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Articles tagged #Olympic Trials
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Quinlan Moll qualified for the United States Olympic Trials in the marathon after running a 2:18:50 on Saturday in the Grandma’s Marathon

The “B” Standard for qualification to the Olympic Trials is 2:19:00.

“I really wanted to get the standard. That was one of my big goals going in,” Quinlan Moll said. “I didn’t know what to expect because I had never run a marathon before. I knew I was in good shape coming off track season, but it is a marathon so you never know what to expect. It is such a long distance that pretty much anything can happen during it.”

Moll competed at UMKC the past five years and finished up his eligibility this spring. UMKC distance coach Brett Guemmer continued to advise Moll through his marathon training.

“He (Coach Guemmer) advised me to take it out slow the first couple miles. It is 5:18 (per mile) average to get under 2:19. He told me not to go out at that, but to start out at 5:30 or 5:25 the first few miles and see how it felt. I was right around low 5:20’s for the first few miles, and the plan was to cut down from there. I was feeling good early on, but it is a long race,” Moll said. “Around mile nine I started dropping closer to 5:18’s to 5:15’s. I wasn’t having any trouble clicking them off, so I (decided) to keep going at that (pace) for a while.”

The steady pace kept Moll feeling good through the half, but his half marathon time of 69:48 was not going to get him to the standard, so he had to pick up the pace.

“I saw I came through the half (marathon) at 69:48, so I knew that I would have to pick it up and start pushing a little more,” Moll said. “Once I started getting later in the race and I still had a little left in my legs, I figured I still had a shot so I just had to keep at it.”

Moll dropped his average mile pace to 5:15 from the half marathon to the 20-mile mark to get closer to where he needed to be to hit the standard.

Going into the event, Moll had never raced longer than a 10-kilometer race or done a training run longer than 20 miles.

“I got to the 20-mile mark and (thought) this is my normal race distance left,” Moll said. “At that point my legs were getting a little heavy, but I was still feeling good enough to where I could convince myself that I had come 20 miles, 6.2 miles isn’t that much further to go. It is just really a mental thing. That was the hardest thing was trying to convince myself I had less distance left than I did.”

After 26 miles, Moll still was in position to hit the standard to qualify for the trials, but it was going to be close.

“I was checking my watch the entire time. Towards the end of the race there are a bunch of curves you have to go around. I felt like my legs weren’t going to give out or anything, so I knew if I could push a little harder that last mile that I could get there. I kept looking at my watch and would pick it up a little bit. Coming down the homestretch, I saw the clock, saw my watch and saw where the finish line was and knew it was going to be close. Once I got toward the homestretch I knew I had it. That was a really good feeling,” Moll said. “I was just grinning across the line. I think I gave a little fist bump too because some of the guys in front of me were celebrating because they knew they were under the standard too.”

The Kickapoo alumus will now have the chance to compete with some of the best distance runners in the United States at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Atlanta on Feb. 29, 2020.

(06/24/2019) ⚡AMP
by Chris Parker
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2020 US Olympic Trials Marathon

2020 US Olympic Trials Marathon

Atlanta will host the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon for both men and women, USA Track & Field and the United States Olympic Committee announced Monday. Hosted by Atlanta Track Club as the local organizing committee, the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon will be held Feb. 29, 2020, and will take place in conjunction with the...

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Galen Rupp is recovering well from his Achilles Tendon injury

Galen Rupp loves to run along the lakefront when he visits Chicago. He occasionally gets noticed as the city’s former marathon champion rather than just an exceptionally fast runner among those who pack the path on sunny days.

“It’s still a weird thing for people to know who you are,” Rupp told the Tribune on Thursday. “I love running along the lake. It’s literally one of the most gorgeous runs I could go on. The architecture of the city is so cool. The people are great here. Obviously I love running here.”

As he works to overcome a foot injury, Rupp logged some miles in the city this week to prepare for the Oct. 13 Chicago Marathon. He’ll have missed nearly a year of competitive marathoning when he returns to the course where he won in 2017.

“It was an easy decision for me to come back here,” Rupp said.

Rupp finished fifth in Chicago last year in 2 hours, 6 minutes, 21 seconds. His coach, Alberto Salazar, revealed two weeks later that Rupp had surgery after the race to fix a condition called Haglund’s deformity, a bone protrusion in his left heel that had worn on his Achilles tendon and partially tore it.

His doctor emphasized how serious the injury could be if Rupp didn’t follow his orders to ease off running. Taking it easy wasn’t easy for Rupp.

“(My doctor) said the only thing I could do wrong is be too aggressive,” he said. “It takes six months to heal. He knows (athletes are) going to try to push it. But he did a good job of scaring me enough. If it went bad, it could have been a career-ender for me. As simple as that.”

Rupp said he’s pleased with his recovery. He’s running about 85 miles per week.

While he recovered, he cross-trained about three hours a week with biking and pool workouts, including running on a water treadmill. He said the break from running was probably good for him from a mental standpoint.

A two-time Olympic medalist, Rupp also hopes to make a fourth U.S. Olympic team at the marathon trials in February in Atlanta. He has won three marathons (the Olympic trials in 2016, Chicago in 2017 and Prague in 2018) and finished second in Boston in 2017.

His time of 2:06:07 in Prague made him the the second-fastest U.S. marathoner of all time behind Khalid Khannouchi’s 2002 record of 2:05:38 in London.

Rupp will face a strong field in Chicago this fall.

(06/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

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Kara Goucher Nearly Collides With Mountain Lion on Morning Training Run

The big cats are a regular part of life in Boulder, but the former Olympian wasn’t expecting to see one on a populated road.

Even Kara Goucher, 2:24:52 marathoner and mainstay of U.S. women’s distance running for over a decade, gets spooked sometimes. But when it’s a dangerous wild predator just inches away from you, that’s understandable.

Since the return of an old hamstring injury forced Goucher to drop out of January’s Houston Marathon after 16 miles—her first marathon attempt since her heartbreaking fourth-place finish at the 2016 Olympic Trials—Goucher has taken her running in a new direction: the trails.

Though she wants more time to acclimate to the new discipline, Goucher told Runner’s World, training in her home of Boulder, Colorado has been going well. That is, until she nearly collided with a mountain lion.

Goucher set out around 8:45 a.m. local time on Monday, May 6, toward the trail systems west of Boulder. As she passed alongside a parked truck outside a residential construction site on Sunshine Canyon Drive—still a Boulder road, not a trail—a mountain lion sprinted across the front of the vehicle. The two were inches away when they saw each other, Goucher told Runner’s World.

“It happened so fast,” Goucher said. “In my mind I was like, ‘That’s not a dog, that’s not a cat. Holy sh--.’”

Goucher set out around 8:45 a.m. local time on Monday, May 6, toward the trail systems west of Boulder. As she passed alongside a parked truck outside a residential construction site on Sunshine Canyon Drive—still a Boulder road, not a trail—a mountain lion sprinted across the front of the vehicle. The two were inches away when they saw each other, Goucher told Runner’s World.

“It happened so fast,” Goucher said. “In my mind I was like, ‘That’s not a dog, that’s not a cat. Holy sh--.’”

But the circumstances—along a developed, populated road in broad daylight—caught her off guard.

“The more I’ve talked to people, the more I’ve thought about it, the fact I ran into it was such a fluke incident,” she said.

Goucher hasn’t braved the trails alone since the incident. (She has run with her male training partner on the trails and alone on the road.) She’s not sure if the unease will wear off in time, but doesn’t plan to venture into the wilderness alone in the near future.

Her biggest takeaway is the need to be more actively prepared for similar encounters, Goucher said. In theory, she knew the standard advice—stay calm, stand your ground, appear intimidating—but that knowledge went out the window in the moment.

“I don’t normally worry about it, because I think I make smart choices,” she said. “But people should practice making yourself big and backing away. I want to make sure if I’m in the situation again, I make the right decisions.”

(05/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by Runner’s World
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Ex-All-American Joseph Whelan goal is to qualify for the Olympic marathon trials

Joseph Whelan, 38, a high school All-American in 2008, is training for the Grandma’s Marathon on June 22 in Duluth, Minn., and aims to run his goal marathon pace of 5:05 per mile up to 18 miles in Buffalo first.  

“I’m going to try to do a workout inside of the Buffalo marathon,” said Whelan, who lives in Spring Branch, Texas, where he is a construction site supervisor. “I’m going to try to win, but it makes sense for me to come home, get out of the heat and get a nice, long effort in, before I have another big marathon.”

Joseph began running marathons a little more than two years ago. Whelan ran cross country and track at Syracuse, but after he graduated in 2014, he focused on relocating and starting his career. When he told people he was a runner, other hardcore runners asked two questions of him: What’s your mile time? What’s your marathon time?

“I took a couple years off after college, not competing, but I’d run all through middle school, high school and college, and it felt like I was obligated to run,” Whelan said. “In 2017, that was the first year that I really thought, ‘I need to put something on the table and do something other than work.’ I needed to run a marathon to say that I’m a runner, and that became my New Year’s resolution in 2017.”

