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Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson in Mountain View, California USA and team in Thika Kenya, La Piedad Mexico, Bend Oregon, Chandler Arizona and Monforte da Beira Portugal.  Send your news items to bob@mybestruns.com Advertising opportunities available.   Over one million readers and growing.  Train the Kenyan Way at KATA Running Retreat Kenya.  (Kenyan Athletics Training Academy) in Thika Kenya.  Opening in june 2024 KATA Running retreat Portugal.  Learn more about Bob Anderson, MBR publisher and KATA director/owner, take a look at A Long Run the movie covering Bob's 50 race challenge.  

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Boston Marathon qualifying standards to remain the same for 2025

After much speculation, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) says marathon qualifying times will not change.

On Monday, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) announced that it will not raise the entry standards for the 2025 Boston Marathon. This news will be a sigh of relief for many runners who have already achieved a Boston qualifying time for next year.

According to the B.A.A., the qualifying standards across all age brackets will remain the same as they were for the 2024 Boston Marathon. However, achieving a qualifying standard does not guarantee entry into the marathon. If applications exceed capacity, those applicants who exceed their qualifying time standards by the smallest margins may not be accepted.

At the 2024 Boston Marathon, there was a cutoff time of five minutes and 29 seconds per age group, one of the largest since time cutoffs were introduced in 2012. There were more than 33,000 applicants last year, with more than 11,000 athletes turned down despite hitting qualifying times.

Due to the large number of athletes being turned down in 2024, there was much speculation about whether the B.A.A. would raise the entry standards for 2025. The field size for the 129th Boston Marathon will remain at 30,000 participants and the race will take place on Monday, April 21, 2025.

For those who have hit a qualifying time for 2025, mark your calendars and set a reminder. Registration will open on Monday, Sept. 9, 2024 at 10:00 a.m. ET, and will close on Friday, Sept. 13, 2024 at 5:00 p.m. ET. The 2025 Boston Marathon qualifying window opened on Sept. 1, 2023, and will close at 5:00 p.m. ET on Friday, Sept. 13, 2024. Any athlete who has achieved a qualifying time in this window may submit a registration application.

The qualifying window for the 130th Boston Marathon, scheduled for April 20, 2026, will open on Sept. 1, 2024. Registration details for the 2026 race will be announced following the 2025 Boston Marathon.

(06/12/2024) Views: 158 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Boston Athletic Association unveils revised unicorn logo for Boston Marathon

On the occasion of Global Running Day, the Boston Athletic Association is unveiling a revised version of its iconic unicorn logo.

B.A.A. officials said the new logo is intended to be a forward-facing and athletic symbol of the organization's future.

"Between our mass participatory events and our support of philanthropic organizations, we aim to spearhead continued growth and enthusiasm around the sport of running while supporting those around us," said Jack Fleming, B.A.A. President and CEO.

Elements of the new logo include:

Facing forward, the emblem eyes the future and many miles ahead.

Spike’s jawline is enhanced, demonstrating the athletic and gritty nature of Boston.

With alert and focused eyes, Spike is determined to conquer the challenging Boston Marathon course.

Pointing northeast, Spike’s horn represents the direction of the Marathon route on a compass from start to finish.

The flowing mane shows swift movement on the pursuit of a healthy and active lifestyle – directly tied to the B.A.A.’s mission.

The new base of the unicorn showcases two sides coming together, the merging of the B.A.A.’s history and future.

Within Spike’s neck is a gap between two lines, symbolic of breaking the champion’s tape at the finish line.

13 points are on the mane, one for each decade of B.A.A. heritage.

B.A.A. officials said the finish line on Boylston Street is being repainted Wednesday to feature the updated logo.

WCVB is the official broadcast partner of the B.A.A. and the Boston Marathon.

(06/05/2024) Views: 284 ⚡AMP
by Phil Tenser
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Registration dates for the 129th Boston Marathon announced

The Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) announced Monday that registration for the 129th Boston Marathon will take place over five days, from Sept. 9–13 at www.baa.org

The field size for the 129th Boston Marathon, to be run on Monday, April 21, 2025, will be 30,000 participants.

Qualifier registration will open on Sept. 9 at 10 a.m. and will close on Sept. 13, at 5 p.m. Any athlete who has achieved a currently valid Boston Marathon qualifying time may submit a registration application during registration week.

Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. on Sept. 13. The 2025 Boston Marathon qualifying window began on Sept. 1, 2023, and will close at 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 13. If space is still available after the conclusion of registration week, registration will re-open on Sept. 16.

Qualifying standards across all divisions will remain the same as they were for the 2024 Boston Marathon.

(06/04/2024) Views: 236 ⚡AMP
by Andrew Clark
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Former Boston Marathon champion finally receives prize money from a stranger after 10-year wait

The 2014 Boston Marathon winner Buzunesh Deba has finally her received prize money from a stranger after waiting for 10 years following Kenyan Rita Jeptoo's doping ban.

At the 2014 Boston Marathon, Ethiopian distance runner Buzunesh Deba gave her all and settled for second place with Rita Jeptoo wining the race in style.

However, in 2016, Jeptoo, the winner of the marathon, was disqualified by the Athletics Integrity Unit over a doping offense and Deba was now crowned champion but without being paid the prize money she deserved.

She has waited for 10 years, patiently, to receive her money and it was finally given to her, not by the race organizers, but by a stranger.

The race organizers insisted that they gave Jeptoo all the money, the $75,000 for winning the race and an extra $25,000 for setting the course record, an amount they never got back from her following her doping offense.

"She took my chance. I lose so many things. I thought everything is to change after I hear the news, but nothing,” Deba lamented last month, as quoted by CBS News.

However, someone, whom she claims to not know, decided to heal her wound and grant her the prize money. As reported by CBS News, Doug Guyer, a Boston College graduate and a businessman in the Philadelphia area, read about Deba's story in the Wall Street Journal and decided to offer her the money.

The Boston Marathon fan decided he would pay her out of his own pocket and he actually did it by sending Deba a cheque for $75,000 as he also considered paying her the remaining $25,000.

Following the news, the Boston Athletic Association explained that they are still in the process of recovering the prize money from Jeptoo.

In a statement, they said: “The Boston Athletic Association stands for clean sport and fair competition. Following the ruling by the Court of Arbitration for Sport, the B.A.A. began pursuit of reclaiming prize money awards from Rita Jeptoo.

“As the matter is still ongoing, we are unable to comment further at this time. We are in the process of attempting to recover the prize money awarded to Ms Jeptoo, so that it can be repaid to Ms Deba.

“While we believe that Ms Deba is due the prize money as she is the rightful winner of the 2014 women's race, there are policies held by World Athletics and supported by World Marathon Majors that we, along with the other members of the organization, follow.

“The B.A.A is still pursuing Ms Jeptoo to recover the prize money for Ms Deba, which the B.A.A. believes would be a just and fair result for her and all runners who follow the rules. As this matter is still ongoing, we are not able to comment further at this time.”

(05/17/2024) Views: 446 ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Canadian Boston Marathon age-grouper shares tips for running as we age

The Halifax runner took up running in his early 60s, and ran his fourth Boston Marathon on Monday.

Sandy Rutledge began running in his early 60s; he has run the Boston Marathon four times. The Nova Scotian clocked an impressive 3:31:38 at Monday’s 128th running of the famous race, earning him second place for his division and top Canadian in that age bracket.

“It was a slower than normal Boston, with the heat,” Rutledge told Canadian Running after his race. “I backed it off and went a little slower than last year, because I didn’t want to push it and not finish.”

After a decade of running, Rutledge knows what he needs to do to stay competitive, but above all else, he’s looking at his longevity in the sport. “My goal is to run as long as I can,” he says. “In my 60s, I could run seven days a week and over 100 kilometres per week, but I’ve now backed that off to five days a week and lower volume,” he adds.

Rutledge has completed around 19 marathons and several shorter-distance races. And he has stayed relatively injury-free, thanks to a couple of key regimens that anchor his weekly training.

“I take Tuesdays entirely off running, and I do strength training,” he says, acknowledging that the consistency of these sessions has helped his healthy running streak. “I focus on the core in these… as we age, many people tend to develop back issues, and I’m no exception.”

Rutledge also shared that 20 to 30 minutes of daily stretching, often before his runs, has also played a big role in injury prevention.

As his career in real estate has wound down, Rutledge is grateful to running for helping him keep a daily routine, and a sense of purpose. “I wake up at 5 a.m.–I’m a morning person,” he says. “Running has brought me a sense of youth. I have continued doing most of the things I could do when I was younger, and I think running has done that for me.”

Having taken up running later in life than many other runners, Rutledge encourages anyone to give it a try if they’re curious, no matter their age. “I started really slow,” he says. “It began with walking and then adding in some running slowly… maybe a kilometre to start, and building up from there.”

Rutledge has no plans to slow down. “I’ve heard that most people have a 15-year life cycle in the marathon, and I’m 10 years in,” he says. “I’d like to keep running marathons into my 80s, but as long as I can keeping running five days a week, I’ll adjust the speed and the distances of my races, if I need to.”

Rutledge is looking forward to, hopefully, running the Athens Marathon later this year or next.

“That’s where it all began,” he says of the marathon. “I think we all owe it to the running gods to do that one at least once.”

(04/20/2024) Views: 255 ⚡AMP
by Claire Haines
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Edna Kiplagat opens up on how she managed to seal a podium finish in Boston

Kiplagat is still flying high at 44 years of age and is not showing signs of slowing down.

At 44, many athletes would be winding down their careers or already retired. However, for Edna Kiplagat, the journey continues.

The Kenyan distance running icon continues to defy age and expectations, delivering a stellar performance at the Boston Marathon on Monday that left spectators in awe.

Returning in the iconic streets of Boston, Kiplagat crossed the finish line in a remarkable 2:23:21, clinching a well-deserved third-place finish. What makes her achievement even more impressive is the fact that she was competing against athletes nearly half her age.

Like a vintage wine that only improves with time, Kiplagat's career trajectory showcases that age is merely a number. Her unwavering passion for the sport and relentless work ethic have enabled her to remain at the forefront of distance running, challenging and even outperforming her younger counterparts.

In a recent interview with KTN News, Kiplagat shared her reflections on the Boston Marathon and the challenges she encountered during the race.

"It was an exhilarating race, and I am delighted that we achieved a Kenyan podium sweep," Kiplagat remarked. "The competition was intense, with many athletes at their peak. I knew I had to be at my absolute best to remain competitive."

Expressing her gratitude for her podium finish, Kiplagat acknowledged the rigorous training that prepared her for the demanding race. "Standing on the podium is a testament to hard work, dedication, and ultimately, God's grace," she added.

Kiplagat's journey in the world of marathon running is nothing short of inspirational. She first burst onto the big city marathon scene by winning the New York Marathon io her debut 14 years ago. Since then, her career has been a fairytale journey across continents and championships.

With two World Marathon Majors trophies to her name and two World Championship marathon titles, Kiplagat's accolades speak volumes about her prowess as a distance runner. Her personal best of 2:19:50, achieved at the 2012 London Marathon, stands as a testament to her exceptional talent.

While many athletes might find it challenging to maintain peak performance over the years, Kiplagat continues to defy expectations. Known for her late-race surges, she has a knack for dramatically overtaking her opponents in the latter stages of a race, leaving them trailing in her wake.

As the world continues to marvel at her achievements, Edna Kiplagat remains a timeless legend in the world of distance running, inspiring generations of athletes with her resilience, determination, and unyielding spirit.

(04/17/2024) Views: 255 ⚡AMP
by Mark Kinyanjui
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Hellen Obiri executes proper strategy to defend her Boston Marathon crown as Kenyan women sweep race

Hellen Obiri made it back-to-back titles at Boston Marathon with fellow Kenyans Sharon Lokedi and Edna Kiplagat completing a podium sweep.

Kenya’s Hellen Obiri defended her Boston Marathon title after running a tactical race to fend off the challenge of compatriot Sharon Lokedi on Monday April 15.

It was an all Kenyan affair as Obiri led a 1-2-3 for the country with Lokedi finishing second while veteran Edna Kiplagat managed an impressive third place but the three waited until late before showing their claws.

Obiri, Lokedi and Kiplagat would exchange leads but stayed close to each other in the final stretch.

The 44-year-old Kiplagat appeared set to pull an upset, and perhaps win her third title in Boston, but she ran out of gas when Obiri and Lokedi pulled away.

Obiri then waited until the tail end to sprint away from Lokedi to win her second straight title in a time of 2:22:37 and defend her crown.

Obiri became the sixth woman to make it back-to-back titles in Boston in what is now becoming her favorite course after her maiden marathon victory last year.

The New York Marathon champion has effectively sealed her place in Team Kenya to the Paris Olympics after being named in the final team of six over a week ago.

(04/15/2024) Views: 293 ⚡AMP
by Joel Omotto
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Who is Sisay Lemma, the winner of the 2024 Boston Marathon?

Sisay Lemma was born in 1990 in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. He is the winner of the 2024 Boston Marathon, with a time of 2:06:17.

Sisay Lemma is an Ethiopian long-distance runner who specializes in the marathon. He is the winner of the 2024 Boston Marathon, with a time of 2:06:17.

This was his first victory at the Boston Marathon, but he has previously won other major marathons, including the 2021 London Marathon and the 2023 Valencia Marathon. Lemma is also a three-time bronze medalist at the World Athletics Championships.

Lemma was born in 1990 in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. He began running at a young age, and quickly showed promise. He made his international debut in 2013, and won his first major marathon in 2018, when he won the Rotterdam Marathon.

Lemma is known for his strong finishing kick. He has often won races by coming from behind in the final stages. He is also a very consistent runner, and has never finished a marathon outside of the top 10.

Lemma is a rising star in the world of marathon running. He is still relatively young, and has many years of good running ahead of him. He is a strong contender for medals at the major marathons, and the Olympic Games.

Here are some of Sisay Lemma’s career highlights:

Winner of the 2024 Boston Marathon

Winner of the 2021 London Marathon

Winner of the 2023 Valencia Marathon

Three-time bronze medalist at the World Athletics Championships

Winner of the 2018 Rotterdam Marathon

Personal best of 2:01:48 for the marathon

The Boston Marathon: The King of Marathons

The Boston Marathon is an annual foot race held in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. It is considered to be the most prestigious marathon in the world, and is one of the world’s oldest continuously run sporting events. The race is traditionally held on the third Monday in April, and it follows a 26.2-mile (42.2 km) route through the streets of Boston and the surrounding towns.

The Boston Marathon was first held in 1897, and it was inspired by the success of the marathon race at the 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. The race was originally intended to be a qualifier for the 1897 Summer Olympics, but it quickly became a popular event in its own right. The Boston Marathon has been held every year since 1918, with the only exceptions being in 1918 due to World War I, and in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Boston Marathon is known for its challenging course, which features several hills, including the infamous Heartbreak Hill at mile 20. The race is also known for its large and enthusiastic crowds, which line the streets throughout the course to cheer on the runners.

The Boston Marathon has been won by some of the greatest marathon runners in history, including Dick Hoyt, Bill Rodgers, Joan Benoit Samuelson, and Kathrine Switzer. The race has also been the site of several world records, including the first sub-2:00 marathon in 1978 by Geoffrey Hirt.

