Running News Daily

Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson in Mountain View, California USA and team in Thika Kenya, La Piedad Mexico, Bend Oregon, Chandler Arizona and Monforte da Beira Portugal.  Send your news items to bob@mybestruns.com Advertising opportunities available.   Over one million readers and growing.  Train the Kenyan Way at KATA Running Retreat Kenya.  (Kenyan Athletics Training Academy) in Thika Kenya.  Opening in june 2024 KATA Running retreat Portugal.  Learn more about Bob Anderson, MBR publisher and KATA director/owner, take a look at A Long Run the movie covering Bob's 50 race challenge.  

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Amputee ultrarunner Jacky Hunt-Broersma takes on 5,250 kilometer challenge for cancer research

Bladerunner Jacky Hunt-Broersma celebrated being 21 years cancer-free by setting out on a new challenge: the Arizona-based athlete and coach will be running a half marathon a day (21.1K a day) from Aug. 1 until she reaches 5,250 kilometers. Aug. 1 is both the athlete’s amputee anniversary and marks 21 years of being cancer-free, she shared on social media, and this challenge is to honor cancer survivors, those fighting cancer and those who have lost their lives.

Dubbed the ‘Doing Hard Things’ project, Hunt-Broersma chose the distance to represent the number of people fighting cancer each day.”I had Ewing sarcoma,” the runner shared. “I was one of the lucky ones to survive and I’m so grateful to be alive and be able to move. I think movement is so important to not only keep us healthy but also help us cope mentally.”

Hunt-Broersma is raising funds for cancer research and will be dedicating each day to someone fighting cancer or who has lost their life to the disease, and guesses it will take her about 250 days to complete the distance.

Hunt-Broersma lost her lower left leg to Ewing sarcoma, a rare form of cancer that affects the tissue around bones, in 2002. While she always lived a healthy lifestyle, she didn’t start running until 2016, when she signed up for a 5K race. Taking on challenging adventures is not new for Hunt-Broersma: she ran 104 marathons in 104 days in 2021, raising over $200,000 for amputee runners, and ran 50K a day for two weeks in July 2022.

The name of her latest project comes from a phrase that carried her through her 104 marathon streak. “When I was running the 104 marathons in 104 days I’d often need encouragement and I’d whisper to myself ‘you can do hard things’ to keep me going when it got really hard,” she explains. “At one point during the marathons, I started believing in myself and that whisper changed to a louder mantra: ‘I can do hard things, I can do hard things.’ ”

The athlete invites runners and walkers of all levels to come out and join her on her daily half-marathon, and will be sharing the location and times of her runs on social media. Runners can show their solidarity from afar by joining the Strava group she has created, called “I can do hard things.” Hunt–Broersma wants everyone to feel included,  she shared on Instagram. “I’m hoping it will create an encouraging space where everyone will feel welcome.”

(08/03/2023) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Defending champions Fraser-Pryce and Jackson lead Jamaican team for WCH Budapest 23

Sprinters Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson, the defending champions at 100m and 200m respectively, feature on Jamaica’s team for the World Athletics Championships Budapest 23 on August 19-27.

The duo filled the top two places in the 100m and 200m in Oregon last year, with Jackson taking silver in the 100m and Fraser-Pryce finishing runner-up in the 200m. Fraser-Pryce, who has competed sparingly this season due to a slight injury earlier in the year, will be vying for a historic sixth world 100m title.

World leader Rasheed Broadbell and Olympic champion Hansle Parchment have both been named in the men’s 110m hurdles, while world leader and world U20 record-holder Jaydon Hibbert will contest the triple jump.

Jamaican team for Budapest

WOMEN

100m: Shashalee Forbes, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson

200m: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson, Natalliah Whyte

400m: Candice McLeod, Nickisha Pryce, Charokee Young

800m: Natoya Goule-Toppin, Adelle Tracey1500m: Adelle Tracey

100m hurdles: Ackera Nugent, Megan Tapper, Danielle Williams

400m hurdles: Rushell Clayton, Andrenette Knight, Janieve Russell

High jump: Lamara Distin, Kimberly Williamson

Long jump: Tissana Hickling, Ackelia Smith

Triple jump: Shanieka Ricketts, Ackelia Smith, Kimberly Williams

Shot put: Danniel Thomas-Dodd

Discus: Samantha Hall

Hammer: Nyoka Clunis

4x100m: Shashalee Forbes, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson, Natasha Morrison, Elaine Thompson-Herah, Natalliah Whyte, Briana Williams

4x400m: Candice McLeod, Nickisha Pryce, Janieve Russell, Ronda Whyte, Shiann Salmon, Charokee Young

MEN

100m: Ryiem Ford, Oblique Seville, Rohan Watson

200m: Rasheed Dwyer, Andrew Hudson

400m: Sean Bailey, Zandrion Barnes, Antonio Watson

800m: Navasky Anderson

110m hurdles: Orlando Bennett, Rasheed Broadbell, Hansle Parchment

400m hurdles: Roshawn Clarke, Jaheel Hyde, Assinie Wilson

High jump: Romaine Beckford

Long jump: Tajay Gayle, Carey McLeod, Wayne PinnockTriple jump: Jaydon Hibbert

Shot put: Rajindra Campbell

Discus: Fedrick Dacres, Traves Smikle, Roje Stona

4x100m: Ackeem Blake, Michael Campbell, Ryiem Ford, Oblique Seville, Tyquendo Tracey

4x400m: Sean Bailey, Zandrion Barnes, Demish Gaye, Malik James-King, Jevaughn Powell, Antonio Watson

Mixed 4x400m: D’Andre Anderson, Rusheen McDonald, Joanne Reid, Stacy-Ann Williams.

(08/03/2023) ⚡AMP
by World Athletics
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World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

From August 19-27, 2023, Budapest will host the world's third largest sporting event, the World Athletics Championships. It is the largest sporting event in the history of Hungary, attended by athletes from more than 200 countries, whose news will reach more than one billion people. Athletics is the foundation of all sports. It represents strength, speed, dexterity and endurance, the...

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How sore should you be after a run?

Most of us have experienced tender or stiff muscles after a hard workout, especially after adding new or challenging training. Where muscle soreness is concerned, how much is too much, and when do we need to scale back our training and opt for rest? We checked in with British sports science consultant Jo Clubb. 

Runners are notorious for pushing through suffering in their training. Is soreness that eases off during a run OK?

Yes. DOMS or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (caused by microscopic damage to muscle fibres as a result of training) is a natural part of the training process and a signal to the body that it needs to adapt and get stronger. DOMS generally occurs one to three days after training. Depending on your training program and your body’s response, you may still be sore on your next run, but exercising (particularly with a thorough warmup) may help to alleviate some of this soreness.

Should a person always feel sore after a hard workout?

If you’re never experienced DOMS in your training, perhaps you’re not training hard enough! It is equally important that you’re not just constantly exercising through soreness. We are always seeking the optimal balance between training and recovery. Without recovery, the body will not adapt, performance will plateau or worsen, and the risk of injury and illness increase. While it might not feel like it, rest days are sometimes the best thing you can do for your running.

Where should runners draw the line on soreness?

If soreness is affecting performance or causing extreme discomfort, the body is trying to communicate that it needs more rest. Poor sleep, getting sick often, irritability and bad moods, plateauing progress and lack of motivation can all be signs of overreaching or overtraining.

Many runners use RPE (Rating of Perceived Exertion) to get a subjective measure of your training load. Pair this with your own ratings of sleep, fatigue, mood and muscle soreness to see how your body is responding. Even with elite athletes, sports scientists use subjective measures to gauge how the athlete is responding to the program.

When should a runner be concerned about what they’re feeling?

A feeling of pain (rather than soreness) can be a red flag, and time to consider consulting a medical practitioner. Think of soreness as more of a tender, dull ache that you feel within a whole muscle group, and pain as a sharper, more specific sensation.

Pain is normally the nervous system trying to protect the body from something that is amiss. Pay attention to general soreness not subsiding after three or so days as well as swelling, bruising, wounds or difficulty putting weight on an area.

If you do have an injury, don’t panic–it’s not necessarily the end of training. When elite athletes are undergoing rehabilitation, we embrace it as an opportunity to work on other areas of their physical capacity (while prioritizing and protecting the injury first and foremost).

(08/03/2023) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Jenny Simpson, U.S. mile legend, to race Olympic marathon trials

Jenny Simpson, the most decorated U.S. female miler in history, is moving up in distance and plans to race the 2024 Olympic Marathon Trials on Feb. 3 in Orlando, near where she grew up.

“It’s an easy decision for me to run the marathon Trials in Orlando,” she wrote in an email after making the announcement in an Instagram live video with the Orlando Track Shack. “For a long time I’ve flirted with the idea of going the full distance and with Orlando hosting the Trials, I just can’t miss the chance to go back home.”

Simpson, 36, announced last October that she was shifting focus from the track, where she was a world champion and Olympic bronze medalist in the 1500m, to longer races on the roads.

Typically for distance runners that accomplished, it means an eventual move all the way up to the marathon. Simpson messaged then that her chances of racing over 26.2 miles were “51% :).”

A month later, Orlando was announced as the host of the 2024 Olympic Marathon Trials. Simpson’s family moved to Florida when she was in third grade, and she went to high school in Oviedo, which is 15 miles northeast of Orlando.

“It’ll be fun to literally come back to the beginnings of my running and take in the scenery of the place where I ran my first few races,” Simpson said in Tuesday’s video.

Simpson’s last track race was at the Tokyo Olympic Trials, where she was 10th in the 1500m final. It was her first time not placing in the top three at a U.S. outdoor championships since 2006 and first time not being on an Olympic team since 2004.

In September 2021, Simpson ran the Cherry Blossom 10-mile road race in Washington, D.C., nearly three times as long as the farthest distance she had raced as a pro up to that point.

She then focused much of her time in 2022 helping her Colorado community heal and rebuild from a late December 2021 fire.

She ran 5km and 10-mile road races late in 2022, then on Jan. 15 of this year placed ninth in the Houston half marathon in 70 minutes, 35 seconds to beat the Olympic Trials qualifying time of 72 minutes. That was her most recent race, according to World Athletics.

Simpson attended the 2020 marathon trials to watch husband Jason run. Jason has not qualified for next year’s trials yet but is still hopeful.

One U.S. woman has made Olympic teams in both the 1500m and the marathon in her career -- Francie Larrieu-Smith, who made her first team in the 1500m at age 19 and her last in the marathon at 39, according to Olympedia.org.

Simpson hasn’t said whether she will race a marathon in the fall or if the trials will be her debut at the distance, “but the next six months will be all about getting ready to go the extra 25.2 miles,” she wrote.

The list of marathon trials qualifiers already includes nine of the 15 fastest American women in history. The top three finishers on Feb. 3 will likely make up the Olympic team.

“As I get older, I didn’t want to run out of really good years to give to something that was so intriguing to me for so long,” Simpson said of the marathon. “I’ve accomplished a lot already, and now I can do something that I want to do, not necessarily something that’s going to just objectively, absolutely pay off.”

(08/02/2023) ⚡AMP
by Nick Zaccardi
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2024 US Olympic Trials Marathon

2024 US Olympic Trials Marathon

Most countries around the world use a selection committee to choose their Olympic Team Members, but not the USA. Prior to 1968, a series of races were used to select the USA Olympic Marathon team, but beginning in 1968 the format was changed to a single race on a single day with the top three finishers selected to be part...

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World Athletics planning a new competition format for 2026

The innovative event aims to maintain the sport's momentum by showcasing the "best of the best" in athletics during non-Olympic and world championship years.

During a media call on Monday, World Athletics president Sebastian Coe provided more insights into a planned new format scheduled to be added to the international athletics calendar in 2026. The innovative event aims to maintain the sport’s momentum by showcasing the “best of the best” in athletics during non-Olympic and non-world-championship years.

Coe highlighted the significance of this new format, stating, “Although 2026 is often referred to as a ‘fallow year’ due to the absence of World Championships or Olympics, the new event aims to offer a fresh and different experience for fans and athletes alike.” The ultimate goal for World Athletics is to incorporate this format into the four-year cycle of athletics competitions.

While the exact format is still being fine-tuned and potential hosts considered, the primary focus is to deliver two or three nights of high-quality athletics, featuring the world’s best athletes. The intention is to have smaller fields and no heats or cross-heats, creating an action-packed spectacle specifically designed for television viewers. “We haven’t entirely agreed on the format, and we are still working with potential hosts here, so there’s more to come,” Coe added.

It is speculated that the new format may draw parallels to the existing Diamond League Final, which invites top athletes from each Diamond League meet to compete in a two-day championship event.

Coe has served as the World Athletics President since 2015 and is set to stand unopposed for a third term at the upcoming World Athletics Congress in Budapest on Aug. 17, ahead of the 2023 World Athletics Championships. Regarding potential investment from countries like Saudi Arabia to enhance the sport’s growth, Coe emphasized the organization is taking a cautious approach, stating, “My default position is that investment from any country or sector looking to enter our sport would be looked at very carefully.” He also pointed out that the executive board has previously declined investments from certain sectors and countries, indicating that any potential investment would undergo thorough evaluation before being accepted.

 

As athletics enthusiasts eagerly await further details on this new format, the prospect of witnessing a condensed showcase of top-tier athletes and exhilarating performances in 2026 promises to be a game-changer for the sport.

(08/02/2023) ⚡AMP
by World Athletics
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Ukrainian team prepares for World Athletics Championships

The Ukrainian athletics team will gather in Slovakia this week for a final training camp before travelling to Hungary for the World Athletics Championships Budapest 23, starting in less than three weeks (August 19).

World Athletics’ Ukraine Fund and the International Olympic Committee’s Solidarity Fund have combined to provide training camp accommodation for 40 athletes and officials in Banska Bystrica, Slovakia, which will allow Ukraine’s top athletes to complete their final preparations for their most important competition of the year.

World Athletics has provided additional accommodation for three athletes and their families for an extended period in Bankska Bystrica, from 1 June to 30 September.

World Athletics President Sebastian Coe said: “We understand how important and inspirational Ukraine’s athletes are to their country at this terrible time and we want to give them every opportunity to compete and excel, despite the great hardship being visited on them and their communities by this horrific war. They have lost so much and the least we can do is help them to keep their athletics dreams alive. I am full of admiration for their fortitude and resilience and I am looking forward to welcoming the Ukrainian team to the National Athletics Centre in Budapest in the coming weeks.”

The general secretary of the Ukrainian Athletic Association Iolanta Khropach offered her “heartfelt thanks” for the “important financial assistance provided during this terrible war in our country”.

“Your unwavering belief in us has made a profound impact on the life of our team and the opportunities to prepare for world-class competitions,” she said. “Thanks to your support, we have been able to provide the best athletes of the Ukrainian team with the necessary conditions on the final stage of the preparation to the World Athletic Championships in Budapest to achieve their sports goals. We are happy to see your willingness to lend a helping hand in difficult times for us during the war.”

World Athletics and the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee funded a similar programme to help the Ukrainian team prepare for the World Athletics Championships Oregon22 last year, where two athletes emerged as medallists. World indoor champion Yaroslava Mahuchikh won the silver medal in the women’s high jump and Andriy Protsenko won bronze in the men’s high jump.