Whelan, who was third in the Buffalo YMCA Turkey Trot in November, is now preparing to qualify for the 2020 Olympic Trials next year in Atlanta. The qualifying time for the 2020 marathon trials is 2:19; Whelan aims to complete the 26.2-mile course in less than 2:13.48.

“I enjoyed the training and the buildup for a marathon, and I thought, hey, if I can focus on this, I can do really well in a marathon. Eventually, I want to do the marathons in Chicago, Boston and New York. They’re the big ones.”

(05/24/2019) ⚡AMP
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Grandmas Marathon

Grandmas Marathon

Grandma's Marathon began in 1977 when a group of local runners planned a scenic road race from Two Harbors to Duluth, Minnesota. There were just 150 participants that year, but organizers knew they had discovered something special. The marathon received its name from the Duluth-based group of famous Grandma's restaurants, its first major sponsor. The level of sponsorship with the...

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Kenyans have won the last five men's full marathons of the Sanford Fargo Marathon

The country that has produced so many great long distance runners over the years will be represented a sixth time at the Fargo Marathon Saturday.

It looks to be a competitive field for the 7 a.m. start. Perhaps helping the increased number of elite runners is the upcoming Olympic Trials for the 2020 Olympic Games.

Runners like Enock Birir, who is training out of Sante Fe, N.M. He’ll toe the line with the fastest personal record of the elite entrants at 2 hours, 20 minutes, 10 seconds. The 28-year-old won the Des Moines (Iowa) Marathon last fall, which was his first marathon in seven years and took third in the Mercedes-Benz Marathon in February in Birmingham, Ala., with a time of 2:26:44.

He’ll have competition from Arturs Bareikis of Crestwood, Ill., a native of Latvia, who took second in the Fargo Marathon in 2014. The Duma Running Club in Coon Rapids, Minn., is sending Kenyan runners Anthony Kurui and two-time Fargo champion David Tuwei.

Kurui most recently finished fifth in the half-marathon in Lincoln, Neb. The 40-year-old Tuwei lists a 2:14 as his PR, but his performances in the last few years have been more in the range of his Fargo-winning times of 2:27.15 in 2015 and 2:28.24 in 2017.

Perhaps the favorite is Garang Madut, who won the St. Jude Memphis Marathon last December. He ran cross country for four years at Cumberland University (Tenn.) and is a graduate assistant coach for the Cumberland women’s cross country team.

Madut moved to Nashville, Tenn., from South Sudan when he was 5 years old. At 23 years old, he may be on the verge of realizing his potential.

Defending Fargo champion Geofrey Terer of Colorado Springs, Colo., won the Brookings (S.D.) Marathon last weekend in 2:30.47. It’s doubtful the 42-year-old would have enough in the tank to challenge on consecutive weekends but he’s been in the running game long enough to know competition over 26.2 miles can get strange at times. It worked last year when he won the Fargo in 2:30.00.

“It’s about who’s on Saturday?” Almquist said. “Who has it mentally and physically together? Or who adapts best to the conditions the runners are facing that day? You know Fargo, it could be anything on Saturday.”

(05/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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Fargo Marathon

Fargo Marathon

The Fargo Marathon is a week full of events, The Fargo Marathon is bound to have something for everyone. From the Cyclothon, Furgo Dog Run, Largest Kid's Race, 5K Walk/Run, 10K, Half Marathon, Full Marathon and Relays, there is a distance for all! Start and Finish inside the Fargo Dome - ...

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Kyle King a 29-year-old marine won the men’s race at the Eugene Marathon clocking 2:18:04

The Eugene Marathon had to alter its course to accommodate a start and finish at Autzen Stadium this year.Organizers might want to make the change permanent.

Between the men’s and women’s Eugene Marathon and Half Marathon on Sunday, there were 18 new names added to the event’s all-time top-10 lists. And on a cool, sunny morning when it seemed so many were running fast, Kyle King and Jennifer Bigham proved to be the fastest.

King, a 29-year-old marine competing in just his second marathon and first since 2014, won the men’s race in 2 hours, 18 minutes, 4 seconds. It was a 45-second victory and the third fastest time in the 13-year history of the Eugene Marathon.

It was also well below the Olympic Trials ‘B’ standard of 2:19.00 (the ‘A’ standard is 2:15:00).Bigham, a 37-year-old mother of three children under the age of 10, got her first win after running “15-20” marathons since her first in 2004. She also reached the finish line inside unchallenged in 2:41:37 — the fifth fastest finish all-time in Eugene, and also easily met the Olympic Trials ‘B’ standard of 2:45:00 (the ‘A’ standard is 2:37:00).“I’ve been trying for the Trials standard for eight years,” Bigham said.

“This is a dream come true.”It was also the only pre-race goal she set for herself. So imagine her surprise when the Pittsburgh resident found herself in the lead once the half marathoners went off in another direction.

“When they cut off, people started saying ‘You’re the first woman,’ and I was kind of shocked,” said Bigham, a steeplechaser and cross country runner during her collegiate career at Ohio State. “It gave me some confidence but it also made me say ‘Keep it cool, chill out.”

Seattle’s Claire DeVoe was second in 2:42:46 (sixth all-time), Perry Shoemaker of Vienna, VA. was third in 2:43:33 (eighth all-time) and Meaghan Nelson of Boise was fourth in 2:44:36.King, an artillery officer based at Buckley Air Force Base outside of Denver who ran distance at Eastern Washington at Oklahoma, said he didn’t know what to expect in his race after only recently beginning to train for the 26.2-mile race.

“Honestly, it went way better than expected,” King said. “I hadn’t been seriously training for like six years. I really had no idea what type of shape I was in so I guess I was in better shape than I thought.”So much so that he struggled at times to stick to his desired pace.

“I really wasn’t too experienced with the marathon so right around miles 10-13 I was chomping at the bit to start going, but I kept telling myself ‘Wait, wait, it’s too early,’” King said. “Then at mile 15 my legs just wanted to go so I opened it up a little bit.

”Second-place finisher Anthony Tomsich of Vancouver, British Columbia finished in 2:18:49 (fifth all-time), and Patrick Richie of Portland was third in 2:19:16 (seventh all-time).

(04/29/2019) ⚡AMP
by Chris Hansen
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Eugene Marathon

Eugene Marathon

Consistently ranked in the top 15 races most likely to qualify for Boston by Marathon Guide, the Eugene Marathon is a beautiful, fast, USATF certified race with amazing amenities and an unrivaled finishinside Historic Hayward Field. The Eugene Half Marathon starts alongside full marathon participants in front of historic Hayward Field home of five Olympic trials, ten NCAA championships and...

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Kellyn Taylor, the seventh-fastest USA marathon woman will run her next marathon at the Volkswagen Prague Marathon

Kellyn Taylor, the seventh-fastest USA marathon woman under all conditions with a 2:24:29 personal best, will run her next marathon at the Volkswagen Prague Marathon on Sunday, May 5, her HOKA Northern Arizona Elite coach Ben Rosario told Race Results Weekly.

Taylor, 32, who finished fourth at the 2016 USA Olympic Trials in the 10,000m and sixth in the marathon, sees running on Prague’s flat, fast course as an opportunity to lower her personal best and get a 2020 Tokyo Olympic qualifying mark (sub-2:29:30).  She last ran the 42.195-kilometer distance at Grandma’s Marathon last June in Duluth, Minn., where she clocked her personal best.  The mark was also an event record.

“After a season off of marathoning, I think Prague is the perfect fit for my next go at 26.2,” Taylor said through a statement. “The field looks fantastic and I’m heading there to compete with the best in search of a win and a new PR.”

Under Rosario’s training, Taylor has moved solidly into the first tier of American marathon women.  She made a very good debut at the Chevron Houston Marathon in 2015 clocking 2:28:40 before finishing sixth at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Los Angeles in hot conditions (2:32:49).  In 2017 she finished 13th at London (2:28:51), 8th at New York (2:29:56) and was the ninth-ranked American marathon woman for 2017 by Track & Field News.  Nearly a year ago, Taylor was unable to finish the 2018 Boston Marathon, held in heavy rain and near-freezing temperatures, but bounced back with her fast run at Grandma’s less than two months later.  Taking last fall off, she will be running Prague on fresh legs.

“Kellyn wanted to try and build on her performance last year at Grandma’s by picking a race where she could battle for the win against a great field and have the opportunity to run a fast time as a result,” coach Rosario told Race Results Weekly in an e-mail.

In Prague, Taylor will face a quality field, including Ethiopia’s Amane Beriso (2:20:48 PB) and Mamitu Daska (2:21:59 PB), Kenya’s Bornes Jepkirui Kitur (2:24:19 PB), and Israel’s Lonah Chemtai Salpeter (2:24:17 PB).

The Volkswagen Prague Marathon is an IAAF Gold Label road race.  Under the new IAAF qualification system for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, a top-5 finish in a Gold Label marathon shall be counted as an Olympic Games qualifying mark regardless of the time.  Nonetheless, Taylor is hoping to run fast.