The Boston Marathon is more than just a race; it is a tradition and an institution. The race is a symbol of Boston’s resilience and spirit, and it is a source of pride for the city’s residents. The Boston Marathon is also a major fundraiser for charity, and it has raised millions of dollars for local charities over the years.

(04/15/2024) Views: 285 ⚡AMP
by Laura Islas
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Hellen Obiri in her best shape ever heading into the Boston Marathon

Hellen Obiri is bubbling with confidence ahead of the Boston Marathon and feels like she is in her best marathon running shape ever.

Reigning New York City Marathon champion Hellen Obiri is ready to rumble at the Boston Marathon after enjoying her training and working on some of her major undoings.

Speaking to Citius Mag, the defending champion feels like she in her best shape and is ready for the challenge as she eyes a slot in the Olympic team ahead of the Paris 2024 Olympic Games.

The two-time World 5000m champion disclosed that she has also worked on her bottle-handling technique, an issue that has affected her a lot since she tends to miss taking water at certain points of the race.

“I feel so excited and nothing has changed…I’m so healthy and I’m ready for Monday. I’ve been doing the bottle handling and I am now much better.

“I think I’m in the best marathon shape and we normally compare my training from last year and now I can say I’ve been running so fast and I feel good,” Obiri said.

The former World 10,000m silver medalist also admitted that there is a lot of pressure coming from her fans and friends since she is the defending champion.

She noted that, however, going to the race, she will embrace a strong mindset and give her all since she is also competing against very strong women. Obiri also explained that it would be a great thing if she wins the race because it would place her in a better position to be selected in the Olympic team.

“This year I have a lot of pressure since I’m the defending champion and everyone will be looking at me to see what I’m going to do. I have a big task and I know we have strong ladies here but I will give my best and stay mentally focused.

“Nowadays I’m a bit nervous when starting because I have never raced with some ladies before but I’m trying to do my best to avoid that.

“I think it would be best if I win but I’m sure they will observe how the race will be…this is a marathon and it’s Boston, the course being the same as the Paris 2024 Olympics. However, I want to win,” Obiri said.

(04/13/2024) Views: 204 ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Sharon Lokedi: How the Kenyan marathon star is sketching her strategy for victory at Boston Marathon

Sharon Lokedi is aiming for victory at the Boston Marathon where she will be facing elite rivals.

2022 New York City Marathon champion Sharon Lokedi has rapidly ascended to the pinnacle of long-distance running with her sights firmly set on the 128th Boston Marathon.

Amidst a field brimming with talent, Lokedi's journey from her marathon debut to becoming a favorite in Boston illustrates not only her athletic prowess but also her unique approach to managing the pressures of elite competition.

"Before I get to a race, there’s so much tension and anxiety. I try to remain present," Lokedi shared as per Run.

This practice, recommended by her sports psychologist in July 2023, has helped her maintain calm and focus, vital for someone whose career in running has been anything but typical.

Surprising herself and the athletic world, she clinched victory at her first marathon attempt in New York in 2022 with a time of 2:23:23, joining the ranks of debut winners in the storied race. 

Despite facing an injury that sidelined her from the Boston Marathon last April she returned to the global marathon scene last November, securing a third-place finish in New York, a testament to her resilience and tenacity.

The 30-year-old Kenyan runner's story is a blend of innate talent and serendipity having never envisioned a professional career in athletics. 

From her humble beginnings running at age 12 to training alongside Olympic champions in Kaptagat, Kenya, Lokedi's ascent in the sport is, by her own admission, "a miracle."

Training at altitudes close to 8,000 feet, Lokedi has pushed her limits, clocking upwards of 140 miles a week in preparation for Boston. 

Under the guidance of her coach Haas, she has emphasized hill training, a crucial component for tackling the notoriously challenging Boston course. 

"I think she’ll be in the mix," said Haas, highlighting Lokedi's diligent preparation and positive mindset.

Lokedi's connection to the running community, both in Kenya and her second home in Flagstaff, Arizona, has been a source of strength and inspiration. 

The camaraderie she shares with competitors, including close friend and fellow Kenyan Hellen Obiri underscores a spirit of mutual respect and friendship that transcends rivalry. 

"Racing with Sharon, it’s really good for me," Obiri remarked.

The Boston Marathon promises a historic showdown in the women's elite field, featuring luminaries such as Obiri, Tadu Teshome, Hiwot Gebremariam, and Edna Kiplagat, alongside promising American contenders like Emma Bates and Sara Hall.

"Sharon has been my good friend since 2019. She’s a lovely girl," Obiri added, highlighting the deep bonds formed between athletes at the highest levels of competition.

For Lokedi and Obiri, the Boston Marathon is not just another race, it is an opportunity to showcase their skills, support each other, and celebrate their friendship, irrespective of the outcome.

As she prepares to toe the line in Boston, her message is clear: "I know I’m strong. I want to come into the race knowing that anything is possible."

(04/11/2024) Views: 231 ⚡AMP
by Festus Chuma
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Your first Boston Marathon: what runners wish they’d known

Experienced runners share what surprised them most in their introduction to Boston.

We are just days away from the Boston Marathon. Whether it’s your first time, you’re headed back for redemption or you’re still working toward your first BQ, you likely have questions about this famous race. We asked the running community what surprised them about the marathon after their first experience. Here’s what they had to say.

Plan appropriately for race morning

Runners should consider the time from wake-up to actually starting their run. At huge races like Boston, where the race organization logistics must allow for thousands and thousands of participants, this can involve a lot of pre-race walking and waiting around for runners. After you get to the start at the appropriate time, you’ll have lots of time before your wave takes off. Many first-time Boston runners wished they had packed more pre-race fuel, disposable layers (check the weather forecast, of course!) and accounted for how they would spend the time waiting for their race to start.

Pacing is tricky

Running coach and marathoner Donna Mader of Fredericton says the biggest challenge at Boston is pacing: “The adrenalin at the start, combined with the course profile [the first approximately 10 km are downhill] makes it challenging to hold back the pace,” she says. “Conserving a bit of energy in the first half is not only smart, but it’s much more enjoyable to be passing runners in the later stages of a marathon than to be struggling and being passed by others.”

“The downhills are harder than the uphills, and your quads are smashed at the end of the race from them,” says running coach, former professional track runner and marathoner Lauren Goss of Boulder, Co. Goss has coached many runners across North America to success in their first Boston Marathon.

You’ll experience a Boston like no other

Not all the unexpected things about Boston are negative. Co-founder of Early Bird Run Club in Hamilton Kavit Puri says the energy in Boston on race day was his favorite aspect of the race. “As I walked from the finish line to Tracksmith for my poster and back to my hotel with my medal on and my bib, I was cheered and congratulated by strangers, like I was a pro runner,” he says. “It felt so validating, and made me feel so welcome in the city. I have never experienced a city that embraces the marathon like Boston did on that day.”

Recreational marathoner and nutritionist Tara Postnikoff of Toronto says that she wasn’t expecting to feel quite so much emotion during her first Boston Marathon. “There were so many things (that surprised me),” she says, “but I really had this sense of being part of something super meaningful and historic.”

(04/11/2024) Views: 207 ⚡AMP
by Claire Haines
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Canadian Olympic marathoner Malindi Elmore pulls out of Boston Marathon due to hamstring injury

Canadian Olympic marathoner Malindi Elmore will not be racing at the Boston Marathon on April 15, she announced on Instagram on Tuesday. Elmore, of Kelowna, B.C., has been dealing with hamstring tendinopathy, a condition in which the tendon that connects the hamstring muscles to the pelvis becomes irritated, resulting in pain and limited function.

While Elmore had hoped to feature in a strong field (including reigning champion Hellen Obiri and 2022 New York Marathon champion Sharon Lokedi), she is focused on the Paris 2024 Olympics. “Boston on hold for another year, all eyes towards being FIT and HEALTHY for Paris on August 11,” she wrote.

This would have been Elmore’s second time lining up in Boston; in 2022, she ran to an impressive 11th-place finish, posting a time of 2:27:58—the fastest-ever time in Boston by a Canadian woman. She left Boston wanting to return, saying, “It’s a blast to run the crowd-lined streets, where there is always someone cheering you on and shouting your name.”

In February, Elmore (along with national marathon record holder Cam Levins) received a nomination from Athletics Canada and the Canadian Olympic Committee to represent Team Canada in the marathon at the 2024 Paris Olympics. This will be both athletes’ third Olympic appearance for Team Canada.

Elmore made her Olympic debut at Athens 2004 in the women’s 1,500 meters. Though she initially retired in 2012, she returned to the sport in 2019 to compete at the Houston Marathon. She ran the Houston Marathon again in 2020 and qualified for the Tokyo Olympics with her Canadian record-setting performance of 2:24:50. In her Olympic return, Elmore placed ninth overall–the second-best finish by a Canadian in the women’s marathon.

While Elmore isn’t able to race this month, she is still training.”After experimenting with more miles, hills and weights this winter to prepare for a hilly and challenging Paris course, my hamstring tendinopathy reared its ugly head again and told me to back off,” she explained on Instagram.”I listened, so here we are, running my favorite easy long runs but holding off intensity and hills until it returns to 100 per cent again. Thankfully (due to my easy paces shuffle) easy running is no problem as I basically have no hamstring extension at this pace so I can still hit my favorite long runs.”

(04/03/2024) Views: 263 ⚡AMP
by Claire Haines
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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2 weeks to Boston: tips to prepare

You've started your taper. Here are some things to keep in mind.

April 1 means it’s officially race month for those headed to the Boston Marathon on April 15. If you’ve spent your winter training for the 2024 edition of this storied race, you’re probably starting to think about the final preparations you can make to set yourself up for success on April 15. Here are five tips to consider:

Weather

It’s not too early to start checking the forecast and thinking about how the weather will factor into your race day plans–from what you’ll wear on the bus to Hopkinton to what you’ll run in. Boston in April can bring all types of weather, as we’ve seen on race day many times. As of today, race-day conditions are predicted to be a lovely 15 C, mainly sunny with a low chance of precipitation. While this could change, it appears we can look forward to a near-perfect day for running. However, packing for all conditions is still advised!

The right mindset

With more time (and energy) on their hands (thank you, taper!), runners often experience feelings of excitement but also stress, doubt and anxiety. This is normal. Reading how the elites handle these emotions can really help. Check out this summary of running mindset tips from some of the greats.

Make a race weekend checklist

Now is the time to locate your registration information, review travel plans, make that pre-race dinner reservation and start to pack. Many runners prefer to travel with their race-day nutrition with them, so ensuring you’ve got the right supplies and some backups will reduce the risk of forgetting anything in the final days.

Prep for the hills

The hard work is done. As runners enter their taper, it’s a good time to start thinking about the unique nature of the Boston course. You’ve probably done lots hill reps in training. As you head into the last two weeks of easier training, now’s a good time to continue practicing some downhill running so the legs get used to what’s coming on April 15.

(04/02/2024) Views: 266 ⚡AMP
by Claire Haines
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Longtime New Hampshire resident Mike Beeman, set to running in his 47th consecutive Boston Marathon this year

When it comes to running the Boston Marathon, any runner who has done it for at least the last 25 straight years is part of the “Quarter-Century Club.”

There are 121 people in that club right now, including longtime New Hampshire resident Mike Beeman, who is set to run his 47th consecutive Boston Marathon in April.

Beeman is a Pinkerton graduate and a former teacher and coach at Salem High School and Londonderry High School.

He lives in Georgia now and he is fifth on the list of quarter-century runners.

“I’ve run just about everywhere. Boston is just so special. The fanbase, the knowledge of the people out there on the course, it is great. The people change, but the cheering and the excitement, especially towards the end, never changes,” Beeman said.

Beeman said he would like to get to 50 straight Boston Marathons, which would put him in the even-more-exclusive “Half-Century Club” of Boston Marathon runners.

(03/26/2024) Views: 280 ⚡AMP
by Jamie Staton
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Rob Gronkowski named grand marshal for 2024 Boston Marathon

New England Patriots great Rob Gronkowski has been named grand marshal for the 2024 Boston Marathon, the Boston Athletic Association announced Tuesday.

Gronkowski will also receive the 2024 Patriots' Award, presented to a person or organization who is "patriotic, philanthropic, and inspirational, and fosters goodwill and sponsorship." In addition to his athletic achievements, Gronkowski founded the Gronk Nation Youth Foundation, which donated the funds to build Gronk Playground on the Charles River Esplanade.

"Giving back has always been a priority in my life," Gronkowski said in a statement. "When I first got to New England, Mr. Kraft and the Patriots Foundation ingrained in the team the importance of giving back to the community that gives back to us. And this community has supported me throughout my entire career. Now it's time for me to give back to help set others up for their own journey, especially the youth. This is why the Gronk Playground project is close to my heart. My family and I are honored to be able to give kids an awesome new space to play in the city.”

“We are honored to have Rob Gronkowski as part of our Boston Athletic Association's long-standing traditions and celebrations this year. The work that he has done and continues to do for the Boston Community exemplifies what we look to recognize with our Patriots’ Award," B.A.A. Director of Development Nicole Juri said in a statement. “Having him also serve as Grand Marshal on race day will bring a lot of added joy and excitement for the thousands of spectators who will be lining the streets from Hopkinton to Boston.”

Gronkowski will be honored at the B.A.A. Gives Back Celebration on April 13. In his role as grand marshal, he will be driven along the marathon course from Hopkinton to Boston, delivering the tropy to the finish line ahead of the athletes on race day on April 15.

Past recipients of the Patriots' Award include Robert and Myra Kraft and the New England Patriots, Red Auerbach and hte Red Auerbach Youth Foundation, the Boston Red Sox Foundation, Rick and Dick Hoyt, Joan Benoit Samuelson, David Ortiz, Tim Wakefield, Tedi Bruschi, Adrianne Haslet, Marty Walsh.

(03/12/2024) Views: 239 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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John Korir is going to run the Boston Marathon

Two-time Los Angeles Marathon champion John Korir is targeting a podium finish in the Boston Marathon after falling short last year. 

Korir said he aims to win the race scheduled for April 8 if not finish on the podium. 

 Korir, who finished 9th last year, said he believes his last year's experience will help him run away with the title.

Korir is fresh from finishing second in the Ras Al Khaimah (RAK) Half Marathon, where he clocked 58:50 minutes behind the champion Daniel Mateiko (58:45). Isaiah Lasoi (58:55) ensured an all-Kenyan podium sweep. 

“As we speak, I am more than ready to battle for the Boston title or finish on the podium. Last year, I miscalculated and ended up in the wrong position,” said Korir. 

Korir, a younger brother to former Boston Marathon champion Wesley Korir, will be seeking redemption on the course where he clocked 2:10.04 last year.

“My training is going well and I hope to secure a top position with a great time,” he said. He said RAK was a good experience for him considering he is not a half marathon runner.

“I used RAK as part of my speed work and build-up ahead of the big task in Boston and it was a great experience finishing second,” said Korir

Korir finished fourth in the Chicago Marathon, where he clocked 2:05:09. The late Kelvin Kiptum won the race in a world marathon record time of  2:00.35 followed by Benson Kipruto (2:04:02), and Dutch runner  Bashir Abdi (2:04:32). 

Korir will be making his third appearance at the Boston Marathon after debuting in 2022 when he finished third in 2:05.01 behind Benson Kipruto (2:04.24) and Ethiopia's Seif Tura (2:04.49).