The IOC contributed an additional US$20,000 to support the Ukrainian team at the World Athletics U20 Championships in Cali last year.

Through its Ukraine Fund, World Athletics distributed more than US$220,000 last year to support Ukrainian athletes preparing for the World Championships and the World Athletics U20 Championships in response to the crisis caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and is distributing a further US$190,000 this year to support Ukrainian athletes preparing for Budapest.

This fund was launched by World Athletics, the Member Meetings of Diamond League Association and the International Athletics Foundation in April 2022 with the purpose of assisting professional athletes, immediate family members and their support personnel affected by Russia’s invasion of their home country.

This is in addition to the Solidarity Fund of US$7.5 million established by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in February 2022 to support Ukrainian athletes and the Ukrainian Olympic community.

(08/02/2023) ⚡AMP
by World Athletics
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World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

From August 19-27, 2023, Budapest will host the world's third largest sporting event, the World Athletics Championships. It is the largest sporting event in the history of Hungary, attended by athletes from more than 200 countries, whose news will reach more than one billion people. Athletics is the foundation of all sports. It represents strength, speed, dexterity and endurance, the...

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Struggling for a new PB? Your genetics could be to blame

You’re doing everything right–nailing all your workouts, fueling properly and not going too hard on your easy days–but the time on the finish clock just won’t budge. What gives? According to a new study, it might be because of your genetics. Recent research out of the University of Essex in the U.K. discovered that less than 31 per cent of people have the genetic makeup that allows them to maximize their training and see the best results.

The study

The eight-week study involved 45 participants (25 men and 20 women) between 20 and 40 years old. The participants completed the Cooper 12-minute Run Test at the beginning of the study, in the middle and again at the end. This test requires participants to run as far as they can in 12 minutes.

Throughout the eight weeks, each participant completed the same training protocol–three weekly runs, with the duration increased from 20 to 30 minutes over the course of the eight-week study.

After performing a genotype analysis and statistical analysis on participants, researchers discovered that each of the top performers had a combination of key gene variants called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were linked to running performance. Participants who had these SNPs improved by an average of 11.5 per cent over the eight-week period, while those who did not saw little to no improvement, even after following the same training program.

What does this mean for runners?

There are a few key takeaways from this study, the first and perhaps most obvious being that yes, there is a genetic component to success in running. If you are not one of the lucky few who have these SNPs, though, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll never snag a new PB.

While this study does highlight the need for favourable genetics if you want to be a prolific runner, there are a few caveats. The first is that eight weeks is a very short training block. While it’s true that someone with natural running talent will likely see more significant improvements in a short time compared to the rest of us, that doesn’t mean that someone without those genetics won’t see improvement over a longer period. It may take several months of consistent, dedicated training for you to see the same results, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

Secondly, the training program that each participant followed during the study only involved steady-state running, which may not be the optimal way to train for everyone. Some runners respond more to other forms of training, like speedwork or hill repeats, so if you’re feeling stuck, it may be time to switch things up.

Finally, it’s important to remember that while getting a shiny new PB is fun, there are so many other reasons to get out and run. Run because it makes you feel good, run because it improves your health, run because it makes you a better spouse, parent, friend or co-worker–or all of the above. The enjoyment you get from running will last far longer than the afterglow of a new personal best, anyway.

(08/02/2023) ⚡AMP
by Brittany Hambleton
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2024 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials to start at 12 noon

USA Track and Field (USATF) caused a stir on social media on Tuesday after announcing in an email addressed to athletes that the 2024 Olympic Marathon Trials would begin at 12 noon, due to broadcasting rights. The marathon trials are scheduled to take place in Orlando, Fla., on Feb. 3, 2024.

The late start time has already caused worry for many coaches and athletes due to the potential for high temperatures. In February, the average temperatures in Orlando range from a low of 13 C to a high of 23 C, but in recent years, it has not been uncommon for temperatures to soar to 30 C–which would be detrimental to performance and potentially unsafe for elite marathoners.

According to Runners World, the email sent to athletes mentions that the Local Organizing Committee (LOC) in Orlando has extensive experience in planning and executing high-level events and has contingencies in place for any potential challenges, including weather-related ones.

The decision to set the start time at noon is believed to be influenced by executives at NBC, the network broadcasting the event. The email highlights that the race will be televised live on NBC for three hours, providing coverage of the men’s and women’s runners and races.

The Paris Olympic marathon, which is also expected to be warm, is scheduled for Aug. 10–the middle of summer in the French capital. But both the men’s and women’s races are set to begin at 8 a.m. local time. This disparity in start times has added to the concerns raised by the late start for the U.S. Trials in Orlando.

The U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials serves as the selection race for the men’s and women’s Olympic teams that will compete at the Summer Games in Paris. The top three finishers who also meet World Athletics’ qualifying standards will go on to represent Team USA at the Olympics.

Some athletes and coaches have expressed concern, while others seem to be looking forward to it. 2018 Boston Marathon champion Des Linden tweeted: “Warmer temps should slightly minimize the pace of super shoes and reward smarter racing. Count me in!”

U.S. ultrarunner Camille Herron said “We are seven months out from the Olympic Marathon Trials. No excuses to not be prepared for a potentially hot day in Florida.”

Renowned U.S. marathon coach Kevin Hanson, who currently has 13 athletes (eight women and five men) qualified for the U.S. Trials, stressed his disappointment that athletes’ health is not taken into consideration. “There is no amount of TV coverage that is worth the health of our athletes,” Hanson tweeted.

This isn’t the first time USATF has faced criticism for its handling of extreme heat during events. At the 2021 Olympic Track and Field Trials in Eugene, Ore., where temperatures were forecasted to reach highs of 40 C, several events were rescheduled for safety. However, the heptathlon was not, and athlete Taliyah Brooks collapsed on the track due to the heat and later filed a lawsuit against USATF.

In the 2016 Olympic Marathon Trials in Los Angeles, which began at 9 a.m., some athletes struggled on an unusually warm day, with temperatures reaching the mid-70s Fahrenheit. Shalane Flanagan, who placed third in 2:29:19, collapsed at the finish line, and the organizing committee and USATF later faced criticism for not providing adequate water on the course for the athletes.

(08/01/2023) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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2024 US Olympic Trials Marathon

2024 US Olympic Trials Marathon

Most countries around the world use a selection committee to choose their Olympic Team Members, but not the USA. Prior to 1968, a series of races were used to select the USA Olympic Marathon team, but beginning in 1968 the format was changed to a single race on a single day with the top three finishers selected to be part...

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Faith Kipyegon now plans to attack the 40-year-old 800m world record

Her main focus at the moment is to successfully defend her world title when she heads to Budapest later this month.

Triple world record Faith Kipyegon might be targeting the 40-year-old 800m world record if a chance presents itself. 

Kipyegon has a personal best time of 1:57.68, which she ran to win the Diamond League Meeting in Doha, Qatar in 2020. The last time she ran the two-lap race was last year during the Trials for the Commonwealth Games and World Championships where she finished.

After three world records, will Kipyegon consider lowering Czechia’s Jarmila Kratochvílova world record time of 1:53.48?

“I don’t know…800m is not easy…but anything is possible. For now, I leave that one for Mary Moraa, she is capable…or Athing Mu and Keely Hodgkinson.

They are all capable of breaking that barrier in the 800m. But if a chance comes whereby I am able to try, I’ll appreciate it,” Kipyegon told Olympics.com.

Her main focus at the moment is to successfully defend her world title when she heads to Budapest later this month.

She admitted to pressure ahead of the event since she will be doubling in the 1500m and 5000m. Her performance at the World Championships will determine greatly whether she will also be doubling at the Paris Olympics.

“I can’t go there like just an athlete, now I have three world records, they expect a lot from me. But going to Budapest, I have to just be myself and run my races and see what will happen at the finish line.

Having fun, enjoying sports and even life is amazing… it has been the drive of our success. It helps mentally (by distracting) you from thinking of races every day and upcoming races and what you want to achieve or what will be the outcome,” she said.

(08/01/2023) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

From August 19-27, 2023, Budapest will host the world's third largest sporting event, the World Athletics Championships. It is the largest sporting event in the history of Hungary, attended by athletes from more than 200 countries, whose news will reach more than one billion people. Athletics is the foundation of all sports. It represents strength, speed, dexterity and endurance, the...

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Kenya’s Hellen Obiri highlights field for Beach to Beacon 10K

Kenya’s Hellen Obiri highlights field for Beach to Beacon 10K on Saturday

Obiri, the 2023 Boston Marathon winner and the only woman to win world championships outdoors, indoors and in cross country, will compete at Beach to Beacon for the first time.

Hellen Obiri of Kenya won the women’s division of the Boston Marathon in April. On Saturday, she’ll compete for the first time in the TD Beach to Beacon 10K in Cape Elizabeth. Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Kenya’s Hellen Obiri, the 2023 Boston Marathon champion, highlights a group of elite runners who will compete Saturday in the TD Beach to Beacon 10K road race in Cape Elizabeth, race officials announced Monday.

Obiri – a two-time Olympic silver medalist and the only woman to win world championships outdoors, indoors and in cross country – will compete at Beach to Beacon for the first time. She’ll be joined by fellow Kenyan and two-time Boston Marathon champion Edna Kiplagat.

The women’s division also will feature Keira D’Amato of Virginia, who set an American marathon record (2 hours, 19 minutes and 12 seconds) last year, and Sanford native Rachel Schneider Smith, who competed for the United States in the 5,000 meters at the Tokyo Olympics in 2021 and placed fifth at last year’s Beach to Beacon.

A trio of Ethiopians – Addisu Yihune, Amedework Walelegn and Muktar Edris, a two-time world champion – are expected to contend for the men’s title. Top Americans in the field include Utah’s Conner Mantz, a two-time NCAA cross country champion, and Biya Simbassa, who placed third at the 2022 Beach to Beacon.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Beach to Beacon, founded by Cape Elizabeth native and 1984 Olympic women’s marathon champion Joan Benoit Samuelson.

(08/01/2023) ⚡AMP
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TD Beach to Beacon 10K

TD Beach to Beacon 10K

Joan Benoit Samuelson, a native of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, won the first-ever women's Marathon at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles and is founder and chair of the TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K. "A long time dream of mine has been realized" says Samuelson. "I've always wanted to create a race that brings runners to some of my most...

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Brimin Misoi determined to defend Nairobi Marathon title

Nairobi City Marathon 42km champion Brimin Misoi will be back on the streets of the Kenyan capital to attempt to defend the title he won in 2022.

The second edition of Africa's richest marathon in terms of winners' prize money will be held on Sunday and will be majorly run on the Expressway.

Misoi, the winner of the 2022 Frankfurt Marathon is full of confidence and believes he has what it takes to defend his title. He said he is currently enjoying top shape and has undergone intensive training.

"I feel great and I believe in my training. I trust my abilities and I believe no one will beat me to the title. Nairobi's altitude is a bit lower compared to Kapkitony, Elgeyo Marakwet County where I train thus making it easier for me to win," he said.

The double Nairobi Standard Chartered Marathon winner clocked two hours and 8:03 minutes to win the race in 2022 after breaking off from the leading pack at the 34km mark. 

The 35-year-old had a poor run in Japan at the Tokyo Marathon in March, where he finished 13th in 2:07:36. 

"My target is to defend my title and lower the time I set last year. I target to run sub-2:06:11, which is my PB set in Germany last year,"  Misoi added.

This year's edition has attracted more than 13,000 athletes with the organisers targeting 15,000.

On his quest for title defence, Misoi will be up against a group of elite athletes who have registered for the race.

Among the names to watch out for during the race include Edwin Kemboi with a personal best of 2:06:52 and who finished fourth in this year’s Seoul Marathon in March.

Joshua Kipsang (2:08:09), Simon Kipkosgei (2:07:07), and Robert Kipkemboi (2:07:09) are among the fastest athletes who have also registered for the 42km race.

An Ethiopian quartet led by Haile Mekonnen with a PB of 2:14:13, Maseret Yitbarek (2:11:34), Desta Tafa (2:11:13) and Haile Assefa will also be in the chase for the Sh3.5million winner's purse. 

In the women’s 42km race, Lydia Simiyu (2:25:44), Sheila Chepkoech (2:27:04) and Sharon Cheimo (2:33:03) are among the fastest Kenyans who will battle it out in the women’s 42km race.

Defending champion Agnes Barsosio who clocked 2:24:45 in last year's event pulled out of Sunday's race after picking a hamstring injury in training.

(08/01/2023) ⚡AMP
by Samuel Nganga
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NAIROBI MARATHON

NAIROBI MARATHON

Nairobi Marathon is an annual road running competition over the marathon distance held in October in Nairobi, Kenya. First held in 2003, the competition expanded and now includes a half marathon race along with the main race. It was part of "The Greatest Race on Earth", fully sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank....

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18-year-old sprinter Issam Asinga breaks world junior 100m record

In a remarkable debut on the international stage, 18-year-old Issam Asinga of Suriname stunned the athletics world on Friday, shattering the U20 100m world record at the South American Championships in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Asinga clocked an impressive 9.89 seconds with a tailwind of (-0.8m/s) to become the first South American sprinter to break the 10-second barrier in the 100m.

Asinga’s blazing run surpassed the previous record of 9.91 seconds set by Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo at last year’s World U20 Championships in Cali, Colombia, and also broke the South American area record, bettering the 10.00 mark set by Brazil’s Robson da Silva in 1988.

To make his record more impressive, his time was run at altitude, as Sao Paulo sits nearly 800m above sea level. Asinga’s new record also sparred other fast times in the field, with Brazil’s Erik Cardoso breaking the Brazilian national record for silver in 9.97. 

The 18-year-old sprint phenom has made headlines in the 2023 season, running for Montverde Academy near Orlando, Fla. Earlier this year, he beat world champion Noah Lyles in a 100m race to break the U.S. high school record, and a week later, broke Lyles’s 200m high school record in 19.97 seconds. 

Asinga’s sights are now on the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest this August, where he will run the sprint double. After worlds, Asinga will head to Texas A&M University in the NCAA on a full track and field scholarship. His exceptional talent runs in the family. His father, Tommy Asinga, holds multiple national records for Suriname and represented the country at three Olympic Games (1988, 1992 and 1996).

(07/31/2023) ⚡AMP
by Marley Dickinson
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Sir Mo Farah confirms final race in London before Olympic hero's retirement

Four-time Olympic gold medalist Sir Mo Farah has announced the Big Half will be his last race in London before retiring.

Farah, who won back-to-back Olympic golds in the 5,000m and 10,000m, revealed ahead of the London Marathon in April that 2023 would be his final year as a competitive athlete. The 40-year-old cited injuries as the reason behind his decision, admitting: "My body is not allowing me."

And it has now been confirmed his final competitive race in London, the city where he won his first two Olympic golds in 2012, will be the Big Half on September 3. It is an event he has won three times, most recently in 2022.

