IAAF Gold Label road race on Sunday (20).

On a morning with perfect windless conditions and temperatures between 10-12C, the pace in the women’s race was swift from the outset. Azimeraw was one of six athletes in the lead pack and passed through 5km in 16:26 and 10km in 32:49. The six women were still together through the half-way point, reached in 1:10:00 exactly, and 30km, covered in 1:39:40.

It was only after then that the real racing began and the group was whittled down to five at 35km (1:56:14) with Azimeraw, Tigist Girma, Azmera Gebru, Besu Sado and Mimi Belete still in contention.

The quintet eventually dispersed over the final few kilometres with Azimeraw – who had clocked 1:06:07 for the half marathon this year – forging ahead to win in 2:19:26, taking almost two minutes from Meseret Hailu Debele’s 2:21:09 course record set in 2012. Former world record-holder Paula Radcliffe is the only woman to record a faster marathon debut, having clocked 2:18:56 in 2002.

“I wanted to see what it was like to run a marathon,” said Azimeraw. “I was expecting a time of about 2:20 so this result is definitely a success.”

Girma was second in 2:19:52, taking almost seven minutes off the PB she set when winning in Ottawa earlier this year. Gebru finished third, replicating her position from last year, but was rewarded with a PB of 2:20:48, while Sado – a former 1500m specialist making her marathon debut – was fourth in 2:21:03, also inside the previous course record.

Bo Ummels, another debutante, was the top Dutch finisher and so became the national champion, clocking 2:32:34.

As was the case in the women’s contest, the men’s race really got going after 35km. Up until that point, a large pack of nine men were still in contention, having gone through 10km in 29:27 and the half-way point in 1:03:00.

Kenya’s Elisha Rotich and Vincent Kipchumba and Ethiopia’s Solomon Deksisa and debutant Betesfa Getahun took the initiative after going through 35km in 1:44:07. Just before entering Vondelpark at 39km, Rotich and Deksisa accelerated and built up a small lead. Both pursuers, however, came back under the leadership of Kipchumba.

After leaving the park at the 41-kilometre point, Kipchumba ran away from the others to finally finish in Amsterdam’s Olympic Stadium in 2:05:09. Deksisa was second in 2:05:16, just holding off Rotich (2:05:18). Getahun also finished well below 2:06 on his debut with 2:05:28.

Kipchumba improved his personal record of 2:06.56 from April this year and was happy:

“We had a very strong group and the pace at the entrance to Vondelpark was very fast,” said Kipchumba, who improved on his PB of 2:06:56. “I started to close the gap with the two front runners. I was hoping for a time of 2:05:50, so I’m very satisfied with 2:05:09.”

The Dutch top runner, Abdi Nageeye, felt some pain in his right hamstring from 10km onwards and had to settle for ninth place in 2:07:39.

“My condition is fine, but mentally this was very tough,” he said. “Nevertheless, I am happy with my second-fastest time ever. Now I have to recover well and start planning smartly for the Olympic Games.”

 

(10/20/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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TCS Amsterdam Marathon

TCS Amsterdam Marathon

Do you want to enjoy Amsterdam in October and all that the city has to offer you? Want to feel a real athlete and start and finish in the historic Olympic stadium? Or run across the widely discussed passage under the beautiful National Museum? Then come to Amsterdam for the 44rd edition of the TCS Amsterdam Marathon in October! The...

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Ethiopia’s Tsehay Gemechu smashes her own Airtel Delhi Half Marathon course record

Ethiopia’s Tsehay Gemechu retained her Airtel Delhi Half Marathon title in 1:06:00 on Sunday (20), taking 50 seconds off the course record she had set 12 months ago at the IAAF Gold Label road race.

Gemechu’s compatriot Andamlak Belihu also retained his title, clocking a PB of 59:10 to finish within four seconds of the course record.

The women’s race came down to a thrilling head-to-head duel over the final five kilometres between the 21-year-old defending champion and her compatriot Yelamzerf Yehualaw.

A large pack went through 5km in 15:43 before the male pacemakers brought the leading group of six past 10km in 31:22, indicating that the course record was very much under threat. One by one, runners became detached until only Gemechu and Yehualaw remained as they went through 15km in 47:05.

Coming into the final kilometre, Yehualaw – who won the African Games half marathon title in August – edged in front and briefly looked like she was going to cause an upset. But with the finish line approaching, Gemechu dug deep and managed to claw her way past her rival to notch up a personal best while becoming just the second woman to retain a title in Delhi.

“I was tired after Doha (where she finished fourth in the World Championships 5000m two weeks ago) but I wanted to come here and fight for the course record. I knew I was mentally strong,” said Gemechu, who becomes the sixth-fastest Ethiopian woman for the distance.

Yehualaw, even younger than the winner having turned 20 in August, took more than three minutes off her previous best for the distance when finishing just one second behind Gemechu in 1:06:01.

Zeineba Yimer, who started to lose contact with the leading pair just before 15km, held on to make it an Ethiopian 1-2-3 when she crossed the line in third place in 1:06:57, the same position as she had finished in 2018. Kenya’s 2017 world cross-country champion Irene Cheptai had a solid half marathon debut to finish fourth in 1:07:39.

The men’s contest also saw a thrilling head-to-head battle over the final few kilometres.

Six men passed 10km in 28:08. Belihu was still accompanied by another Ethiopian, Solomon Berihu, and the Kenyan pair of Kibiwott Kandie – who had made much of the pace in the middle stages of the race – and Alfred Barkachas.

The lead quartet reached 15km in 42:11 but between 17 and 18 kilometres firstly Barkach and then Kandie couldn’t stay with the relentless momentum and surges from the two Ethiopians and drifted backwards.

Berihu pushed again at 18km and Belihu looked in trouble for several minutes but recovered his poise and reeled in his rival with little more than a kilometre remaining before pulling away for victory.

“At about 18km I started to suffer some back pain; that possibly cost me the course record,” said Belhiu, who still managed to take eight seconds off his PB to move to seventh on the Ethiopian all-time list. “I have been mainly focusing on the track season in my training until recently but I always knew I was going to come here and so I had that in mind.”

Berihu, just 20, posted one of the fastest half marathon debuts ever when he came home second in 59:17 while Kandie hung on for third in 59:33.

(10/20/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

Ethiopia’s Birhanu Legese and Almaz Ayana took the honours at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon, crossing the line in the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in 59:46 and 1:07:11 respectively to win, world and Olympic 10,000m champion Ayana was making her debut over the half marathon distance but hardly looked like a novice as she led home an Ethiopian clean sweep of...

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Radcliffe admits to mixed feelings as Kosgei breaks marathon record

Paula Radcliffe's world marathon record, which had stood imperiously for over 16 years, has been obliterated by Brigid Kosgei at the Chicago Marathon.

The 25-year-old Kenyan ran 2:14:04 to beat Radcliffe's best of 2:15:25 by an astonishing 81 seconds.

The whispers all week in Chicago had been that Kosgei was intending to make a serious assault on Radcliffe's time. In cold and sunny conditions - perfect for the marathon - she knew the attempt was on, especially when the winds died down yesterday morning.

Kosgei immediately set out her stall by going through five miles in 25:10, way inside world record pace.

Some feared that she had massively overcooked her pace and would eventually boil over. But even though Kosgei slowed her pace she still went through halfway in 66:59, over a minute faster than Radcliffe's time in setting her world record in 2003.

There was a moment when Kosgei appeared to not quite be as comfortable, but when she ran the 5km between 25km and 30km in 15:45 it was clear that the record was in her grasp. And so it proved.

Afterwards, an elated Kosgei admitted: "I am feeling good, and I am happy because I was not expecting this. But I felt my body was moving, moving, moving so I went for it."

Meanwhile, Radcliffe, who posed for photographs with the Kenyan afterwards, admitted it was a bittersweet moment.