“Last year, the Boston Marathon was too tough but I want to try my luck this year,” he said.

Korir, just like his brother Wesley, is remembered for winning the LA Marathon twice in a row. Wesley won in 2009 and retained the title in 2010 while the junior Korir won in 2021 before defending the title in 2022.

(03/01/2024) Views: 262 ⚡AMP
by Emmanuel Sabuni
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Albert Korir bubbling with excitement ahead of the 2024 Boston Marathon

Albert Korir has already began the build-up to the 2024 Boston Marathon as he seeks to improve on his fourth-place finish.

In the world of marathon running, the countdown has began for the 2024 Boston Marathon, and the excitement is palpable.

Albert Korir has been confirmed for the event and he is eagerly anticipating the challenge that lies ahead. Korir, a seasoned marathon runner, has set his sights on conquering the historic course once again, and his journey has already began.

For Korir, the Boston Marathon is not just a race; it's a passion, a relentless pursuit of excellence. As he laces up his running shoes and hits the roads for training, the anticipation is building.

In a post on his Instagram page, Korir said: "The countdown has begun, the work has started. Preparing for another Boston Marathon, and I just can't wait.”

His words reflect the eagerness that echoes through the hearts of all dedicated marathoners. The journey to the starting line is as crucial as the race itself, and for Korir, every step in training is a step closer to realizing his marathon dreams.

Korir, having almost tasted success on this hallowed ground before, understands the significance of the challenge that awaits him.

He finished fourth at last year’s edition of the race and will be keen to go one place better this year. The 2021 New York City Marathon champion immerses himself in a meticulous preparation routine.

Long runs through scenic landscapes, interval training to build speed, and strength workouts to endure the course's demands – each element is a crucial piece of the puzzle. His dedication to the sport and the Boston Marathon, in particular, is evident in every stride he takes.

As the world eagerly awaits the 2024 Boston Marathon, Korir stands at the intersection of anticipation and preparation. The countdown continues, and with each passing day, his commitment to the journey becomes more apparent.

(01/19/2024) Views: 294 ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Malindi Elmore set to race 2024 Boston Marathon

Two-time Olympian Malindi Elmore of Kelowna, B.C., is on the women’s elite list for the 128th Boston Marathon on April 15. Elmore is featured in a strong field with reigning champion Hellen Obiri and 2022 New York Marathon champion Sharon Lokedi; she will also be one of three Canadian women running in Boston.

This will be Elmore’s second time running the Boston Marathon. In 2022, she ran to an impressive 11th-place finish, posting a time of 2:27:58, which is the fastest-ever time in Boston by a Canadian woman. She left Boston wanting to return, saying, “It’s a blast to run the crowd-lined streets, where there is always someone cheering you on and shouting your name.”

Elmore, who ran the second-fastest Canadian women’s marathon time at the 2023 Berlin Marathon, achieved the Olympic qualifying mark of 2:26:50. She is currently the only woman who has solidified her spot on Team Canada for the marathon in Paris. The 43-year-old told Canadian Running that she plans to use Boston as a prep race for the Olympic marathon in August. 

“Racing Boston is part of the Paris 2024 plan,” says Elmore on her decision to race Boston. “The course in Paris is reported to be twice the elevation gain of Boston, so I want the opportunity to train and race on hills through the winter and hopefully be a hill beast by August!”

The Boston and New York marathons are two of the tougher Abbott World Marathon Major courses. The Boston is a net downhill, but features a lot of hills in the second half of the race, including the famous Heartbreak Hill at 32 kilometres. The Paris Olympic marathon is touted to be the hilliest Olympic marathon to date, featuring more than 400 metres in elevation gain on an out-and-back loop to the Palace of Versailles. 

Elmore will be one of three Canadian marathoners on the women’s elite list. Joining Elmore in Boston are two up-and-coming marathoners from Thunder Bay, Ont., Michelle and Kim Krezonoski. The Krezonoski sisters ran their personal bests of 2:36:39 (Michelle) and 2:37:20 (Kim) at the 2022 California International Marathon.

Michelle said it’s been an exciting and emotional journey to get to this point after partially tearing her Achilles tendon in her build-up to the 2023 Toronto Waterfront Marathon (which she did not race). “I am grateful to have this opportunity to run alongside the world’s best with my twin sister,” Michelle told Canadian Running. “Boston is historic, and it’s a course that challenges your strength.”

Obiri returns for glory

The most dominant women’s marathoner in the world right now, Hellen Obiri, returns to Boston to defend her title. Last year, Obiri unleashed a perfectly-timed sprint in the final mile to earn her first Boston Marathon title, in only her second career marathon. Boston marked one of her two marathon wins in 2023. She became only the second women’s marathoner in history to win both Boston and New York in the same year. 

“I am excited to return to the 2024 Boston Marathon to try to defend my title,” shared Obiri, who won last year’s race in 2:21:38. “Boston is a historic race, and I would like to add my name further to its history on April 15. Winning such a historic marathon with my family waiting at the finish line was an experience I’ll never forget.”

The 2024 Boston Marathon will also see a trio of Ethiopian runners with personal bests under 2:18:00. Worknesh Degefa, the 2019 Boston Marathon champion, is set to return. Tadu Teshome, with a marathon best of 2:17:36 from the 2022 Valencia Marathon, will make her Boston debut, and Senbere Teferi, a world championship silver medallist over 5,000m, will also compete after winning the B.A.A. 5K in a course record time of 14:49 in 2022.

(01/18/2024) Views: 317 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Suguru Osako to skip Tokyo Marathon in order to compete in Boston Marathon

Paris Olympic hopeful Suguru Osako revealed Thursday he will skip the March 3 Tokyo Marathon in favor of competing in the Boston Marathon the following month.

Osako, who was sixth at the Tokyo Olympics in 2021, is currently on track to claim the third and final Japanese men's marathon slot for Paris by virtue of his third-place finish in October's Marathon Grand Championship.

Another Japanese runner must clock 2 hours, 5 minutes, 50 seconds or faster, the time set by the Japan Association of Athletics Federations, at either February's Osaka Marathon or the Tokyo Marathon to move ahead of Osako in the Olympic qualification standings.

In a video message posted to Instagram, Osako indicated he wanted to avoid the intense focus in Japan on qualifying for the games and said his heart was set on running in Boston.

"The bigger the fuss being made around me, the less enthusiasm I tend to feel," the 32-year-old Tokyo native said. "The race that I really felt like I wanted to run was the Boston Marathon."

"Of course, the Olympics are important, but I don't think it's necessary to obsess about them as much as some people do."

Two Japanese runners, Naoki Koyama and Akira Akasaki, have already earned their Olympic berths by finishing first and second, respectively, in the MGC.

(01/18/2024) Views: 306 ⚡AMP
by The Japan Times
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Chebet, Lemma and Geay to clash at Boston Marathon

Evans Chebet and Gabriel Geay, the top two finishers at last year’s BAA Boston Marathon, will return to the World Athletics Platinum Label road race on April 15, to take on recent Valencia Marathon winner Sisay Lemma.

Chebet successfully defended his Boston title last year in 2:05:54. In fact, the Kenyan has won six of his past seven marathons.

Lemma won in Valencia last month in 2:01:48, making him the fourth-fastest man in history. The Ethiopian, who also won the 2021 London Marathon, is the fastest man in this year’s Boston Marathon field, which features 20 men with sub-2:10 PBs.

Tanzania’s Geay, runner-up in Boston last year, has an identical PB to Chebet – 2:03:00 – and, like Chebet, it was also set in Valencia.

Other men in the field with sub-2:05 PBs are Kenya’s Joshua Belet (2:04:18), Ronald Korir (2:04:22), and Cyprian Kotut (2:04:34), as well as Ethiopians Haftu Teklu (2:04:43) and London and New York City runner-up Shura Kitata (2:04:49).

New York Marathon champion Albert Korir, former Japanese record-holder Suguru Osako, and Norwegian record-holder Sondre Moen are also in the field, as are Morocco’s Zouhair Talbi, winner of last week’s Houston Marathon in a course record 2:06:39, and multiple NCAA champion Edward Cheserek.

Elite field

Sisay Lemma (ETH) 2:01:48

Evans Chebet (KEN) 2:03:00

Gabriel Geay (TAN) 2:03:00

Joshua Belet (KEN) 2:04:18

Ronald Korir (KEN) 2:04:22

Cyprian Kotut (KEN) 2:04:34

Haftu Teklu (ETH) 2:04:43

Shura Kitata (ETH) 2:04:49

John Korir (KEN) 2:05:01

Mohamed Esa (ETH) 2:05:05

Suguru Osako (JPN) 2:05:29

Sondre Moen (NOR) 2:05:48

Filmon Ande (ERI) 2:06:38

Zouhair Talbi (MAR) 2:06:39

Isaac Mpofu (ZIM) 2:06:48

Albert Korir (KEN) 2:06:57

Kento Otsu (JPN) 2:08:15

Ryoma Takeuchi (JPN) 2:08:40

Segundo Jami (ECU) 2:09:05

Tsegay Tuemay (ERI) 2:09:07

Matt McDonald (USA) 2:09:49

David Nilsson (SWE) 2:10:09

Tristan Woodfine (CAN) 2:10:39

CJ Albertson (USA) 2:10:52

Chris Thompson (GBR) 2:10:52

Edward Cheserek (KEN) 2:11:07

Yemane Haileselassie (ERI) debut

(01/17/2024) Views: 345 ⚡AMP
by World Athletics
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Why Mary Ngugi-Cooper is always eager to return to sentimental Boston Marathon

Mary Ngugi-Cooper has opened up on why the streets of Boston hold a special place in her heart.

Mary Ngugi-Cooper will once again line up for the Boston Marathon scheduled for Monday, April 15.

Ngugi expressed her elation upon returning to the streets of Boston which she considers one of her favorite courses, citing various reasons.

Ngugi has made several appearances at the Boston Marathon and has managed to finish among the top ten athletes five times. She was also in action last year, where she managed to finish ninth before ending her season with a fifth-place finish at the New York City Marathon.

“Back to Boston… I’m really excited to announce that in April I will be running the Boston Marathon. Boston holds a special place in my heart, not only for having two podium finishes in the last few years, but getting married there too!

"The streets are always amazing, crowds loud and I can’t wait to hit Heartbreak Hill once again with a ridiculously strong field of talented women. See you there," she said in a post on her Facebook page. 

The Kenyan will be up against some of the greatest female marathon runners including defending champion Hellen Obiri who has already exuded confidence ahead of the assignment.

The Kenyan charge also includes former World Marathon silver medallist Judith Korir, two-time Boston Marathon champion Edna Kiplagat, and the 2022 New York City Marathon champion Sharon Lokedi.

The Kenyans will face an acid test from Ethiopians who have confirmed participation in large numbers. Worknesh Degefa, the 2019 Boston Marathon champion, will make a return and she will enjoy the company of Tadu Teshome who will make her Boston debut.

Hiwot Gebremaryam will be aiming to improve upon her eighth-place finish last year while Senbere Teferi will also be in the mix.

Experienced marathoner Ababel Yeshaneh –second in 2022 and fourth in 2023— will try to become the seventh woman from Ethiopia to win the olive wreath in Boston.

(01/13/2024) Views: 326 ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Hellen Obiri faces tough field in Boston Marathon title defence

Hellen Obiri will defend her Boston Marathon title on April 15 in what the organizers say is the strongest elite women's field in the history of the race.

However, Obiri faces a Herculean task in a race where 19 athletes have personal bests under 2:23:00 including Olympians, World Marathon Majors winners and national stars.

Obiri, a two-time Olympic 5000m silver medalist — now living in Colorado, USA — won the 2023 edition thanks to a perfectly-timed sprint in the final kilometer.

Obiri who has been named in Kenya’s marathon team for Paris Olympics is also the New York City Marathon champion.

“I am excited to return to the 2024 Boston Marathon to try to defend my title,” said Obiri, who finished last year’s race in 2:21:38.

“Boston is an historic race and I would like to add my name further to its history on April 15. Winning such a historic marathon with my family waiting at the finish line was an amazing experience.”

A trifecta of Ethiopians with lifetime bests under 2:18:00 will take to the Boston course.

Worknesh Degefa, the 2019 Boston Marathon champion, returns, while 2:17:36 marathoner Tadu Teshome will make her Boston debut. Hiwot Gebremaryam aims to improve on her eighth-place finish last year.

World championships medallist Senbere Teferi who won the 2022 B.A.A. 5K in a course record of 14:49 is also in the mix.

Experienced marathoner Ababel Yeshaneh –second in 2022 and fourth in 2023— will try to become the seventh woman from Ethiopia to win the olive wreath in Boston.

Joining Obiri from Kenya are 2022 World Athletics Championships Marathon silver medalist Judith Korir, two-time Boston Marathon winner Edna Kiplagat, four-time top-ten finisher Mary Ngugi-Cooper and 2022 New York City Marathon champion Sharon Lokedi.

Helah Kiprop, who holds a silver medal in the marathon from the 2015 World Athletics Championships and has earned wins in Tokyo, Copenhagen and Paris, makes her second career Boston start. From Morocco is 2023 world marathon bronze medalist Fatima Gardadi.

Desiree Linden leads the American contingent six years after winning the title. Linden has finished in the top-five five times and holds the third-fastest time by an American ever on the Hopkinton-to-Boston route (2:22:38).

Linden will run her fifth U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials in February. Joining her is Emma Bates, who finished fifth last year in the second-fastest time ever by an American woman at Boston (2:22:10).

“At this point in my career it’s an easy decision to return to the Boston Marathon and make it my top priority race of the spring,” said Linden.

“I can’t wait to take on the iconic course for an 11th time and have the opportunity to mix it up with some of the best runners in the world.”

Jack Fleming, President and CEO of the Boston Athletic Association said: “The Boston Marathon is proud to showcase the world’s best athletes year in and year out on Patriots’ Day.”

“This year’s women’s field is exceptionally fast and showcases many who’ve been podium finishers on the global stage. It’ll make for an exciting race from Hopkinton to Boston, and we look forward to crowning our champions on April 15,” he added.

(01/12/2024) Views: 329 ⚡AMP
by Angwenyi Gichana
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Strongest Women’s Field in the race history at Boston Marathon 2024

The 128th Boston Marathon presented by Bank of America will feature the strongest women’s field in race history, led by defending champions Hellen Obiri and Susannah Scaroni. A total of 19 women with personal bests under 2:23:00 will line up in Hopkinton aiming to earn the Open Division crown, including Olympians, Abbott World Marathon Majors winners, and national stars. In the Wheelchair and Para Athletics Divisions, Paralympic hopefuls from around the world are set to compete.

“The Boston Marathon is proud to showcase the world’s best athletes year in and year out on Patriots’ Day,” said Jack Fleming, President and CEO of the Boston Athletic Association. “This year’s women’s field is exceptionally fast and showcases many who’ve been podium finishers on the global stage. It’ll make for an exciting race from Hopkinton to Boston, and we look forward to crowning our champions on April 15.”

Women from 20 countries will be competing as part of the Bank of America Professional Athlete Team.

“Each year, the Boston Marathon sets the bar higher with an unbelievable level of athletic talent, and its impact on communities around the world,” said David Tyrie, chief digital officer and chief marketing officer, Bank of America. “The 128th Boston Marathon builds on a rich history and will continue to be an inspiration for all athletes.”