"I'm excited to run my last ever London race at The Big Half," Farah said. "It will be bittersweet, knowing it will be the last time I race competitively in my hometown but it's always such a great day and I know the London crowds will be cheering me on, as they always do. I look forward to being back in London and hope to bring home the win one final time."

Spencer Barden, Head of Elite Athletes at London Marathon Events which organises the Big Half, added: "It's fantastic to have Sir Mo leading the field at this year's The Big Half. Mo has had a phenomenal career and everyone at London Marathon Events wishes him all the best in his retirement.

"Before that though, we hope he signs off his racing career in London with another record-breaking win at The Big Half." However, the Great North Run on September 10 will be Farah's final race altogether.

"I have so many incredible memories of racing at the Great North Run, my first ever race there in 2013 was billed as one of the greatest men’s half marathons in history," he said. "It was a special experience to line up against Ethiopia's Kenenisa Bekele and the iconic Haile Gebrselassie.

"Kenenisa took the top spot that day, but there was so much support for me all along the course. Even at the finish line in the pouring rain, all I can remember was people shouting my name, it made me even more determined to come back and do them proud.

"From 2014 onwards I won the event in front of that incredible crowd six times. There were some really tough races, but the phenomenal support always saw me through.

"It's fitting the AJ Bell Great North Run will be my last ever race as an elite athlete. It will definitely be emotional, but I’m so happy to have the opportunity to celebrate the end of my professional career on that famous finish line."

(07/31/2023) ⚡AMP
by Matthew Cooper
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The Vitality Big Half

The Vitality Big Half

Created by London Marathon Events Ltd, in partnership with Sported,The Vitality Big Half is a community running festival, taking place in London in March. This one-day event offers a host of running distances, from a challenging half marathon to a free one-mile course, as well as a family-friendly festival of food, music and activities. What’s happening? Take part with friends...

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Daisy Kimeli reigns supreme at the Bogota Half Marathon

Kenya’s Daisy Kimeli and Morocco’s Omar Ait Chitachen have reigned supreme in the women’s and men’s races respectively at the Bogota Half Marathon.

Kimeli, 28, was in the leading pack from gun to the 19th km mark where she unleashed a finishing kick to cut the tape in 1:15:13 ahead of Ethiopia’s Anchialem Haymanot who clocked 1:15:36. Colombia’s Angie Orjuela shone on home soil and sealed the podium in 1:15:43.

Defending champion Angela Tanui, who had entered the race with the hope of successfully reclaiming the title but unfortunately missed out on a podium finish. She was leading for the better part of the race but faded as the race intensified.

In the men’s race, Chitachen was in a class of his own as he also controlled the better part of the race before sprinting to the finish line. He crossed the finish line first in 1:03:51.

The Kenyan duo of Ezra Tanui and Edwin Soi finished second and third in respective times of 1:04:50 and 1:04:56.

Soi, the defending champion, had also made a return to the streets of Colombia with the hopes of winning back-to-back titles but unfortunately, the field was too strong for him.

He was also looking comfortable in the leading pack but Chitachen reacted before him and he was forced to settle for third place.

(07/31/2023) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Bogota Half Marathon

Bogota Half Marathon

The Bogotá International Half Marathon, or mmB as it is traditionally known, is an annual road running competition over a half marathon distance 21.0975 kilometres (13.1094 mi) taking place in Bogotá, Colombia in late July or early August. Established in 2000, it holds IAAF Gold Label Road Race status, making it the first and thus far only South American race...

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Pro-runner Allie Ostrander’s Five tips for avoiding injuries

Former American steeplechaser turned trail-elite Allie Ostrander shared her tips for runners to avoid injuries on social media recently, telling fans to consider it her “formal petition against running-related injuries.”

Ostrander announced her shift from track to trail in Feb. 2023 (along with her partnership with ultrarunning GOAT Kilian Jornet‘s brand NNormal) and is also a mental health and eating disorder awareness advocate.

Originally from Kenai, Alaska, Ostrander had a very successful NCAA career with Boise State University in Idaho, winning three straight NCAA titles in the 3,000m steeplechase. Her tips on avoiding injuries are excellent ones for all runners, whether they run on track, trail or roads.

Here are Ostrander’s suggestions, along with some ideas to get you started.

Run more uphill miles

“Uphill running is lower impact and higher output, so you work harder,” shared Ostrander, “but it puts less stress on your bones.” She suggests running on the treadmill at a 3–5 percent grade, running up a long hill and getting a ride down, or doing hill repeats and walking downhill between reps.

Replace easy miles with cross training

“You don’t have to replace every easy run with a bike sesh because, let’s be honest, running is way more fun, but cross-training can be a great tool to get in some aerobic training without the impact,” Ostrander says. She suggests replacing 1–2 runs a week with a cross-training session and explains that she uses the formula of 10min of XT=1 mile running.

Try: a standing bike workout.

Don’t be afraid to strength train, lift heavy, and build muscle

Building muscle will make you a stronger runner, and you’ll be better equipped to power through hard training. “It can also correct imbalances and improve running economy,” says Ostrander.

Try: these at-home strength workouts with Canadian ultrarunner Jazmine Lowther.

Fuel

“Being in an energy deficit increases injury risk and decreases adaptation to training,” explains Ostrander. She recommends focusing on consistently giving your body the energy it needs.

Rest days are important

“Rest allows your body to absorb all the training,” Ostrander says. “Don’t wait until you feel overly tired or have some sort of pain to give yourself a day off.” It can be challenging to really allow ourselves to take the time off we need, and Ostrander suggests scheduling rest days into your training plan to keep it as much a priority as hard training.

Try: recovery day yoga to relax and unwind.

(07/31/2023) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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A Higher VO2 Max May Offer Protections Against Cancer, Study Suggests

More evidence of the connection between cancer risk and exercise levels.

A new study found a link between higher cardiorespiratory fitness and lower risk of certain cancers. 

The researchers also found an association between higher fitness level and lower risk of dying from cancer. 

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), marked by your VO2 max, refers to the capacity for your circulatory and respiratory systems to supply oxygen to the muscles during sustained exercise, and the American Heart Association notes that it’s an important health marker for both physical and mental health.

As new research in JAMA Network Open suggests, it’s also a factor in reducing risk of colon and lung cancer in men. 

Looking at data from a large cohort study in Sweden, researchers analyzed health and physical activity information on almost 18,000 men between the ages of 18 to 75, collected over nearly 10 years. CRF was assessed using a cycle ergometer test, which measures heart rate and oxygen consumption. 

They found that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with lower risk of developing colon and lung cancer. For those who did develop those cancers, higher fitness was associated with lower risk of death from those cancers within the study’s timeframe.

One possibly counterintuitive finding from the study is that higher CRF was associated with higher prostate cancer incidence. However, even in that result, researchers noted that those with high fitness levels showed a 5 percent lower death rate from that cancer.

Given the wide range in ages, researchers were able to determine that the cancer hazard risk was lowest for younger, non-smoking men at a normal weight and with the highest CRF. 

Overall, researchers concluded that having very high CRF levels for any age could prevent up to 8 percent of all colon cancer cases, 4 percent of all deaths from lung cancer, and between 4 to 19 percent of deaths from prostate cancer. They added that it’s likely higher-intensity physical activity could have even more protective effects. 

Although the recent study was done only on men, there is ample other research showing similar benefits for women in terms of both cancer prevention and longer survival rates for those who do develop cancer. 

For example, a recent study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine about cancer recurrence in men and women with stage III colon cancer found that for physically inactive patients, disease recurrence peaked within two years of treatment, but that wasn’t true with physically active patients, according to that study’s lead author, Justin Brown, Ph.D., director of the Cancer Metabolism Program at Pennington Biomedical Research Center.

Brown told Runner’s World that even for people who had not been very physically active before a cancer diagnosis, making the effort to get consistent exercise can improve health outcomes overall. That means you don’t just potentially live longer through reduced cancer risk or lower recurrence risk, you live better as well.

“Whether someone has cancer or they’re considering what could lower their risk, there’s something about this disease that causes people to step back and evaluate decisions like how they’re treating their health,” Brown said. “Health is comprised of many components, of course, but physical activity is a key starting point, and a crucial factor when it comes to lowering your risk level with cancer.”

(07/30/2023) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World
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Here’s What Strava Data Says About Your New Year’s Resolution

Time for a six-month check-in! Here’s what the data says about how athletes are sticking to their goals in 2023.

Less than nine percent of Americans are able to stick to their New Year’s resolutions for a full year, according to one study. In 2023, the most common resolution for Americans was to exercise more. But, when it comes to setting SMART goals, we runners are smarter, right?

Many runners set ambitious goals for their yearly mileage. According to Strava, 53 percent of runners who set yearly mileage goals for 2023 are on track to achieve those goals– with plenty of year to spare. Staying on track towards a yearly mileage goal is a balancing act that requires athletes to manage their training load over the course of a year. In 2022, 22.8 percent of athletes finished less than 20 percent shy of their goal– and 12.5 percent completed 90 percent of their yearly goal volume –so close, and yet, so far!

The most popular year-end goal for Strava users was 1,000 kilometers, followed by 1,000 miles (so much to love about an affinity for big, round numbers that transcends the Imperial/Metric system binary!). There was also a spike in interest in 2023k and 2023M goals, because…2023. To meet that goal, runners would need to log just under three miles or three kilometers a day, or 18 miles a week. Doable? Definitely.

Let’s take a deep dive into the data to examine what strategies help, and what strategies hinder runners en route to achieving their yearly mileage.

Runners tend to hit more mileage in the warmer months (surprising no one who, resigned to logging winter miles on the treadmill, ran out of Great British Bake Off reruns). According to Strava’s data, the athletes who met their yearly mileage goals tended to log more runs in August, September, and October. These months, in that tender spot between the heat of the summer and the chill of winter, gave athletes an opportunity to bank some miles before daylight savings and December.

Runners who met their goals tended to run up to 10 percent more than was needed for their goal in these months (also coinciding with the pinnacle of summer trail race season and preparation for fall marathons). September tended to be the goal-meeter’s peak month, with average monthly volume 33 percent higher than December 2022. For the best shot at meeting your year-end goal, the time to recommit to consistency is now.

Strava’s data shows that waiting for a last-minute push isn’t a productive method for runners looking to meet their year-end goals. Athletes tended to trend under the consistency needed for their goals in February, November and December. Colder weather and shorter days provide enough friction to prevent many athletes from reaching the goals they were excited about in January. Even among folks who met their year-end goals, November and December, with all their holiday travel and schedule interruptions, were the lowest-volume months of the year, with December being the lowest month of all.

The best advice for staying consistent enough to meet your goals is to not let one missed day become three, then become a week, then become a month off. It’s okay to have a down week, or even a down month as long as you’re able to maintain a base of consistency.

Among the runners who met their yearly goals in 2022, 52 percent ran less in June than was required for their goal. Almost half of runners who ultimately met their yearly goal went into June behind pace and used August, September, and October as an opportunity to make up for some lost volume. 20 percent of runners who were 20 percent behind their goals going into July of 2022 ended up making it up by the end of the year. So, right now is the perfect time to take stock of where you’re at, and recommit to those year-end goals.

Analyzing thousands of Strava uploads, there were clear patterns among runners who were able to meet their year-end goals vs. those who fell short. Here’s what we learned from the data:

Consistency is key. Big, year-long goals aren’t achieved through one-off heroic efforts, but by doing the best you can to get out as often as is healthy and productive for your training. Athletes who met their goals had about 15 percent more active days than folks who didn’t. So, if you’re struggling to meet your goal, consider adding an additional, lower-volume day to your run week.

(07/30/2023) ⚡AMP
by Outside Online
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Why You Should Stop in the Middle of Your Run

The case for taking more than just a momentary water break

A few years ago, I was out on a run with a friend in New York. It was the first perfect day of the year—60 degrees, partly cloudy. The city seemed new again. As we jogged through the West Village, she suddenly came to a stop in front of a store window. “Let’s go in!” she said. I was baffled. But we’re in the middle of the run, I thought. How could we possibly interrupt this?

We spent a minute browsing the store and, guess what, the world didn’t end. I still got my run in. That day, my friend taught me a lesson that I try to remember whenever I’m taking my sport a little too seriously: One of the great joys of running is that you can go anywhere. Why wouldn’t you stop to enjoy all the stores, parks, cafes, and farmer’s markets along the way?

As runners, we care about the sport. We track our mileage, time, and progress—and fret when a goal outstrides us. And, yes, there’s a time and place for this structured take. Maybe we’re training for a marathon or trying to clock a speedy 5K. But as these long, lustrous days of summer roll on, I’m calling for a free-spirited approach to lacing up. What if we used our precious running hours to see our cities, towns, and neighborhoods on foot? What if we acted as a running tourist?

Summer is the perfect season to prioritize fun on your runs, says Jess Paris, a personal trainer and master tread instructor at SLT. “Heat and humidity can add extra stress and fatigue that makes it difficult to achieve pace or mileage goals,” she explains. “The summer is a great time to take some pressure off those running goals and just enjoy the movement.”

Lately, my boyfriend and I have been channeling this joie de running into our weekend mileage by sprinting to the ocean, jumping in, and jogging home. Sure, we’re a little wet on the way back, but who cares? (Need I repeat, it’s summer!) Paris has similar priorities. “I think it’s a great idea to use your runs as a travel tool to a fun destination or to explore a new place,” she says. “For example, there’s an ice cream shop in my town that I used to run to with a friend to enjoy a cone and hang around town for a bit before running back.”

Paris adds that the middle months of the year are also a great time to prioritize destination running—or taking a road trip and hitting the ground to scope out a new spot. “If you’re on vacation, check out some running routes ahead of time to explore the local area or attractions,” she says.” Just make sure you’re wearing the proper sneakers. For example, if you stumble across an unknown trail, you wouldn’t want to be caught wearing road shoes.

As you enjoy your summer of casual running, remember that you still need to rest. “Too much of anything is not good, even if you’re using running as a fun activity,” Paris says. “At the end of the day, it’s still exercise, movement, and exertion.” Balance out your efforts with plenty of stretching.

Move through dynamic stretches, such as side lunges, before you take your first step, and static stretches, like a forward fold, as you’re cooling down. “On the days when you’re not running, focus on a restorative or cross-training activity like yoga, pilates, or strength training,” Paris says. “All of those types of exercise will make you stronger and help you recover so that you can truly enjoy your fun runs injury-free.”

I’ve been a runner for eight years now, and I still love every part of it—the manic excitement of race day, jogging the sidewalks of my quiet California neighborhood before the world (or, OK, the West Coast) awakes, and the breathless, post-speed run high. It feels like it will never get old. But, to be honest, I think these wandering summer runs are my favorite. There’s something about them that lets you see your surroundings through fresh eyes. And, in this case, I get to see my own backyard anew.

As I was wrapping up writing this story, I couldn’t help myself. I turned to my boyfriend —who was working just five feet away—and said, “Hey, want to run to Venice and watch the skateboarders on the boardwalk?” Next thing I knew, we were lacing up our sneakers.

Ocean, lake, pond, pool—whatever H2O you have access to, make sure you use it to cool down at least once on today’s run.