"If you had told me when I set it in 2003, that it would last that long I wouldn't have believed it," she said. "But I always knew this time would come - and when I saw how fast Brigid was running I knew the record would go if she could maintain her pace."

If there is one question mark over Kosgei's thundering achievement it is that her agent, Federico Rosa, has had a high number of athletes who have been banned. They include Asbel Kiprop, the former world 1,500m champion, Jemima Sumgong, the 2016 London marathon and Olympic champion, and Rita Jeptoo, who won this race in 2013. However, there is no suggestion of wrongdoing by Kosgei or Rosa.

Some will also point out that Kosgei was wearing the Nike Next% training shoes, which have been estimated to give between 60-90 seconds of performance benefit over other shoes. But on a stunning day in Chicago, few appeared to care as she blasted into the history books.

(10/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Eliud Kipchoge Sues NRG Radio Through Lawyer Donald Kipkorir

NRG radio was heavily bashed on social media this week when they used Eliud Kipchoge‘s name and likeness to run their own campaigns. This was soon after Kipchoge became the first human being to run a marathon in under 2 hours.

The former home of Andrew Kibe and Kamene Goro re-branded some of its properties to ‘Kipchoge radio’, also using his image.

For instance, the Kevin Mulei-owned station changed its morning show to ‘KipchogeBreakfastClub’, and went on to push the hashtag on social media.

What however pissed off most Kenyans was NRG’s unsanctioned plan to award Kipchoge a BMW i8, that the station regularly uses for its own promotion work.

The whole fiasco was championed by Eric Omondi, and it was clear this was an unachievable target. They promised to give Kipchoge the car if their Instagram page reached 1 million followers within 24 hours.

Many Kenyans interpreted it as an attempt to gain followers using Kipchoge’s name, with no intention of handing over the car to him.

Their page had slightly over 100,000 followers and would have needed nearly 900,000 more.

Today, through flamboyant city lawyer Donald Kipkorir, Kipchoge has struck back.

NRG Radio has been issued a demand notice to remove any reference to Kipchoge on all their properties, to expunge his image from all their platforms, and to issue an ‘unqualified apology for violation of his rights and misuse of his image.’

As if that’s not enough, once the station complies with the above, they shall enter discussions on how much money they will pay for this gross miscalculation.

Well, Kipchoge might end up getting more than just the car.

(10/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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INEOS 1:59 Challenge

INEOS 1:59 Challenge

Mankind have constantly sought to reach new frontiers and to achieve the impossible. From Edmund Hillary reaching the summit of Mount Everest to Roger Bannister’s four-minute mile to Felix Baumgartner jumping from space we have frequently redefined the limits of human achievement and broken new barriers previously seen as simply impossible. After the four-minute mile and the ten second 100m...

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Boosting testosterone levels significantly improves female athletic performance, according to one of the first randomised controlled trials

Testosterone was assumed to be performance-enhancing and a factor in explaining differences in strength and endurance between men and women. However, there was a surprising lack of evidence on the impact of testosterone in women and the question had become mired in controversy following a series of rulings in professional sport.

The latest research confirmed that testosterone significantly increases endurance and lean muscle mass among young women, even when given for a relatively short period.

Angelica Hirschberg, a gynaecologist for the Swedish Olympic Committee based at Karolinska University Hospital and the study’s first author, said the results were the first to show a causal effect of testosterone on physical performance in women. “This has not been demonstrated previously because most studies have been performed in men,” she said. “Furthermore, the study shows the magnitude of performance enhancement by testosterone. Testosterone levels increased more than four times but were still much below the male range. The improvement in endurance performance by the increased testosterone levels was more than 8% – this is a huge effect in sports.”

Prof Chris Cooper, emeritus professor of biochemistry at the University of Essex, who was not involved in the work, said: “The data is really clear. This adds further evidence that if you give testosterone to female athletes. you improve their performance. Some people have suggested that testosterone is not the only sex difference, but it’s clearly the best indicator.”

Cooper added that, despite growing interest in the issue, the challenge in gaining ethics approval to give healthy women testosterone had resulted in a lack of empirical studies.

The IAAF ruled this week that trans female athletes must keep their levels of natural testosterone below 5 nanomoles per litre of blood to compete in the female category. The new regulation follows a similar limit imposed on athletes with differences of sexual development (DSD), including the South African Olympic gold medallist, Caster Semenya.

Semenya is challenging the IAAF’s new rules that athletes with DSD must take testosterone-reducing medication to compete in track events from 400m to the mile or change to another distance.

The athlete argued that the rules were discriminatory and unfair. In May, she said: “For a decade the IAAF has tried to slow me down, but this has actually made me stronger.”

The Court of Arbitration for Sport in May found that the rules for athletes with DSD were discriminatory, but that the discrimination was “necessary, reasonable and proportionate” to protect “the integrity of female athletics”.

Critics of the limit have argued that testosterone is not the dominant factor in giving men a performance advantage in certain sports.

In the study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 healthy 18- to 35-year-old women were randomly assigned to 10 weeks of daily treatment with 10mg of testosterone cream or 10mg of a placebo.

The scientists tested the hormone’s impact on aerobic performance measured by how long the women could run on a treadmill before reaching the point of exhaustion, and leg power, muscle strength and lean muscle mass.

Circulating levels of testosterone rose from 0.9 nmol/litre of blood to 4.3 nmol/L in the women given the hormone cream. This was below the recent 5 nmol/L IAAF limit and below the normal male range of 8-29 nmol/L.

Running time to exhaustion increased significantly by 21.17 seconds (8.5%) in the testosterone group, compared with those given the inactive substance. The group given the hormone also had significant changes in lean muscle mass, gaining 923g vs 135g overall and 398g vs 91g in their legs.

(10/19/2019) ⚡AMP
by Hannah Devlin
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Eric Kiptanui was involved in Eliud Kipchoge's record-breaking feat in Vienna, and now he is set to run the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

Kiptanui was part of a 41-member pacemaking team at the Vienna event that ran in front of Kipchoge in a V-formation, protecting him from drag caused by wind, allowing the main runner to save energy in the process — a technique known as drafting or slipstreaming in running events and in motorsports.

"My family was happy. Everybody at home was happy. Eliud is a friend to me, always encouraged me to train. Has done a lot for me. So I think it’s very special for me and for my family," said Kiptanui at an event in New Delhi in the build-up to the 15th edition of the event certified as an IAAF Gold Label Road Race.

When asked about his standout memory from the record-breaking feat, Kiptanui picked the moment when his compatriot finally crossed the finish line to complete the historic feat. The sight of Kipchoge raising his arms in celebration, as did his pacemakers behind him, before embracing his wife on the other side of the finish line has now become an iconic sporting moment.

Can a feat like this be achieved without a team of in-and-out pacemakers? Kiptanui replied by saying: "It’s possible, and even now it’s possible. Even now one can say 'I want to run alone, maybe one pacemaker along the course of the 30k.'"

Life however was far from easy for Kiptanui. Early in his career, the runner resorted to washing toilets to make ends meet, which he now says has been a learning experience and has only made him a stronger person.

"In college, I had nothing. I had no money. I had to look for a job. I got a job for washing toilets. That experience made me a stronger person, because where I am today, and what I did some time back, it tells a lot. I believed in myself, that one day, one time, I will be somebody. No matter who I am now, I will be somebody one day one time," said Kiptanui.

Being part of Kipchoge's 41-member team of pacemakers at Vienna however, isn't his only claim to fame, for he is a serious contender himself as far as long-distance IAAF events are concerned. Kiptanui enjoyed a good run in 2018 by winning the Berlin (58.42 seconds) and Lisbon (60.05 seconds) half marathons, and had won the Barcelona half marathon earlier this year.

For Kiptanui, part of his training for the Delhi half marathon came in the form of his pacemaking duties at Vienna, and has had a fair bit of training in the build-up to the Delhi event in order to keep his body in shape.