HELLEN OBIRI SET TO DEFEND OPEN DIVISION TITLE

Hellen Obiri, a two-time Olympic silver medalist from Kenya now living in Colorado, won the 2023 Boston Marathon thanks to a perfectly-timed sprint in the final mile. Adding to her trophy case, Obiri also took home the 2023 B.A.A. 10K title in June and the TCS New York City Marathon crown in November.

“I am excited to return to the 2024 Boston Marathon to try to defend my title,” said Obiri, who finished last year’s race in 2:21:38. “Boston is an historic race and I would like to add my name further to its history on April 15. Winning such an historic marathon with my family waiting at the finish line was an amazing experience.”

A trifecta of Ethiopians with lifetime bests under 2:18:00 will take to the Boston course. Worknesh Degefa, the 2019 Boston Marathon champion, returns, while 2:17:36 marathoner Tadu Teshome will make her Boston debut and Hiwot Gebremaryam aims to improve upon her eighth-place finish last year. Also from Ethiopia is World championships medalist Senbere Teferi; she won the 2022 B.A.A. 5K in a course record 14:49 and has shown talent at the longer distances. Experienced marathoner Ababel Yeshaneh –second in 2022 and fourth in 2023— will try to become the seventh woman from Ethiopia to win the olive wreath in Boston.

Joining Obiri from Kenya are 2022 World Athletics Championships Marathon silver medalist Judith Korir; two-time Boston Marathon winner Edna Kiplagat; four-time top-ten finisher Mary Ngugi-Cooper; and 2022 TCS New York City Marathon champion Sharon Lokedi. Helah Kiprop, who holds a silver medal in the marathon from the 2015 World Athletics Championships and has earned wins in Tokyo, Copenhagen, and Paris, makes her second career Boston start. From Morocco is 2023 World Athletics Championships Marathon bronze medalist Fatima Gardadi.

Desiree Linden leads the American contingent six years after winning the 2018 title. Linden has finished in the top-five five times, and holds the third fastest time by an American ever on the Hopkinton-to-Boston route (2:22:38). Linden will run her fifth U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials in February. Joining her is Emma Bates who finished fifth last year in the second-fastest time ever by an American woman at Boston (2:22:10).

“At this point in my career it’s an easy decision to return to the Boston Marathon and make it my top priority race of the spring,” said Linden. “I can’t wait to take on the iconic course for an 11th time and have the opportunity to mix it up with some of the best runners in the world.” 

128TH BOSTON MARATHON PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S FIELDS

 Women’s Open Division

Country

Personal Best

Worknesh Degefa

ETH

2:15:51 (Valencia, 2023)

Tadu Teshome

ETH

2:17:36 (Valencia, 2022)

Hiwot Gebremaryam

ETH

2:17:59 (Valencia, 2023)

Judith Korir

KEN

2:18:20 (Eugene, 2022)

Meseret Belete

ETH

2:18:21 (Amsterdam, 2023)

Tiruye Mesfin

ETH

2:18:47 (Valencia, 2022)

Worknesh Edesa

ETH

2:18:51 (Berlin, 2022)

Zeineba Yimer

ETH

2:19:07 (Berlin 2023)

Senbere Teferi

ETH

2:19:21 (Berlin, 2023)

Dera Dida

ETH

2:19:24 (Berlin, 2023)

Edna Kiplagat

KEN

2:19:50 (London, 2012)*

Mary Ngugi-Cooper

KEN

2:20:22 (London, 2022)

Nazret Weldu Gebrehiwet

ERI

2:20:29 (Eugene) NR

Ababel Yeshaneh

ETH

2:20:51 (Chicago, 2019)

Vibian Chepkirui

KEN

2:20:59 (Vienna, 2022)

Helah Kiprop

KEN

2:21:27 (Tokyo, 2016)

Hellen Obiri

KEN

2:21:38 (Boston, 2023)

Emma Bates

USA

2:22:10 (Boston, 2023)

Desiree Linden

USA

2:22:38 (Boston, 2011)*

Buze Diriba

ETH

2:23:11 (Toronto, 2023)

Sharon Lokedi

KEN

2:23:23 (New York City, 2022)

Malindi Elmore

CAN

2:23:30 (Berlin, 2023)*

Fatima Gardadi

MOR

2:24:12 (Xiamen, 2024)

Angie Orjuela

COL

2:25:35 (Berlin, 2023) NR

Fabienne Konigstein

GER

2:25:48 (Hamburg, 2023)

Jackie Gaughan

USA

2:27:08 (Berlin, 2023)

Dominique Scott

RSA

2:27:31 (Chicago, 2023)

Grace Kahura

KEN

2:29:00 (Sacramento, 2023)

Katie Kellner

USA

2:32:48 (Berlin, 2023)

Briana Boehmer

USA

2:33:20 (Sacramento, 2021)

Dylan Hassett

IRL

2:33:25 (Pulford, 2021)

Parley Hannan

USA

2:33:43 (Carmel, 2023)

Sara Lopez

USA

2:33:48 (Eugene, 2023)

Annie Heffernan

USA

2:34:33 (Lowell, 2023)

Nera Jareb

AUS

2:35:00 (Queensland, 2022)*

Johanna Backlund

SWE

2:35:10 (Hamburg, 2019)

Argentina Valdepenas Cerna

MEX

2:35:34 (Chicago, 2022)*

Ariane Hendrix Roach

USA

2:35:39 (Sacramento, 2022)

Michelle Krezonoski

CAN

2:36:39 (Sacramento, 2022)

Shannon Smith

USA

2:36:43 (Columbus, 2023)

Caroline Williams

USA

2:37:01 (Sacramento, 2022)

Gina Rouse

USA

2:37:10 (Sacramento, 2023)*

Kim Krezonoski

CAN

2:37:20 (Sacramento, 2022)

Abigail Corrigan

USA

2:37:45 (Sacramento, 2023)

Marissa Lenger

USA

2:38:41 (Chicago, 2022)

Emilee Risteen

USA

2:38:46 (Duluth, 2023)

Isabelle Pickett

AUS

2:38:46 (Valencia, 2023)

Allie Hackett

USA

2:38:52 (Duluth, 2023

Mary Christensen

USA

2:38:55 (Big Bear, 2023)

Olivia Anger

USA

2:39:13 (Indianapolis, 2023)

April Lund

USA

2:39:23 (Houston, 2022)*

Sarah Short

AUS

2:39:51 (Valencia, 2023)

Maura Lemon

USA

2:40:30 (Valley Cottage, 2023)

Sarah Sibert

USA

2:40:31 (Philadelphia, 2022)

Lauren Ames

USA

2:40:34 (Valley Cottage, 2023)

Kassie Harmon

USA

2:41:48 (Utah Valley, 2023)*

Elizabeth Camy

USA

2:42:51 (Sacramento, 2022)*

Alexandra Niles

USA

2:43:23 (Hartford, 2022)*

Amber Morrison

USA

2:43:50 (Sacramento, 2022)*

Mindy Mammen

USA

2:44:01 (Duluth, 2023)*

Ziyang Liu

USA

2:44:56 (Eugene, 2023)*

*Denotes Masters Division (40+)

(01/10/2024) Views: 384 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Boston Marathon unveils Olympic-inspired 2024 Celebration Jacket

On Friday, Adidas and the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) unveiled the highly anticipated Celebration Jacket for the 2024 Boston Marathon. And as they say, beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.

The jacket, designed by Adidas, is a tribute to the historic marathon and holds symbolic significance for the 2024 Olympics in the French capital. According to the B.A.A., the colour scheme is a harmonious blend of red, white and blue, drawing inspiration from the French flag and the upcoming Paris Olympic Games in August.

The 2024 jacket is different than some of the more recent and traditional Boston Marathon designs with its unconventional tri-colour look, showcasing two contrasting colours on the sleeves and body. Rather than drawing direct inspiration from the French flag or the upcoming Paris Olympics, we think the jacket bleeds the vibrant styles of the 80s. This is also the first year the new title sponsor, Bank of America, is featured on the jacket–below the B.A.A. logo crest. 

Adidas points out that they’ve incorporated softer shades of red and blue, complemented by the B.A.A.’s distinctive blue and gold colours. This infusion of Boston-centric colours adds a “local touch” to the design, celebrating the achievements of the marathon runners. The Celebration Jacket will be released online exclusively at www.adidas.com on December 15 (U.S. only).

“The Boston Marathon is a pinnacle moment in the sports world,” Jennifer Thomas, VP of global sports marketing at Adidas. “We wanted to honour the marathon while nodding to what will undoubtedly be a pinnacle moment in not just running but sport this summer, as thousands of athletes make their way to Paris.”

We are almost four months from the 128th running of the prestigious Boston Marathon, scheduled for Patriot’s Day on Monday, April 15. An astounding 33,058 qualifiers applied to get into the 2024 race, setting a new record, which led to the largest cutoff time in Boston Marathon history (in a non-pandemic year), at five minutes and 29 seconds. 

(12/12/2023) Views: 310 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Boston Marathon has a cutoff once again, runners had to run 5:29 faster than the qualifying time for their age and gender to gain entry into the 2024 race

The Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) announced on September 28 that the cutoff for the 2024 Boston Marathon is 5:29.

In other words, it wasn’t enough for applicants to run a qualifying time for their age group and gender. They had to be significantly faster than their time standard.

According to race officials, 11,039 runners who qualified were unable to be let into the race.

This reverses the trend from the past two years, coming out of the pandemic, when there was no cutoff time. Everyone with a valid qualifying time who applied for the 2022 and 2023 races got in.

The 2021 race, which was held in October that year, had a cutoff of 7:47, because the field size was much smaller—only 20,000 runners—coming out of COVID. The 2020 edition of the Boston Marathon was canceled.

The B.A.A. announced on September 15 that for the 2024 race, there had been 33,000 applicants during the one-week registration period, a record. The field size is set at 30,000 and about 73 percent of those—this year, 22,019 runners—are time qualifiers. The other 8,000 entrants run for charities or receive invitational entries.

The previous record for applications was 30,458 in 2018 for the 2019 race. That number of applicants resulted in a cutoff of 4:52. Also in 2018, the race tightened the qualifying times by five minutes across every age group.

“Just four years after we adjusted the race’s qualifying standards by 5 minutes for all ages and divisions, more than 33,000 athletes earned Boston Marathon qualifying times,” said Jack Fleming, the B.A.A.’s president and CEO, in a written statement. “While we’re unable to accept all into the field, we applaud and recognize the many athletes who circled the 128th Boston Marathon on their calendar as a goal race to strive towards.”

The B.A.A.’s early announcement of the record number of applicants helped some Boston hopefuls brace for the news they wouldn’t gain entry into the race. Across social media, runners prepped for disappointment.

Robert Wang, founder of the World Marathon Majors Challenge Facebook group, which closely tracks the ins and outs of getting into various races, said he was hoping to establish a streak of 10 consecutive years of running Boston, after which he would no longer have to worry about the cutoff time; qualifying would give him automatic entry. (He was up to four.) He had already booked refundable hotel rooms in Boston for April 2024.

He was shocked to see the B.A.A.’s announcement of the number of applicants on the evening after registration closed. “It was the first time in recent memory the B.AA has released an estimate of the number of applicants with the close of registration,” said Wang, 50, of Canton, Ohio. “I knew immediately that I was not getting in with my 2:54 with 33,000 applicants.”

Road racing appears to be emerging from a slump that began during the pandemic, when most events were canceled, and extended through 2021, even as races returned to the calendar. Now many races are seeing registration numbers that match or exceed their pre-pandemic totals.

The qualifying period for the 2024 marathon ran from September 1, 2022, through the last day of registration, September 15, 2023.

(09/28/2023) Views: 430 ⚡AMP
by Sarah Lorge
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Record-breaking registration numbers reported for 2024 Boston Marathon

The 128th Boston Marathon presented by Bank of America has set a remarkable record as it closed its qualifier registration window on Friday, Sept. 15. An astounding 33,000 applications were received by the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) surpassing the previous record of 30,458 entries in 2019.

The applications for the 2024 Boston Marathon came from runners from 127 different countries and all 50 U.S. states, along with Washington, D.C. Qualifying athletes earned their spots in more than 528 races worldwide, showcasing the event’s international appeal. Impressively, applicants ranged in age from 18 to 82, underlining the race’s inclusivity and ability to inspire athletes of all ages.

Despite the surge in applications, not all qualifiers will secure a spot in the 128th Boston Marathon. The B.A.A. is currently verifying all qualifying times and will notify applicants of their acceptance or non-acceptance within the next three weeks.

To maintain transparency, the organization has not speculated on a “cut-off” time for entry and requests athletes’ understanding and patience during this verification process.

Jack Fleming, President and CEO of the B.A.A. commended the global running community’s passion and commitment to participating in the iconic race. Fleming stated, “Receiving a record number of applications is a testament to the strength of road racing around the world and speaks to runners’ commitment to taking on the challenge of earning a Boston Marathon qualifying time with the goal of reaching the start line in Hopkinton.”

For individuals who do not make the cut or lack a Boston Marathon qualifying time, there’s still an opportunity to participate through the Bank of America Boston Marathon Official Charity Program. This program includes 160 non-profit and charitable organizations that have begun accepting applicants for the upcoming event.

(09/18/2023) Views: 417 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Registration for 128th Boston Marathon presented by Bank of America Begins September 11

With nearly one month to go until registration opens for the 128th Boston Marathon presented by Bank of America, the Boston Athletic Association reminds athletes of what to expect during registration week, September 11-15. The 128th Boston Marathon will feature a field size of 30,000 athletes and will mark the first Boston Marathon with Bank of America as presenting partner.

REGISTRATION TIMETABLE

Qualifier registration will open on Monday, September 11 at 10:00 a.m. ET and will close on Friday, September 15, 2023, at 5:00 p.m. ET. The B.A.A. will use the same registration process for qualified runners as it used for the 2021, 2022, and 2023 races, allowing any athlete who has achieved a currently valid Boston Marathon qualifying time to submit a registration application during Registration Week, September 11–15.

Registration will be held within the B.A.A.’s online platform Athletes' Village. Registration is not on a first-come, first-served basis – all applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. ET on Friday, September 15 and treated in the same manor regardless of when they are submitted during the application period.

PRE-VERIFY YOUR QUALIFYING TIME

To enhance the Boston Marathon registration experience, the B.A.A. is offering a special pre-verification period for 128th Boston Marathon qualifying times. Athletes who plan to register for the 128th Boston Marathon between September 11-15 may take part in this pre-verification, helping to expedite their registration application in September.  

Please note that verifying a qualifying time during the pre-verification period does not enter you in the Boston Marathon. Rather, it simply allows us to confirm and verify one’s qualifying time early so that when applying between September 11-15, the athlete’s qualifying information is already in our system.  

Pre-verification submission is open within Athletes’ Village through August 23.  Additional information is available here.

QUALIFYING WINDOW & STANDARDS

The 2024 Boston Marathon qualifying window began on September 1, 2022, and will close at 5:00 p.m. ET on Friday, September 15, 2023. If space is still available after the conclusion of Registration Week, registration will re-open on Monday, September 17.

Qualifying standards for the 128th Boston Marathon can be found here. Achieving a Boston Marathon qualifying standard does not guarantee acceptance into the event. Those who are fastest among the pool of applicants in their age and gender group will be accepted.