Refuel with a mid-run snack from the farmer’s market. An incredible baker hangs out at my local spot, selling muffins, croissants, and scones. I love to grab one, digest for a few minutes in the sun, and then run home.

Let’s put an end to all the running window shopping, OK? I dare you to go in and actually poke around. If you’re stinky, just give everyone a wide berth and (of course) don’t try on any clothes.

Maybe you’ve lived in your city for years, but still haven’t visited the most famous landmark. Take this opportunity to run there, explore, then head home.

Parks are essential to the “run, lounge, repeat” lifecycle I love. Find a greenspace near you and make your way there on foot. Once there, lay down, people watch, or read a book on your phone.

(07/30/2023) ⚡AMP
by Outside Online
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Do You Need Electrolyte Supplements at Altitude?

Here's what to keep in mind about hydration supplementation at all elevations

When Lara Crawford stopped into her local vitamin and supplement store a few months ago, she was in search of something to alleviate her acid reflux, which causes a burning sensation in her chest and acid regurgitation. But the conversation quickly took a turn when a staff member learned Crawford wasn’t taking electrolyte supplements.

Crawford lives at 9,000 feet in the Colorado Rockies, a place considered to be high altitude. Even after living in the mountains for years, she never saw a need for additional electrolytes. However, the staff member told Crawford those who live at altitude tend to get dehydrated overnight—and suggested she start taking sports salts pills and a daily electrolyte powder.

“I thought those were just for ultra athletes or like serious athletes, but he told me everybody should be taking them,” Crawford says. He spoke so convincingly about their benefits that she decided to give the electrolytes and sports salts a try.

After using the sports salts in the morning and the electrolytes at midday for a few months, she noticed a moderate improvement in her acid reflux. However, the biggest change was in her face: She no longer woke up with dry, puffy eyes.

Spotting the meaningful difference, she wondered if the staff member was right. Was the shift due to her new electrolyte supplements? Maybe these weren’t just for endurance athletes after all. Perhaps even people who only engaged in moderate exercise still needed to supplement with electrolytes at altitude.

Vic Johnson, an Utah-based sports nutritionist who works with outdoor athletes, including ultra runners, cyclists, and triathletes, says that while we do lose more fluids at altitude, there’s nothing special about nighttime.

However, the electrolyte and hydration question, and how much each of us should be consuming each day, is a bit more complicated.

At higher elevations, your body has to work harder to get oxygen, which causes your breathing rate to increase. Since you lose water through respiration, this results in greater fluid loss. The air is also drier at altitude, which makes your sweat evaporate faster and causes additional fluid loss. Each of these factors contribute to your body losing more water than at sea level, requiring you to hydrate more frequently.

However, the longer you stay up in the mountains, the better it gets. Johnson says people who live at altitude are able to adapt to the lack of oxygen. Their bodies become more efficient, producing more red blood cells to carry oxygen through the body, which reduces the amount of fluid lost.

“It’s going to be pretty stressful on your body for a couple of weeks,” Johnson says, referring to spending time at elevation. “That’s the most crucial time to increase fluid intake. Then things will kind of regulate, and you won’t have to compensate quite so much.”

However, even longtime residents of high altitude towns—Crawford has lived at 9,000 feet for 29 years—typically need about a liter to a liter and a half more water per day (about four to six cups) than people living at lower altitudes. But hydration isn’t a one-size-fits-all prescription. Whether you’re in the mountains or at sea level, your fluid intake varies based on the weather, the amount you exercise, and your overall health.

To help his athletes find the amount of hydration they need, Johnson performs a sweat rate test. He starts by weighing them before they exercise. While they work out, he keeps track of the fluids they drink and any urine they lose. After they’ve finished, he weighs them again and plugs each data point into an equation to figure out how many milliliters of sweat per hour they lose. (If you’d like to try this for yourself, use a step-by-step guide to finding out your own sweat rate.)

It’s important to note that even once you’ve figured out your sweat rate, completely replacing your lost liquids isn’t necessarily the goal. It’s not bad to be slightly dehydrated and more hydration isn’t always the solution. For many, drinking to quench your thirst is sufficient. (Those in their 70s or 80s need to monitor their intake a bit more, because our thirst sensation can decrease with age.)

Electrolytes are electrically-charged minerals such as sodium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium that regulate your muscle contractions, keep you hydrated, and balance your pH levels. Every fluid and cell in your body has electrolytes, which aid the function of your nerves, muscles, brain, and heart. Electrolytes also manage the balance of fluids in your body’s cells and are lost through sweat and urine, or if you’re sick, through vomiting and diarrhea.

While electrolytes are essential, Johnson says most of us get all we need from food. “A normal, varied diet should provide you with plenty of electrolytes, even at altitude.” Johnson says, “For the recreational athlete, it’s honestly not that big of an issue.”

If you aren’t engaging in high-output endurance activities lasting longer than three hours, and if you’re eating a nutrient-dense diet with whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, Johnson says you should be getting enough electrolytes without needing additional supplementation. However, endurance athletes who engage in high-output endurance activities lasting longer than three hours have different hydration needs, and may find electrolyte powders and capsules are a good way to stay hydrated and keep their electrolytes balanced.

That doesn’t mean these supplements are the secret to unlocking a new PR. A 2020 study conducted by researchers at Stanford University found that electrolyte supplementation does not improve performance or protect against illnesses caused by a change in sodium levels, including exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH).

If an endurance athlete wants to take in some sodium, Johnson recommends turning to salty foods, such as pretzels or even a peanut butter sandwich.

“For the most part, when our serum sodium levels drop, the body can usually take care of that and regulate that on its own,” he says.

So, if electrolyte supplementation isn’t really necessary for most people, why did Crawford see a noticeable difference in her face after months of supplementation?

The answer most likely lies in what Crawford took with the powder and capsules.

Before going to the supplement store, Crawford says she struggled to drink enough water. However, while doling out instructions for the supplements, the staff member instructed Crawford to drink a full bottle of water with her morning sports salts capsules (which contain sea salt, magnesium, and potassium) and to mix the flavored electrolyte powder with at least 16 ounces of water later in the day. The supplements provided the structure for her to consume more water, improving her overall hydration and reducing the puffiness in her eyes.

If you live at altitude and find it difficult to drink adequate fluids, a flavored powder might help. For most people, however—including serious athletes—drinking when you’re thirsty is usually enough.

(07/30/2023) ⚡AMP
by Outside Online
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Try this tune-up workout before your next race

It’s hard to know what to do in the taper week leading up to your race. Run too much, and you risk showing up to the start line tired; run too little and you risk feeling sluggish on race day. Figuring out this balance takes some trial and error, but if you’re not sure what to do, consider adding this quick, feel-good tune-up workout into your training plan the week before your race. 

It may sound crazy to do a workout so close to your goal race, but this quick session is designed to get your legs moving without wiping you out. It should be done no less than three days before your race (even further out if you’ve got a long race on the calendar), and is an opportunity to remind yourself what race pace feels like.

In other words, don’t be a workout hero–run your goal race pace and no faster, and resist the temptation to do extra intervals. (Save that energy for the start line!)

The workout

Warmup: 10-15 minutes’ easy jog, followed by form drills

Workout: 

1 km at race pace, followed by two minutes’ rest

2-4 x 400m with 1:30 rest (run these at a pace that feels comfortable and strong–don’t get caught up in the numbers)

800m at race pace

Cooldown: 10 minutes’ easy jog, followed by light stretching.

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Brittany Hambleton
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90-year-old U.S. runner Dot Sowerby, topples Canadian’s 1,500m world age-group record

A 90-year-old runner saved the best for last during her winning weekend at the USATF Masters Outdoor Championships in Greensboro, N.C., breaking the W90 world record in the 1,500m and claiming the crown from a Canadian.

Greensboro’s own Dot Sowerby delighted a hometown crowd Sunday when she ran the 1,500m in 11:30.62, taking more than a minute off the record held by North Vancouver’s Lenore Montgomery, who covered the distance in 12:34.67 at a track meet in Surry, B.C., in September 2020.

Sowerby’s world-record effort this week, which has yet to be ratified, capped off a memorable weekend for the athlete, who racked up quite a collection of medals over the four-day event at Truist Stadium.

She finished her first day of competition last Friday with gold in the 400m (2:35.33) and silver in the 100m  (26.25)—right at the heels of first-place finisher Betty Stroh. On the same day, she took gold in the long jump (1.05m) and the shot put (4.51m). She followed that up Saturday with gold in the 800m (5:52.93).

Her accomplishments in Greensboro are all the more impressive considering they came just one week after she collected six gold medals at the 2023 National Senior Games in Pittsburgh.

“I have a philosophy that you are never too old to do something like running or whatever you want to do,” Sowerby told Greensboro’s News & Record heading into the USATF Masters Outdoor Championships.  “When I came along, they would not let girls in high school and college run because they thought they were too fragile or something. So, I did my first race when I was 50 years old.”

Although Sowerby has taken Montgomery’s 1,500m world record, the latter athlete’s name still features prominently in the Canadian masters record book. In addition to her W90 1,500m record, Montgomery holds 11 other outdoor track records. These include the W85 and W95 records in the 800m,  the W75 and W85 in the 1,500m, the W80 and W85 records in the 3,000m, the W70, W75, W80 and W85 in the 5,000m and the W75 record in the 10,000m.

 

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Paul Baswick
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Kipruto eyes history in Chicago Marathon, Jepkosgei set for debut

Benson Kipruto will hope to make history during this year's edition of the Chicago Marathon, set for October 8.

Kipruto, 32, is a regular podium finisher in the world marathon majors and has a chance to make more history in the Chicago Marathon when he defends his title in the men's race. If he manages to win the competition, he’ll be the first back-to-back men’s open field champion since the late Sammy Wanjiru in 2010.

To win the title in the last edition, the long-distance runner broke away in the 25th mile last year to win in 2:04:24, which is the fourth fastest time ever in Chicago.

Kipruto should expect stiff competition from Kelvin Kipruto, the second-fastest man in history. The 23-year-old Kiptum will make his U.S. marathon debut in Chicago.

Kiptum won the London Marathon in 2023, which is his second marathon ever, at 2:01:25, which was just 16 seconds shy of Eliud Kipchoge’s world record. 

Jepkosgei's debut

Meanwhile, Joyciline Jepkosgei is set to make her debut in the Chicago Marathon. The winner of the 2021 London Marathon and the 2019 New York City Marathon will compete alongside 2022 Chicago Marathon champion Ruth Chepng'etich, American record holder Emily Sisson, and 2023 London Marathon winner Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands.

Apart from Jepkosgei, Genzebe Dibaba of Ethiopia will also be making her Chicago Marathon debut. Dibaba, who made her marathon debut in Amsterdam last fall, placing second in 2:18:05, has established herself as one of the top athletes as she holds six world records from the 1500m to the 5000m.

More than 45,000 participants will take part in the 45th edition of the Chicago.

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Joel Sang
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Bank of America Chicago

Bank of America Chicago

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states and more than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and...

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Can Exercise Replace Your Antidepressant?

For centuries, we've known anecdotally that movement can improve your mood. Joggers often describe a euphoric runner's high, while swimmers recall an inner calm that lasts long after they leave the pool. In April, researchers published the strongest evidence to date showing that physical activity does more than induce these temporary feel-good effects; It can actually improve depression as effectively as medication or psychotherapy. The findings build on previous studies showing exercise can reduce anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar, and obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms.

This mounting evidence doesn't suggest you should toss out your medication or skip your next therapy appointment in favor of exercise alone. But it does indicate physical activity could be a powerful first-line treatment for mental health disorders, especially when combined with other therapies.

Based on the data, some experts see exercise as a safe, cheap antidepressant that could help the estimated one third of adults with mental illness who do not receive adequate treatment. And some clinicians are putting this concept into practice, doling out "exercise prescriptions" for mental health. These scripts give patients step-by-step instructions for physical activity recommendations, much like they would with antidepressants or behavioral therapy. But providers say that on the whole, the field has been slow to embrace exercise as medicine for mental illness, and "exercise prescriptions" remain the exception in clinical care, not the norm.

"Exercise is a good, underutilized tool to help with mental health conditions," Ivan Escobar Roldan, a psychiatrist in Florida who regularly writes "exercise prescriptions" for his patients and studies the use of exercise in clinical practice, says. He co-authored a study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice in 2021 showing that while many providers generally encourage patients to be active, they don't often give specific instructions due to a lack of training, education, or standardized clinical guidelines.

"Everyone says you should exercise more," Seattle-based clinical psychologist Julie Vieselmeyer says. "But patients always ask: What does that mean? Do I need to take an extra lap around the grocery store, or does that mean I have to go to a gym for three hours every day?"

Currently, mental health providers don't give the clearest answers to these questions.

A Mind in Movement

Exercise is as close to a miracle drug as we've got. Research shows it works as effectively as some prescription drugs in preventing and treating more than 26 different diseases.

When you start a workout, your pulse quickens and breathing deepens as your heart pumps oxygen-rich blood to your brain and muscles. Within a few minutes, you likely notice a lift in your mood as your brain releases "happy chemicals" like endorphins, dopamine, and serotonin (the same neurotransmitter targeted by antidepressants). The fleeting bliss of a runner's high results from a spike of endocannabinoids in the bloodstream-cannabis-like signaling molecules that are naturally produced in your body and induce feelings of calm.

After your strength or conditioning session wraps up, the positive effects don't stop. Over time, physical activity can increase levels of a protein called brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which leads to the creation of new neurons. More BDNF is correlated with reduced anxiety and depression, better focus, improved cognition, and sharper memory as you age.

When people exercise regularly, the brain's hippocampus-the area linked to memory and learning-has also been found to increase in volume. That's not all. With a regular workout routine, people often feel better, sleep better, eat better, and report improved relationships and work satisfaction. Exercising can burn off anxious energy as well as increase resilience to future stress. Eventually, it can even help people taper off medication and cut down on doctor's visits or medical treatments. People who start to exercise before or during middle age typically save between $824 to $1,874 annually on their health care costs after retirement.

"While medications may take a few weeks to work, you see benefits right away with exercise," Escobar Roldan says. "It's not only going to help with anxiety, depression, and many other mental health conditions, but also with patients' overall health and other chronic conditions."

Getting moving can be tough initially. Despite the upsides, less than a quarter of U.S. adults do enough aerobic exercise or strength training to meet the national physical activity guidelines. But once people get going, exercise's instant gratification often kicks off a beneficial feedback loop, Vieselmeyer says.

"When we're making healthy choices, that ends up affecting how we think about ourselves, our self-confidence, and our energy levels-things affect our emotions positively and lead to behavior change," she says. Working out isn't just about quelling anxiety, depression, or negative emotions, but fostering positive ones too.

Matthew Ellison, a late-twenties investment banker based in New York City, has experienced these benefits firsthand. Ellison has a history of anxiety and recently dealt with a bout of depression tied to work stress. With the support of his therapist, Ellison made going to the gym a daily priority. He says the routine pulled him through this period and has become a non-negotiable practice to maintain his mental health.

"Being able to clear my mind, in the morning or late at night, has honestly been the greatest thing for my mental health," Ellison says. "It's the foundation for my mental well-being."