“Her training has, without a doubt, been as good as ever over the last few weeks and I am excited to see what she can do on the streets of Prague,” concluded Rosario.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
by David Monti
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Prague Marathon

Prague Marathon

The Volkswagen Prague International Marathon is considered by many, to be one of the top 10 marathons and invariably contains a number of high profile runners. Winding through the streets of one of Europe's most beautiful cities it is a spectacular race. And with a mainly flat course there is the chance for a personal best. Since its inception in...

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John Hancock 2019 Boston Marathon US Elite Open Team

Featured video: 2019 Boston Marathon John Hancock U.S. Elite Open Team for Monday April 15.

Abdi Abdirahman, a four-time Olympian, placed sixth at the 2017 Boston Marathon. He is a multiple national champion in the 10,000m, 10K, 10-mile and half marathon. 

Shadrack Biwott finished third this year in Boston. Last year, he was second American and fourth overall. Biwott placed fifth at the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon in a personal best time of 2:12:01.

Aaron Braun, 13th at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, is a versatile road runner. Braun is a national champion in the 12K and was top American at the 2015 Houston Marathon.

Sarah Crouch has finished top-ten three times at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, including this year where she was top American and ninth overall. She is a past champion of the Tallahassee Marathon and finished 11th at the 2016 Boston Marathon.

Jeffrey Eggleston has raced on three IAAF World Championships Marathon teams, placing as high as 13th in 2018. He has won the Pittsburgh, Woodlands, Lima and San Diego Marathons and has been runner-up in Brisbane, Pittsburgh and at Twin Cities.

Scott Fauble was the second American and seventh overall at the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon. Fauble placed fourth in the 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Trials and represented the United States at the 2017 IAAF World Cross Country Championships.  

Lindsay Flanagan, the 2015 Pan American silver medalist in the marathon, finished 11th at the 2017 Boston Marathon and set her personal best of 2:29:25 at the Frankfurt Marathon this year.  

Sara Hall is the tenth fastest U.S. women’s marathoner of all time having set her 2:26:20 mark at the 2018 Ottawa Marathon. Hall has earned national titles in the marathon, 20K, 10-mile, mile and cross country. She is married to Ryan Hall, who is a John Hancock Elite Athlete Ambassador and holds the American course record of 2:04:58 at the Boston Marathon. 

Jordan Hasay set an American debut record of 2:23:00 with her third-place finish in Boston in 2017. She then ran the second fastest marathon of all time by a U.S. woman at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, where she placed third in 2:20:57. Hasay is an 18-time All American and a national champion at 15K and 20K.  

Elkanah Kibet, a member of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, has had two top-ten finishes at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon. At the 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon, Kibet finished top American and 16th overall. He was 8th in Boston in 2018.

Desiree Linden, a two-time Olympian, returns to Boston as defending champion. A top-five finisher in eight Abbott World Marathon Majors, additional accomplishments include placing seventh at the 2016 Olympic Games Marathon, tenth at the 2009 IAAF World Championships Marathon, second at the 2012 and 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and second in the 10,000m at the 2015 Pan American Games. In addition to her 2018 win in Boston, she placed second in 2011.

Timothy Ritchie, the 2017 U.S. National Marathon champion, ran for the U.S. at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships where he placed 23th. Ritchie is the head men’s cross country coach at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Dathan Ritzenhein is the fourth fastest U.S. marathoner of all time with a 2:07:47 personal best. Career highlights for the three-time Olympian include finishing ninth at the 2008 Olympic Marathon, winning the bronze medal at the 2009 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and finishing 13th at the 2012 Olympic Games 10,000m. 

Sarah Sellers ran through freezing rain and torrential wind this year to finish second behind Des Linden. In her 2017 marathon debut, Sellers won the Huntsville Marathon. In New York this year she finished 18th.

Brian Shrader is a versatile runner on the track and roads. He made his half marathon debut in Boston this year at the B.A.A. Half Marathon, running 1:05:26. He also made his marathon debut in 2018, running 2:13:31 at the USA Championships in Sacramento.  

Becky Wade, a champion of the California International Marathon, finished 11th at the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon and tenth at the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon. 

Jared Ward placed third at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and followed with a sixth-place finish at the Olympic Marathon in Rio de Janeiro, less than a minute and a half out of medal contention. In 2017 Ward was tenth at the Boston Marathon and this year, he finished top American and sixth overall at the TCS New York City Marathon. 

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
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Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

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America’s Amy Cragg is set to race the Prague Half on Saturday

Success for reigning USA Olympic Trials Marathon champion Amy Cragg did not come easily or quickly.  Indeed, the 35 year-old Nike Bowerman Track Club athlete nearly quit the sport before her true talent really showed through, eventually carrying her to Olympic Trials wins in both 2012 (at 10,000m) and 2016 (marathon), four USA titles, and a 2:21:42 marathon personal best.  It’s been a long, and sometimes bumpy, road.

“Definitely, I’ve made some mistakes along the way,” Cragg told Race Results Weekly in a telephone interview from Prague where she’ll be running the Sportisimo Prague International Half-Marathon on Saturday.  “I’ve learned from them and that’s kind of led me to here.  So, every once in a while I’ve looked back and I’m, like, I should have done this differently or this differently.  But, the reality is that I might not have ended up here.  I think I’m in a really good place.”

Working with coaches Jerry Schumacher and Pascal Dobert and Bowerman teammate Shalane Flanagan since the end of 2015, Cragg has blossomed into one of America’s best at 26.2 miles.  After winning the February, 2016, Marathon Trials on a brutally hot day in Los Angeles, she went on to finish ninth in the Olympic Games Marathon in Rio. 

She backed up that performance a year later with a thrilling, late-race charge at the 2017 IAAF World Championships marathon in London, taking the bronze medal (the first medal for a USA woman at those championships in the marathon since 1983), and only missing the silver by a fraction of a second. 

She recovered from her London race well, then ran the Tokyo Marathon in February, 2018, finishing third in an excellent 2:21:42.  That performance made her the fifth-fastest American of all time behind only Deena Kastor, Jordan Hasay, Flanagan and Joan Samuelson.

"I love where I’m at,” Cragg continued.  “I love my team and my coach.  Just living in Oregon, that’s been incredible.  I think overall, those rough moments, those times when I considered stopping have made me a stronger athlete.  I’m glad I went through that.  It’s hard to say that.  Those times, I think I really learned a lot from them.”

Cragg is at an unusual juncture in her career.  She hasn’t run a marathon in over a year.  She built-up for Chicago last October, but ended up withdrawing from the race after she and her coaches felt that her training hadn’t brought her to the fitness she would need to run her best.  They had intense discussions, she said, about what to do next.

“When I pulled out of Chicago last year the big talk was, OK, what do we really want to get out of the next two years?” Cragg said.  “I’ll probably be in the sport two years and reassess.  The big thing is making another Olympic team and trying to perform well in Tokyo.  Everything we do from here on out, that’s the goal to make that team and we’ve been working back from there.”

Cragg decided not to do a spring marathon this year.  Instead, she worked with her Bowerman teammates Shelby Houlihan, Marielle Hall, Courtney Frerichs, and Karissa Schweizer to get ready for the USATF Cross Country Championships last February where she finished fifth in her first national cross country championships in nine years. 

A month later she ran the special Road to Gold test event in Atlanta where she was able to run on the 2020 Olympic Trials course.  Uncontested, she covered the 8-mile route in 43:23 and won by a minute.  She told Race Results Weekly that the Atlanta race was essentially the kick-off of her Trials training.

“I felt pretty good,” Cragg said.  “I think I’m in a good position and I’m pretty excited to get into the bigger miles.  For me, that makes a huge difference.  I feel ready to start that, which is exciting for me.”

Saturday’s race in Prague is the next logical step on Cragg’s long journey to Atlanta next February for the marathon trials and Tokyo for the Olympics next August.  On Prague’s flat, record-eligible course Cragg wants to race hard with the goal of improving herself as a marathoner.

(04/05/2019) ⚡AMP
by David Monti
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Prague Half Marathon

Prague Half Marathon

Start the RunCzech season with one of the biggest running events in the Central Europe! Every year the Sportisimo Prague Half Marathon excites spectators with performances of elite athletes breaking records. Enjoy a course with incomparable scenery in the heart of historic Prague that follows along the Vltava river and crisscrosses five beautiful bridges. Take in majestic views of...

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Ethiopian Ayantu Dakebu Hailemaryam Is set to win again for the third time at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon

Two-time winner Ayantu Dakebu Hailemaryam seeks to repeat against a top international field at this year’s Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, set for Sunday, May 5. This year’s race will feature a total prize purse of $56,000 including $8,000 for each race champion.

Hailemaryam, of Ethiopia, won the women’s division of the 2016 DICK’S Sporting Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon with a time of 2:39:18. 

She repeated in 2017,  improving her time by nearly three minutes to finish in 2:36:20. To earn the coveted laurel wreath once again, she will need to beat fellow Ethiopians Bose Gemeda Assefa, the 2018 Richmond Marathon Champion who has a marathon personal best of 2:32:59, and Bizuwork Getahun Kasaye, the 2018 the Vermont City Marathon champion who has a marathon personal best of 2:38:15.