East African runners have dominated long-distance running events across the world for decades now, and the Delhi Half Marathon is no different — nearly all the winners in both the men's and women's categories in the event hailing from either Ethiopia or Kenya — both titles being won by an Ethiopian last year.

Come Sunday, Kiptanui will face a stiff challenge from defending champion Andamlak Belihu and debutant Hagos Gebrhiwet. In the women's category, its defending champion and course record-holder Tsehay Gemechu will be in the spotlight along with Kenya-born Kazakh runner Caroline Kipkirui. Over 40,000 are expected to take part in the upcoming event, which begins in the wee hours on Sunday in the national capital, across five categories — Half Marathon (21.097 km), Great Delhi Run (5 km), Open 10K, Senior Citizens' Run (3.2 km) and Champions with Disability (3.2 km).

(10/19/2019) ⚡AMP
by Amit Banerjee
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Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

Ethiopia’s Birhanu Legese and Almaz Ayana took the honours at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon, crossing the line in the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in 59:46 and 1:07:11 respectively to win, world and Olympic 10,000m champion Ayana was making her debut over the half marathon distance but hardly looked like a novice as she led home an Ethiopian clean sweep of...

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Ethiopian Junior World Record Holder Tsegaye Mekonnen joins the Frankfurt marathon

“The addition of Meskerem Assefa and Tsegaye Mekonnen means two more top stars have joined our race. It says a lot for the quality of the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon that these two athletes want to run their autumn marathon here. If weather conditions are right, we have a good chance for very fast races,” said the race director Jo Schindler.

A year ago Meskerem Assefa set a course record of 2:20:36 despite windy conditions which was also her personal best. The 34-year-old has the potential to target a sub-2:20 time for her latest appearance in Frankfurt. She may well have company in this challenge since the Kenyan Valary Aiyabei has a best of 2:20:53, only 17 seconds slower than Meskerem’s course record in Frankfurt.

Sylvia Kibet can also be expected to produce a considerable improvement on her fastest time.

The 35-year-old won in Rabat in Morocco in April, setting a personal best of 2:25:52. Her pedigree for the marathon includes impressive speed over shorter distances on the track which helped her win two silver medals over 5,000m in the 2009 and 2011 World Championships and an Olympic bronze for the same distance in 2008.

Another newcomer to the women’s race in the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon is Fabienne Königstein, better known as Fabienne Amrhein.

The 26-year-old made her breakthrough last year, improving to 2:32:34 to win the women’s title in Düsseldorf, followed by becoming the top German finisher in 11th place in the European Championship Marathon in Berlin. Injuries have prevented her from racing in the early part of 2019 but she is likely to be aiming for the Olympic qualifying time of 2:29:30 in Frankfurt.

Tsegaye Mekonnen is a runner with enormous potential. In 2014 the Ethiopian was the shooting start of the international marathon scene, running, as an 18-year-old, an unofficial junior world record in Dubai on his debut at the distance of 2:04:32 (the IAAF does not record official marathon world records for juniors).

Since then Tsegaye Mekonnen’s progress has been restricted by a succession of injuries. He also suffered misfortune when making his Frankfurt debut in 2014, recovering from a fall during the race but subsequently dropping out.

In 2017 Tsegaye Mekonnen won his second marathon with 2:07:26 in Hamburg. He has not raced internationally this year but the flat and fast course in Frankfurt should give him the opportunity to show what he can do.

(10/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

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Mike Reynolds will run his 39th Columbus Marathon on Sunday

Mike Reynolds opens a scrap book full of his biggest running memories, including his race bib from the first Columbus Marathon in 1980.

“It cost $7 to enter,” Reynolds says. “And you had to finish to get your windbreaker.”

A lot has changed since 1980, including the entry fee (now $145) and runners getting their race swag in the days before the race at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.

As organizers plan to hold the 40th running of the marathon, which is set to start Sunday at 7:30 a.m., Reynolds will step to the starting line for the 39th time. He missed the 1983 race because of illness.

So what else has changed since those early days?

“We started at noon because we were concerned about the church crowd,” Reynolds says. Another big distinction between the early 80s and now is the addition of electronics and breathable fabrics.

“We were all wearing cotton and nylon,” Reynolds says.

“They bragged that were five water spots on the course.” Reynolds says, adding that runners didn’t get any snacks unless they brought them with them. There are 17 water stands now, many of them passing out energy bars and Powergel packets.

As far as changes he’d still like to see, Reynolds says he wishes organizers gave more recognition to people who’ve hit milestones, like participating in their fifth or 10th marathon.

His advice for people running their first marathon on Sunday?

“I always say get a friend. Find somebody else to run with,” Reynolds says. “If you’re very good, that’s a different situation, but if you’re a normal person, find somebody who’s a friend and share that situation with them.”

(10/18/2019) ⚡AMP
by Steve Brown
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Columbus Marathon

Columbus Marathon

The Nationwide Children's Hospital Columbus Marathon, first run in 1978 and held annually since 1980, features a flat, fast course which saw nearly 20 percent of finishers qualify for the Boston Marathon in 2010. The event has sold-out in mid-August the past eight years. There are 7,000 runners in the full marathon and 11,000 in the half marathon, making it...

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There is a good chance the course record will be broken at the EDP Lisbon Marathon

With two IAAF Label road races being held on the same day – the LUSO Lisbon Half Marathon (Gold) and the EDP Lisbon Marathon (Silver) – and competitive fields lined up for both, there’s a strong chance of at least one course record being broken in the Portuguese capital on Sunday.

Kenya’s 2016 world half marathon champion and former world record-holder Peres Jepchirchir leads the women’s field for the half marathon. The 26-year-old, who had a baby at the end of 2017, has returned to action this year with a best of 1:07:36, two-and-a-half minutes shy of her lifetime best.

She’ll face defending champion Yebrgual Melese of Ethiopia, who set a course record of 1:07:18 last year.

Others in the field include Kenya’s Vivian Kiplagat, 10km world leader Dorcas Kimeli, Monica Jepkoech, Ethiopia’s Waganesh Amare, South Africa’s Glenrose Xaba and Portuguese duo Jessica Augusto and Catarina Ribeiro.

With a PB of 58:48, Kenya’s Jorum Okombo is the fastest in the men’s half marathon field and has the ability to challenge the course record of 1:00:13, but he heads to Lisbon with a season’s best of 1:02:31 so might not be at his absolute best.

Eritrea’s Amanuel Mesel, who has a best of 1:00:10 and finished seventh at the 2018 World Half Marathon Championships, will be keen to improve on his third-place finish from last year. Uganda’s Thomas Ayeko, seventh at this year’s World Cross Country Championships, and Kenya’s Daniel Rotich also have PBs inside 61 minutes and should contend for top honors. Hermano Ferreira, who has a best of 1:01:24, is the leading Portuguese entrant.

The course record of 2:07:34 will be the prime target for the leading men in the marathon field.

Kenya’s Stephen Chemlany, who has a best of 2:06:24, is the fastest in the field, but his PB was set back in 2014 and the 37-year-old hasn’t raced this year. Fellow Kenyan Samuel Wanjiku won in Lisbon in 2014 in 2:08.21, but his PB of 2:07:04 dates back even further to 2012.

Barnabas Kiptum, however, heads to Lisbon off the back of a 2:08:02 lifetime best at the Gold Coast Marathon just three months ago. Likewise, Ethiopia’s Andualem Shiferaw (2:08:16) and Birhanu Teshome (2:08:20) have set PBs earlier this year.

Others in the field with PBs inside 2:09 include Kenya’s former steeplechaser Patrick Terer, Joseph Aperumoi and Richard Mengich.

Fatuma Sado’s lifetime best of 2:24:16 is just three seconds shy of the Lisbon course record. The Ethiopian won in Osaka earlier this year in 2:25:39, the second-fastest performance of her career, and will start as the favorite on Sunday.

Compatriot Sechale Dalasa set her PB of 2:26:27 on her debut at the distance back in 2012 but has come close to it on several occasions since then, including her 2:28:46 run in Houston earlier this year. Kenya’s Truphena Chepchirchir, meanwhile, set her PB of 2:27:52 at this year’s Dongying Marathon.