ENTRY FEE

The entry fee for accepted qualifiers will be $230 USD for United States residents and $235 USD for international residents. Participants will have the opportunity to purchase registration insurance at the point of registration. Entry fees will only be processed once an athlete is accepted into the Boston Marathon.

129TH BOSTON MARATHON

The qualifying window for the 129th Boston Marathon, scheduled to take place on April 21, 2025, will begin on September 1, 2023. Registration details for that race will be announced following the 2024 Boston Marathon.

ABOUT THE BOSTON ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (B.A.A.) 

Established in 1887, the Boston Athletic Association is a non-profit organization with a mission of promoting a healthy lifestyle through sports, especially running. The B.A.A. manages the Boston Marathon, and supports comprehensive charity, youth, and year-round programming. The Boston Marathon is part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors, along with international marathons in Tokyo, London, Berlin, Chicago, and New York City. Starting in 2024, the Boston Marathon’s presenting partner will be Bank of America. The 128th Boston Marathon is scheduled to take place on Monday, April 15, 2024. For more information on the B.A.A., please visit www.baa.org.

(08/10/2023) Views: 465 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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2024 Boston Marathon entry standards are out

On Monday, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) announced the entry standards and registration window for the 128th Boston Marathon presented by Bank of America, which is set to take place on Monday, April 15, 2024. The world’s most prestigious marathon will host its traditional field size of 30,000 participants.

The registration period will span five days, from Sept. 11 to 15, 2023. Registration will open on Monday, Sept. 11 at 10 a.m. E.T. and close on Friday, Sept. 15, 2023, at 5 p.m. E.T. The registration process will follow the same format used for the previous three races, allowing qualified runners with valid Boston Marathon qualifying times to submit their applications during the designated registration week.

The qualifying standards for the 128th Boston Marathon will remain the same as those for the 2023 edition. Participants who have achieved their qualifying times can submit their applications during the registration window. This will also be the second year the marathon features non-binary qualifying standards.

However, meeting the qualifying standard does not guarantee acceptance into the marathon. Selections will be based on the fastest applicants within each age and gender group. In the last two editions of the race, there have been no cut-off times inside the qualification standards.

Those wanting to run the marathon must use a marathon time from the qualifying window of Sept. 1, 2022 to Sept. 15, 2023.

Additionally, athletes with active finisher streaks of 10 or more consecutive Boston Marathons will receive early registration between Aug. 28 and Sept. 1, 2023. Further details regarding this exclusive registration period will be communicated to eligible participants in the coming months. 

If space remains available after the registration period, it will re-open to the public on Monday, Sept. 17, until the race is full. 

(06/05/2023) Views: 544 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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127th Boston Marathon Raised $40.2 Million For Non-Profit Organizations

The Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) has announced that $40.2 million was raised for more than 200 non-profit organizations through this year’s 127th Boston Marathon, held on Patriots’ Day, Monday, April 17.

The fundraising total marks the highest amount raised surrounding a single Boston Marathon, breaking the previous mark of $38.7 million set in 2019. Combined, the B.A.A. Official Charity Program and John Hancock Non-Profit Program have raised $500.2 million since the charity program’s inception at the 1989 Boston Marathon.

“Philanthropic and fundraising efforts surrounding this year’s Boston Marathon hit record highs in 2023, a testament to the hard work and dedication of all participants running for greater causes,” said Nicole Juri, B.A.A. Director of Development. “More than 200 charities and non-profit organizations will benefit thanks to the efforts of our fundraising participants.”

The $40.2 million raised this year includes donations raised through the B.A.A.’s Official Charity Program, the John Hancock Non-Profit Program, and from other qualified and invitational runners. 2,537 participants ran as fundraising athletes at the 127th Boston Marathon. Further details can be found on the Boston Marathon’s fundraising page through GivenGain.

“We are proud to cap our 38-year principal sponsorship by setting a new fundraising milestone this year,” said Tom Crohan, VP & Counsel, Global Head of Community Investment at John Hancock and Manulife. “Thank you to every runner, volunteer, donor, and non-profit partner who contributed to these record-setting results. It’s an honor to have helped build a legacy of impact, and we are proud of our collective efforts to help make lives better for those served by our community partners.”

Leading up to Boston Marathon race day, the B.A.A. and John Hancock hosted a variety of fundraising giving initiatives to support athletes running for causes, including Boston Marathon Giving Day on March 15. Through Boston Marathon Giving Day, $1,041,766 in donations was raised over a 24-hour period.

The B.A.A. has annually provided non-profits associated with the B.A.A. Official Charity Program and John Hancock Non-Profit Program with invitational entries into the Boston Marathon. Each non-profit organization directly manages its own application process, athlete selection, and fundraising minimums, deadlines, and requirements.

The B.A.A. will notify non-profit organizations who have been selected to participate in the 128th Boston Marathon as part of the B.A.A. Official Charity Program this Summer. More information can be found on the B.A.A. Official Charity Program.

The next B.A.A. event is the B.A.A. 10K presented by Brigham and Women’s Hospital on Sunday, June 25. Registration is currently open.  

(05/24/2023) Views: 515 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Boston Marathon icon Rick Hoyt dies at 61

On Monday, the Hoyt Family announced the death of Boston Marathon icon Rick Hoyt at age 61. Hoyt was a longtime staple of the Boston Marathon, who was pushed to the Boston Marathon finish line in his wheelchair by his father, Dick, for 32 years between 1980 and 2014.

“It is with profound sadness that the Hoyt Family announces the passing of our beloved brother and uncle, Rick, this morning. Rick was 61 years old. Rick passed away due to complications with his respiratory system,” the family said in a statement. “As so many knew, Rick along with our father, Dick, were icons in the road race and triathlon worlds for over 40 years and inspired millions of people with disabilities to believe in themselves, set goals and accomplish extraordinary things.”

Hoyt had cerebral palsy, which left him a quadriplegic. In 1977, he told his father, Dick, that he wanted to take part in a charity run for a lacrosse player who was paralyzed in an accident. Dick pushed his son for the race, and after, he told his father, “When I’m running, I don’t feel handicapped.”

The duo’s participation in marathons, triathlons, and endurance events showcased that physical disabilities should never limit one’s aspirations. Hoyt’s presence on the Boston Marathon course symbolized courage and the belief that anything is possible.

Dick died in March 2021 at age 80. The same year his son retired from marathons.

The Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) released a statement in memory of Hoyt: 

Rick Hoyt will always be remembered as a Boston Marathon icon and for personifying the “Yes You Can” mentality that defined Team Hoyt. We are fortunate to have been able to call Rick a friend, mentor, pioneer, and Boston Marathon finisher. His legacy will live on through the Rick & Dick Hoyt Award, which is presented each April around the Boston Marathon to someone who exhibits the spirit of Team Hoyt through advocacy and inclusion. 

Our thoughts go out to the Hoyt family, Rick’s many friends, and all who were touched by his positivity.

The B.A.A. has continued to honour Hoyt’s legacy at the Boston Marathon, establishing the Rick & Dick Hoyt Award in 2021. The award annually recognizes individuals who promote inclusivity and advocate for others in the community.

(05/23/2023) Views: 635 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Hellen Obiri: Boston Marathon winner on family sacrifice and quitting the track

As Hellen Obiri crossed the finish line to win this year's Boston Marathon, a few metres ahead was her daughter, Tania.

The double world champion was soon locked in an embrace with both her husband, Tom, and Tania as the family celebrated the surprise win in what was only her second marathon.

Speaking to BBC Sport Africa, Obiri found it all hard to describe.

"That was one good moment for me, at the finish line seeing my daughter. I cannot even explain what I felt."

The rush of emotion, which left Obiri in tears, is understandable when placed in the context of her decision to uproot her family and move them from Kenya to the United States after she quit track running to target the marathon.

"When switching to the road, I felt I needed a coach on the ground with me in training," the 33-year-old explained.

"On track you can train without a coach present and do well, but with the marathon sometimes you need a coach to watch what you are doing."

The Obiris' new home is in the city of Boulder, Colorado. But her husband and daughter only arrived a few weeks before the race in Boston. For months before that Obiri had been on her own.

'Why am I here?'

Previously a 5000m specialist who claimed world titles over the distance in 2017 and 2019, the 2018 Commonwealth title and Olympic silver medals in 2016 and 2020, Obiri made her marathon debut in New York last November.

Two months prior she had moved to the US to join her coach, retired American athlete Dathan Ritzenhein.

At the time, it meant leaving Tania and Tom back in Kenya waiting on their visas.

"It was a challenge because you don't have a family in the US. Sometimes the time difference (for) calling is not good. Maybe when you call the child is sleeping," she said.

"The most important thing is the family understands what you are going there to do, because it's a short career. The family give me a lot of time, support and a lot of encouragement."

But the pain of separation sometimes led Obiri to question her decision.

"She (Tania) was always telling me 'Mommy, I want you to come now'. When she tells you, you feel like crying, you feel you don't have morale.

"Why am I here and my baby's crying there?"

Despite her best efforts to remain focussed, New York did not go as planned as poor race tactics saw her finish sixth on her marathon debut.

"I used to run from the front in track races. I thought even in a marathon I can run in front. That cost me a lot because in marathon you can't do all the work for 42 kilometres," she admitted.

"What I learned from New York is patience, just wait for the right time so you can make a move."

Obiri proved to be a fast learner. With her family now watching on, she won her second marathon, taking more than four minutes off her time in New York.

"When you have your family around you, that means you don't have stress.

"You don't need to think about anything else. You are thinking about your family and the race and when your family is there to watch you, they give you a lot of encouragement."

Rocking life in Boulder

With the family now settled in their Colorado home, Tom has enrolled as a student. But Obiri worries about how a seven-year-old Kenyan girl will adjust to life in a different country.

"The first week was terrible for her because she didn't have friends here, it's a new environment," she said, fretting as any mother would.

"(But) Tania is so friendly. So after one week and a half, she was coming and telling mum 'I have some friends, this one and this one...'"

Obiri also had concerns when it came to Tania enrolling in school.

"I was so worried. I wondered, how will the teachers treat her as she's from Africa?

"Maybe some schoolmates will think 'You are from Africa, we don't want to be your friends.'

"I used to ask after school, 'Who wasn't nice to you? Do they treat you well?' and she said 'No, I'm okay with my friends and my teachers'."

Olympic agenda

The 2019 world cross country champion says not all of her friends understood her decision to uproot her family, but Obiri blocks out the "negative talk" to focus on her athletic ambitions and is also now at peace with her family situation.

Her next big mission, away from the six World Marathon Majors - which are Boston, New York, Chicago, London, Berlin and Tokyo - is to try to complete her list of global titles, filling the one very obvious hole in her list of achievements.

"I will work hard to be in the Kenya (marathon) team for Paris 2024."

"I have won gold medals in World Championships so I'm looking for Olympic gold. It is the only medal missing in my career."

 

(05/08/2023) Views: 661 ⚡AMP
by Sports Africa
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Three days after her 75th birthday, Jeannie Rice runs 3:33 at Boston Marathon

Three days after her 75th birthday, Jeannie Rice of Mentor, Ohio, added the women’s 75+ age group world marathon record to her impressive resume, winning her age category at the 2023 Boston Marathon by 20 minutes and crossing the line in 3:33:15.

Rice not only beat the previous record of 3:38:56, held by Norway’s Vera Nystad. She also beat Nystad in the race, who finished second to Rice in 3:53:52. Nystad is three years older than Rice, and originally set the record at age 77, when she ran 3:38 at the 2022 Berlin Marathon.

This masters record isn’t Rice’s first over the marathon distance. She also holds the women’s 70+ record of 3:27:50 from the 2018 Chicago Marathon. Her time of 3:38 is remarkable, and it shows that age really is just a number. 

Rice averaged a mind-blowing five minutes per kilometre pace for 42.2 kilometres at age 75. That’s eight and a half consecutive 25-minute 5 Ks. 

Rice considers herself a snowbird, as she lives and trains in her hometown of Mentor, Ohio for six months of the year before heading to Naples, Fla., for six months every winter.

This is Rice’s second marathon in the last six weeks. In March, she won the women’s 70+ age category at the 2023 Tokyo Marathon in 3:31:22 to receive her six-star finisher medal–completing all six Abbott World Marathon Majors.

(04/21/2023) Views: 689 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Eliud Kipchoge shed some light on what happened in his Boston Marathon debut

More than a day after he finished sixth in his first Boston Marathon, Eliud Kipchoge sat down to answer a few questions.

Kipchoge, the 38-year-old marathon world record holder, had only lost two of his 17 career marathons prior to Monday. So it was surprising to see him struggle to answer the acceleration of Gabriel Geay during Mile 18 of the race. He then fell to the back of the pack and was subsequently dropped by the race leaders by Mile 21.

Kipchoge acknowledged that he had an issue with his upper left leg that began during Mile 18.

“That’s where the problem is,” Kipchoge told reporters on Wednesday. “I tried to do what was necessary, but it was not working.”

“I’m not a doctor,” he later joked when asked for more specifics.

Having encountered the issue mid-race, he said that he simply “put my mind just to run in a comfortable pace to finish.”

Asked if he considered dropping out once he experienced an issue with his leg, Kipchoge admitted that “a lot of talking was going on in my mind.”

“But I said, ‘Hey, I can’t quit.’ They say it’s important to win, but it’s great to participate and finish.”

Given that he started confidently — leading the pack of elite runners for nearly all of the opening 17 miles — Kipchoge responded to a question about whether he had been tactically too aggressive in the early part of the race.

“This is sport, and you need to push,” he replied.

As for what’s next on his agenda, the Kenyan acknowledged that he will take some time to think things over. His main focus in the short term is to “recover, both mentally and physically.”

Despite the differences between Boston’s course — with its continuous elevation changes — and others that he’s run, which have generally been much more flat, Kipchoge also downplayed its effect on how he ran.

Though his debut in Boston didn’t go to plan, he said he would “absolutely” consider returning to run again. However, this will likely not be in 2024 since Kipchoge will probably aim to run in the Paris Olympics, which will take place too close to Boston’s April schedule for him to be at his fitness peak. He is the two-time defending Olympic gold medalist.

Kipchoge also released a statement following the race on Monday in which he congratulated eventual winner (and fellow Kenyan) Evans Chebet.

“I live for the moments where I get to challenge the limits. It’s never guaranteed, it’s never easy,” Kipchoge said. “Today was a tough day for me. I pushed myself as hard as I could but sometimes, we must accept that today wasn’t the day to push the barrier to a greater height.

“I want to congratulate my competitors and thank everyone in Boston and from home for the incredible support I am so humbled to receive,” he added. “In sports you win and you lose and there is always tomorrow to set a new challenge. Excited for what’s ahead.”

(04/19/2023) Views: 628 ⚡AMP
by Hayden Bird
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Dave McGillivray Completes 51st Consecutive Boston Marathon

After all other participants had long finished their Boston Marathon journeys, Dave McGillivray crossed the finish line at 7:28 p.m. yesterday evening. McGillivray oversaw the course throughout the race earlier in the day, taking runners across the starting line and helping to ensure their safe arrival on Boylston Street. This is McGillivray’s 51st consecutive completion of the Boston Marathon and the 36th of which he has completed at night after seeing to his race day duties.