The impressive women’s field includes decorated race champions and rising American athletes, including Christina Murphy and Brittany Tretbar who will lead this year’s American field.

Tretbar is making her Pittsburgh debut and has a marathon personal best of 2:41:29. Murphy, who won the 2018 Columbus Marathon, returns to Pittsburgh after placing third in 2015.

“This is my first time back in Pittsburgh since finishing third in 2015,” said Murphy. “I am so excited to experience the challenges of the course and the excitement of the crowds again on May 5 and hopefully improve upon my previous performance!”

In the men’s race, Ethiopian Tadesse Yae Dabi, the 2018 Philadelphia Marathon champion, is the top seeded runner with a marathon personal best of 2:11:50. He will face tough competition from Kenyans Eliud Ngetich, the 2019 Mercedes Marathon winner who has a marathon personal best of 2:11:59, and Boniface Kongin, the 2017 Philadelphia Marathon who has a marathon personal best of 2:14:00.

Ethiopian Birhanu Dare Kemal, with a marathon personal best of 2:12:21, will return to the race after placing fourth last year. This year’s race has also attracted emerging American professional athletes who hope to use their finishing time in Pittsburgh to qualify for the 2020 U.S. Marathon Olympic Trials.

To support these athletes, P3R will provide a pace team who will lead the American female elites to an Olympic Marathon Trials Qualifying “B” Standard time. The trio of Pittsburgh competitive runners plan is to reach the finish line in 2:44:59 (“B” Standard time is 2:45:00).  

(04/02/2019) ⚡AMP
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Dick's Sporting Good Pittsburgh Marathon

Dick's Sporting Good Pittsburgh Marathon

This race is your game - however you decide to play it. As a competitor. A fund raiser. An enthusiast. A veteran. A team player. It's whatever you want it to be. It's whatever you make it. It's YOUR game..... Run it. Play it. Own it. Love it. Runners will race on the North Shore of Pittsburgh, cross each of...

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How The 2020 Olympic Qualifying Rules could Impact The Sprints, Field Events, and Walks in the United States

In case you haven’t been paying close attention, the IAAF has greatly increased the difficulty of the entry standards as they mainly want athletes to qualify via the newly-created world rankings. When the IAAF announced its new qualifying system on March 10,  “the process is designed to achieve about 50 percent of the target numbers for each event through Entry Standards and the remaining 50 percent through the IAAF World Ranking System,” but that is somewhat misleading as most of the athletes who qualify via the entry standard would also qualify via the world rankings.

The entry standards were mainly designed as an insurance policy for a superstar who might have been out with injury or pregnancy, as the IAAF explained in a press release in July, “Entry standards will be approved and published later this year, but will be set for the sole purpose of qualifying athletes with exceptional performances unable to qualify through the IAAF world rankings pathway.”

Despite that, for some unknown reason, USATF told us on Friday that they won’t pay any attention to the IAAF world rankings for Olympic Trials competitors if there are three people in an event who have hit the qualifying standard.

So even if the top three finishers in an event at the US Olympic Trials are all ranked in the top 32 in the world — the IAAF takes at least 32 people for every track and field event except for the multis (24) and 10,000 (27) — if they don’t have the standard, USATF has said they won’t be going to the Olympics if there are three other finishers at the Trials who have hit the qualifying mark.

If the 2020 rules had been in place for 2016, USATF wouldn’t have sent  Paul Chelimo — who finished third at the Trials in the 5,000 in 2016 and would have been ranked in the top 30 in the world had the world rankings existed — to the Olympics even though he went on to earn a silver medal as his PR at the time was slower than the 2020 standard.

All told, seven US mid-d or distance runners — all of whom were top three at the Trials and five of whom went on to make the final in their event in Rio — would not have made the team.

 

(03/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

Fifty-six years after having organizedthe Olympic Games, the Japanese capital will be hosting a Summer edition for the second time, from July 24 to August 9, 2020. The Games in 1964 radically transformed the country. According to the organizersof the event in 2020, the Games of the XXXII Olympiad of the modern era will be “the most innovative ever organized,...

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Tyler Pence has started training rigorously for U.S. Olympics Trials marathon

Tyler Pence never struggles to get out the door. Well, unless there’s a freakish snowstorm not unlike the one in January.That forced him to stay indoors and run on a treadmill.

“But usually 99 percent of the time I’m running outside,” said Pence, who graduated from Springfield High School in 2011.

Pence hasn’t slowed down one bit since winning a couple of NCAA Division II long-distance titles at University of Southern Indiana in 2015, which included the indoor 5,000 meters and outdoor 10,000.

That’s because the 2016 USI grad is prepping for his first appearance in the U.S. Olympic Trials marathon scheduled Feb. 29, 2020 in Atlanta.

He qualified this past December, beating the required 2:19.00 standard at the USATF-sanctioned California International Marathon in Sacramento, California. Pence came in at 17th place with a time of 2:15.36.

“That’s something that I really wanted to accomplish,” Pence said. “The marathon, it’s a gamble. Things can go wrong. It’s such a long period of racing that something can go wrong at any moment, so to put it together and have the day that I had, I was very happy with how it went.”

Pence had only attempted one other marathon – the Las Vegas Rock n Roll Marathon in 2016. Pence said that was just for fun.

Sacramento was different.

Pence started training rigorously in August, approximately the same time he won his third straight 10-kilmometer Abe’s Amble road race at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

His training spanned four months, running 110-120 miles a week. Sundays were always his big runs, reaching up to 20-24 miles.

He often did morning practices with UIS runners, in addition to a second jaunt in the afternoon.

It was the source of his inspiration.

“When I graduated college, I actually didn’t really plan on continuing my running career and then once I got into coaching, I was around these guys all of the time. It was definitely a motivator of mine,” Pence said. “I thought, ‘How can I tell these guys what to do all of the time, but not do it myself?’ So, I’m a big believer in practice what you preach. That’s definitely what got me back into getting motivated to run at the next level.”

(03/12/2019) ⚡AMP
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2020 US Olympic Trials Marathon

2020 US Olympic Trials Marathon

Atlanta will host the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon for both men and women, USA Track & Field and the United States Olympic Committee announced Monday. Hosted by Atlanta Track Club as the local organizing committee, the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Marathon will be held Feb. 29, 2020, and will take place in conjunction with the...

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Can Japan’s Suguru Osako Win the Tokyo Marathon on home soil? Yes it is possible but there are five Africans in the field with faster times

Japan’s national record holder Suguru Osako, is running Japan’s biggest marathon, Tokyo. And that’s exciting. Because as great as Japan has been at the marathon in recent years, Kenya and Ethiopia have still been way better.

Prior to last year, no Japanese man had broken 2:07 since 2002, which is almost a prerequisite to win a WMM these days: since 2013, 89% of men’s WMM champs have entered the race with a sub-2:07 PR. 23 Kenyans had broken 2:07 in 2018 alone.

But Japan is narrowing the gap to the East Africans. Last year, after going 15 years without a sub-2:07 marathoner, Japan produced three: Osako (2:05:50), Yuta Shitara (2:06:11), and Hirohito Inoue (2:06:54). And both Osako (3rd in Chicago) and Shitara (2nd in Tokyo) were in the mix for the win at majors.

This weekend kicks off an incredible 18 months of marathoning in Japan. It begins with the Tokyo Marathon on Sunday, the first WMM of 2019, and continues in September with the Japanese Olympic Trials, also in Tokyo.  Then there’s the 2020 Tokyo Marathon and, of course, the Olympic marathon in August 2020.

The biggest reason to be excited about this year’s Tokyo Marathon is Osako, who is based in the US and trains under Nike Oregon Project coach Pete Julian.

A win by Japan’s best marathoner on home soil just 17 months before they host the Olympics would be a huge story, and it could actually happen. That doesn’t mean it will happen — there are five guys entered with faster PRs than Osako, including four under 2:05 — but it certainly can happen!

(02/28/2019) ⚡AMP
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Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

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Kenyan`s Eliud Ngetich wins the 2019 men’s Mercedes Marathon clocking 2:18:12

Eliud Ngetich from Kenya crossed the finish line Sunday morning to win the 2019 men’s Mercedes full Marathon.

He finished with a time of 2:18:12, that’s a Mercedes Marathon record. Negetich is 25. The previous course record was 2:18:48.

Ruth Kimutai won the women’s marathon clocking 2:45:48.

The race featured the deepest pool of elite talent since the 2004 Olympic Trials that were held in Birmingham.

A handful of men and women are trying to qualify for the Olympic Trials, which will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, in 2020.

(02/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Mercedes-Benz Marathon

Mercedes-Benz Marathon

The race is a Boston Marathon qualifier and attracts racers from across the nation and around the world. The race was founded in 2003 as a fundraising effort for The Bell Center, a program for developmentally-challenged children. Celebrating 18 years, we're Alabama's premier running weekend! Bring the family and stretch out your legs on Saturday with our Regions Superhero 5K...