Others in the field include Ethiopia’s 2008 world U20 5000m champion Sule Utura, Kenya’s Helen Jepkurgat and 2010 Commonwealth 10,000m silver medalist Doris Changeywo.

(10/18/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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EDP Lisbon Marathon

EDP Lisbon Marathon

In its 7th edition, the EDP Lisbon Marathon is already considered as one of the most beautiful races in the world and acclaimed by international media such as the Forbes Magazine, the Huffington Post and American Express. Starting in Cascais and finishing at Praça do Comércio, the EDP Marathon course is 100% sea and river side, providing to the runners...

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Kenya’s Linet Masai and Ethiopia’s Solomon Deksisa are running the TCS Amsterdam Marathon hoping to claim victory on Sunday

Deksisa clocked 2:04:40 to finish third in the Dutch city last year and placed third, finishing just 34 seconds behind Lawrence Cherono, who set a course record of 2:04:06. “The course is completely flat and I am really looking forward to it,” Deksisa said at the pre-race press conference.

Fellow Kenyans Elisha Rotich and Vincent Kipchumba head to Amsterdam off the back of PBs earlier this year. Rotich ran 2:06:12 in Seoul, while Kipchumba won in Vienna in 2:06:56.

Following the withdrawal of Ayele Abshero, who contracted food poisoning this week, Abdi Nageeye of the Netherlands has been added to the field. This year the 30-year-old has set Dutch records of 2:06:17 for the marathon and 1:00:24 for the half marathon. Nageeye, who trains alongside Eliud Kipchoge, also clocked 59:55 at the Great North Run, a course not eligible for record purposes.

“If you can keep up with him (Kipchoge) during the training sessions, you know that you have become a better athlete,” said Nageeye, “and you can believe that you will also go faster and faster in competitions.”

The lead pack will be paced through the half-way point in 1:02:30 with the aim of finishing in about 2:05:00.

Masai, the 2009 world 10,000m champion, set her PB of 2:23:46 to finish fifth in Amsterdam last year. Following a 1:07:44 run at the Great North Run, she returns to Amsterdam this year with one eye on the course record of 2:21:09, set by Meseret Hailu Debele in 2012.

Bahrain’s Mimi Belete is another former track specialist who has turned to the marathon in recent years. Her PB of 2:22:29, set when winning in Toronto last year, makes her the fastest woman in the field.

Azmera Gebru, who finished third in Amsterdam last year and improved her PB to 2:22:52 earlier this year in Paris, leads a strong Ethiopian contingent. She’ll be joined by 2018 Amsterdam runner-up Shasho Insermu and Guteni Shone, who have respective PBs of 2:23:28 and 2:23:32

The weather forecast for Sunday morning is good: dry with temperatures between 10-12C and a light breeze from the south.

(10/18/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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TCS Amsterdam Marathon

TCS Amsterdam Marathon

Do you want to enjoy Amsterdam in October and all that the city has to offer you? Want to feel a real athlete and start and finish in the historic Olympic stadium? Or run across the widely discussed passage under the beautiful National Museum? Then come to Amsterdam for the 44rd edition of the TCS Amsterdam Marathon in October! The...

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Ethiopian Muktar Edris went from being an underdog to being a two time world champion

Rarely had a reigning world champion been such an underdog. Rarely had an athlete so accomplished, so dangerous, been so overlooked in the pre-race predictions.

But Muktar Edris has a habit of defying expectations.

When the 25-year-old Ethiopian launched his kick to grab gold in the men’s 5000m, many at the IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha 2019 turned to each other, as they had done in London two years earlier, in surprise: Where had he come from?

Edris’s second successive title proved a much bigger shock than his first, even if two years ago he had to defeat Mo Farah on his home turf to take gold, the Briton who had won the previous three world 5000m titles.

The reason for Edris being so severely doubted was simple: injuries.

After London he developed chronic pain and inflammation in his achilles tendon, and while it wasn’t the kind that completely side-lined him, it limited his training substantially. Edris could only do longer, slower running for much of the past two years, his achilles flaring up anytime he let rip on the track with shorter reps.

“One kilometre and under, no,” he said. “Because (practising the) kick is painful. I could just do slow running, lap after lap. The injury is still sore today.”

It was the reason he failed to fire in 2018 and for much of 2019, Edris’s two outings in the IAAF Diamond League resulting in an 11th-place finish in Oslo (over 30000m) and an 18th-place finish in Lausanne (over 5000m). In May he dropped out of the 10,000m at the Ethiopian Championships, which meant the only reason he was able to compete in Doha was via his wild card entry as defending champion.

But he had shown flickers of his old self in the summer, clocking a 7:39.52 3000m to finish second in Budapest – good, but not the kind of great form needed to win a world title.

Few had expected him to repeat his 2017 feat, with teammates Selemon Barega and Telahun Haile Bekele tearing it up on the circuit, the Ingebrigtsen brothers primed to utilise their fearsome kicks if the pace was slow, and accomplished 5000m performers like Mohammed Ahmed of Canada and Paul Chelimo of USA never to be discounted.

Edris himself didn’t expect it to win. “I had such problems with injury,” he said. “My hope was to be in the medals.”

(10/18/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

The seventeenth edition of the IAAF World Championships is scheduled to be held between 27 September and 6 October 2019 in Doha, Qatar at the renovated multi-purpose Khalifa International Stadium. Doha overcame bids from Eugene, USA, and Barcelona, Spain to be granted the rights to host the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Having hosted the IAAF Diamond League, formerly...

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Michael Davis runs Chicago Marathon with Cystic Fibrosis, sets record

More than 45,000 runners completed last Sunday’s Chicago Marathon, but none of them were quite like Townsend’s Michael Davis.

Davis became the youngest runner with Cystic Fibrosis in the event’s 42-year history to complete the 26.2-mile tour of the Windy City.

It’s a nearly perfectly flat trek through the city, until a hill inside the final half mile. Michael said he was so locked in; he didn’t even notice his mother.

“I had my headphones in, I turned the music up. She was actually at the 26-mile mark, and I was just looking at the ground trying to get up that hill. I didn’t even notice she was there until she showed me the video after. I was so zoned in to getting up that hill and finishing. I got to the top of the hill, the finish line was right there, and it was a good feeling.”

It's another finish line for Davis, who was named the 2017 Team Boomer Co-Athlete of the Year as part of the former NFL quarterback’s Boomer Esiason Foundation.

But it was another finish line that didn’t seem possible for Davis at one point when he was in elementary school.

“I had developed this bacteria in my lungs at one point, and my doctor actually told me that I was either going to die rapidly and fast, or slow and painful, and fast was going to be painful, and I was going to die. So that kind of sparked that I needed to make a change.”

That change? It turned out to be running.

“I was supposed to do a nine-month treatment, and I was going to lose my hearing along with other side effects. I started running, and I asked him if I could have one last summer to live my life, and start the treatment afterward. I picked up running, and surfing, and being around the salt air. I went back and my lung function actually had improved. I noticed that change and kept it up, and it’s made a huge difference.”

It was enough to spark Michael in the 5K game, and after he medalled in an event known as the Otter Trotter at Old State Elementary, he was hooked, but as someone always looking for a challenge, 3.1 miles wasn’t enough for Davis.

 “When I was 14 years old, I decided I wanted to more than 5K or a little run that I had been doing. I ran the New York City Half Marathon when I was 14. My lung function was pretty low, so I was in and out of the hospital a lot. After that, I kept running more and more, and my lung function started going up, and I felt better overall, along with the new medication. I then went on to do four half marathons, and decided I wanted to do a full marathon.”

Ultimately, Chicago became Michael’s goal, but there was still the matter of fighting the Cystic Fibrosis. Remarkably, as his stamina improved, his body was showing signs of winning some rounds of his health fight.