Barriers to Entry

For more than 20 years, Vieselmeyer has been interested in exercise as medicine, and says that amid recent studies, she is seeing more acceptance of the topic across the field. But even with a robust body of evidence, providers still struggle to convert these research breakthroughs into targeted exercise prescriptions.

That's because there's little formal training or education on the topic. Some clinicians are concerned about their patients' health status and worry that exercise might lead to injury or cause a heart attack. Others simply don't have the time to discuss exercise in depth.

Many providers recommend 150 minutes (or 2.5 hours) of physical activity per week-guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-but are hesitant to give concrete instructions beyond that. The American Psychological Association's most recent clinical practice guidelines on depression don't mention exercise as treatment.

In his own practice, Escobar Roldan uses resources like this prescription form created by Exercise is Medicine, a global initiative coordinated by the American College of Sports Medicine. The organization also provides a handy action guide to help providers prescribe the right "dose" of physical activity for more than 40 chronic conditions, including mental health disorders. Exercise is Medicine maintains a referral program for health professionals to connect patients with qualified exercise professionals. Some insurance companies also subsidize training programs or gym memberships, or even reimburse health and fitness expenses. But these programs aren't yet commonly used in the mental health arena. "You need a lot of mounting evidence to see a paradigm shift or clinical practice change," says Escobar Roldan. "With more awareness, we're moving towards that, but we aren't there yet."

To get patients moving, Vieselmeyer and Sarah England, a clinical psychologist based in New York, don't use strict "prescriptions." Instead, they draw on techniques from cognitive behavioral therapy, one of the most evidence-based forms of therapy. The psychologists use motivational interviewing to explore the root causes of behavior and barriers to exercise. They also target behavioral activation, which uses behavioral shifts like physical activity to influence people's emotional state.

"If clients are severely depressed and unable to do their laundry, I'm not going to suggest running two miles," England, who helps patients set "SMART" goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound, says. "We have to behaviorally activate them first, in smaller steps, like walking around the block."

A Happiness Workout

Ellison managed to establish a regular workout routine with only vague encouragement from his therapist. But for many others dealing with mental health issues, symptoms like fatigue or lack of motivation preclude their ability to exercise regularly.

"When somebody is really depressed, it's hard to put the running shoes on and get out the door, even if they know that's going to make them feel a whole lot better," Vieselmeyer says. Sometimes the easiest entry point might be medication or seeing a therapist, and then progressing to exercise, she says.

Much of the evidence behind the antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects of exercise is based on people with mild to moderate cases of mental illness. A few small studies suggest that structured workout treatments can help patients with serious mental illness in inpatient settings. But on its own, exercise is unlikely to alleviate serious mental illness, experts say.

A major reason why mental health providers have been slow to embrace exercise as treatment is because researchers haven't nailed down the exact "dose and effect" like they would with a prescription drug. More research is needed to determine which type of exercise works best, how much is needed, and who it can benefit mentally.

Based on what we know so far, the most effective exercise prescription includes physical activity that is:

Moderate to Vigorous

Escobar Roldan suggests people bring their heart rate up to the point where they are a little bit out of breath. Gardening, walking, dancing, hiking, running, or cycling can all ease symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Enjoyable

Most studies point to aerobic exercise as a way to boost your mood, but evidence shows strength or resistance training works too. It's more about getting people moving doing something they enjoy, rather than finding the "perfect" exercise, Vieselmeyer says.

Social

Group exercise sessions, from bootcamp to yoga, can be especially effective. People appear to gain more benefit when supervised by trained health and exercise professionals. There's also the extra opportunity to connect with others, which pays dividends on our mental health.

Doable

Vieselmeyer recommends starting small. No triathlon or two-a-days involved. It's more about working out consistently, not calculating the perfect ratio of Crossfit to Pilates.

"Whatever prescriptions are made going forward need to fit with people's lives, or they're just not going to do them," Vieselmeyer says. "There are already enough barriers for people to exercise."

Ultimately, physical activity isn't a silver bullet for mental health-and more intense movement isn't always the best strategy, especially for fitness fanatics who already train hard. "A good long run is not enough to process through your history of trauma," Vieselmeyer says. If exercise alone was the panacea to our mental health crisis, we wouldn't see any mental health difficulties in professional athletes, England notes.

The right exercise prescription comes down to each person's level of physical and mental fitness. "I certainly hope no one is hesitating to prescribe exercise on top of other evidence-based treatments," Vieselmeyer says. "I would rather give patients more tools than fewer, and then see where their interest lies."

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Trail Runner Magazine
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British athletes criticize U.K. Athletics world championship selection process

U.K. Athletics is under criticism after 19 athletes have been denied the opportunity to compete at the upcoming World Athletics Championships in Budapest next month, despite earning qualifying through their world rankings.

According to The Guardian, U.K. Athletics has rejected invitations sent by World Athletics to athletes who have not met the required qualification standard in their respective events, but are ranked within the top 50 in the World Athletics rankings. Three years ago, World Athletics implemented a new qualification system that aims to create a fairer selection process for major championships. The system is designed to select half the athletes based on automatic qualification standards and the other half based on where athletes sit in the rankings.

Several athletes took to social media expressing their frustration and disappointment, since they thought they had rightfully earned their spots to compete on the world stage.

Lina Nielsen, a British 400m hurdler, expressed her frustration with the selection process on Instagram: “To know that I’m deemed good enough to go to the world champs but that my federation will say no is world-shattering,” she wrote. “My heart is heavy. I feel completely cheated by U.K. Athletics.”

Nielsen, ranked 25th in the world this year, is among those who will receive a World Athletics invite based on her world ranking. However, U.K. Athletics plans to reject it, citing her best time this summer as 0.06 seconds outside the automatic qualification standard.

The selection process has also affected British hurdler Joshua Zeller, who finished fifth in the men’s 110m hurdles at the 2022 World Championships in Eugene. Despite reaching the world final last year and being ranked inside the top 30, Zeller’s invitation to the 2023 world championships will be rejected for the same reason.

“I fully comprehend that I did not meet the required criteria set forth, but this situation adds further disappointment,” wrote Zeller on Instagram. “Going from being a world finalist to not even being able to compete in this year’s championships is truly disheartening.”

U.K. Athletics has been transparent that their new selection process emphasizes optimizing medal success and securing top-eight placings at the major championships, rather than sending the highest number of athletes allowed. Zeller and Nielsen stress that this should not come at the cost of denying opportunities to deserving athletes who qualified based on world rankings.

The issue has sparked discussions about the authority and decision-making of national federations, with some athletes even contemplating legal action to challenge UK Athletics’ stance.

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Netflix to release track and field documentary on world-class sprinters

Netflix is set to launch a new documentary series focused on 100m and 200m sprinters on the Diamond League circuit, featuring some of the world’s most renowned sprinters. According to The Daily Mail, the show will follow the journey of several elite sprinters like world champions Noah Lyles, Fred Kerley and Dina Asher-Smith, providing a behind-the-scenes glimpse into their world of track and field.

The report says the filming for the documentary series is underway, with a camera crew capturing the thrilling moments of the Diamond League and Continental Tour season. The crew was present during the recently concluded London Diamond League, where Lyles ran a 200m world lead of 19.47, adding to the anticipation surrounding the upcoming series.

The concept of sports-themed documentaries has gained a lot of popularity, as seen with Netflix’s previous success with Drive To Survive, a captivating series centred around Formula One racing, the golf series Full Swing following golfers on the PGA and Break Point, a doc series that followed the top male and female players in professional tennis. The shows have resonated with existing fans and attracted new audiences to watch the sport. World Athletics has the same hope–that the upcoming series will spark more interest in the sport, outside of the Olympics and World Championships. 

Although the title and release date of the docu-series are yet to be unveiled, World Athletics has confirmed the existence of the project. In a statement to Daily Mail Sport, the organization acknowledged the presence of documentary film crews following the sport and its athletes, but keeping the project under wraps for the time being.

Kerley, in particular, has been an advocate for the idea of a Netflix-style series for athletics. In an interview with BBC in May, he expressed his belief that the sport deserves more recognition and attention. Drawing parallels with F1, he emphasized that athletics, too, has events beyond the Olympic Games that could captivate audiences worldwide.

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Kiwi woman crushes 48-hour treadmill world record

New Zealand’s Emma Timmis has broken the women’s 48-hour treadmill world record after running 340.36 kilometres at a fitness club in Christchurch over the weekend.

With her run, an effort averaging more than seven kilometres an hour, Timmis put a healthy distance between herself and Swedish runner Kristina Paltén, who has held the record since 2014, running 322.93 kilometres.“Well, what a weekend that was!!!! It was everything I expected and more,” Timmis wrote in an Instagram post, in which she shared her motivation for tackling this treadmill world record. “One (reason) was to push my mental strength, and it definitely did!!! I went to some pretty dark places throughout the run, felt it with all my heart and managed to pull myself out of it each time.”

Making Timmis’s feat all the more remarkable was her comment that the 48-hour run was a “practice run” for a much larger challenge she plans on attempting later this year, although she’s keeping details of that “big goal” under wraps for now.Timmis added she “felt 100% loved and cared for every minute of the run. To be able to complete something this huge you have to put full trust in people around you. Each and every person in the event showed me that the trust given was deserved.”

Once ratified, this will be the third Guinness World Record held by Timmis, who is originally from Derby, England, but now lives in the town of Reefton, New Zealand.

In January 2022, she broke the record for the fastest crossing of New Zealand on foot by a female, completing the trek from the northern town of Cape Reinga to the southern town of Bluff in 20 days, 17 hours, 15 minutes and 57 seconds.“Averaging over 100K every day, this run had many, many challenges—it was no walk (run!) in the park,” Timmis said of that run on her website. “I battled extreme heat, heavy, fast traffic, several injuries, one of my support crew being involved in a car accident, and so much more. It takes incredible grit, resilience and determination to achieve something like this.”

In 2017, she set the record for the longest journey by elliptical cycle in a single country, travelling 7,753 km from Denham, Western Australia to Cape Byron in 74 days.

Three years earlier, Timmis completed an 89-day run from the Atlantic Ocean at Henties Bay, Namibia, to the Indian Ocean at Pemba in Mozambique, covering 3,974 km. Her run across southern Africa, which she called “the toughest thing I have done in my life,” was the inspiration for a children’s book, The Girl Who Ran Across Africa, which she published in 2020.

(07/29/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Foot strength exercises for speed and stability

Your feet may take a serious pounding when you run, but chances are you (like most runners) neglect foot mobility and care. Spending a few minutes on these stability-builders (do them while you’re watching TV!) will be a game-changer–you’ll have a stronger foundation and prevent future injuries.

If you’ve never done foot mobility or strength before, ease into these exercises and increase or decrease repeats as needed. Incorporate them into your warm up or cool down routine a few times a week, or try a few anytime you’re relaxing on the couch.

Toe curls

Toe curls strengthen the intrinsic muscles of the feet, essential for maintaining arch support and proper foot mechanics during running.

Sit on a chair with your feet flat on the floor. Curl your toes inward as if you’re grabbing the floor, then release. Do three sets of 15–20 repetitions for each foot.

Single-leg balance

Single-leg balance exercises enhance ankle stability and proprioception (your ability to sense where the ground is), essential for maintaining proper form and preventing ankle-related injuries.

Stand in bare feet with hands on the back of a chair or wall for stability, if needed. Rise up onto the ball of one foot, hovering the other foot above the ground if possible (leave your toes touching if you need to, and work up to lifting the leg). Hold for 30 seconds to one minute, and switch to the other leg. Repeat for three sets, build up to five.

Toe spreading

Toe spreading helps improve toe mobility and strengthens the muscles responsible for toe alignment, which can enhance stability during the push-off while running.

Sit or stand with your feet flat on the ground. Spread your toes as wide as possible, then bring them back to a neutral position. Repeat for three sets of 15–20 repetitions.

Towel scrunches

Towel scrunches strengthen the muscles in your toes and on the bottom of your feet, and contribute to better foot stability and proprioception.

Place a small towel on the floor. Stand barefoot, and use your toes to scrunch up the towel toward you. Release and repeat for three sets of 15–20 repetitions.

(07/28/2023) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Courtney Dauwalter to race UTMB this year

The U.S. ultrarunning phenom, hot off her record-breaking finishes at Western States and Hardrock 100, will be looking to best her own course record in Chamonix in September.

Ultrarunning sensation Courtney Dauwalter has announced she’ll be toeing the start line at Ultra Trail du Mont-Blanc (UTMB) in Chamonix, France on Sept. 1, setting the stage for what is sure to be one of this year’s most highly anticipated ultras, following her recent record-breaking wins at the Western States 100-mile Endurance Run and the Hardrock 100.

The 38-year-old shared on social media Friday morning—with an apparent mix of excitement and trepidation—her decision to take on the famed 170-km course, which features 10,000m of vert around the base of Mont Blanc.

“We decided to do UTMB!” she wrote. “I have no idea how this will go, or what I’ll be able to squeeze out of my body & brain in one more 100 mile race this summer, but that makes it even more interesting to try! Mont Blanc, here we come! Race date: Sept 1”

The big question surrounding the September race will be whether Dauwalter, who holds the UTMB course record following her 22:30:54 finish in the race two years ago, will be able to best herself to claim the championships and course records at Western States, Hardrock and UTMB within a span of less than three months.

On June 24, Dauwalter not only demolished the Western States women’s course record that had stood for more than a decade (16:47:19 set by Canadian Ellie Greenwood in 2012), but beat most of the men, finishing in 15:29:33 and sixth overall.

Just three weeks later, she turned in another mind-blowing performance at the Hardrock 100 in Silverton, Colo., crossing the finish line in fourth place overall in 26:14:08. Dauwalter’s run was more than an hour faster than the counter-clockwise record set by Diana Finkel of South Fork, Colo., in 2009, and 30 minutes faster than Dauwalter’s own overall women’s course record set last year.

In addition to holding the course records at UTMB, Western States and Hardrock 100, Dauwalter, who is based in Golden, Colo., holds the record at Diagonale des Fous on Reunion Island.

 

(07/28/2023) ⚡AMP
by Paul Baswick
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North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

Mountain race, with numerous passages in high altitude (>2500m), in difficult weather conditions (night, wind, cold, rain or snow), that needs a very good training, adapted equipment and a real capacity of personal autonomy. It is 6:00pm and we are more or less 2300 people sharing the same dream carefully prepared over many months. Despite the incredible difficulty, we feel...

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Half Marathon specialist Daniel Mateiko is excited to make his debut in this year’s Chicago Marathon

Daniel Mateiko promises to pull a major upset in Chicago Marathon.

Mateiko, who has been competing on both track and the road, has promised a surprise this year despite the presence of top-notch athletes in Chicago this year. 

“Yes, this will be my first time to run a marathon, and a major one. This means I have to work extra hard in training to keep up the pace,” he said.

He said he was spotted by Chicago race organisers in London Marathon where he paced Kelvin Kiptum to victory early this year.