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Strong field is expected at the 68th Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon

After an exciting head-to-head battle last year that saw runners sub-2:10 PBs, Desmond Mokgobu from South Africa and Hayato Sonoda return to the Feb. 3 Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon.

The pair face not only each other but recent sub-2:10 men Hicham Laqouahi from Morocco, Ethiopian Abdela Godana, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, Daisuke Uekado, Kenyan Justus Kiprotich, Takuya Fukatsu, Kohei Ogino and Yihunilign Adane, and sub-62 half marathoners Keijiro Mogi, Charles Ndirangu and Shuho Dairokuno, setting up a better-than-average pack by Beppu-Oita standards.

For the Japanese men Beppu-Oita counts toward qualification for the MGC Race, Japan's 2020 Olympic Trials. Sonoda and Uekado have already made it along with fellow entrants Naoki Okamoto and Tomohiro Tanigawa, but for Ogino and others it will be just about their last chance. The basic rule is that anyone under 2:08:30 will qualify.

The top Japanese finisher not already qualified will join the list of qualifiers if under 2:11:00, with up to five more joining the list if under 2:10:00.

There's also the option of qualifying via a two-race average under 2:11:00 within the qualifying window. In Ogino's case that means a 2:12:24 will be enough, and Ryo Hashimoto also has the chance it make it that way by clearing 2:10:20. Japan's current #1 man in the 10000 m, sub-62 half marathoner Dairokuno will be making his debut alongside sub-61 teammate Mogi, and if either has a successful one he will be the first from three-time New Year Ekiden national champion Asahi Kasei's current roster to earn MGC qualification assuming Fukatsu or another teammate in Beppu-Oita doesn't get there first.

If they or others miss out there's the consolation prize of consideration for the 2019 Doha World Championships team, pretty much an either-or situation relative to the MGC Race.Beppu-Oita also has a small women's field. The heavy favorite is Haruka Yamaguchi, runner-up at last fall's Osaka Marathon and looking to break her 2:34:12 PB and hopefully the 2:33:00 CR set last year by Hiroko Yoshitomi.

Next-strongest is American Cate Barrett with a 2:43:40 on the aided California International Marathon course in December, but with Yamaguchi having tuned up for Beppu-Oita with a 2:42:39 training run effort at the Xiamen Marathon earlier this month it's clearly her race to lose.

(01/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon

Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon

The Beppu-OŒita Marathon is an annual men's marathon race that takes place every February between the cities of Beppu and Oita on the island of Kyushu in Japan. First held in 1952 as a 35km race, the looped marathon course begins at the bottom of Takasaki Mountain and reaches Beppu's Kankoko International Port before turning back towards the finishing point...

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Olympic medalists Clayton Murphy and Nick Willis to Headline NYRR Wanamaker Mile Men’s Field at 112th NYRR Millrose Games

Olympic medalists Clayton Murphy and Nick Willis, along with the world’s fastest miler indoors or outdoors last year, Edward Cheserek, will headline the NYRR Wanamaker Mile men’s field at the 112th NYRR Millrose Games on Saturday, February 9 at The Armory’s New Balance Track and Field Center.

The signature event at the NYRR Millrose Games has taken place every year on the men’s side since 1926 and was won last year by Chris O’Hare, and this year it will be broadcast live nationally on NBC for the third consecutive year.

“The NYRR Wanamaker Mile is revered as one of the world's greatest mile races and this year's men’s field in the 112th NYRR Millrose Games looks to be one of the best ever,” said NYRR Millrose Games Meet Director Ray Flynn.

Murphy, 23, of New Paris, OH, was the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials champion over 800 meters and won bronze in the distance at the Rio 2016 Olympics. The University of Akron graduate set a personal best in Rio, running 1:42.93 to become the third-fastest American in history. Murphy, who won two NCAA titles in 2016 and a Pan American title in 2015, finished second in a personal-best time in his NYRR Wanamaker Mile debut in 2017 and was fifth over 800 meters at last year’s NYRR Millrose Games.

“I am very excited to be back in New York and race the prestigious NYRR Wanamaker Mile,” Murphy said. “I’m sure the fans will be loud and cheering us on, and I am looking forward to putting on a show for everyone.”

Willis, 35, of New Zealand, finished as runner-up at the NYRR Wanamaker Mile three times (2009, 2015, 2016), was third twice (2008, 2014) and took fifth last year. As a four-time Olympian, the University of Michigan graduate and Ann Arbor, MI resident won the silver medal in the 1500 meters at the Beijing 2008 Games, carried New Zealand’s flag at the London 2012 Opening Ceremony, and returned to the podium with a bronze medal in the 1500 meters at the Rio 2016 Games. In 2017, he won a record-tying fourth men’s title at the 5th Avenue Mile, adding to his previous victories on Manhattan’s most famous thoroughfare from 2008, 2013, and 2015.

(01/09/2019) ⚡AMP
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Timothy Ritchie will run the Boston Marathon for the second time and hopes to finish strong this year

Tim Ritchie pulled out a baseball analogy when describing his success in past marathons. "I'm 2-3," Ritchie said on Friday. "I've had two good ones and three bad ones. I'd like to even the score and bat .500 Monday."

Ritchie, 30, of New Haven will run the Boston Marathon for the second time. His last time in Boston was one of the bad ones — it was his first marathon, he went out too hard and struggled in the last 10K.

But his last marathon was one of the good ones — in fact, it was the best. Ritchie won the U.S. 2017 national championship at the California International Marathon Dec. 3 in Sacramento in 2:11:56, a personal best by close to three minutes. Only Olympian Galen Rupp, who won the Chicago Marathon in 2:09, ran a faster time by an American in 2017.

Ritchie, who grew up in Worcester, went to Boston College, where he starred on the track and cross country teams. He was an assistant at BC for the track and cross country teams until the fall of 2016, when he left the job and moved to New Haven with his fiancee and started to concentrate on his running.

In Boston in 2013, he finished in 2:21. At the Olympic Trials in 2016, he finished in 2:22 and ran a similar time at New York City later that year.

"I would be good for 20 miles then collapse over the last 10K," he said. "You've got to learn from your mistakes — or even if there weren't mistakes, you always have to try to improve, in the training and the fueling.

"For CIM, the training was really consistent. Higher volume workouts were the key. We didn't really have these major long runs but we had a lot of kind of long runs at a good pace. Like 16-18 miles, maybe twice a week."

(12/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jordan Hasay is working toward 2020 Olympics after latest injury setback

Even through two significant foot injuries in 2018, Jordan Hasay remains optimistic about her long-term running career and is focused on having a successful year leading up to the 2020 U.S. Olympic Trials.

Hasay captured the attention of the running world when she finished third at the Boston Marathon in April 2017.  Jordan shattered the record for an American woman in her marathon debut by nearly three minutes.

Six months later, Hasay cemented her status among the world’s elite marathon runners with a third-place finish at the Chicago Marathon. She clocked 2:20:57, the second-fastest marathon time ever recorded by an American woman.

Hasay, an 18-time All-American at the University of Oregon, had her sights set on breaking Deena Kastor’s American record this year when she suffered two separate fractures to the bone in her left heel.

In April, Hasay withdrew from the Boston Marathon the day before the race after an MRI revealed the significance of the initial injury.

Hasay said she was encouraged the first injury healed so well, and she expects to make a full recovery from the most recent setback.

She’s thankful to be able to return the Central Coast and spend time with family while she rests and recovers.  Sacrificing eight weeks of running is a concession Hasay is ready to make for what she hopes will be a long career ahead.

“You’ve got to find things that can make you smile each day when you’re out injured like that, because you’re not out there doing what you love the most,” Hasay said.

“I see it as sort of the beginning of my marathon career, and hopefully we’ll figure it out so I don’t have these sort of injuries again.”

(12/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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It is important to understand that we are not bullet proof as runners - Larry Allen on Running File 4

I went out for a slow, difficult three mile run the evening prior to my pacemaker being implanted.  My heart, although not functioning properly, was thankfully strong enough for that one last run without artificial help.

My friend, a nurse, probably saved my life by getting me into a walk-in clinic that next morning.  Everything went fine and I am now running again but with a pacemaker (recent photo in NY Central Park). 

Let me share some advice. There is a fine line between being tired or feeling weak from a hard workout or thinking maybe fatigue or weakness is “just” natural decline with age making things harder  vs. something feeling “off” enough to seek help.

It’s a blurry line but I guess my best advice is to be keenly observant of your own physical traits and patterns and when anything falls outside of a normal range for you, again, see someone. I think it’s very important to understand that we aren’t “bullet proof” as runners.

I remember in the 70s Dr. George Sheehan wrote and in lectures said that we, as marathon runners, were essentially immune from having a heart attack. It wasn’t long after that Jim Fixx died of a sudden heart attack while running on an easy training run.

Almost every day when I run in Central Park in NYC I run right by the spot where Ryan Shey died suddenly of an undiagnosed cardiac condition early in the 2007 Olympic Trials Marathon, on a downhill section, it was a cool day and the pace early in the race was conservative (for him).