“Before I started running, I was in the hospital up to six times a year for 4-6 weeks at a time. Since I started running, now I’ve been out of the hospital for two years, and my lung function has been in the 80s [percent], and it used to be in the low 70s or even the 60s sometimes. I haven’t even seen that in two years, so it’s made a big difference.”

(10/17/2019) ⚡AMP
by Sean Greene
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Ineos is using its vast profits to roll out a series of cutting-edge sporting projects in top-level cycling, football, athletics and sailing

When Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge became the first man to run a marathon in under two hours in Vienna this month, his performance had been meticulously planned by one of sport's major new players, the petrochemicals giant Ineos.

Founded and 60-percent owned by British billionaire Jim Ratcliffe, Ineos is using its vast profits to roll out a series of cutting-edge sporting projects in top-level cycling, football, athletics and sailing.

"We make six or seven billion dollars a year in profit, so what's wrong with investing a bit of that in sport?" Ratcliffe said recently.

A highly driven amateur sportsman himself, the self-made businessman was on hand to personally congratulate Kipchoge as he crossed the finish line.

With Kipchoge and his pacemakers decked out in Ineos-branded vests as he triumphantly stopped the clock at 1hr 59min 40sec, the brand was broadcast to the four corners of the earth.

The feat has propelled marathon running into a new era, even though the world athletics body IAAF do not recognize it as a world record due to the conditions in which it was conducted. A group of 35 pacemakers worked in shifts to form a V-shaped aerodynamic drag position using expertise that Ineos gained from cycling's peloton, decreasing the impact of the air on Kipchoge's body by 50-70 percent whether there was wind or not.

Research into carbohydrate intake, which is key to enhancing performance in cycling, was also used during Kipchoge's exploit.

Under the slogan "No human is limited", Ineos's efforts, or sports marketing activities, have themselves few limits.

When the 21-year-old Colombian cycling prodigy Egan Bernal won the Tour de France in July he did do under the Ineos banner after Ratcliffe stepped in to sponsor cycling's most successful outfit, formerly known as Team Sky.

"Sky was the reference in terms of sports performance promoting the name of the sponsor," Vincent Chaudel, founder of France's Observatoire du Sport Business, told AFP of the setup that won five Tour de France titles in six years in the colors of the media company.

- "Red Bull-type strategy" -

Football is also part of the Ineos sports business plan and Ratcliffe, a lifelong Manchester United fan, has been mentioned as a possible future owner of Chelsea, if Russian tycoon Roman Abramovich ever sells the Premier League club. Its Stamford Bridge stadium is close to Ineos's Knightsbridge headquarters.

Having previously bought and so far failed to revive the fortunes of Swiss club Lausanne Sport, Ineos bought French top-flight club Nice in the close season with a view to helping them into the Champions League.

"Lausanne was an investment to be close to the major sports bodies," Chaudel said, noting that the International Olympic Committee are based in the city and UEFA's headquarters are in Nyon, 40 kilometers away. "The Nice investment came with a new stadium that is already built. And the Riviera has marketing potential."

Ineos has also provided Britain's Olympic medal-winning sailor Ben Ainslee with a 110-million-euro ($121.6-million) yacht in a bid to bring the America's Cup back to Britain in 2021.

"The strategy is similar to Red Bull where they are not just sponsors but owners. Look at the marathon, they organized it down to the last detail, mastering every aspect of the operation," Virgile Caillet, the general delegate of' Union Sport & Cycle, a body representing 1,400 sports businesses.

"Ineos is a big international group working in a sector which is not the most virtuous sector. While cycling, running, sailing are all environmentally sound sports."

(10/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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INEOS 1:59 Challenge

INEOS 1:59 Challenge

Mankind have constantly sought to reach new frontiers and to achieve the impossible. From Edmund Hillary reaching the summit of Mount Everest to Roger Bannister’s four-minute mile to Felix Baumgartner jumping from space we have frequently redefined the limits of human achievement and broken new barriers previously seen as simply impossible. After the four-minute mile and the ten second 100m...

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Olympic champion Kikkan Randall who was diagnosed with breast cancer is set for New York City Marathon

Kikkan Randall, who was diagnosed with breast cancer soon after a gold medal in the cross-country skiing team sprint at the 2018 Olympics, will run Nov. 3 in the New York City Marathon as part of a group of people with inspirational stories, race organizers announced Monday.

Randall has been named as one of 26 runners on Team #MovedMe. Other runners in the group include Dave Fraser, who was born with cerebral palsy and will be running his 12th NYC Marathon; Sean Hennessey, a former college athlete and recovering addict; and Mama Cax, a model with a prosthetic leg.

Randall racked up medals in World Cup and World Championship competition from 2009 to 2014 and went into the 2014 Olympics as a heavy favorite in the sprint, but she struggled and lost in the quarterfinals. Four years later, after taking time off to start a family, she and Jessie Diggins teamed up to win the team sprint in Pyeongchang, only the second cross-country skiing medal the U.S. has ever won and the first for U.S. women.

She revealed her breast cancer diagnosis in July 2018 and blogged about her treatment for the next several months. Known for having pink streaks in her hair, she quickly went bald during chemotherapy and showed off her new look in an August 2018 blog post.

In the last few months, she has put more of her story on social media, and she showed that the pink is back.

On July 2, she announced that she had completed infusion treatment.

Randall will be running on behalf of AKTIV Against Cancer, which works to ensure physical activity for cancer patients. Coincidentally, the foundation was established by a nine-time NYC Marathon winner, Grete Waitz.

She is also a board member of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee.

(10/17/2019) ⚡AMP
by Beau Dure
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TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

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Brigid Kosgei says that Eliud Kipchoge inspires her to greatness

The day after Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge became the first to run a marathon in under two hours, Brigid Kosgei showed her country's dominance in distance running by setting a world record in retaining her Chicago Marathon title.

She finished with an unofficial time of 2hr 14min 4sec, shattering the 2:15:25 mark set by Britain's Paula Radcliffe in the 2003 London Marathon by more than a minute.

Sunday's display capped an unbelievable weekend for marathon running, with Kipchoge breaking the two-hour barrier in a special event in Vienna designed to show that a sub two-hour mark was possible despite the time not recognised as a world record as it was on a specially prepared course.

Former United States president Barack Obama yesterday lauded their achievements as "staggering", tweeting that "they're also remarkable examples of humanity's ability to endure - and keep raising the bar".

Kosgei also revealed that her compatriot's feat had inspired her to "be the second Kipchoge - the Kipchoge for women".

"They (spectators) were cheering, cheering and I got more energy to keep faster. I was not expecting this," she said. "I was expecting to run 2:16 or 2:17. It's amazing to run 2:14, but the world record was in my head. When I started the race, I was thinking I need 2:15 for Paula's record.

"I don't know how to explain how it feels to run a world record. I am so happy."

Radcliffe, who posed for photos with Kosgei later, admitted that she always knew the time would come when the record would be broken.

"When I saw how fast Brigid was running in the first half of the race, I knew that she had a good chance of getting the record," the four-time Olympian added. "I've always said 17 is my lucky number and it was exactly 17 years ago to the day that I set my first world record here in Chicago."

And like any true competitor, Kosgei does not plan to coast on her latest accomplishment as she believes "if a lady can prepare good and they have no injury... they can reduce to reduce to 2:12 or 2:13".

Making it clear that her sole goal was to get even faster, the youngest winner of the London Marathon said: "I'm still focusing to reduce my time again - if it's possible. If my body would be good, (I can) reduce little by little, slowly."

(10/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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The IAAF has set the same limit for trans women, as expected that it imposes on female athletes with DSD

World Athletics (formerly the IAAF) has ruled that transgender women must maintain testosterone levels at a maximum of 5 nanomoles per liter for 12 months before being declared eligible to compete, it was announced. The limit is half the previous limit of 10 nmol/l, in effect since 2015.