“It doesn’t feel so long ago that I was 18 years old, sitting on the curb at mile 21, wondering if I would ever get a chance to finish the Boston Marathon. If I could go back and tell my younger self that he goes on to finish that day and 50 more editions, I can’t imagine his reaction,” said McGillivray. “I’m grateful for the more than a dozen friends and colleagues who joined me on the journey to the finish line today. I had to dream big to get to this moment, and I couldn’t do it without my community and my family that support me every step of the way.”

The weekend featured two other special moments for McGillivray. On Saturday, Team With A Vision inducted McGillivray into their hall of fame during a dinner at the Westin Copley Place. Team With A Vision pairs blind and sighted runners together to complete endurance races across the country. Their efforts support the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired, which delivers professional, peer, and volunteer support to over 1,200 individuals each year, giving them the support they need to live with dignity and independence. All funds raised support MABVI’s statewide vision rehabilitation services, including 34 low-vision support groups, Assistive Technology and Training Centers, and 400 volunteers matched 1:1 with blind individuals.

In addition, McGillivray was a featured speaker during the Boston Marathon Expo, where World Marathon Challenge champion Becca Pizzi interviewed him about his long history with the race. He shared photos, videos and stories with the crowd, and signed copies of his books for attendees at the Dave McGillivray Finish Strong Foundation booth following the presentation.

McGillivray is one of just a handful of runners who have marked half a century or more of completing the world’s most famous marathon. Alongside his rich connection to this race, his running resume includes completing the World Marathon Challenge (seven marathons in seven days on seven continents,) nine Ironman Triathlon World Championships, a 1,250-mile run along the U.S. East Coast in 1980 to again benefit the Jimmy Fund, a 24-hour run (120 miles,) a 24-hour bike (385 miles,) and a 24-hour swim (27 miles.) He triathloned around the six New England states by swimming one mile, biking 80 miles and running 20 miles every day for 32 consecutive days. Over the span of his life, he estimates he’s run more than 150,000 miles.

For more information on Dave McGillivray, visit www.davemcgillivray.com and follow him on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.

ABOUT DAVE MCGILLIVRAY

Running legend Dave McGillivray has increased the self-esteem of millions of people through his work as an entrepreneur, philanthropist, motivational speaker, author, and athlete. Dave is best known for his athletic feats including his 80-day trek across the United States, running the 3,452 miles from Medford, Ore., to Medford, Mass. in the summer of 1978 to benefit the Jimmy Fund. In addition, he’s received great acclaim for directing or consulting on more than 1,400 events throughout the world including the Boston Marathon, the Olympic Marathon trials, and the Olympic Games. For more information on Dave McGillivray, visit www.davemcgillivray.com and follow him on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.

(04/18/2023) Views: 589 ⚡AMP
by Running USA
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Sara Hall set a new American master record in Boston

Sara Hall just set a new American Record in the Marathon for the Masters division.

Hall now 40 years old finished the Boston Marathon in 17th place in 2:25:48.She of course won her division.Old American record was 2:27:47 by Deena Kastor in 2015.

(04/18/2023) Views: 664 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Eliud Kipchoge is human afterall

Eliud Kipchoge came to Boston seeking to add the world’s most storied annual marathon to his unrivaled trophy case. He will leave with a sixth-place result and questions about whether he can achieve two outstanding, unprecedented goals.

“I live for the moments where I get to challenge the limits,” was posted on Kipchoge’s social media four hours after he finished. “It’s never guaranteed, it’s never easy. Today was a tough day for me. I pushed myself as hard as I could but sometimes, we must accept that today wasn’t the day to push the barrier to a greater height.”

Kipchoge was dropped in the 19th mile in his Boston Marathon debut in the middle of the race’s famed hills. He finished 3 minutes, 29 seconds behind fellow Kenyan Evans Chebet, who clocked 2:05:54 and became the first male runner to repeat as Boston champion since 2008.

“I did not observe Kipchoge,” Chebet said of what happened, according to the Boston Athletic Association. “Eliud was not so much of a threat because the bottom line was that we trained well.”

It marked just Kipchoge’s third defeat in 18 career marathons, a decade-long career at 26.2 miles that’s included two world record-breaking runs and two Olympic gold medals.

Kipchoge, 38, hopes next year to become the first person to win three Olympic marathons, but major doubt was thrown on that Monday, along with his goal to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. Kipchoge has won four of the six, just missing Boston and New York City, a November marathon that he has never raced.He skipped his traditional spring marathon plan of racing London to go for the win in Boston, the world’s oldest annual marathon dating to 1897.

Kipchoge has yet to speak to media, but may be asked whether a failed water bottle grab just before he lost contact with a leading pack of five contributed to his first defeat since he placed eighth at the 2020 London Marathon. Boston’s weather on Monday, rainy, was similar to London in 2020.

Kipchoge’s only other 26.2-mile loss was when he was runner-up at his second career marathon in Berlin in 2013.

He is expected to race two more marathons before the Paris Games. Kipchoge will be nearly 40 come Paris, more than one year older than the oldest Olympic champion in any running event, according to Olympedia.org. Kenya has yet to name its three-man Olympic marathon team.

“In sports you win and you lose and there is always tomorrow to set a new challenge,” was posted on Kipchoge’s social media. “Excited for what’s ahead.”

Kenyan Hellen Obiri won Monday’s women’s race in 2:21:38, pulling away from Ethiopian Amane Beriso in the last mile.

Obiri, a two-time world champion and two-time Olympic medalist in the 5000m on the track, made her marathon debut in New York City last November with a sixth-place finish. She was a late add to the Boston field three weeks ago after initially eschewing a spring marathon.

“I didn’t want to come here, because my heart was somewhere else,” said Obiri, who is coached in Colorado by three-time U.S. Olympian Dathan Ritzenhein. “But, my coach said I should try and go to Boston.”

Emma Bates was the top American in fifth in the second-fastest Boston time for an American woman ever, consolidating her status as a favorite to make the three-woman Olympic team at next February’s trials in Orlando. Emily Sisson and Keira D’Amato, who traded the American marathon record last year, didn’t enter Boston.

“I expected myself to be in the top five,” said the 30-year-old Bates, who feels she can challenge Sisson’s American record of 2:18:29, if and when she next races on a flat course.

The next major marathon is London on Sunday, headlined by women’s world record holder Brigid Kosgei of Kenya, Tokyo Olympic champion Peres Jepchirchir of Kenya and Olympic 5000m and 10,000m champion Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands in her 26.2-mile debut.

(04/17/2023) Views: 733 ⚡AMP
by Olympic Talk
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Evans Chebet successfully defended his title at the Boston Marathon and fellow Kenyan Hellen Obiri triumphed in the women’s race at the World Athletics Platinum Label road race on Monday

The big sub-plot of the race, however, was the performance of Eliud Kipchoge, who headed to Boston in the hopes of taking one step closer to completing his set of World Marathon Majors victories but trailed home in sixth place in 2:09:23, the slowest time of his glittering career and more than three minutes behind the winner.

But the day belonged to Chebet and Obiri, both of whom dropped their final opponents in the last few minutes of the race, winning in 2:05:54 and 2:21:38 respectively. Chebet’s mark is the third-fastest winning time ever recorded in the men’s race in Boston and Obiri’s performance is the fourth-fastest women’s winning mark.

Kipchoge looked comfortable in the early stages and was part of a lead pack of 11 men that passed through 10km in 28:52 before reaching the half-way point in 1:02:19.

Chebet and Kipchoge were still together in the lead group through 30km, reached in 1:29:23, but the double Olympic champion and world record-holder started to lose contact with the leaders just a minute or two later, having missed picking up his bottle at a water station.

At 35km, with 1:44:19 on the clock, the lead pack was down to five men – Chebet, 2021 Boston winner Benson Kipruto, Tanzanian record-holder Gabriel Geay, Kenya’s John Korir and Ethiopia’s Andualem Belay. Kipchoge, meanwhile, was more than a minute behind the leaders and no longer in contention for a podium spot.

 

Evans Chebet wins the 2023 Boston Marathon (© Getty Images)

With three miles to go, and Korir and Belay no longer in the running, the race was down to three men: Geay, Chebet and Kipruto. They ran together as a trio for the best part of two miles before Geay’s challenge eventually faded, leaving the Kenyan duo out in front. Chebet then gradually pulled ahead of his compatriot and training partner Kipruto, going on to cross the finish line in 2:05:54.

Geay recovered enough to pass Kipruto in the closing stages, claiming the runner-up spot in 2:06:04, two seconds ahead of Kipruto. 2021 New York winner Albert Korir finished strongly to take fourth place in 2:08:01 and Morocco’s Zouhair Talbi was fifth (2:08:35). Kipchoge followed a further 48 seconds in arrears.

 

“I train with Benson; he’s my friend and like a brother to me,” said Chebet, who became the sixth man to win back-to-back Boston titles. “With one kilometre to go, I said to him, ‘let’s go’.”Obiri wins in final mile thriller

Five months after making her marathon debut with a sixth-place finish in New York, two-time world 5000m champion Hellen Obiri triumphed in her second race over the classic distance.

In an incredibly close race that wasn’t decided until the final few minutes, Obiri disposed of one of the strongest women’s fields ever assembled for the Boston Marathon.

In contrast to the men’s race, the women’s contest started off at a cautiously steady pace and gradually picked up as the race went on. A large lead pack of more than 20 runners passed through 10km in 34:46, but they had been whittled down to 11 contenders by the half-way mark, reached in 1:11:29.

By this point, the lead pack still included Obiri, world marathon champion Gotytom Gebreslase, Ethiopian record-holder Amane Beriso, Amsterdam course record-holder Angela Tanui, 2020 Tokyo champion Lonah Salpeter, Eritrean record-holder Nazret Weldu and 2021 London champion Joyciline Jepkosgei.

Gebreslase and Weldu had fallen out of the pack with five miles to go, and the lead pack was reduced further to just six women at 23 miles: Obiri, Salpeter, Beriso, Jepkosgei, Ethiopia’s Ababel Yeshaneh and USA’s Emma Bates.

Jepkosgei and Bates started to fade in the last few miles, while Yeshaneh tripped and fell, only to rejoin the lead pack soon after. Salpeter was the next to fade, leaving just Obiri, Beriso and Yeshaneh to battle it out for the victory.

 

Hellen Obiri wins the 2023 Boston Marathon (© Getty Images)

With 2:17 on the clock, Obiri and Beriso had broken free from Yeshaneh. About 90 seconds later, Obiri embarked on a long drive for the finish line. With occasional glances over her shoulder, the Olympic silver medallist maintained a healthy gap ahead of Beriso and went on to finish in 2:21:38.

Beriso took second place in 2:21:50 and Salpeter overtook Yeshaneh in the closing stages to claim third place in 2:21:57, three seconds ahead of the Ethiopian. Bates was fifth in 2:22:10, making her the top US finisher in either of the races.

“I’m so happy,” said Obiri. “I was undecided about which marathon to do this year, but eventually I decided to do Boston. My coach (Dathen Ritzenhein) told me, ‘you have trained well, you’re ready to do Boston’. I’m very, very happy I chose to do it.”

Leading results

 

Women1 Hellen Obiri (KEN) 2:21:382 Amane Beriso (ETH) 2:21:503 Lonah Salpeter (ISR) 2:21:574 Ababel Yeshaneh (ETH) 2:22:005 Emma Bates (USA) 2:22:106 Nazret Weldu (ERI) 2:23:257 Angela Tanui (KEN) 2:24:128 Hiwot Gebremaryam (ETH) 2:24:30

Men1 Evans Chebet (KEN) 2:05:542 Gabriel Geay (TAN) 2:06:043 Benson Kipruto (KEN) 2:06:064 Albert Korir (KEN) 2:08:015 Zouhair Talbi (MAR) 2:08:356 Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 2:09:237 Scott Fauble (USA) 2:09:448 Hassan Chahdi (FRA) 2:09:46

(04/17/2023) Views: 776 ⚡AMP
by World Athletics
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Boston Marathon preview: will Kipchoge break the course record?

The 127th Boston Marathon is bound to be historic, for two main reasons: it’s the 10-year anniversary of the 2013 Boston bombing. And the men’s marathon will host the world’s fastest marathoner, Eliud Kipchoge, for the first time. Kipchoge is obviously the favourite to win, as he furthers his quest for all six Abbott World Marathon Majors. But nothing comes easy, and here’s why Boston might be Kipchoge’s toughest test yet.

The course and weather

The Boston Marathon course looks like it should be fast, but it isn’t. You start out in the distant suburb of Hopkinton, 150 m above sea level, and cruise downhill for the first eight miles before heading back uphill to finish at sea level in downtown Boston. The course runs almost entirely from west to east, meaning the wind will either be with or against you, which adds variability to the results. 

Earlier this month, Kipchoge told Nation that he’s ready for any challenges the Boston course throws at him. “The weather can be unpredictable, but I am trying to be an all-weather man,” said the reigning back-to-back Olympic marathon champion. Kipchoge also said he and his training partners designed a hilly long-run route in Kaptagat, Kenya to emulate the Boston hills, involving 40+ kilometres of rolling hills at 2,500 metres above sea level.

Kenya‘s Geoffrey Mutai holds the course record of 2:03:02 from the 2011 Boston Marathon, when there was a 20 km/h tailwind. Unlike at other marathon majors, pacers are not allowed at Boston, meaning Kipchoge will have to set a 2:02 pace from the get-go if he wants the course record.

Kipchoge’s competition

The 2023 Boston Marathon features of five of the last six marathon majors winners (the only one missing is Amos Kipruto, who will attempt to defend his London Marathon crown on April 23).

Usually, the former Boston champion is the favourite heading into race week, but that isn’t the case when you have the world record holder making his first appearance.

Last year, reigning Boston champion Evans Chebet had a season to remember, becoming the first marathoner to win Boston and NYC in the same year since Mutai did it in 2011. Chebet is fast, and he’s a bit of a tactician, which can work in his favour if Kipchoge mistimes his move. Chebet’s best performance is from the 2020 Valencia Marathon, where he took the win in 2:03:00 (the eighth fastest time in history).

Chebet’s training partner and Kenyan compatriot, Benson Kipruto, is one of the best tactical marathoners in the world. He’s a two-time major marathon champion (Chicago 2022 and Boston 2021) and in both wins he has showcased his ridiculous speed, dropping a 13-high 5K split between kilometres 35 and 40. Kipchoge will need to find a strategy to manage the two-headed dragon of Kipruto and Chebet, who are both familiar with the course and know what it takes to win.

Kipchoge, Kipruto and Chebet will be the main contenders to watch, but there are a few other candidates who could either pull off an upset or get dropped by Kipchoge around kilometre 35, starting with Tanzania’s Gabriel Geay. Geay has always been the bridesmaid but never the bride–he was second in Valencia last December, fourth at Boston in 2022 and seventh at the 2022 World Championships. The 2:03-flat runner ranks inside the top 10 for all-time in the marathon but has yet to win a major–will he get his first win in Boston?

Shura Kitata of Ethiopia was the last man to beat Kipchoge in a marathon major, which happened on a wet day at the 2020 London Marathon. Kitata’s results have been up and down since his 2020 win, but he bounced back last fall, placing second at the 2022 NYC Marathon. Like Kipruto, Kitata is much more of a tactical racer than a speedy one. His personal best of 2:04:49 was set as a 21-year-old at the 2018 London Marathon.  