A friend, physician and Olympic Trials qualifier in the marathon from Maine has a sad but growing list of lifelong runners from northern New England alone that have met similar fates without knowing they had a health issue.

We have to understand that even as very fit runners we are vulnerable, and that goes hand in hand with understanding the importance of listening to your body.We all have to be our own best advocate and our own best piece of medical monitoring equipment.

It’s easier with all of the new technologies however, as runners, we have intuitive ability that puts us in touch with our own bodies. We must listen carefully to all of it and also try to overcome another trait we have as runners, our stubbornness, which can certainly be our strength and our weakness at the same time. 

Recovery has been tricky. After my pacemaker was  functioning I was diagnosed with intermittent (paroxysmal) Afib which is treatable with medication. At first I didn’t quite understand that Afib progressively becomes more persistent or permanent and that treatment options become less effective or sometimes completely ineffective as it goes along. 

I ran again for a bit over a year but my Afib was gradually getting worse and eventually the stronger medications needed weren’t easily tolerable. It got harder to run yet again. My remaining option was a cardiac ablation. After careful consideration I had it done early this past summer.

The good news is that my Afib has not reoccurred since. The bad news is that it’s a lengthy healing process. I am six months into it and have probably walked about 600 miles. I’ve gradually added short stints of jogging into my walks and only recently a few miles of continuous very slow running.  

I’m told that it will take perhaps 3-5 months to fully heal and hopefully then I’ll be able to run more normally.

(Larry Allen on Running is a regular MBR feature sharing the wisdom of Larry Allen, a 50 year accomplished runner and artist.  He is currently participating in the third Run The World Challenge.)

(12/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Making his debut Colby Mehmen, was the winner at BMW Dallas Marathon

It was over halfway through Sunday’s BMW Dallas Marathon, and not much was going right for contestant Colby Mehmen, who was making his marathon debut.

The problems started days before the race, when Mehmen, a 24-year-old, Princeton, Texas, native aiming to earn an Olympic trials qualifying standard got sick, contracted a fever and started having issues with his asthma.

Then, though Mehmen managed to jump out to a commanding lead within the first 10 miles of Sunday’s race, he started hurting around Mile 16. Gage Garcia, the only other runner nearby, took advantage, chipping away at Mehmen’s lead before narrowly pulling ahead by Mile 20.

And quickly approaching was what Mehmen considered the toughest and most important part of course: the Winsted Drive Hill. But somehow, the very immensity of that challenge spurred Mehmen to victory: Mehmen fought hamstring pain, the daunting hill and a formidable opponent to regain a solid lead by Mile 22, catapulting him to a first-place finish in the Dallas Marathon with a final time of 2:22:40.

“When we hit that hill, I just tried to... take the lead and see what happened,” Mehmen said. “Around Mile 21 or 22, I finally got loosened up again, and just brought it home...I got a little bit of a gap on him and then tried to pull away.

“That was one of the hardest things I've ever had to do, with my hamstrings tightening up, to really pull away at the point.”

(12/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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No Japanese Women Runners qualify for Olympic trials at the Saitama Marathon

Marie Imada finished fourth for Japan's best performance in the Saitama International Marathon on Sunday, failing to meet the qualifying standards for the Marathon Grand Championship, 2020 Olympic trials. 

In the race won by 20-year-old Dalila Gosa of Bahrain in 2 hours, 25 minutes, 35 seconds, Imada clocked 2:29:35, neither making the top three and running under 2:29:00, nor finishing in the top six under 2:28:00 to earn a place in next fall's MGC Race.

Only eight women have met the qualifying standards so far for the MGC Race to be held Sept. 15 next year in Tokyo. The MGC is a race that will determine two of the three members for both the men's and women's marathon teams for the Tokyo Olympics.

On Sunday, Imada and Saki Tokoro fell behind the leading pack around the 23-kilometer mark, while the IAAF Race turned into a duel between Gosa and fellow Bahraini Shitaye Habtegebrel down the final stretch.

"I was able to win because I trained hard. I'm very happy," Gosa said. "I'd like to work more on speed and endurance, and be able to maximize my performance." Habtegebrel crossed the finish line at the Saitama Super Arena four seconds after Gosa, and Kenya's Sylvia Jebiwot Kibet took third in 2:28:38.

Mao Kiyota, who competed in the world athletics championships in London last summer, finished fifth in 2:31:07, and Tokoro came home sixth.

(12/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Colby Mehmen will make his marathon debut at Sunday's BMW Dallas Marathon

Colby Mehmen hopes to earn an Olympic trials qualifying standard and capture his hometown marathon title in the process. "I think they go hand in hand," Mehmen said of needing a sub-2-hour, 19-minute finish. "I'm probably going to have to hit the standard to win it." Mehmen, 24, has spent the last five months living and working in Boulder, Colo., training at altitude to put himself in position to run well. He's been living in his camper van and working at the Boulder Running Co. He considers two-time defending champion Keith Pierce the favorite. "He has so much experience," Mehmen said. "He's the seasoned veteran. Speed doesn't always translate into the marathon. I might have it in the shorter races, but the marathon is a whole different game."   (12/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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High School runner Katelyn Tuohy has set her sights on the 2020 US Olympic trials

The high school junior, Katelyn Tuohy just 16 finished another undefeated season at Nike Cross Nationals and announced her intent to focus on qualifying for the 2020 US Olympic trials.

Everything I do is impacted by my decision to want to make it to the Olympic trials. That’s definitely my big picture goal for the future.” She continued, “I think I’m more of a 5K runners because of my stride, but I also love the 3,000m and 1,500m. Unfortunately there’s no 3,000m at the trials so I think the 5K is my best shot right now.”

The qualifying standard for the trials was 15:25:00 for the 5,000m in 2016. Tuohy is only 16-years-old but she will be 18 by the time 2020 rolls around.

This is young for a runner to try and make an Olympic team, especially in a distance like the 5,000m, but not unheard of.

Newly signed New Balance Athlete Sydney McLaughlin had a similarly stunning high school career and made the 2016 Olympic team at only 16-years-old, and turned 17 just before the games.

(12/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sarah Mulcahy fractured a hip in January 2017 and was told she´d never run again qualified for US olympic trials at CIM

A hip fracture suffered while 31 weeks pregnant in January 2017 left Sarah Mulcahy uncertain about her distance running future. But surgery and successful childbirth soon were followed by a return to the roads, and on Sunday she capped off that comeback by qualifying for the 2020 U.S. Olympic women’s marathon trials. Mulcahy, 33, earned a berth in the Trials, to be held in Atlanta on Feb. 29, 2020, by achieving the Olympic “B” standard of 2 hours, 45 minutes, with her time of 2:44:28 at the California International Marathon in Sacramento. “My whole goal had been the 2020 Olympic Trials,” said Mulcahy, who with her husband Jon, 4-year-old daughter Olivia and 20-month-old son Isaiah, moved back in August to the St. John Valley where she works as a math teacher at a High School. “I felt so defeated when I broke my hip; I thought I’d never get that chance,” she said. “It looked like my one shot was CIM because once 2020 rolls around my kids will be so busy there won’t be time to train."  Mulcahy said she was aided by the quality of the field at the California International Marathon, which for the second straight year served as the USA Marathon Championship. “It was unreal always having so many fast people around me,” she said. “I’ve always run races in Maine where I was pretty much alone, so this was awesome.” Mulcahy began running competitively in 2009 while working as a teacher in Westbrook and soon established herself as one of the state’s top distance runners. She is a two-time Millinocket Marathon women’s champion and a four-time winner of the demanding Bay of Fundy International Marathon in Lubec. Her 2:49:53 clocking there in June was good for second place overall and her personal best for the 26.2-mile distance until Sunday’s effort.  (12/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Emma Bates Won the California International Marathon in her debut

On a near-perfect day for marathon running with sunny skies and comfortably cold temperatures, Brogan Austin of West Des Moines, Iowa, and Emma Bates of Boise, Idaho, won the USATF Marathon titles at the California International Marathon on Sunday Dec 2. Austin, 27, who entered today’s race with only a 2:24:39 personal best, was a surprise winner, while Bates, 26, was one of the favorites, despite making her marathon debut. Austin clocked 2:12:38 while Bates was timed in 2:28:18. Both athletes earned $20,000 in prize money plus a $1500 bonus for achieving USA Olympic Trials Marathon qualifying times. Emma Bates said in her pre-race interview on Friday that she had one simple goal for today: to win. When the gun went off, she paid no attention to the other 98 elite women and pounded aggressively through the opening stages of the race. She split 10-K in 34:41, a 2:26 pace. She slowed only slightly through halfway (1:13:24), but later admitted that she had started too fast. “I just felt so good,” Bates said with a laugh. “You get wrapped up in it, and there’s so many people running around you, all the guys, everybody cheering. The adrenaline is really hard to keep at bay. I went out a little too aggressive, I think. I definitely wanted to run the second half a little bit faster.” Like Llano, Bates had a big lead through the halfway point. The number-one seeded woman in the field, Stephanie Bruce, was a full 83 seconds back. Was Bates worried about getting caught? “I wasn’t,” she said. “I didn’t know where the other women were behind me, but I knew I was keeping a decent pace, a solid pace. So, I wasn’t worried at any point. I just wanted to run a fast time. At the end of the day, I just wanted to do my best.” Bates was never challenged. She cruised through the final miles and looked remarkably fresh at the finish line. Her time of 2:28:18 made hers the eighth-fastest USA marathon debut for a woman. It was also her first national title at any distance. “I said that I wanted to win,” she said.  (12/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympic Trails qualifier, Karen Bertasso hopes to run well in Sunday's MVP Healthcare Stockade-athon 15k