The new rule, passed during IAAF Council meeting in Doha at the conclusion of the recent World Championships, brings guidelines for female transgender athletes into line with those imposed on female athletes with differences of sexual development (DSD) such as Olympic gold medalist and former world champion in the 800m, Caster Semenya, who was ruled ineligible to compete while appealing the decision brought down by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on May 1.

(Semenya is not transgender, but her DSD means she has naturally elevated levels of testosterone, exceeding the average range for women of between 0.12 and 1.79 nmol/l. In her absence, the women’s 800m in Doha was won by Halimah Nakaayi in 1:58.04, a new national record for Uganda.)

Trans women do not need to show evidence of being recognized by law as female, as long as their testosterone levels are maintained within the acceptable limit, but “should provide a signed declaration that her gender identity is female,” according to a report on the Inside the Games site. 

The Council also created a five-member Expert Panel for the Eligibility Regulations of Transgender Athletes, comprised of endocrinologists and other medical experts from around the world. The panel will sit for a four-year term.

(10/16/2019) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
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The International Olympic Committee announced that, is planning to move the Olympic marathon and race walking events to Sapporo

The International Olympic Committee has announced that the men’s and women’s marathons and race walking events will be moved from Tokyo to Sapporo, a distance of some 800 kilometers, due to the extreme heat and humidity conditions expected in the Japanese capital next summer.

Sapporo, the capital city of the northern Hokkaiden Prefecture, hosted the Winter Games in 1972. The weather in July and August, when the 2020 Olympics will be held, is likely to be warm (averaging 26 C), but five or six degrees cooler than Tokyo and significantly less humid.

Athletes and others have been sounding the alarm about Tokyo’s heat and the possible danger to athletes for some time, and in turn, the IOC Medical and Scientific Commission Adverse Weather Impact Expert Working Group has a number of measures in place to mitigate the effects of extreme heat, which include scheduling track events of 5,000m and longer in the evening rather than the morning, and scheduling the marathon and race walk events at 6:00 a.m.

Heat countermeasures will be high on the agenda of the IOC Co-ordination Commission for Tokyo 2020’s upcoming meeting in Tokyo from October 30 to November 1. They will also consider the results of a heat countermeasure questionnaire distributed to each international federation.

With Sapporo being so remote from Tokyo, the decision has an impact on the logistics of transporting and housing athletes, officials and spectators.

The decision comes on the heels of the IAAF World Championships in Doha, Qatar, where numerous athletes dropped out of the women’s marathon due to extreme heat and humidity.

Team Canada is particularly adept at embracing measures to counteract the effects of heat, with athletes doing heat acclimation, pre-cooling, taking full advantage of measures designed to keep them cool on the course, and being conservative about pace. As a result, Evan Dunfee won a bronze medal in the 50K race walk in Doha, and Lyndsay Tessier finished in the top 10 of the women’s marathon.

Tokyo is currently digging out after what experts are calling the worst typhoon in 60 years.

(10/16/2019) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
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Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organized the Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, originally scheduled from July 24 to August 9, 2020, the games were postponed due to coronavirus outbreak, the postponed Tokyo Olympics will be held from July 23 to August 8 in 2021, according to the International Olympic Committee decision....

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Canadian Kinsey Middleton is set to defend her title this Sunday at Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

Sunday is the 2019 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon and Canadian Olympic Marathon Trials, and the Canadian elite lineup is killer. Kinsey Middleton is the defending champion, following her impressive 2018 run where she took the win in her marathon debut.

The Boise, Idaho native says that her build has been great, with more miles than ever before, and a broader variety of workouts. She jokes that she’s becoming accustomed to the marathon, or at least as accustomed as you can be for only having run one.

The runner lives at 800m altitude, surrounded by mountains (she has dual citizenship, since her mother is Canadian), so she has relatively easy access to higher altitudes for training purposes. She’s looking to run Olympic standard on Sunday (2:29:30) and sounds confident in her ability to do so.

Middleton’s race day plan is to wake up roughly three hours before the race, and have a coffee and peanut butter and jam on toast. After breakfast she’ll take 10 minutes to visualize her race day plan and put her feet up, then she’ll take the bus to the course.

The runner jokes that the funny thing about marathon warmups is how short they are. “They’re the shortest warmup ever, because you don’t want to take any energy away from your race. The bigger the race, the smaller the warmup.”

Middleton’s race plan is all about standard. “I am hoping that there’s a solid group of women to run with. I’ve talked to Malindi [Elmore] and Emily [Setlack] about the pace they’re trying to run. It’s better if we all run together.” The runner says that they’ll sort out pacing at the technical meeting, but her plan is to go out on 1:14 pace for the half. “You really want to negative-split a marathon, otherwise it doesn’t feel good,” she says, referring to the practice of running the second half of the race faster than the first half.

“I’m really confident about the time, because I think if your goal is to make an Olympic team, the time shouldn’t scare you, it should feel possible. It’s all about executing on the day.”

Middleton races for the Idaho Distance Project and is hoping to get its logo added to a plain black crop top. Her plan is to race in that black top, or if it’s cold, a black tank top and Asics shorts. For shoes, she’ll be wearing the green Nike Next%.  “I like the upper a lot better on the Next%. I didn’t like the knit upper on the Vaporfly as much. I have narrow feet, so my foot would move around in them.”

(10/16/2019) ⚡AMP
by Madeleine Kelly
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Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

The Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, Half-Marathon & 5k Run / Walk is organized by Canada Running Series Inc., organizers of the Canada Running Series, "A selection of Canada's best runs!" Canada Running Series annually organizes eight events in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver that vary in distance from the 5k to the marathon. The Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon and Half-Marathon are...

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Kenya's Gideon Kipketer will lead the hunt for gold at this Sunday's Amsterdam Marathon in the Netherlands

Kipketer, who was fourth in Amsterdam last year, is yet to win a marathon this season.

He failed to finish the Tokyo and London Marathons, but hopes his return to the Dutch capital will be another chance to redeem himself.

Kenya´s Gideon Kipketer, Laban Korir and Jonathan Korir, the trio will, however, face stiff competition from Kenyan-born Kaan Ozbilen of Turkey - formerly known as Mike Kipruto Kigen - and Ethiopia's Mule Wasihun.

"The forecast is promising, with temperatures between 10 and 15 degrees, not much wind and comfortable humidity levels. A tight regime in terms of mid-course times won't work. We will have to tailor the strategy during the race," said race director Cees Pronk.

Last year, Kenya's Lawrence Cherono set a new course record, winning his first Amsterdam Marathon in 2:05:09, also establishing a new personal best time. He has since gone on to win in Boston and last weekend won in Chicago.

"I was thrilled with last year's win. It was a good race on a flat course and the crowd was great," said Cherono.

(10/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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TCS Amsterdam Marathon

TCS Amsterdam Marathon

Do you want to enjoy Amsterdam in October and all that the city has to offer you? Want to feel a real athlete and start and finish in the historic Olympic stadium? Or run across the widely discussed passage under the beautiful National Museum? Then come to Amsterdam for the 44rd edition of the TCS Amsterdam Marathon in October! The...

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Jordan Hasay suffered an injury during the Chicago Marathon forcing her to drop out

Jordan Hasay suffered an injury while running the Chicago Marathon and couldn’t finish the race.  She had placed third at the Boston Marathon.  

Jordan said in an Instagram post that she was about two miles into the race when she “felt a sharp pain in (her) hamstring and had to stop.”

“I stretched and tried to go again but was unable to run,” Hasay, 28, wrote in the post. “The emotions are raw and new but already I know despite the sadness, it’s time to reset, refocus and gear up for the Olympic Trials in February and a big year in 2020.”

Before the race, Hasay had talked about trying to break the American marathon record of 2 hours, 19 minutes and 36 seconds, which was set by Deena Kastor in 2006.

Hasay’s appearance in April’s Boston Marathon came after a year in which she suffered two significant foot injuries, which forced her to withdraw from both the 2018 Boston and Chicago marathons.