A dark horse who might be a familiar name to many Canadians is the 2022 Ottawa Marathon champion, Adualem Shiferaw of Ethiopia. Shiferaw won Ottawa in a course record 2:06:04 on a warm and windy day in the nation’s capital last year, and has only lost one marathon since 2018 (he was 2nd at the 2022 Riyadh Marathon). This is Shiferaw’s first marathon major, and he has little to lose. If you are looking for a sleeper pick, Shiferaw could certainly catch a few people by surprise. 

Prediction

Kipchoge will win this race, but he won’t do it in course record time. The conditions won’t be perfect, and there’s too much uncertainty and variability around the Boston course for him to go out at a 2:01 or 2:02 pace. If I had to guess, Kipchoge will execute a similar race strategy as he did in the Tokyo Olympic marathon, where he sat with the lead group for 25 km and then took matters into his own hands, winning by a minute and a half.

Although he may not have the Boston experience, he is the fastest athlete in the field. What matters to Kipchoge first and foremost is getting the victory, and he’ll execute whatever race strategy it takes to get the job done. Look for him to sit on former champions Chebet and Kipruto early on, and make his move around the 25- to 27-kilometre mark before the Newton Hills, then ride the roar of the crowd home to Boylston Street.

Canadian Running pick: Eliud Kipchoge (Kenya) – 2:05-mid 

Stay tuned for our women’s marathon preview.

How to watch

The 2023 Boston Marathon will be broadcasted on TSN 5 beginning at 8:30 a.m. E.T. on Monday, April 17. The men’s open race will begin at 9:37 a.m. E.T. and will likely conclude around noon E.T. 

Canadian Running will be your home for the 127th Boston Marathon, featuring live-tweeting for April 15th’s B.A.A 5K and the Boston Marathon. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for news and updates. 

(04/15/2023) Views: 623 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Hundreds of dogs to run at Boston Marathon to honour late pups

On April 16, hundreds of furry friends will take to the 127th Boston Marathon course to honour Spencer and Penny, the official Boston Marathon dogs who died of cancer in February. 

More than 100 golden retrievers and their owners are expected to attend and walk to the finish line in a special one-mile event organized by a regional group called MA Golden Meetups. The doggo parade will be the day before the world’s most prestigious marathon on Patriots Day, April 17.

In 2018, Spencer went viral after he was seen in a video holding “Boston Strong” flags in his mouth, cheering on the marathoners racing past him in the rain. Since 2014, Spencer has watched the marathon near Ashland State Park (around the five-mile mark on the Boston course), and Penny, who was three years younger, was often seen by his side.

This year’s race will be the first marathon Spencer and Penny will not attend since 2013. The two golden retrievers will also be commemorated on a billboard in Ashland, Mass., with the slogan “Forever Boston Strong.”

Boston Strong was a slogan created to empower the community after the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. This year marks 10 years since the catastrophic event.

“We miss you and are proud to call you a friend and forever the ‘Official Dog’ of the Boston Marathon,” the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) said in a tweet. 

The dog walk will start at 10 a.m. outside the Boston Common and end at the Boston Marathon finish line on Boylston St. “In memory of Spencer and Penny, the Boston Marathon Goldens, and so many of our beloved furry members who have battled canine cancer,” the website states.

(04/15/2023) Views: 642 ⚡AMP
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Evans Chebet will be facing the fastest man in the world to defend his Boston Marathon title

Boston Marathon champion Evans Chebet relishing clash with the real ‘G.O.A.T’ .

Evans Chebet will be facing the fastest man in the world over the distance when he steps on the road on Monday to defend his Boston Marathon title.

Chebet cannot wait to clash with marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge whom he will be racing against for the first time in his career.

The Kapsabet-based Chebet says he is highly motived to compete against Kipchoge considered the Greatest of All Time (G.O.A.T) in marathon racing.

“I have never competed against the fastest man over the distance. We are finally meeting in Boston and I believe the race will be faster and that will help me improve on my personal best. My target is to be on the podium. Expect an exciting race on Monday,” said Chebet who trains under 2Running Athletics Club in Kapsabet, Nandi County.

Chebet, will also be competing against his compatriot and training mate Benson Kipruto.

The reigning Boston Marathon champion said that his preparations for the race have gone on well, he is injury free and wants to show what he has got on the road on Monday.

“I love the Boston Marathon course and given that we shall be competing with other Kenyans, it will be a tough affair but a race normally starts after 35km and that is where you can know if you will finish as a winner,” said Chebet.

In last year’s race, Chebet pulled away from a loaded field in the last few kilometres to surge to victory in 2:06:51. Compatriot Lawrence Cherono finished second in 2:07:21 while Benson Kipruto was third in 2:07:27.

Kipruto, Chebet's training partner, won the 2021 Boston Marathon champion. 

He will be coming up against Kipchoge for the second time on Monday after the 2021 London Marathon where he emerged seventh while Kipchoge settled for eighth position.

“In 2021, I competed against Kipchoge though we both finished outside the podium. I believe that we'll have a good race this year. I will be eyeing a podium position despite the stiff competition. It's a rich field but I will do my best and apply what I have been working on in training,” said Kipruto, the 2022 Chicago Marathon champion.

Other Kenyan athletes who will be competing in the race include John Korir who was third in last year’s Chicago Marathon, Nobert Kigen, Mark Korir, who was second in 2022 Berlin Marathon, Michael Githae, and the 2021 New York Marathon champion Albert Korir. 

(04/14/2023) Views: 625 ⚡AMP
by Bernard Rotich
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Running 900 km to the Boston Marathon2

On Tuesday night in Toronto’s Parkdale neighborhood, it was business as usual for community builder Quinton Jacobs. Jacobs and his team of 13 runners departed on their four-day, 904.5-kilometer journey from Toronto to the historic Boston Marathon finish line on Boylston St.

The team left Toronto on April 11, at 8 p.m. and plan to arrive in Boston on Saturday–two days before the start of the 127th Boston Marathon.

Jacobs’s Escape project started out as a ridiculous idea with his friend Anoke Dunston on a 2019 trip to New York. “We saw the first Escape to NYC as a challenge,” he says. But Jacobs ended up tearing his Achilles playing basketball before the journey started, so he did not get to run in New York City. 

After Escape to NYC, Jacobs and Dunston knew that the project had the potential to turn into something extraordinary. In 2021, the two men ran to Chicago for the Chicago Marathon with a team of 12 runners from different backgrounds. “We decided that Chicago was our canvas, and we wanted to create something entirely new,” says Jacobs.

Their past two destination ultras to New York and Chicago have been done in the fall, and Boston is their final major, facing their hardest Escape route to date, encountering the Appalachian Mountains of upstate New York and western Massachusetts.

“Escape is about celebrating the diversity of our running community,” says Dunston. “Our goal is to bring people together, no matter their background.”

The team aspect is special for Jacobs, who met his teammates through volunteering in the running community. “We have a team of people from Toronto, Montreal, New Orleans and Chicago,” says Jacobs. “People are all tapped into our ground for all different reasons–it’s special.”

Jacobs is a familiar face to many in the Toronto running scene, as he has been giving back to the city as a volunteer for seven years. He was named community builder of the year by Canadian Running in 2021.

This year Jacobs, Dunston and Hamilton’s Andre Morgan launched their own not-for-profit charity, Ubuntu, which gives back to underprivileged communities in Toronto. Ubuntu is a Zulu word meaning that we are all connected and that one’s sense of self is shaped by relationships with others. “I love to bring people together, where they can enjoy each other’s company.”

Toronto filmmaker and videographer Jason Dam of Tenfold Productions will accompany Jacobs, Dunston and the 11 other runners, capturing all the emotions and moments from their Boston journey into a documentary. 

“Running isn’t the hard part,” says Dunston. “The hardest part is battling your body on sleep deprivation and trying to be the best version of yourself for the team.”

“There’s a beauty and a struggle to all our Escape challenges,” Dunston says. “But I think the triumph to battle through means everything.”

You can follow their journey from Toronto to Boston via their Instagram page, @escape_to___. The Escape to Boston team is projected to arrive in Boston on the morning of April 15, and is hosting a panel discussion at the Boston Marathon expo on Saturday at 4 p.m. on how ultra running is changing.

(04/14/2023) Views: 567 ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Indefatigable Edna Kiplagat to tackle Boston course again, at 43

It is commonly said that age is nothing but a number.

At 43 years old, two-time world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat will be out to prove that when she lines up among the elite athletes for the 127th Boston Marathon race on April 17 in the USA.

She will be heading to Boston for the sixth time where she is optimistic of good results after training for the last four months.

Nation Sport caught up with her at Kipchoge Keino Stadium in Eldoret, Uasin Gishu County while she was doing her speed session in readiness for the race.

Maiden win

Kiplagat won the title at her first attempt in Boston in 2017. She returned the following year but finished ninth, in 2019 she was second. The 2020 edition was postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

She went back in 2021, finishing second behind Diana Kipyokei, but was later declared the winner after Kipyokei was banned for using a banned substance.

Kiplagat was fourth last year.

Kiplagat who lives and trains in Colorado, USA said she shifted her training to Kenya which has favourable weather conditions.

“I started training in December last year when I learned that I will be racing in Boston. But in January and February, it was so cold in the US, I decided to come to Kenya because the weather is favourable,” said Kiplagat.

She will be competing against Kericho-based Sheila Chepkirui, former New York Marathon champion Joyciline Jepkosgei, 2021 Amsterdam Marathon Angela Tanui and Fancy Chemutai.

Also in the elite field are Maurine Chepkemoi, Mary Ngugi, Viola Cheptoo, Vibian Chepkirui and Hellen Obiri.

(04/13/2023) Views: 745 ⚡AMP
by Bernard Rotich
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Former Red Sox Pitcher Ryan Dempster will Make His Marathon Debut in Boston

This year’s Boston Marathon is set to have plenty of Boston sports royalty on hand—from Big Papi serving as the race’s grand marshal to Bruins legend Zdeno Chara lacing up himself. Now, former Red Sox pitcher Ryan Dempster, who pitched for the Sox on the day of 2013’s tragic Boston Marathon bombing, is set to make it his first marathon. While he only pitched for one season in Boston, his last as a pro, it was a memorable one for Bostonians as he helped lead them to a World Series title.

The two-time MLB All-Star, now 45, says he has always wanted to run a marathon. He was a distance runner in high school and frequently ran during his playing days to increase his endurance, but until now, he hadn't found the right time to debut at 26.2.

Realizing the date's significance and his connection to it, he knew the 2023 Boston Marathon was the perfect opportunity to finally make his marathon dream a reality. This year marks the bombing’s 10th anniversary, and the Boston Marathon has symbolized the city's perseverance and unity.

“It seemed fitting to do it 10 years after I played for the Red Sox,” Dempster told the Boston Globe. “It was perfect.”

On April 15, 2013, Dempster limited the Tampa Bay Rays to one run across seven innings. Just 41 minutes later, two bombs detonated near the race’s finish line. Three people lost their lives, and dozens more were injured.

The Red Sox's surprising success during the season made Fenway Park a symbol of hope for the wounded city, honoring victims and first responders before games. This tradition continued through the Red Sox's World Series victory that October.

Dempster, like Chara, is running to support a charity. He’ll be raising funds for the Lingzi Foundation, which honors the memory of Lingzi Lu, one of the first victims of the bombing. “I wanted to run for charity, and somebody suggested the Lingzi Foundation,” Dempster told the Globe. “I did some research, and it was a great fit.”

Dempster says that the way baseball allowed him to have a small part in the city's recovery changed his perspective on the sport.

“I only played one season in Boston, but it feels like 10 with everything that happened that season,” Dempster said. “I’ll never forget that day.”

(04/12/2023) Views: 541 ⚡AMP
by Laura Ratliff
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Kenyan Celestine Chepchirchir eyes Boston Marathon title

The 127th edition of Boston Marathon which will be run on Monday has attracted 18 Kenyan athletes, among them big names who will contest for honors in the world’s oldest marathon race.

Winners in both categories will go home US$150,000 (Sh19,662,647.40) richer, and the top 10 finishers will also be awarded in the open division.

There will be a new champion in the women’s category since last year’s winner Peres Jepchirchir will not compete. Jepchirchir has opted to compete in the London Marathon.

Cellestine Chepchirchir is among the Kenyan women in contention for the title. For the last three months, she has been preparing for the race in Kapsabet, Nandi County.

She will come up against Kericho-based Sheila Chepkirui, former New York Marathon champion Joyciline Jepkosgei, the 2017 London Marathon champion Edna Kiplagat, 2021 Amsterdam Marathon Angela Tanui and Fancy Chemutai.

Other Kenyans in the women’s filed include Maurine Chepkemoi, Mary Ngugi, Viola Cheptoo, Vibian Chepkirui and Hellen Obiri.

The men’s category will have world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge, defending champion Evans Chebet, the 2021 Boston Marathon champion Benson Kipruto, John Korir, Mark Korir, 2021 New York Marathon champion Albert Korir, Nobert Kigen, and Michael Githae.

In an interview with Nation Sport last week, Chepchirchir who has been training in Kapsabet, Nandi County, and has so far competed in 12 marathon races worldwide said she was delighted to be making her maiden appearance in a World Marathon Majors event this year.

Chepchirchir said that being named among elite athletes for Boston Marathon comes with a big responsibility because there will be a lot of expectations on her.

 “I’m privileged to compete with some of the star athletes I have been watching on TV in major races. When I was named among the competitors, I immediately knew I was going to have to work extra hard, and to run a good race. It’s my first major marathon race and my training has gone well. I believe I will run a good race,” said Chepchirchir.

The soft-spoken athlete, who is coached by her husband Nahaman Serem, has competed in 12 marathon races. She finished fourth last year in Seoul Marathon, which gave her a reason to continue running.

Last year, she had been named among the elite athletes for Chicago Marathon but she delayed in processing her travel documents and missed the race.

“I would have competed in my first major marathon last year at the Chicago Marathon but my travel visa delayed. I was also prepared for the race. Unfortunately it didn’t happen but I thank God because I have another race to run this year. My aim will just to run a good race,” added Chepchirchir, who has a personal best time of 2 hours, 20 minutes and 10 seconds.

Other competitors in the women’s category include world champion Gotytom Gebreslase from Ethiopia, 2016 Boston Marathon champion Atsede Baysa, 2020 Tokyo Marathon champion Lonah Salpeter from Israel, 2018 Boston Marathon champion Desiree Linden from USA, among others.

(04/11/2023) Views: 852 ⚡AMP
by Bernard Rotich
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Now nonbinary runners can compete at Boston Marathon

For nonbinary runners, this year’s Boston Marathon isn’t just a running event. It’s a major milestone in the race for inclusion.

The 2023 race will include a nonbinary division for the first time in the marathon’s storied 127-year history. While other major marathons, including New York City and Chicago, also have nonbinary divisions, Boston remains one of the most prestigious events on the marathon calendar.

It’s considered a bucket-list marathon because the race requires most runners, including those in the new nonbinary division, to earn their way onto the course by meeting strict qualifying time standards.

“Hopefully this has ripples across the country and across the world — in the running world to begin and then hopefully beyond the running world,” said Cal Calamia, a 26-year-old inclusivity activist from San Francisco who will be one of 27 runners competing in the nonbinary division at Boston on April 17.