"In London, I paced Kiptum to the second-fastest marathon in the world in London and exited at the 30km mark, just 12km to the finish. Some race organizers were amazed at what I did and that is why I am heading to Chicago,” he revealed. 

After finishing second in at the Kip Keino Classic last year, he went ahead to finish in position eight in the 10,000m at the World Athletics Championships in Eugene, Oregon.

The inaugural Eldama Ravine Half Marathon champion said he is undergoing intense to post good results in Chicago. 

The Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon silver medalist failed to make Team  Kenya for the 2021 Olympic Games after finishing sixth in 10,000m at the national trials.  

Mateiko has a personal best time of 58:26 set in the Valencia Half Marathon last year, where he finished third. He finished third in Copenhagen after timing 59:25. 

He will be up against defending champion Benson Kipruto, who will be seeking to defend his title after winning last year's race in 2:04:24— the fourth-fastest time ever in Chicago. Should Kipruto win again, he’ll be the first back-to-back men’s open field champion since the late Sammy Wanjiru in 2010. Also in the race are Kenya's John Korir ( 2:05:01) and Wesley Kiptoo (debutant). 

Other key names in the field include Belgium's Bashir Abdi (2:03:36), the Ethiopian duo of Dawit Wolde (2:04:27) and Seifu Tura(2:04:29) and United States Galen Rupp (2:06:07) among others.

(07/28/2023) ⚡AMP
by Emmanuel Sabuni
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Bank of America Chicago

Bank of America Chicago

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states and more than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and...

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Defending champions Angela Tanui and Edwin Soi to return to Bogota Half Marathon

Tanui and Soi won last year’s edition of the Half Marathon in style, clocking 1:13:29 and 1:05:27 respectively.

Defending champions Angela Tanui and Edwin Soi will return to Colombia for the Bogota Half Marathon on Sunday, July 30.

Tanui and Soi won last year’s edition of the Half Marathon in style, clocking 1:13:29 and 1:05:27 in the women’s and men’s races respectively.

Soi is the fastest in the men’s field with a Personal Best time of 1:00:24 and he will be opening his season at the event. He will enjoy the company of compatriot Daniel Muteti who is also among the top entries.

On his part, Muteti will be lining up as the third fastest in the field and so far, this year, he has only participated in two Half Marathons. He opened his season with a 12th-place finish at the Nationale-Nederlanden Warsaw Half Marathon before winning the Cereales Angel Lima Half Marathon.

The Kenyan duo will face a stern test from Morocco’s Omar Ait Chitachen who will be lining up as the second fastest in the field. Chitachen has competed in three races so far. He opened his season with a 16th-place finish at the Osaka Marathon.

He then proceeded to the Xiamen Marathon where he finished third before winning the Rabat Half Marathon.

Another threat will come from Ethiopia’s Sisay Lemma. The 32-year-old Ethiopian has competed in two marathons so far this season. He started off with the Tokyo Marathon which he unfortunately did not finish and then later went for the Prague Marathon where he finished second.

In the women’s field, Tanui will be joined by compatriot Veronica Wanjiru who has also recorded good times over the 21km distance since the season started.

Wanjiru finished fourth and third at the Publix Atlanta Half Marathon and the San Blas Half Marathon respectively.

The Kenyan duo will be up against the Ethiopian duo of Zenebu Fikadu and Anchialem Haymanot who will be looking to give them a run for their money.

(07/28/2023) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wuafula
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Bogota Half Marathon

Bogota Half Marathon

The Bogotá International Half Marathon, or mmB as it is traditionally known, is an annual road running competition over a half marathon distance 21.0975 kilometres (13.1094 mi) taking place in Bogotá, Colombia in late July or early August. Established in 2000, it holds IAAF Gold Label Road Race status, making it the first and thus far only South American race...

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TD Beach to Beacon 10K founder and Olympic gold medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson offers tips ahead of race

The TD Beach to Beacon 10K is happening on Saturday, August 5,and it's celebrating a major milestone: 25 years. It was founded in 1998 by Olympic gold medalist and Mainer Joan Benoit Samuelson. 

The race draws top athletes from around the world to Cape Elizabeth.

TD Bank sponsors the race and, this year, the beneficiary is Valo, a nonprofit organization that offers free programs to help Maine teens with their emotional wellbeing.

Benoit Samuelson said a diverse mix of people run the race, which makes it even more exciting for all.

"The kids run came along shortly after the 10K, and now the high school mile, which is very competitive, so there is something really for everybody," she explained. "

And my favorite part of the race is the fact that we've pulled many runners off the sidelines; those people who have come to cheer the runners on and then asked themselves, 'Do you think I might be able to cover the distance?' and they come out and they cover the distance. And I love being at the finish line for the invited runners, the professional runners, and I like being at the finish line when the stragglers come in, those people who never thought they could do the distance."Race day includes the wheelchair division, elite women, and the general public. The competitive high school mile and the children's 1K race will take place on Friday, August 5, at Fort Williams.

Benoit Samuelson said she founded the race as a way to give back to her community and promote the importance of a healthy lifestyle. This year, more than 6,500 runners and 800 volunteers are expected to participate.Larry Wold is the president for TD Bank in Maine. He is a legacy runner, meaning he has run the race for the past 24 years.

"To be able to run in the same race at the same time with world class athletes, with world record holders, with Olympic gold medalists, and know that you are in the same event they are, [it] has a fun attraction to it," he explained. "We know there are families that have now established sort of family routines around this event."

Wold offered some tips for everyone participating.

"Don't go out too fast. Make sure you are well hydrated, let the crowd bring you along, run a nice steady comfortable pace, and you are going to be great," he said.

Of course, Benoit Samuelson also gave some advice for runners. 

"Just make sure your buildup is gradual. Don't try to build room over night. It's important to stay fit at some level throughout the year, and then a lot of people go out and run the course, some people have never gone 10K in training and they hope that they can go the distance after maybe running 3 to 5 mile runs on a regular basis," she said. "Don't try anything new race week, meaning don't change your diet in any significant way and don't try the newest and latest item on the market that might improve your performance. Make sure you have double knots in your shoe laces."

Race day is usually hot and humid, so Benoit Samuelson said to wear at hat and clothes that are light in color.

(07/27/2023) ⚡AMP
by Hannah Yechivi
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TD Beach to Beacon 10K

TD Beach to Beacon 10K

Joan Benoit Samuelson, a native of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, won the first-ever women's Marathon at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles and is founder and chair of the TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K. "A long time dream of mine has been realized" says Samuelson. "I've always wanted to create a race that brings runners to some of my most...

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How new runners can add speed and ramp up confidence

As a newer runner, adding speedwork can be intimidating. It shouldn’t be–speedwork is an essential addition to your weekly mileage, and adding a little oomph to an occasional workout will boost your confidence and have you ready to try other new-to-you style training techniques in the future. You can try these speed sessions on road, trails, track or treadmill.

Before you start incorporating short speed sessions into your training, make sure you have been running for at least six months and are injury-free. Here are two simple workouts to get your legs used to moving quickly. With time and added strength, increase repeats or lengthen intervals.

Short speedy intervals

Don’t let this workout scare you away–if it seems like too much, simply shorten the intervals so that they seem manageable. 30 seconds fast with a one-minute recovery is fine. If you feel like you need to walk during your recovery, it’s perfectly OK to do so. Don’t worry about your pace during intervals, simply go by effort. You’ll probably be pleasantly surprised at how well you do, and how soon you can increase your repeats.

The workout:

Warm up with 10 minutes’ easy running

Five to eight repeats of one minute hard, followed by two minutes’ easy running or walking to recover

Cool down with five to 10 minutes’ easy running

Strides

Strides can be tacked on to the end of any easy run and are a fun, efficient way to begin adding speed. If you’ve never tried strides before, don’t worry: it’s hard to go wrong.

Start your strides by going easy, focusing on a short, quick stride, and then gradually increase your speed by lengthening your stride. Focus on staying relaxed and running smoothly. It should feel like a controlled faster pace, not a sprint.

The workout:

Easy run (approx. 30 minutes)

Four to five strides of 15 to 30 seconds each, 45 seconds rest in between

Recovery goes hand-in-hand with speedwork for all runners, from beginners to seasoned veterans. In these beginner speed workouts, the recovery intervals are longer in duration than the hard intervals. As you build strength, cut down recovery time to make the workouts more challenging. Take a very easy recovery running or rest day following any speedwork.

(07/27/2023) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Don’t tell me what’s impossible – Tom Evans confirms UTMB is up next

Tom Evans has announced that he will run at this year’s Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB) after a late alteration to his 2023 plans.

The British runner claimed a “dream” victory at Western States last month to add to his “super fun” Ultra-Trail Snowdonia win in May and second place at Black Canyons 100K in February.

Evans crowned his return from knee surgery to finish third behind Kilian Jornet at last year’s UTMB, but had not scheduled in the iconic Chamonix race for 2023.

Western States recovery

His race calendar for this year, which he shared on Instagram in January, included a Fastest Known Time (FKT) attempt of the Bob Graham Round in September, but there was no mention of UTMB following Western States.

However, after his dominant win in California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains, a defiant Evans suggested that UTMB could still be on the cards.

“If I recover well from this, I’ll race UTMB this year,” Evans said at the end of adidas TERREX’s documentary on his Western States win.

“People have said it’s impossible to do. Don’t tell me what’s impossible or not.

Irresistible challenge

Over the next three weeks, Evans’ recovery clearly went to plan and yesterday he revealed that he was unable to resist the allure of UTMB, which takes place next month.

“Couldn’t resist the chance to make more memories like this,” he wrote on Instagram. “See you in Chamonix!

“Next up… UTMB.

“The Western States 100 / UTMB double is something that has always interested me. It wasn’t on my original plan but things have to change with how you’re feeling!

“And now, I can’t wait for the challenge!”

(07/27/2023) ⚡AMP
by Olly Green
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North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

North Face Ultra Trail du Tour du Mont-Blanc

Mountain race, with numerous passages in high altitude (>2500m), in difficult weather conditions (night, wind, cold, rain or snow), that needs a very good training, adapted equipment and a real capacity of personal autonomy. It is 6:00pm and we are more or less 2300 people sharing the same dream carefully prepared over many months. Despite the incredible difficulty, we feel...

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Study shows risk of sudden cardiac arrest from exercise is low among older adults

Every so often, you hear a tragic story about someone who collapsed from cardiac arrest while out for a run, or while racing a marathon. Often their running habit will be called into question, with speculators asking whether they were simply running too much. This can be unsettling, but a new study from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on older adults concluded that sports-related sudden cardiac arrest is exceedingly rare. 

The study

Researchers analyzed data on sudden cardiac arrests that occurred in people age 65 and older and found that of the 4,078 total sudden cardiac arrests they studied, only 77 occurred during or following exercise, such as running, cycling, going to the gym or playing golf or tennis. That means only 1.9 per cent occurred during or after a bout of exercise. 

The researchers also analyzed medical records for 47 of the 77 people who experienced sudden cardiac arrest during or after exercise, as well as the records for 3,162 people who experienced non-exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest. Perhaps not surprisingly, those who experienced sports-related sudden cardiac arrest had fewer cardiovascular risk factors than the others.

The sports-related group was also four times more likely to survive than the non-sports-related group, partly because they typically experienced sudden cardiac arrest in a more public location (assuming they were exercising outside, at a fitness facility, and/or with other people), and so were able to get help faster. 

The takeaways

The researchers point out that in rare cases, exercise can trigger an irregular heart rhythm that could lead to sudden cardiac arrest, but this generally shouldn’t dissuade people from exercising. Exercise is one of the most heart-healthy activities you can do, and while there are risks, the potential benefits are far greater. 

“The annual incidence of sports-related sudden cardiac arrest among older adults is extremely rare,” said Sumeet S. Chugh, senior author of the study. “This means older people who regularly participate in sports should continue.”

Chugh adds that those who wish to begin a new exercise regime, particularly older adults, should talk to their doctor first to ensure they can do so safely. Of course, if you are exercising and you start experiencing any new symptoms, you should consult your doctor.

As always, if you’re starting a new running program, you should take it slow and build your mileage gradually, no matter how old you are. Not only will this ensure you can exercise safely, but it will also help prevent injuries that could slow or even stop your progress entirely.

(07/27/2023) ⚡AMP
by Brittany Hambleton
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Usain Bolt kicks off 2024 Olympic torch relay in Paris

On Tuesday, under the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Jamaican sprinting legend Usain Bolt helped kick off the Olympic torch relay ceremony, unveiling the torch and marking 365 days until the start of the 2024 Olympic Games.

The world record holder in the men’s 100m, 200m, and 4x100m events, Bolt proudly hoisted the torch high into the air, captivating the audience with his signature lightning-bolt pose. The sight of the world’s fastest man with the symbolic torch filled the air with excitement as thousands of Parisians turned up in anticipation of the upcoming games.

“I’m happy to be here,” said Bolt, the retired sprinter. “Paris has always been a city that I enjoyed competing and hanging out in. I’m excited for the Olympics next year. I’ll be here with my family.”

During the ceremony, Bolt unveiled the Olympic torch alongside Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo and Paris 2024 chief Tony Estanguet. The eight-time Olympic champion was paraded through the cheering crowd of spectators, waving French flags, as he unveiled and carried the torch around.

The opening ceremony of the 2024 Olympics is scheduled for July 26, 2024, and it will be the first Olympic ceremony in history to take place outside the traditional stadium setting, on boats, along the picturesque River Seine in front of an audience of over half a million spectators. The unveiling took place on the banks of the iconic river, which also inspired the design of the torch.

“I think it’s gonna be one of the best, if not the best, opening ceremony,” said Bolt to reporters. “Imagine everybody standing outside, across the bridges cheering people up. It’s never been done before…”

The torch, crafted with lightweight polished steel and a champagne hue, boasts a remarkable design imitating the reflection of the Eiffel Tower on the rippled surface of the Seine. This creative touch aims to convey a sense of peaceful energy, reflecting the spirit of Paris and the Games.

The Olympic flame will be ignited on April 16, 2024, in the ancient city of Olympia, Greece, the birthplace of the Games, symbolizing the beginning of the torch’s journey to Paris. The torch relay will pass through various French cities and landmarks, including the Pantheon in Paris and the picturesque Mont Saint-Michel, before the torch is passed to some of France’s overseas territories.

(07/26/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Paris 2024 Olympic Games

For this historic event, the City of Light is thinking big! Visitors will be able to watch events at top sporting venues in Paris and the Paris region, as well as at emblematic monuments in the capital visited by several millions of tourists each year. The promise of exceptional moments to experience in an exceptional setting! A great way to...

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Travel tips for runners: keep training simple away from home

It’s the season for road trips, family get-togethers and spontaneous getaways, and for many runners that means trying to fit in our regular training around an unpredictable schedule. While travel is fun and exciting, it can also be stressful, and logging some miles can help ease mental angst. Here’s how to make the most of your trip, wherever you go, while squeezing in some quality run time.

Plan ahead (while packing!)

Make sure you have your running gear handy on your trip. If you’re flying, keep a set of running clothes and shoes in your carry-on–that way you can head out for a run if you’re unexpectedly delayed somewhere. Hey, maybe you’ll even find an airport Strava segment to tackle.