Karen Bertasso of Albany, New York blends her career as an orthopedic Physician Assistant with a marathon career training 70-80 miles per week. "It can be tough in the OR," she said. "You're operating on a lot of joint patients, so you're on your feet all day and it's physically exhausting." On Oct. 13, Bertasso ran an even paced Hartford Marathon clocking 2:43:46, which was a personal record.  She has run 20 marathons.  She was comfortably under the 2:45 standard to qualify for the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Marathon Trials. Since then, she has "indulged" herself by taking a break from training, but still should be one of the top women in Sunday's MVP Healthcare Stockade-athon 15k, a race she last ran in 2015. No matter what happens on Sunday, she already has her ultimate goal in the bank, and looks forward to the 2020 Olympic Trials to be held Feb. 29 in Atlanta. (11/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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National record holder Yuta Shitara and Yuki Kawauchi are running the Fukuoka Marathon

The best year in Japanese men’s marathon history is drawing to a close, and with it the chances for them to qualify for the new MGC Race 2020 Olympic trials are running out. The Dec. 2nd Fukuoka International Marathon features one of the best Japanese fields ever assembled, with ten Japanese men under 2:10 since 2016. Half marathon national record holder Yuta Shitara, 2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi, 2017 Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon winner Kentaro Nakamoto, Hayato Sonoda and Yoshiki Takenouchi, make up the list of those already qualified for the MGC Race, Shitara running a marathon for the first time since his now-former national record 2:06:11 in Tokyo in February and Kawauchi hoping to turn things back around after a string of bad races since Boston. Those with a realistic chance of qualifying off the two-race average include 2017 Gold Coast Marathon winner Takuya Noguchi, who missed it by seconds at this year’s Gold Coast, recent sub-2:10 men Kohei Ogino, Yuma Hattori and Jo Fukuda, and a trio who finished together just over the 2:10 mark in Tokyo this year, Asuka Tanaka, Hiroki Yamagishi and Daichi Kamino. There’s a good number of others on the list who ran well in 2015 and 2016 and will be hoping to get back on board in Fukuoka, including sub-2:10 teammates Takuya Fukatsu, Fumihiro Maruyama and Satoru Sasaki , and given the depth of Japanese men’s marathoning and the tendency for dark horses to post seemingly out-of-nowhere breakthroughs like Taku Fujimoto, earlier this month in Chicago there’s almost no limit to who else could have their day. Twins Hiroshi and Takashi Ichida would make a lot of people happy if they finally broke through in Fukuoka. Both 100 km world record holder Nao Kazami, and 100 km silver medalist Takehiko Gyoba, are also in the race. It being a nominally international marathon, Fukuoka also has its usual small contingent of overseas runners perfectly positioned to pace the Japanese men to times in the 2:07 to 2:08 range and to lend a little shine to the race with their medals. 2011 world championships silver medalist Vincent Kipruto tops the list with a 2:06:14 in Berlin last year, with 2015 world champion Ghirmay Ghebreslassie and past Fukuoka champ Yemane Tsegay. (10/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Galen Rupp will miss the spring marathon season following left foot surgery after his fifth-place finish in the Chicago Marathon

Galen Rupp is the only US man to break 2:11 in the marathon over the last three years.  He has been the top U.S. marathoner since debuting at 26.2 miles at the February 2016 Olympic Trials. He won that race in Los Angeles, then took bronze in Rio (adding to his 2012 Olympic 10,000m silver medal). Rupp then finished second at his first city marathon in Boston in 2017 and won Chicago later that year. He was one of many dropouts at this year’s Boston Marathon, with the worst weather in the oldest annual marathon’s recent history. Rupp’s surgery last Friday was related to an Achilles injury that forced him to withdraw before the Sept. 16 Copenhagen Half Marathon and flared up near the end of the Chicago Marathon — Haglund’s Deformity, a bony bump on his heel that caused the tendon to fray, according to the Oregonian.  (10/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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The elite field at the Chicago Marathon keeps growing with more depth

Andrew Bumbalough, a member of Nike’s Bowerman Track Club, is back in Chicago after racing well in 2017. In just his second go at the marathon distance, he finished 13th overall. This spring, he endured arguably the most brutal conditions in Boston Marathon history to prove not only his physical fitness, but also his mental toughness and he was rewarded with a fifth-place finish. He set his PR during his marathon debut at the 2017 Tokyo Marathon, running a steady and controlled pace to finish in 2:13:58. Following Tokyo, he took part in the Nike Breaking2 project as a pacer. Prior to moving to the marathon, he qualified for the 2012 Olympic Trials in the 5000m and he was the U.S. 5K national champion in 2013. (08/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Three-time champion Mary Keitany of Kenya wants to reclaim her crown this year at the TCS New York City Marathon

Mary Keitany and Virgin Money London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot are joining previously announced defending champion Shalane Flanagan and Boston Marathon champion Des Linden in star-studded field at the TCS New York City Marathon on Sunday, November 4.  “With Mary, Vivian, Shalane, Des, Tatyana, and Manuela, this year’s TCS New York City Marathon is stacked with some of the most competitive women’s professional athlete fields ever to compete in New York,” said Peter Ciaccia, president of events for NYRR and race director of the TCS New York City Marathon. “This is the best group of American women marathoners since the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, and along with Mary and Vivian, the competition will be fierce.” (08/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Stephen Sambu has sights on his fifth Falmouth Road Race Win

The last four years the New Balance Falmouth Road Race has been won by Stephen Sambu. The  30-year-old Kenyan is coming back in quest of a fifth-consecutive victory, organizers anonounced today. Seeking to make some history of her own will be Caroline Chepkoech, who last year became the first woman to defend her Falmouth title since fellow Kenyan Lornah Kiplagat won three straight from 2000-2002. Not only is the 24-year-old Chepkoech hoping to win her third straight, but she is also aiming to break Kiplagat’s 18-year-old course record of 35:02. In the men’s race, Sambu will face a stiff challenge from a pair of U.S. Olympians, Leonard Korir and Lopez Lomong.  Korir, a 2016 Olympian at 10,000 meters and an eight-time U.S. champion on the roads and cross country, was runner-up to Sambu here in both 2016 and 2017; last year, the finish was so close that both men were given the same time. Lomong, a two-time Olympian and one of the “Lost Boys of Sudan,” was the U.S. flagbearer in 2008 and recently won the U.S. 10,000-meter title, becoming the only American man in history to win national titles at both 1500 meters and 10,000 meters on the track. He will be making his Falmouth debut. Among the other top Americans are Haron Lagat, runner-up in the USA 10 km Championships on July 4; Christo Landry, a six-time national champion on the roads; Scott Fauble, fourth at 10,000 meters in the 2016 Olympic Trials; and Martin Hehir, fifth this year at the USA Cross Country Championships and third in the USA 15 km Championships. (08/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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USA Track & Field is expected to name the University of Oregon's Hayward Field in Eugene as the site for the 2020 U.S. Olympic trials

USA Track & Field is expected to name the University of Oregon's Hayward Field in Eugene as the site for the 2020 U.S. Olympic trials, according to a source with direct knowledge of the decision. The announcement is expected soon, perhaps as early as Thursday. The source was not authorized to discuss the decision and requested anonymity. Calls to TrackTown USA, the Eugene local organizing committee and the U.S. Olympic Committee were referred to USA Track & Field. USATF spokeswoman Jill Geer declined comment. Eugene has staged the Olympic trials six previous times, including in 2008, 2012 and 2016. This would be the first major meet at the reconstructed Hayward Field. The stadium has been torn down and will be rebuilt. The project is expected to be completed in April 2020. (08/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Grace Padilla believes running is her fountain of youth