(10/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Molly Huddle clams victory at Reebok 10K for Women clocking 31:50 on Monday

Molly Huddle, 35, of Providence, took home first place in the Reebok 10K for Women race held at Boston Common on Monday afternoon, finishing with a time of 31 minutes, 50 seconds.

Rounding out the top three were Iveen Chepkemoi, 22, and Emily Infeld, 29, each finishing within 30 seconds of Huddle.

Huddle was one of two top-10 finishers out of the age 30-39 division, along with Lauren Perkins who finished ninth.

In the wheelchair race, Alicia Dana, 50, took home first place in 18:47. She finished more than 25 minutes ahead of her competitor, 10-year-old Madelyn Wilson. 

(10/15/2019) ⚡AMP
by Dan Shulman
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Reebok Boston 10K for Women

Reebok Boston 10K for Women

The Reebok Boston 10K for Women, formerly known as the Tufts Health Plan 10K for Women and the Bonne Bell Mini Marathon, is a major 10K held annually in Boston, on Columbus Day, popular as both an elite world-class competition and a women's running event promoting health and fitness. Feel the empowerment as you unite with over 7,000 fellow...

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A glacier on the Italian side of Mont Blanc is at risk of collapsing from melt linked to climate change and threatens UTMB Trails

One month after 2,300 runners toed the line at the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc, part of the course has been closed due to rapid glacial melt.

A glacier on the Italian side of Mont Blanc glacier is at risk of collapsing from melt linked to climate change. The Planprincieux Glacier sits on the Grandes Jorasses peak on the Mont Blanc massif above Courmayeur, Italy.  The small resort town is the halfway point for the UTMB and the starting point for the TDS and CCC races. 

Scientists have been using radar technology to monitor the glacier since 2013, and detected the accelerated melting via radar this summer. A summer heatwave is causing a lower chunk of the glacier to melt at a rate of two feet per day, according to glaciologist and alpinist Ulyana Horodyskyj, who has climbed Mont Blanc.

“The high air temperatures this summer have led to more melting and faster movement of the glacier down the mountain,” says Horodyskyj. “The glacier is always moving and always has a large crevasse, but this summer it’s melting faster and the crevasse is bigger.” The part of the glacier below the crevasse could break, and separate entirely. 

If it collapses, 250,000 cubic meters of ice could tear away from the mountain and crash into trails, roads and alpine refuges below. That impending danger has prompted road closures and evacuations. 

“For this region, in particular, the biggest impacts will be on tourism,” says Horodyskyj. 

Glacial melt could endanger trails like those on the UTMB course, and also affect local water supplies. Though it’s impossible to predict when exactly the glacier could collapse, the glacier’s speed has local officials and scientists concerned. 

“These phenomena once again shows that the mountain is going through a phase of strong change due to climatic factors. Therefore it is particularly vulnerable,” said the mayor of Courmayeur, Stefano Miserocchi, in a statement. 

Scientists have been monitoring thousands of glaciers across the Aosta Valley Region. Temperate glaciers, like the ones on Mont Blanc,  are essentially at melting point. Liquid water coexists with glacial ice, which makes them especially vulnerable to temperature variation caused by climate change. If greenhouse gas emissions continue at their current rate, alpine glaciers would shed half of their ice by 2050. They could lose over 80 percent of their ice by 2100, according to Horodyskyj. 

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte warned the United Nations General Assembly last week that this news just the beginning, and that Mont Blanc’s future “must shake us all and force us to mobilize”. 

(10/15/2019) ⚡AMP
by Zoe Rom
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North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

Mountain race, with numerous passages in high altitude (>2500m), in difficult weather conditions (night, wind, cold, rain or snow), that needs a very good training, adapted equipment and a real capacity of personal autonomy. It is 6:00pm and we are more or less 2300 people sharing the same dream carefully prepared over many months. Despite the incredible difficulty, we feel...

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Kiambu Senator Kimani Wamatangi will run the Standard Chartered Marathon

Kiambu Senator Kimani Wamatangi has praised world marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge for setting record after running 42 km in under 2 hours. 

In an interview with NTV on Tuesday, Wamatangi said that that he will complete the Standard Chartered Marathon in less than four hours. 

“I will run the Standard Chartered Marathon in under 4 hours,” he said. 

He noted that Kipchoge has inspired him greatly, adding that he is proud to be associated with him. 

He added that he fully supports local talent, adding that he will root for more projects for the youths who are talented in different areas of sports.

Rarieda MP Otiende Amollo also said that he will join the race in support of Wamatangi observing that Kipchoge has set an amazing record and he will forever be celebrated. 

“Kimani Wamatangi I like the way you called Eliud Kipchoge your colleague, I like the way people associate with success. To also associate with success; I will also run the Standard Chartered Marathon,” he said.

Kipchoge has since been nominated for the IAAF Male Athlete of the Year. Leaders from all over the world including former US President Barack Obama have congratulated him because of the good results he posted in Vienna, Austria.

(10/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

STANDARD CHARTERED NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank. The other three legs of this four-marathon race...

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Germany's Jan Frodeno won his third Ironman World Championship triathlon in a course record time in Hawaii on Saturday

Jan Frodeno won his third Ironman World Championship triathlon in a course record time in Hawaii on Saturday and continued German dominance of the men's event.

Frodeno, the 2008 Olympic champion, produced a good swim and then scorched the bike course to open a lead of more than two minutes starting the marathon run under a fierce sun on the Big Island.

The 38-year-old set a cracking pace from his very first step and inexorably extended his advantage, enjoying the luxury of being able to savor his achievement by walking across the finish line to add to his previous victories in 2015 and 2016.

Frodeno's unofficial time of seven hours, 51 minutes and 13 seconds was more than three minutes better than the previous record time set by compatriot Patrick Lange last year.

Frodeno said the time had been insignificant compared to the victory. "My legs are shattered," he said.

"I don't care about the record. It's a championship, the Wimbledon of our sport." 

American Tim O'Donnell also broke eight hours for a distant second place, while German Sebastian Kienle claimed third.

German men have won the past six years, with Lange (2017 and 2018) and Kienle (2014) also notching victories.

Lange pulled out during the bike leg on Saturday, reportedly suffering from a fever.

The Ironman comprises a 3.8 km swim, 180 km bike ride and 42.2 km run.

The race was first held in 1978 to settle a friendly argument among Hawaiian endurance athletes as to who was the fittest.

(10/14/2019) ⚡AMP
by Grant McCool
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Ironman World Championship Triathlon

Ironman World Championship Triathlon

The inaugural KONA™ race was conceptualized in 1978 as a way to challenge athletes who had seen success at endurance swim, cycling, and running events. Honolulu-based Navy couple Judy and John Collins proposed combining the three toughest endurance races in Hawai’i—the 2.4-mile Waikiki Roughwater Swim, 112 miles of the Around-O’ahu Bike Race and the 26.2-mile Honolulu Marathon—into one event. ...

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Lois “Marge” Stroebel, age 101, crosses finish line at Ohio State 4 Miler

Amid the crowd of 15,000 walking and running across the campus Saturday, Lois “Marge” Stroebel, 101, of the Dayton area, completed the charity 4 Miler for the second year in a row, with help from her granddaughter and friends. She was the oldest participant in the race ending in Ohio Stadium, but nearly 200 of them were over 70.

When she reached the north end zone inside Ohio Stadium on Saturday, Lois “Marge” Stroebel rose from her wheelchair, shed the sleeping bag she’d been bundled into like the stuffings of a burrito, and, powered by her own determination, headed straight for the 50-yard line.

Now, she wasn’t exactly bee-lining toward the big “O” at the center of the field, and her gray Nike sneakers weren’t leaving any smoke trails, but give her a break. She is 101 years old, after all.

After walking those last 50 yards and crossing the finish line at the seventh annual Ohio State 4 Miler to cheers, high-fives and a special acknowledgement from M3S Sports Race Director David Babner (who mistakenly announced Saturday was her birthday, thought it was in September), Stroebel said she wasn’t even tired.