Map out your routes

Do your homework before your trip, if possible, making safety your goal. Many towns have a local running store, and contacting them can be a great way to get info. If you have some serious intervals planned, calculate how long they will take you and plan out a route that takes you out and back. It sounds silly, but doing the mapping and math pre-trip will make it that much easier to hop out of bed, lace up and head out (and you’ll have one less excuse to miss a run). Apps like Trailforks and Strava can be very useful.

Run early

Hey, maybe you love your sunset runs and find the pre-dawn efforts a struggle–me too. On a recent trip, I discovered that I was far more likely to fit in my run if I managed to get up before everyone else and grind it out. It’s tempting to imagine you’ll fit in your run in the evening before bed or supper, but if you’re like me, you’ll be too tired from the day’s adventures or end up having a jam-packed schedule. Those sunrise runs grow on you, I promise. Heading out for your day having already fit in your running is a huge mental boost, as well.

Fill your family (or coworkers) in

Let the people you are with know what you’re up to. It’s important to tell people where you’re headed if you’re running outside, particularly in new-to-you areas (safety first!) but fitting in your runs will be easier if everyone is on board. Better yet, invite your travel companions or hosts to run with you. You may have to change up your pace, but having company will make the miles fly by, and you may help out an aspiring beginner runner.

Be flexible

Remember that skipping a run won’t derail your fitness, and taking things slowly because others are joining you should be fun, not frustrating. Stressing about your training may cause you to miss out on adventures and experiences while traveling. Finding a balance can be tricky, but opt for maximum fun. Don’t be afraid to switch things up, and head out on a bike ride or a hike instead of your scheduled speed session. You’ll create lasting memories, and your VO2 max will be just fine.

(07/26/2023) ⚡AMP
by Keeley Milne
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Kenyan Samwel Mailu sets ambitious goal as he returns to the Frankfurt Marathon

The Kenyan runner finished second on his debut in the German city last year and want to go one better in 2023.

Vienna Marathon champion Samwel Mailu has set his target ahead of making a return to the Frankfurt Marathon on October 29.

Mailu, one of the rising talents in the marathon, has already proved that Frankfurt is a good place for him after a brilliant marathon debut last year where he finished second.

During last year’s event, Mailu had originally been entered as a pacemaker but he did not drop out of the race and, despite his role, finished second in 2:07:19.

This year, Mailu triumphed in Vienna with 2:05:08, breaking the men’s course record which had stood for nine years.

“I have a good feeling about returning to Frankfurt. After all, I made my marathon debut there and the organisation is very good. My aim is to improve my personal best and to run under 2:05 in Frankfurt,” Mailu said.

Meanwhile, race director Jo Schindler expressed his excitement at having brought on board Mailu, alongside Matea Parlov Kostro, who has also been entered as the top female athlete. The event will also be marking its 40th anniversary.

“In Matea Parlov Kostro and Samwel Mailu, we’ve succeeded in recruiting two rising stars of the international marathon scene," he added.

"I’m delighted that we are going to have two popular figures running on the start line in Frankfurt.

"After our successful comeback from the COVID-19 lockdown a year ago, we want to stage an exciting show of running in celebrating the anniversary of the oldest German city race in Frankfurt,” Schindler said.

(07/26/2023) ⚡AMP
by Abigael Wafula
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Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old city), cosy apple wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city's cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife...

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Sha'Carri Richardson gets ready for upcoming World Athletics Championships

Sha'Carri Richardson took to social media to announce that she was all set to compete in her next race at the 2023 World Athletics Championships, to be held in Budapest next month.

"My first real season and I'm loving the process of learning myself, pushing myself as well as knowing when to be still", she wrote.

"Budapest UP NEXT", she added. 

The 23-year-old won at the Silesia Diamond League in Poland on July 16, where she ran a thrilling dash of 100m in 10.76 seconds. This came after her splendid win at the USATF Outdoor Championships at the Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon, on July 7, where Richardson completed the race in 10.71 seconds.

The 2023 World Athletics Championships to be held in Budapest will have a star-studded line-up. Along with Sherika Jackson, Sha'Carri Richardson will also be competing with the top Jamaican sprinter, Elaine Thompson, who has won the Olympic gold medal five times, and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, who has three Olympic gold medals to her name so far.

The face-off between the American and the Jamaican athletes would hence be a show to watch for in Budapest, Hungary.

(07/26/2023) ⚡AMP
by Janhavi Shinde
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World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

From August 19-27, 2023, Budapest will host the world's third largest sporting event, the World Athletics Championships. It is the largest sporting event in the history of Hungary, attended by athletes from more than 200 countries, whose news will reach more than one billion people. Athletics is the foundation of all sports. It represents strength, speed, dexterity and endurance, the...

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Kelvin Kiptum to race 2023 Chicago Marathon

The second fastest marathoner in history will not face Kipchoge at Berlin after all.

The 2023 Chicago Marathon revealed on Tuesday morning that Kiptum will make his North American marathon debut on Oct. 8, postponing the highly anticipated potential clash against Eliud Kipchoge, who will appear at the 2023 Berlin Marathon.

In the last eight months, Kiptum has emerged as one of the world’s fastest marathoners. In December, he made his marathon debut at the 2022 Valencia Marathon, securing a commanding victory in a remarkable 2:01:53, the fastest debut in history. He continued his dominance at the 2023 London Marathon, where he shattered Kipchoge’s course record and came remarkably close to the world record, with a 2:01:25 finish.

Despite his achievements in London, Kiptum remains relatively unknown on the major marathon scene. The 23-year-old from Eldoret, Kenya, is self-coached and did not enter marathoning from a prolific track career like Kipchoge, or Ethiopia’s Kenenisa Bekele.

In June, Kiptum was selected for Team Kenya in the 2023 World Athletics Championships marathon. However, he declined the invitation to focus on a fall marathon instead. With Kiptum eyeing either Chicago or Berlin, many anticipated a head-to-head battle between the two Kenyan titans in Berlin, renowned for its flat and incredibly fast course, having been the location where the previous eight men’s marathon world records were set.

Choosing Chicago, which takes place two weeks after Berlin, clearly indicates Kiptum’s intent to vie for a victory and target Kipchoge’s world record of 2:01:09. Chicago’s primarily flat course, with only 70 metres of elevation gain, offers a promising setting. 

However, a win in Chicago won’t come easy, as Kiptum will face off against one of the best tactical marathoners in the world and the reigning champion, Benson Kipruto. Kipruto comes off a second-place finish at the 2023 Boston Marathon, where he was runner-up to his training partner, Evans Chebet. Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura, who knows the Chicago course well, having won the race in 2021 and finished as runner-up to Kipruto last fall, will also return. Among the other elite names in the men’s field are Galen Rupp, Conner Mantz and Belgian 2020 Olympic marathon bronze medallist Bashir Abdi.

(07/25/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Bank of America Chicago

Bank of America Chicago

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states and more than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and...

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Could your gut hold the key to running motivation?

Why do some people seem to be more motivated than others to exercise? How can you increase your motivation to go out for a run or push harder in workouts? New research suggests that the answer may be found in your gut. According to researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, some species of gut-dwelling bacteria can increase your motivation to exercise.

The gut-brain connection

There has been a lot of research in the last decade dedicated to the connection between your gut and your brain, and it is now generally understood that your gut (specifically the billions of bacteria that live in your gut and intestines) has a profound impact on your mood, and even your behavior.

This new study, published in the scientific journal Nature, discovered that certain bacteria in the guts of lab mice had a substantial impact on their running performance. The reason, according to the study’s authors, can be attributed to the metabolites produced by these bacteria.

The study

The researchers set up the study to test for multiple factors that may influence running performance. Using a set of genetically diverse mice, they recorded their genome sequences, gut bacterial species, bloodstream metabolites and other data. To conduct the study, they simply measured how much voluntary wheel running the mice did every day, as well as how long they ran each time (to measure their endurance). 

There was a significant difference in the amount of wheel running, as well as endurance, across the groups of mice, and the researchers used machine learning to measure which factors seemed to have the most influence on this difference. 

The results

All bacteria in your body, including your gut, produce metabolites, which stimulate different nerves in your body. The researchers in this study discovered that the metabolites produced by certain gut bacteria stimulated sensory nerves in the gut that enhance activity in the region of the brain that is responsible for motivation during exercise. 

The two main gut bacteria that had the greatest impact were eubacterium rectale and Coprococcus eutactus. These bacteria produced fatty acid amides (FFAs), which stimulated specific receptors in the gut called CB1 endocannabinoid receptors, which connect to the brain by way of the spine. When you stimulate these receptors, it increases the amount of dopamine in your brain, which increases your motivation to exercise.

In other words, mice that had more of these bacteria did a much higher volume of voluntary running and ran for much longer than mice that had less. They also found that if they gave the mice a broad-spectrum antibiotic, which reduced the number of bacteria in their guts, their running performance was reduced by 50 per cent. Interestingly, genetics only seemed to account for a very small amount of performance differences.

The takeaways

This research, which took place over a number of years, has only been done in mice, but it could have significant implications for humans. “If we can confirm the presence of a similar pathway in humans, it could offer an effective way to boost people’s levels of exercise to improve public health generally,” said study senior author Christoph Thaiss.

The team is now planning to do further research to confirm the presence of this pathway in humans, which could open the door for an entirely new branch of exercise psychology research. In the meantime, this is yet another reminder of the importance of having a healthy gut microbiome, so if you’re struggling with motivation to get out the door, maybe the answer is in your gut?

(07/25/2023) ⚡AMP
by Brittany Hambleton
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Ruth Chepngetich in search of a 3rd consecutive win at Chicago Marathon

Ruth Chepngetich will be on the starting line for the Chicago Marathon this Sunday. And the Kenyan champion is aiming for a third consecutive success. She will have her work cut out against some formidable competition, including Sifan Hassan.

Ruth Chepngetich dominated the Chicago marathon last year. Chepngetich won last year's race in 2:14:18, just 14 seconds off the world record. It was the second-fastest women's marathon performance of all time. It was the Kenyan's second consecutive victory. And this year, she is aiming to win for the 3rd time in a row. And she's hoping to clock her best time over the 42.195 km distance.I plan to defend my title and improve my time," said Chepngetich. There is no better race in the world than the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

To do that, she will have to beat double Olympic gold medallist Sifan Hassan. The Ethiopian-born Dutchwoman hit the ground running on her marathon debut in London in April. Despite stopping twice to stretch, she closed a 25-second gap on the leaders to win and set a national record of 2h18mn33s.

The world champion is nevertheless focused on the forthcoming World Athletics Championships. "At the moment, I'm concentrating on the World Championships in Budapest, so my preparation for the marathon will be very short, but as most people know, I like to be challenged," maintained Hassan.

Chepngetich and Hassan have only met once, at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon where Hassan broke the European record with 1h05mn15s in his first serious attempt at the distance and Chepngetich finished fifth in 1h07mn02s.

(07/25/2023) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago

Bank of America Chicago

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states and more than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and...

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New world 1500m record for women 90-94 set at Masters championships

Dot Sowerby, age 90, on Sunday at Greensboro Nationals broke the World Record in the W90 1500 Meters, pending ratification.  Dot clocked in at 11:30.62, more than a minute faster than the existing W90 1500m World Record of 12:34.67 set by Canadian Lenore Montgomery in 2020. 

(07/24/2023) ⚡AMP
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Tigist Ketema set a course record to win the women’s contest, and USA’s Diego Estrada won the men’s wharf to Wharf race

The latest results from the 2023 Wharf to Wharf 6 Mile race, which took place on Sunday, 23 July, in the City of Capitola. This year was the 49th edition of the event, and the races were won by Ethiopia’s Tigist Ketema, who set a course record to win the women’s contest, and USA’s Diego Estrada, the winner of the men’s race.

Highlighting the 2023 Wharf to Wharf 6 Mile competition, which took place in California, was the record-breaking performance by Tigist Ketema, who clocked an impressive 29:51 to secure the victory. Her time was a new women’s course record, and she pocketed USD $4000 for her effort.

The previous Wharf to Wharf 6 Mile course record of 29:59 was set by Kenya’s Caroline Rotich in 2018.

Kenya’s Sarah Naibei ran a time of 30:13 to take second place behind Ketema to collect USD $3000, with third place going to Ethiopia’s Werkuha Getachew, who clocked 30:37 and earned USD $2000.

Meanwhile, USA’s defending champion Ednah Kurgat, who clocked 30:29 to win last year’s race, was only fourth this year in 30:38.

Diego Estrada Dominates Men’s Race

In the 2023 Wharf to Wharf 6 Mile men’s race, experienced runner Diego Estrada returned from his second-place finish to Emmanuel Bor last to clock 27:14 to run away with the title this year and earned USD $4000, plus an additional USD $1000 in bonus money.

Kenya’s Josphat Kipchirchir clocked in at 27:48 for second place, with his fellow countryman, Shadrack Keter, following home closely at 27:50 in third place. USA’s Colin Bennie (27:56) and Ben Blankenship (28:02) rounded out the top five men’s finishers.

(07/24/2023) ⚡AMP
by Glen Andrews
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Wharf to Wharf

Wharf to Wharf

Each year, on the fourth Sunday in July, thousands of runners from across America and around the globe return to Santa Cruz, California for the annual six-mile race to Capitola-by-the-Sea. First run in 1973 by a handful of locals, the Wharf to Wharf Race today enjoys a gourmet reputation in running circles worldwide. Its scenic, seaside setting, perfect weather, and...

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Louisiana man Jarrett Leblanc runs 62-minute half-marathon on a treadmill

On Sunday, a Louisiana man took to the treadmill at his local gym in Lafayette, La., attempting to break the Guinness World Record for a treadmill half-marathon. Jarrett Leblanc, a 2020 U.S. Olympic marathon trials qualifier, clocked a time of 62:50 over 21.1 kilometers, breaking the old mark of 63:08 from 2020 and raising money for a non-profit organization that provides camps and programs for children with heart defects.

Leblanc had the speed on the treadmill set at a ridiculous 12.5 mph for nearly the whole challenge. According to local news, Leblanc was six seconds ahead of the record through his first 5K split (14:54) and built a 13-second cushion, hitting 29:46 through 10K. He ended up breaking the previous mark by 18 seconds. The previous treadmill record was held by U.S. 2:12-marathoner John Raneri, who placed fourth at the California International Marathon in 2022.

The 32-year-old told local news that his inspiration behind targeting the record came from a friend who broke this same record while running on a treadmill at altitude. “He broke the record at an altitude, so with me doing it at sea level, I knew I already had an advantage,” he said. “The thought of having a World Record attempt would not only bring the community together but also the entire world to get behind a great cause to help the children.”

Leblanc works full-time as a registered diagnostic cardiac sonographer at the Lafayette General Medical Center, and wanted to use his platform and passion to raise money for Camp Bon Coeur, a camp for children with hearts that have needed mending. Leblanc has so far reached nearly $10,000 of his $25,000 goal.

This world-record feat isn’t Leblanc’s first running accomplishment. In 2015, he became the first Louisiana native to run a sub-four-minute mile on Louisiana soil, clocking 3:59.95 in front of his friends and family in Lafayette. His success has also led him to qualify for the 2016 and 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials.