The London Marathon will also debut a nonbinary division at its race this year on April 23.

Setting nonbinary qualifying times

Calamia, who identifies as nonbinary transmasculine, had qualified to run the 2021 Boston Marathon in the women’s division but then tore their ACL playing soccer. The first thought that went through Calamia’s head was anguish at not being able to run Boston. But the delay offered a silver lining.

“I like to look back on it and just think I’m actually really grateful that things happened the way they did,” Calamia said. “Because I was gonna go in there as a nonbinary person in the female category, and it didn’t feel right.”

Now, Calamia says they don’t have to choose between running Boston and their gender identity. “I don’t have to deal with essentially choosing between two things that aren’t really true and trying to pretend that one of them fits when it doesn’t,” they said.

Calamia has run the Chicago Marathon, California International Marathon and San Francisco Marathon. Their personal best is 2:58:50 from last year’s Chicago Marathon. But to Calamia, Boston is special.

“When I started thinking about running marathons, I was thinking about Boston,” they said.

A big reason for the race’s mythical status is its strict qualifying standards. Qualifying times are now broken down by age groups, and qualifying for Boston — or “BQ” in running vernacular — has become a badge of honor for amateur runners around the world.

One of the challenges of adding a nonbinary division was figuring out the qualifying standards. Race organizers decided that the nonbinary time standards for this year would match those for the women’s division, said Jack Fleming, the chief executive and president of the Boston Athletic Association, which hosts the Boston Marathon.

This year, runners in the women’s and nonbinary divisions ages 18 to 34 needed to run a marathon at 3:30 or faster to qualify. The men in that age range were required to run three hours or faster.

“We landed on having the nonbinary qualifications match the female qualifications, because it was the most inclusive,” said Susie Cleary, the BAA director of athlete services.

The BAA said on its website that the organization does not yet have enough data to establish nonbinary qualifying times and that this first year will be used as an “opportunity to learn and grow together.”

Jake Fedorowski, a 27-year-old from Seattle who wrote a guide for nonbinary inclusion in running, called the decision a “good move.” “You’re doing this to start to collect data so that over time you can start to really tailor what those times need to be,” they said.

Awards but no prize money

Along with Calamia, Fedorowski will run in the nonbinary division. Both will be among the 30,000 runners competing at Boston this year. Of the 27 runners in the nonbinary division, 25 qualified through time standards, Cleary said. Two nonbinary runners applied through the marathon’s charity program, which waives time restrictions in exchange for raising at least $5,000 for a designated charity.

But unlike participants in other divisions, nonbinary runners will not receive prize money. The top three runners in the nonbinary division will be awarded trophies, similar to runners who place top three in their age groups. The winner in the nonbinary division at the NYC Marathon last year took home $5,000, while the Chicago Marathon did not give prize money for the nonbinary division.

The BAA didn’t explain why the nonbinary division won’t include prize money this year. “We will continue to listen to our participants, review our events and continue to strive for the best experience possible for all our athletes,” Fleming, the BAA chief executive, said in a statement.

The first-place finishers in the open division will receive $150,000, winners of the wheelchair division get $25,000, masters division winners get $5,000 and winners of the para divisions, for athletes with disabilities, get $1,500, according to the marathon website.

(04/11/2023) Views: 626 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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The Boston Marathon has never been easy, that’s why Des Linden keeps coming back

The conditions were wretched when Des Linden first toed the starting line in Hopkinton in 2007. An amped-up nor’easter brought rain, a 30-mile-per-hour headwind, and soggy, chilly misery for the runners.

“I was one probably of the few people who felt, that was one of the best things I’ve ever done,” Linden recalled years later. “I’m going to do this forever. I loved it.”

On Patriots Day Linden will lace up for her 10th Boston Marathon. During the 16 years since her first appearance here, which also was her 26-mile debut, Linden has won the laurel wreath (”storybook stuff”), lost by two seconds on a sprint down Boylston Street, finished fourth twice, and 17th in a “total suffer-fest.”

Every trip here is a homecoming, said the California native and Michigan resident who has a dog named Boston. What brings Linden back is the race’s incomparable history, the feeling of family that she gets from the Boston Athletic Association, the exuberant crowds along the course, “the greatest finish line in our sport,” and the unchanging challenge from the lumpy layout and mercurial weather.

“We’re in this era where we want the marathon to be easier than ever before,” said Linden. “We want it faster, we want it flatter, we want wind blockers, we want shoes that bounce you forward, we want better gels. You name it, we’re trying to dumb this thing down. Boston is already not going to manage well with a lot of those things, then you throw in the weather conditions. I’ll take the tough one every time.”

Boston never has been easy. For decades there were no mile markers or water on the course. There was no prize money until 1986 — the reward was a medal and a bowl of canned beef stew. The starter fired the gun and sent you off. If you ended up sitting on the curb, cramped and blistered, the “meat wagon” picked you up.

Linden loves the purity of a race that always has the same course but rarely the same conditions. “A lot of people get surprised by it,” she said. “Well, it’s Boston in the spring.”

Boston is the recurring theme of “Choosing To Run,” Linden’s new memoir written with Bonnie D. Ford. Chapters recounting her 2018 triumph, the first by an American woman here in 33 years, are interspersed with a narrative of her evolution from a track racer to a marathoner.

Linden, who’ll officially become a master when she turns 40 in late July, is in the final stretch of her elite career, which she hopes will include a third Olympic team next year in Paris. Maybe she’ll run a fall marathon to prep for the Orlando trials in February. “Or maybe I just spin the legs and do some fast stuff,” she mused.

At this stage of her career it’s all about being smart and patient. “It’s a challenge letting go of your prime years, but there’s also a reality to it,” Linden said. “It’s recalibrating and readjusting what the goal is. I’m learning.”

One significant concession is her weekly mileage, which Linden has reduced from 120 to between 95 and 105. “I have this mentality that I’m being lazy if I’m not doing 115-120-mile weeks,” she said. “ ‘You’re not being lazy,’ my coach [Walt Drenth] said. ‘It’s just not practical.’ ”

At her age, maintaining speed and power are more important than training volume. “So work on what’s going away,” Linden said, “and rely on what you’ve done in the past as far as the volume goes.”

The lighter workload paid dividends at the recent New York City Half Marathon, where she placed fifth in 1 hour, 12 minutes, 21 seconds, the top American finisher. “It was the first time in a while that I got good momentum from a race,” she said.

Up against a stacked Boston field that includes Gotytom Gebreslase and Lonah Salpeter, the world gold and bronze medalists; two-time Boston victor Edna Kiplagat; returning medalists Ababel Yeshaneh and Mary Ngugi; two-time Olympic track medalist Hellen Obiri; and Amane Beriso, a sub-2:15er, Linden is realistic about her chances.

“Top 10 is a great goal at times and particularly this year — the field’s incredible,” said Linden, who was 13th last year. “Just mixing it up and racing is fun for me.”

At this point in her career Linden has little left to chase. She was seventh in the 2016 Olympics, cracked the top 10 at the 2009 world championships, and has posted top-five efforts in New York, Chicago, and Berlin.

But her crowning achievement came in Boston five years ago when she slogged her way through punishing wind and chilly rain to win a race that she didn’t plan on finishing. “It’s not gonna be my day,” Linden told Shalane Flanagan after 6 miles. “I think I’m going to drop out soon.”

But she pushed on, thinking more about survival than victory. “I was running in fear for most of the race,” Linden said. “Even halfway through Boylston I was thinking, if someone comes up on my shoulder I know I can respond.”

She won by more than four minutes, to her astonishment. Linden’s jacket and headband were added to the BAA memorabilia collection, whose artifacts date from the 19th century. “The same museum I had once viewed as an unattainable sanctum,” she wrote in “Choosing To Run.”

Gloria Ratti, the BAA’s longtime first lady, had given Linden the tour before her 2007 debut. That, she said, “made me fall in love with 26.2.”

“Everyone talks about Boston’s special history,” Linden said. “You can feel it on the course, you can see it on race day. But to have that collection of the very first medals and the shoes that were being worn … ”

(04/10/2023) Views: 819 ⚡AMP
by John Powers
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Sharon Lokedi Withdraws from the Boston Marathon due to an injury

Sharon Lokedi’s highly anticipated return to competition will be postponed for the time being. On Thursday, March 30, the 2022 New York City Marathon champion announced via Instagram that she will not run the Boston Marathon on April 17. She said an injury forced her to withdraw from the race.

“Just when everything was lining up well and getting excited to toe the line once again, I sustained an injury that hindered my training, not giving me enough time to get back,” Lokedi, 29, wrote on social media.

Three weeks ago, Lokedi’s coach, Stephen Haas, told Runner’s World she was training well in Kenya, but she was slightly behind where she was for her New York City Marathon buildup because she took a lengthy break after the race. Runner’s World has reached out to Haas for comment on the injury.

Last fall, the University of Kansas graduate stunned in her first 26.2 at the New York City Marathon. She outran veterans, including reigning world champion Gotytom Gebreslase of Ethiopia and Lonah Chemtai Salpeter, who was born in Kenya and now runs for Israel, to win the World Marathon Major in 2:23:23. Securing the upset put Lokedi on the map as the next rising star on the roads.

The Boston Marathon would’ve been Lokedi’s first race since her debut in November.

Prior to Thursday’s announcement, Lokedi was considered a favorite among a stacked elite field. The remaining podium contenders include Salpeter, who finished second in New York City, and Gebreslase. They’ll be joined by Ethiopian Amane Beriso, who ran 2:14:58, the third-fastest marathon in history, and two-time world champion Hellen Obiri, who was added to the lineup earlier this week.

(04/03/2023) Views: 763 ⚡AMP
by Taylor Dutch
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Red Sox icon David Ortiz named 2023 Boston Marathon Grand Marshal

On Friday, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) announced that MLB Hall of Famer and Boston Red Sox legend David Ortiz will serve as Grand Marshal for the 127th Boston Marathon on Monday, April 17.

The three-time World Series champion will serve as the 2023 Grand Marshal, kicking off the race with a speech in Hopkinton, before the 30,000+ entrants from 122 countries make the 42.2km journey down to Boylston Street. Ortiz will ride in the lead vehicle, and will reach the finish shortly before race champions break the finish tape out front of the Boston Public Library.

This year’s race marks the 10th anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing. In the wake of the 2013 bombing, Ortiz gave a memorable speech to Bostonians at Fenway Park before the Red Sox game. He took on the role of a leader on the Red Sox from 2003 to 2016, embodying the spirit of the city on and off the field.   

Ortiz, 47, won’t be the only former Boston sporting legend taking part in this year’s race; former Boston Bruins captain Zdeno Chara, who led the Bruins to a 2011 Stanley Cup, will be running the marathon for The Hoyt Foundation. This will be Chara’s first marathon.

The 127th Boston Marathon has many storylines, but the most interesting one will be how the greatest marathoner in history, Eliud Kipchoge, fares in his Boston debut. The 38-year-old marathon world record holder is on a quest to win all six Abbott World Marathon Majors; he currently has four wins, missing only Boston and New York. (He is also a two-time Olympic gold medallist.)

(03/31/2023) Views: 497 ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Eliud Kipchoge: Three down, three to go

“I want to not only compete in all six but to do so and win. These are two different targets. What’s more, I have added another challenge of getting course records for the other half of the races,” Kipchoge said in a recent interview with NN Running Team, setting out a new goal for an athlete who has achieved almost every target put in front of him.

Already a two-time Olympic champion, reigning world record holder and the only man to run a marathon in under two hours, it would be easy to forgive Kipchoge for wanting to rest on his considerable laurels after a career in which he has won 15 of the 17 marathons he has run.

But the man who is a living personification of his catchphrase “No human is limited” is on a mission to change the face of history by winning the six most prestigious marathon races on the planet in record time.

He currently owns the course record in three marathons, London (2:02:37) set in 2019, Tokyo (2:02:40) set in 2022 and Berlin, the current world record of 2:01:09 also set in 2022.

That leaves three left on his bucket list, starting with the Boston Marathon, which takes place on April 17 2023.

(03/30/2023) Views: 593 ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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Steve Gilbert now 77 was diagnosis with Parkinson’s in 2004 but it did not stop him to go after a dream to qualify to run the Boston Marathon

My racing career began with a 2010 half marathon, six years after my Parkinson’s diagnosis at age 64 and after three years of training at Rock Steady Boxing I ran 2:45:00 for the half.  I was not at my best that day, but I finished.

The next year I ran my first marathon with my brother Bruce (third photo). Five years later I connected with Matt Ebersole at Personal Best Training.  With his help I had 18 podium finishes. I had gotten faster. 

The year I turned 70 I was still gaining pace and my age-group had thinned dramatically. You must be present to win. It all depends on who shows up. I won my AG at my next 19 races, then at 72 I stumbled through a half marathon.  A month later at a half I was back on the podium.

In November 2019, at age 74,  my half fell apart again. My neurologist said I had 30% nerve function loss in my left leg and he said I should not run more than five miles. At that point I didn’t feel like running farther, but I chafed at the restriction. 2020 was the year of ‘remote’ races but I sneaked in a 10K near the end.

In 2021, I stood on the top step in very thin fields. Many races were still being cancelled, but when my club put on a quarter/half marathon in December I ran the half impromptu and finished first in my age-group.  

The time made me think I could run Boston in 2023! I would need some slack to qualify and I knew Boston offered help to offset neurological impairment. The time adjustment offered to those with Parkinson’s made it possible. What a thrill it would be for someone with a movement disorder to be able to participate in this iconic marathon. 

I’ll take it! I started training again. The April 2022 Carmel Marathon was my target Boston qualifier race. It began with a cold rain, then sleet at start time and snow later. I still was optimistic and was able to finish with a BQ time and an AG course record. All of the records and wins are great for the ego, but are relative. I know there are those who could easily eclipse my time.

Now I am training for Boston, having been interrupted by a serious fall in December and Covid in February. I started my first marathon on injured knees. I am looking forward to good knees April 17th.

If the outcome were certain, there would be no point in the doing. I plan to run strong and finish healthy.  My wife and several family members and friends will be there to support me, along with many other well-wishers from afar. There will be previous Boston and New York winners competing in my age-group.  I won’t be on the podium, but crossing the finish line will be my greatest win.

God did not ask me to run, but he allowed me the body and spirit to do so. He created the miracle that is each of us and the finish line will be my testament to His Glory.

(Steve credits Rock Steady Boxing for awakening the potential to run, his brother Bruce ​​​for the inspiration, and Forté Sports Medicine for keeping his body working. He trains ​​​regularly with Personal Best Training and the Fishers Running Club.  Steve hopes to get under five hours with the help of his brother Bruce.)

(03/30/2023) Views: 813 ⚡AMP
by Steve Gilbert
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I hope Boston is going to be an amazing experience for you. You will feel like a rock star the whole way. I know I did when I ran it in 2013. 3/30 11:25 am


Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

Among the nation’s oldest athletic clubs, the B.A.A. was established in 1887, and, in 1896, more than half of the U.S. Olympic Team at the first modern games was composed of B.A.A. club members. The Olympic Games provided the inspiration for the first Boston Marathon, which culminated the B.A.A. Games on April 19, 1897. John J. McDermott emerged from a...

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