“I didn’t do anything but sit here,” she said with a laugh as she pointed to her posse. “They did all the work.”

This is the second year that Stroebel has completed the race, the largest of its kind in the country with 15,000 walkers and runners wending their way through the Ohio State University campus and ending up on the Buckeye football field. Stroebel and her granddaughter, Beth Kreger, travel from Vandalia, near Dayton, and Kreger’s friends and co-workers, Scott and Wendy Tharp, come from Lancaster to join in.

Scott Tharp ran the whole 4 miles pushing Stroebel in her transport wheelchair (that means it has small wheels) while his wife and Kreger ran interference.

“Look out! We’ve got Grandma!” they yelled as they zigged and zagged through the sea of people. “Beep beep. Grandma’s coming through!”

The small wheels on the transport chair meant it wasn’t the steadiest thing on the route. Scott Tharp said his hands were numb at the end of the race from gripping it so tightly to keep control.

“It was sure bouncy and bumpy,” agreed Stroebel, who seemed to not understand what all the fuss over her was about. She still lives alone, after all, and she cooks her own meals, dresses herself and never misses her regular bridge game. Until three years ago, she still golfed regularly.

She has been a rabid Ohio State football fan as long as she can remember. But last year when Kreger, a triathlete, suggested her Gram compete in her first-ever race at Ohio Stadium, it surprised her.

“Why, I thought she was crazy!,” Stroebel said of the idea. Now, she has two race medals in her collection. “We have a lot of fun.”

(10/14/2019) ⚡AMP
by Holly Zachariah
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The Ohio State 4 Miler

The Ohio State 4 Miler

The Ohio State 4 Miler is the largest four-mile event in the United States with a sold-out field of 15,000 runners and walkers. The 7th Annual Ohio State 4 Miler will be held at 10am on Saturday, Oct. 12 at Ohio Stadium....

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Everything you need to know about running the 2020 Berlin marathon

The fast, flat marathon is known for its record-breaking history

As the home of Kipchoge’s amazing world-record of 2:01:39, Berlin Marathon is known to be one of the fastest marathons in the world, with Kenenisa Bekele missing the world record by 2 seconds at this year's race. Here's what you need to know about entering the 2020 ballot.

When does the 2020 Berlin Marathon ballot open?

The 2020 Berlin marathon ballot opened on October 1 2019 and will remain open until 31 October 31 2019. With a limit of 44,000 runners, Berlin marathon spots are in high demand.  You will receive an email confirming your entry into the ballot straight away.

When will the 2020 Berlin Marathon take place?

The 2020 Berlin Marathon will take place on Sunday September 27 2020.

How much does it cost to run the 2020 Berlin Marathon?

If you are successful in the ballot, the registration fee for the Berlin Marathon is €125 which at the time of writing coverts to £110.13 or $150US.  

When will the ballot results be announced?

The results of the ballot will be released from November 27 2019 onwards.

How does the ballot work?

The Berlin Marathon uses the same entry drawing procedure as other marathon events at the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series.

In the single runners entry, you will be required to submit all your relevant data during the registration phase, including your payment details. If you are successful in the ballot, your card will be charged and it will not be possible to transfer or cancel your race entry, so make sure you’re 100% certain before submitting your entry. If you are not successful in the ballot, your payment information will be deleted.

How can you get a guaranteed place for the 2020 Berlin Marathon?

If you’re 100% sure you want to run next year’s Berlin Marathon, you can enter under a guaranteed starting spot. 

There are two options when it comes to getting a guaranteed place – entering with a tour operator, or getting a charity place. Tour operators offer race spots as part of a holiday package, which you can often pay for in instalments up to the race.

Similar to other major marathons, charity places are also available, giving you a guaranteed marathon place in exchange for fundraising for a good cause.

What are the Good for Age options at the 2020 Berlin Marathon?

Known as the ‘fast runners’ route, fast runners can secure a guaranteed place for the 2020 Berlin Marathon if they can prove they have finished an AIMS-certified marathon in the last two years (2017/2018) in a certain time. These times are as follows:

Male runners:

18-44 (DOB 2001-1975): under 2:45 hours

45-59 (DOB 1794-1960): under 2:55 hours

60 and above (DOB 1959 and older): under 3:25 hours

Female runners:

18-44 (DOB 2001-1975): under 3:00 hours

45-59 (DOB 1794-1960): under 3:20 hours

60 and above (DOB 1959 and older): under 4:10 hours

The ballot for fast runner places also opened on October 1 2019 and close on October 31 2019.

When will I get my number for the Berlin Marathon?

Similar to other marathons, you will be required to pick up your bib number at the Berlin Marathon expo, which will be open from Thursday September 24 2020 to Saturday September 26 2020. 

The course is not confirmed but most likely it will be similar to the course run in 2019 (photo).  

(10/14/2019) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World UK
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BMW Berlin Marathon

BMW Berlin Marathon

2020 Marathon has been cancelled. The story of the BERLIN-MARATHON is a story of the development of road running. When the first BERLIN-MARATHON was started on 13th October 1974 on a minor road next to the stadium of the organisers‘ club SC Charlottenburg Berlin 286 athletes had entered. The first winners were runners from Berlin: Günter Hallas (2:44:53), who...

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Enos Kales and Naomi Jebet from Kenya win the Paris 20km

The pace of the men’s race was aggressive from the outset. “It was really fast. I decided to let it go with some others French runners,” said Florian Carvalho afterwards. The Frenchman, third two years ago, then bridged the gap at about two kilometres into the race.

A group of 10 runners hit the 5km mark in 14:25, but the pace was irregular. Carvalho decided to take the lead after 10km, reached in 29:05, with eight other runners still in contention.

After the 15km mark, hit in 43:58, Enos Kales, who entered the race at last minute, made a big move. His compatriots Shewalem Yergalem and Joseph Mbatha as well as Ethiopia’s Getinet Mele Gedamu were able to stick to his stride as the French trio Carvalho, Michael Gras, and Nicolas Navarro struggled to sustain the pace.

In the closing stages, Yergalem and Mbatah couldn’t handle the pace and Kales broke off. At about the same time, Carvalho and Gras drew level with the chasers.

Kales held on for the win and crossed the line in 58:28, following a 14:30 last 5km section, as Carvalho finished second in 58:56, 16 seconds outside his time from 2017. “It bodes well for the Valencia Marathon, which is my main goal,” said Carvalho.

Gras managed to hold off Yergalem and Mbatha to round the podium in a personal best of 59:02.

In contrast to the men’s race, the women’s race set out at a relatively slow pace. Nine runners hit the 5km mark in 17:52, suggesting a possible finish time of 1:11:30, far from the results of past editions. The group, spearheaded by Kenya’s Naomi Jebet, ramped up the tempo during the next 5km section to reach the 10km checkpoint in 35:06.

With five kilometres to go (52:30 at 15km), there were still eight contenders for the win, including Jebet, Adawork Aberta, Chaltu Dida as well as the French pair Liv Westphal and Samira Mezeghrane.

Jebet made a big surge after 15km and only Dida and Aberta were able to follow her. Aberta then struggled to sustain the pace with two kilometres remaining, and Jebet sealed the win in 1:08:51, following a 16:21 5km section, the fastest of the race, six seconds ahead of Dida. Aberta finished third, 33 seconds adrift of the winner.

“I am very happy,” said Jebet, who clocked a half marathon PB of 1:08:08 last month. “I didn’t expect to win that race.”

(10/14/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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Les 20K de Paris

Les 20K de Paris

The 20 Kilometers de Paris (Paris 20 km) is an annual road running competition over 20 kilometers which takes place on the streets of Paris, France in October. First held in 1979, the race attracts top level international competitors and holds IAAF Bronze Label Road Race status. The competition was the idea of Michel Jazy, a French runner who was...

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