(07/24/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Rai Benjamin eying world record performance at World Athletics Championships

USA’s 400 meters hurdler, Rai Benjamin, has his eyes set on the world record heading into next month’s World Athletics Championships from August 19-27 in Budapest, Hungary.

The record, 45.94 seconds, is currently held by Norwegian sprinter, Karsten Warholm.

The son of former West Indies and Antigua and Barbuda fast bowler, Winston Benjamin, Rai stopped short of revealing what targets he has set for the championships but said he believes it will take a record-breaking performance to beat Warholm in Budapest.

“Am not going to put it out there but I am looking for a sub world record mark because that’s what it’s going to take to win in all honesty because Warholm is in shape and I am in shape so it’s just about getting sharp now these next couple of days and fine-tuning a couple of things to get ready to go and do that,” he said. 

Benjamin, who represented Antigua and Barbuda as a youth athlete, won a fourth straight US title in his signature event on July 9 at the 2023 US Track and Field Championships in Eugene, Oregon. In the final, he sped to his season’s best, a 46.62, to take the crown.

The athlete, who was speaking on the Good Morning Jojo sports show at the time, however revealed that he had struggled with an injury leading into the US event.

“I’ve been battling with a quad injury for the past three or four months so it’s been an interesting one because I was in great shape coming into the year where I opened up my season very well in the 400 and just preparing to do some big things this year.

“I had a quad injury after the first meet and then I had to go to Germany to get that [sorted]. After that we had USA’s [US trials] and I ran pretty fast there, so now it’s just about maintaining feeling good and training well,” he said. 

Hoping to break the world record and become an Olympic champion in the near future, Benjamin said one of his goals is to fulfill his father’s dream of seeing him compete in the 200 meters.

“This was my initial plan, break the world record, win at the Olympics and then run the 200 the following World Championships but unfortunately nothing ever goes to plan.

“I am still trying to break the world record and then after I get done with that I’ll run the 200 and then I’ll run the 400 and go for that world record. I think I’ll run the 400 hurdles the last Olympics or the last two Olympic cycles,” he said.

 

In August 2021, Warholm broke the 400 meters hurdles record with a time of 45.94 seconds with Benjamin clocking 46.17 for the silver medal.

(07/24/2023) ⚡AMP
by Neto Baptiste
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World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

World Athletics Championships Budapest 23

From August 19-27, 2023, Budapest will host the world's third largest sporting event, the World Athletics Championships. It is the largest sporting event in the history of Hungary, attended by athletes from more than 200 countries, whose news will reach more than one billion people. Athletics is the foundation of all sports. It represents strength, speed, dexterity and endurance, the...

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New study shows how running affects the aging brain

Running is not only great for your physical health, but your mental and cognitive health as well. Regular exercise is necessary if you want to keep your brain healthy as you age, and new research from Florida Atlantic University explains exactly how it helps you maintain memory function as you get older.

For years, general cognitive decline and memory loss were regarded as an unavoidable part of the aging process. Thankfully in the last decade, research has shown that adult neurogenesis (the creation of new brain cells) is possible. The best way to ensure this happens? Regular exercise. 

A study published earlier this year in the journal eNeuro demonstrated that long-term exercise increases the survival of adult-born neurons and modifies their network so they can continue participating in cognitive processes. In other words, the neurons you generated as an adult will continue to function effectively.

Running and the aging brain

The hippocampus and surrounding parts of the brain, which are responsible for learning and memory, are typically the first parts of your brain to start declining as you age. According to the researchers, running has been shown to increase the number of adult-born neurons in the hippocampuses of rodents, but they didn’t know if these new neurons remained integrated into the hippocampal network over the long term.

To find out, they tagged adult-born neurons in the brains of young adult mice, then came back to them after a six-month running regime (when the mice were middle-aged) to determine whether the neurons born in early adulthood remained integrated into the neural networks (i.e., whether they were still functioning effectively). The results showed that these old “new” neurons were still there, and still functioning.

“Long-term exercise profoundly benefits the aging brain and may prevent aging-related memory function decline by increasing the survival and modifying the network of the adult-born neurons born during early adulthood, and thereby facilitating their participation in cognitive processes,” said Henriette van Praag, one of the authors of the study.

The takeaways

Our brains are complex, mysterious organs, and there is still a lot we don’t know about how they function and how to keep them functioning well. This study is yet another reminder of the importance of regular exercise performed over a lifetime, and how that can impact your cognitive health. Runners, it seems, are a step ahead of the rest in terms of preventing cognitive decline, so if you needed a dose of motivation to get out the door today, perhaps that’ll do it.

“Our study provides insight as to how chronic exercise, beginning in young adulthood and continuing throughout middle age, helps maintain memory function during aging, emphasizing the relevance of including exercise in our daily lives,” said Carmen Vivar, a co-author of the study. 

(07/24/2023) ⚡AMP
by Brittany Hambleton
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Tommy Rivers Puzey inspires in short film about his Boston Marathon

Beloved endurance athlete Tommy Rivers Puzey shares his “why” for running in a short film about his experience at the 2023 Boston Marathon, which the formerly-elite runner finished in 4:53:44–which is remarkable, considering that three years ago he was stricken by a rare and aggressive form of lung cancer that nearly killed him. “I don’t love to run fast, I just love to run,” Puzey says.

Puzey, or “Rivs” (as fans and friends call him), has for years been an inspiring force to the endurance world and casual runners alike. Once known for being an elite marathoner, ultrarunner and triathlete, Puzey now runs to celebrate his incredible recovery and to strengthen his body in case of a relapse. His illness and recovery are documented in a recently published book, Everything All At Once, written by his wife, Steph Catudal.

“Steph Catudal shares how her ultrarunner husband’s terrifying illness sparked transformation” — Canadian Running Magazine

View on the original site.

The short film poses the question of why we run: something Puzey can find a multitude of eloquent ways to answer.”It’s an expression of what we are as human beings,” Puzey shares in the film. “It’s what we’re meant to do.” Puzey, who lost 75 per cent of his lung capacity from his illness, has accepted and embraced his slower pace. “I don’t think anything has changed necessarily except that I’m not able to do it as fast,” he explains. Puzey returned to racing with the 2021 New York City Marathon, sharing high-fives and smiles as he walked the course with Catudal in 9:18:57.

The 2017 Boston Marathon was where Puzey ran his best, finishing in 2:18:57 for 16th place. In 2022, Puzey ran a vastly different, yet even more remarkable race. Due to his reduced lung capacity (and despite looking incredibly fit) Puzey must rest for 15-20 seconds for every 30 seconds of running, and he still manages to pull off a sub-five-hour finish.

Puzey explains that post-illness, the draw to the sport remains the same to him. Returning to the level of fitness he formerly had is not the goal; rather, he wants to “do everything [he] can to reach [his] greatest new potential.” Puzey has so many fans for a reason–he comes across as thoughtful and genuine and speaks with humility and grace. The film will have you pondering your why, and leave you inspired by a runner who never gives up.

(07/23/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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Strava unveils two new game-changing features

Attention Strava subscribers! Brace yourselves for two cutting-edge updates coming to the world’s most popular social media app for runners. These game-changing features will forever alter the way you use the app. With the new Waypoints feature, you can now draw and create your route, adding specific stops along the way. Plus, the Best Efforts feature allows you to view your top 10 fastest runs, tracking your progress like never before.

Draw your route with Waypoints

Many Strava users have eagerly awaited an upgrade to the route-designing feature, and their wishes have been answered with the introduction of the Waypoints feature, set to revolutionize your route-planning experience. With Waypoints, placing specific stops between the start and finish becomes a breeze, thanks to the new waypoint button and long-pressing on the map. This feature will build a route in the vicinity where you want to run, displaying specific viewpoints or landmarks en route.

“Strava adds Spotify integration in new update” — Canadian Running Magazine

View on the original site.

View your Best Efforts

Progress tracking on Strava has never been easier, thanks to its Best Efforts feature, now available for running. This new update brings an insightful experience, showcasing their top 10 efforts in distances ranging from one mile to 50K. The Best Efforts feature allows for effortless comparisons of your achievements, offering a glimpse of your progress over time. Strava subscribers can access their Best Efforts through the Progress tab on their profile, making it a breeze to stay motivated and on track.

Hold on tight, these exciting new updates are exclusively available to Strava subscribers. If you haven’t joined the club yet, now’s the time to unlock a world of endless possibilities and take full advantage of your training data.

(07/23/2023) ⚡AMP
by Running Magazine
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What is the UTMB? Meet trail running’s most difficult race

We answer all of your questions about this hellacious footsport event

If you’re starting to dip your toes into the crazy sport of ultrarunning, a couple of things will happen. First, you’re going to need several pairs of the best trail running shoes in rotation at any given time to put up with all those miles pounding rocky trails, and second, it won’t be long before you hear mention of the UTMB. 

In fact, I recently attended the Arc’teryx Alpine Academy in Chamonix which holds a number of trail running clinics, and over the course of four days it was rare to have a conversation where the UTMB didn’t come up. Other participants in the academy wanted to know if our mountain guides had run it, how many times and whether they liked it (they don’t, considering it a tourist event) and mountain guides were keen to complain about how busy it made their favorite running trail.

But what is the UTMB exactly? Is it the ultimate goal for all trail runners? Why is it so hard? Here, we answer all of your questions about this hellacious footsport event.

What is the UTMB race?

UTMB stands for Ultra-Trail du Mont Blanc and is considered one of the world's premier trail ultra marathons. This demanding annual event follows the route of the Tour du Mont Blanc, a classic long distance hiking trail which circles the Mont Blanc Massif over 106 miles and passes through France, Switzerland and Italy. The UTMB begins and ends in Chamonix and is regarded as one of the most difficult races in the world. 

The race takes place on the last weekend of August or first weekend of September and is today the ultimate in a series of events that take place around the world. Runners from all over the world aspire to compete in the UTMB. In the first year of the race, there were 700 participants, but these days, participation is capped at around 2,300 runners and other events have been created to allow for more participation. 

The maximum cutoff for the race is 46.5 hours. In 2022, Kilian Jornet became the first to complete the UTMB in less than 20 hours (check out his race data to find out how he managed it) but most mere mortals can expect to have to run for two days and two nights to complete the race. Better bring some running gels then! 

How does the UTMB race work?

Due to the event’s extreme popularity, you need to qualify to run the UTMB. That involves accumulating points through qualifying trail races over a two-year period. Qualifying races take place all over the world, from elsewhere in the Alps to Snowdonia, California, Mexico, Hong Kong and Australia. So if you’re serious about participating, you’ll have lots of time to train.

For each event you participate in and complete you’ll receive one running stone, which you can then enter into the lottery to be selected. You can enter the lottery at the UTMB website. 

Why is UTMB so hard?

Besides the fact that at over 100 miles, it’s very long, competitors in the UTMB are also looking at 32,940 feet of elevation gain. In comparison, over roughly the same distance you could run the Leadville 100 in Colorado and gain only 11,000 feet (though at much higher altitude) or the West Highland Way in Scotland where you’d gain 10,300 feet.

The highest point of the route is 8,743 feet, which you’ll reach twice, in both Switzerland and France. That’s not extremely high altitude and it’s unlikely you’d experience altitude sickness at that height, but you’ll definitely notice shortness of breath and more challenging conditions, especially if you’re not already used to this altitude.

What you can also expect is more extreme conditions that come with trail running in the Alps. The altitude combined with the season means that the days might be swelteringly hot, while the temperatures at night could drop down around freezing at night. 

How much does it cost to enter UTMB?

In 2023, the UTMB itself cost €335 to enter, plus administration fees. Of course, you’ll also have to pay registration fees for your qualifying events too. Your race will also include the cost of traveling to and from Chamonix, and accommodation while you’re there, but on the plus side the aid stations will be on hand to feed you during the race so you can save a little on those pricey Chamonix restaurants.

How many people have died in UTMB?

Sadly, deaths do occur in ultrarunning events and it’s perhaps more remarkable that for 17 years, no fatalities occurred during the UTMB, which not only places runners’ under extreme physical stress but entails a lot of night running. There have now been two deaths of runners in the UTMB, occurring in 2021 and 2022, both as the result of falls.

Do people sleep during UTMB?

Some runners somehow manage to do the UTMB without sleeping at all while others do sleep, but they’re not carrying a bivy sack and grabbing eight hours if that’s what you’re wondering. Sleeping during the UTMB looks like cat napping, and according to a 2015 study of 17 UTMB runners, the average time spent resting was between 12 and 17 minutes in total, and hallucinations were a common complaint, understandably.

Can you walk the UTMB?

Can you walk the UTMB? Well, yeah you could. Since the race is 106 miles and you have 46.5 hours to complete it, you technically could walk at a 2.3 mile per hour pace without any breaks and make the cutoff. Obviously though, you could just walk it at a time when the race isn't going on, save yourself €335 and enjoy far fewer people on the trail.

In all seriousness though, if you don’t already know, ultrarunning is actually hiking, and you’re not going to be running at the same pace you do on the tarmac back home. Even Jornet ran at an adjusted pace of around five miles per hour which isn’t exactly turbo speed (though it is if you maintain that for 20 hours). You’ll most likely walk the uphills and slow down or walk for rest periods, making up time on the downhills. And sorry, there aren’t many flats to speak of.

 

(07/23/2023) ⚡AMP
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Apple Watch helps save Norwegian trail runner's life after a fall

A trail runner in Norway has credited the existence of the Apple Watch for being able to call an ambulance after falling during a run.Following a holiday, investment director Robert Naess decided to go for a trail run, with his time off prompting him to run faster than usual. However, an accident on the run led to a hospital visit, one helped by the Apple Watch.

After starting at 7 A.M. outside of Bergen, Norway, 59-year-old Naess slipped at one bend, despite being a keen runner and having ran the route a number of times.

The skid had Naess fall chest-first into the edge of a wall, before landing on the floor. Verdens Gang reports the impact cracked multiple ribs, and collapsed one of his lungs.

Due to ending up in severe pain and with breathing problems, he could not pull out his iPhone to call an ambulance. However, he was wearing an Apple Watch and was listening to podcasts via AirPods.

Rather than wait for Fall Detection to kick in, he placed the call to the emergency services himself. Approximately 15 minutes later, he was attended to near the road and taken to Haukeland Hospital.

During the 15-minute wait, Naess notes over 100 cars drove past his location. He reasons that he didn't get any assistance because it was hard to see him from the road, and that it was difficult for traffic to stop there, either.

Doctors confirmed the collapsed lung and broken ribs, before treating abrasions on his face and legs.

After recovering from the ordeal, Naess claims the Apple Watch saved his life, since he had no opportunity to move and was in a critical state. He adds that the next time he runs that route, he will be extra careful at that particular bend.

The Apple Watch has repeatedly been praised for saving lives and helping wearers in tough situations. In June, an Ontario man was helped thanks to the Apple Watch Fall Detection feature, while a woman in Cincinnati was saved from a high-risk blood clot.

(07/23/2023) ⚡AMP
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