RUN THE WORLD: Growing up being the middle child out of seven kids was challenging for Grace Padilla Leong.   "I didn’t feel notice. I discovered running when I was 12 years old," Grace says.  Her younger brother started running and racing back in 1984.  "I was jealous of him because our parents spoiled him with running gear, eating out, and money when he won races. I wanted to feel special too." She tried the 3,000m steeplechase back in 1995.  "I wasn’t much of a hurdler, but I learned to step over barriers and run fast between them. I got better every time I jumped. I really enjoyed the extra challenge the barriers gave me."   She took pride in almost completely clearing the water barriers.  In 1996, she broke the America record and actually held the World Record before it was recognized.  "I was blessed to compete in the 1996 Olympic Trials in Atlanta, Georgia. Unfortunately, I had the flu and really struggled in the 114 heat during our race," Grace says.   She took time off after this to have a family. Then 16 years later, she decided to try the 2,000m steeplechase as a master runner in the World Masters Championships.  "I was nervous and went out too fast (75 for 400m) this came back to haunt me on the last 300m. I was running world record pace and missed winning by a few seconds. I wasn’t the same brave kid, now I was afraid of the barriers and landed in the middle of the water pit with two feet."  After getting hurt from all the impact from jumping the barriers, she decided to give steeplechasing a break."Running is my life so I make it one of my priorities. I get up early to feed my children, take them to school, feed all our pets. Then I teach part time, followed by coaching at our local high school my children attend. I usually run with my kids, except on the Track interval days. I do my speed work with my husband’s running club, SoCal RoadRunners." Although, she has never played soccer, she is a huge soccer fan.  "My uncle used to have a team when I was a kid and we would cheer for them every weekend."   Asked why she thinks she is such a good runner."When I was a kid I ran to get my parents attention and to make them proud. Then I ran for the awards. Later, ran because I enjoyed winning and the spotlight. Now I run because I love pushing myself and the way running makes me feel. I feel strong, beautiful, and brave! I think what makes me a good runner is the fact that I’m a hard worker! I don’t take any shortcuts. I’ve always been a front runner and I’m not afraid to take chances."  What does this think of this challenge?"This Run The World challenge sounds interesting and I want to be part of something great! Running bring people together world wide, language stops being a barrier."  Grace sums it up well. "Running has been my life and passion for over 35 years.  I believe running is my fountain of youth." (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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You can always count on self motivation to make you stronger. Be your own hero!”

Some days are harder than others. Injuries can bring you down, and staying focused can be difficult. Learning not to depend on or compare yourself to others is crucial. While some friends may only be there for the good times. You can always count on self motivation to make you stronger. Be your own hero!”  (Editor's note: Here are some highlights of Grace's running career - Former 3,000m Steeplechase American Record holder (World Record-Pre-recognition). USA Olympic Trials 1996 & 2016, Masters World Record 4x800 relay. USA Masters National Champion Cross Country 2016. National Masters champion in 1,500m, 2,000m Steeplechase, and 5,000m.) (06/17/2018) ⚡AMP
by Grace Padilla Leong
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Here is why the USATF reopened the bids for the U.S. 2020 Olympic Trials

USA Track & Field didn’t learn about lawsuits that jeopardized the 2020 Olympic Trials until two months after its board awarded the meet to Mt. San Antonio College in June 2017, newly revealed documents show. But by late October 2017, USATF was threatening to pull the showcase event from Mt. SAC — six months before it shocked the track world by reopening bids for the meet.  Adam Schmenk, USATF’s managing director of events and entertainment properties, on Oct. 27 demanded that Mt. SAC provide a construction timeline and a guarantee that Hilmer Lodge Stadium would be built no later than April 2020. “Should you be unable to provide the above assurance by November 17, we will reopen the bid process to secure a host city who can provide the commitments necessary to host a successful Olympic Trials,” Schmenk wrote Doug Todd, Mt. SAC’s athletic special events director. Two months later, USATF Deputy General Counsel Donald Woodard doubled down in a letter to Mt. SAC’s president. “We, and our major partners, are extremely concerned about whether the construction of the appropriate facilities will be complete in sufficient time to host a first class high caliber 2020 Trials,” Woodard wrote William Scroggins. “Therefore, we require unequivocal proof that the lawsuits have been dismissed or otherwise resolved in such a manner as to remove any doubt that construction of the stadium and other facilities will not be delayed in any way whatsoever,” he said Jan. 3, demanding a Jan. 4 conference call. Woodard said that at an August 2017 campus meeting, “we were made aware of the existence of two lawsuits filed against Mt. SAC directly or indirectly related to Mt. SAC’s preparation and ability to successfully host a first class 2020 Trials.” (05/13/2018) ⚡AMP
by Ken Stone
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Tracktown USA hopes to be selected to host the USATF 2020 Olympic Trails

The University of Oregon says work will begin in June on a renovation of Hayward Field, to be completed in 2020. The plans include a 165-foot, 9-story tower named in honor of Bill Bowerman, the coach who brought Steve Prefontaine to campus and helped Phil Knight launch Nike. The work will be funded by Penny and Phil Knight and more than 50 other donors.  Tracktown USA made it clear Wednesday that they'll be making a bid to bring the 2020 Olympic Trials back to Hayward Field. USATF pulled its original bid from Mount SAC in California, due to concerns over the stadium construction.  Construction on the new Hayward Field will start this summer.  Tracktown USA CEO Michael Reilly says the new-look Hayward Field will be completed in plenty of time to host the 2020 Trials. "We understand everything is going to be ready to go for an entire Track and Field season in 2020," said Reilly. "I can't think of a better way to welcome America's top athletes than to bring them to a new Hayward Field."      (05/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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The date was May 1, 2010, the place Stanford and on the track running the race of his life was Chris Solinsky

“I just watched the video of this race again on Flo Track.  Wow, what an amazing race it was,” says Bob Anderson. On May 1, 2010, Chris Solinsky ran his first 10,000 meter race at the Payton Jordan Invitational in Stanford, California. Although the race was marketed as an American record attempt by fellow American Galen Rupp, Solinsky finished first and set the American Record of 26:59.60 (bettering Meb Keflezighi's 2001 mark of 27:13.98 by fourteen seconds).  His last 800 meters was timed at 1:56.  He looked so strong the entire race and passed Galen with a little more than two laps to go.  Galen faded to fourth but still clocked 27:10.  Solinsky was the first non-African to break the 27-minute barrier for the 10,000 meters.  At 6'1" and 165-pounds, Solinsky was also the first man over 6 feet or over 141 pounds to break the 27-minute barrier. Beginning in 2011, Solinsky suffered a series of injuries. He developed a chronic left hamstring strain, which became an avulsion after Solinsky tripped over his dog. The injury required surgery, making it impossible for him to compete in the 2012 US Olympic Trials. In 2015, Solinsky suffered from an injury to his Achilles tendon, which led to a calf problem which interfered with his ability to train for the 2016 US Olympic Trials. Solinsky chose to retire from professional running in April 2016. (05/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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David Luy goal is to run sub 2:20 this weekend in Eau Claire and qualify for the Olympic Trials

When the Eau Claire Marathon begins on Sunday, May 6, in Eau Claire Wisconsin, runners from 27 states, plus Canada and Malaysia, will be at the starting line. One runner to watch is David Luy but be sure to get there early. David Luy, 26, of Brookfield, Wisconsin is the defending two-time Eau Claire Marathon winner, having beat the field last year with a 2:25:57 finishing time — 23 minutes ahead of the next runner. He has an ambitious goal this year — to trim six minutes off that time and finish below 2:19:00 so he can qualify to compete at the Olympic Trials.  Avid runner Michael Olson said he’s thrilled that Luy is trying to reach this milestone at the Eau Claire Marathon. He said the city is perfectly placed for holding a marathon in early spring. “I think Eau Claire is getting noticed,” Olson said. “If we have someone hit the Olympic standard, that just boosts our race that much more.” To finish in under 2:19:00, Luy will need to run about a 5:18 pace per mile for 26.2 miles. Luy said he has been running all his life and ran at Brookfield East High School but wasn’t in the upper tier. He didn’t run for the UW-Madison team while attending school there. However, he continued to run and got faster. “I’d run the campus and go further and further,” Luy said. He decided to compete in the Chicago Marathon in 2012. “It was such a surreal experience, it just jump-started my passion for the sport,” he said. (05/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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The USATF finally realized they need to find a new host for the U.S. 2020 Olympic Trials

The USATF said today it has reopened bidding to host the 2020 Olympic Trials amid litigation surrounding the construction of a new stadium at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, Calif., where the trials were originally awarded. USA Track and Field hopes to reward the trials no later than June. The Los Angeles area college originally beat out Eugene, Ore., and Sacramento for the right to host the 2020 Olympic Trials, USATF announced last June Eugene hosted the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympic Trials. Sacramento hosted in 2000 and 2004. Mt. SAC previously hosted the 1960 Olympic Trials and annually hosts a popular relays meet in April.  “The USATF Board of Directors unanimously authorized the move amid continuing litigation surrounding construction of a new Hilmer Lodge Stadium at (Mt. SAC) in Walnut, California, and the resulting delays on planning for a successful 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials,” USATF said in a statement.  Mt SAC President William T. Scroggins said: “While we are disappointed, we accept that the terms of the agreement give USATF the authority to withdraw from this commitment.” (05/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sarah Sellers focus is now to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics after Boston

Sarah Sellers who came out of nowhere to finish second at the Boston Marathon, is turning her attention to trying to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Sellers, an Ogden (Utah) High School and Weber State graduate, initially wanted to hit the 'A' standard Olympic qualifying time of 2 hours, 37 minutes earlier this month in Boston. As soon as she saw the weather — wet, windy and miserable — she abandoned that goal, but still hit the 'B' standard with her time of 2:44:04 (the 'B' standard is 2:45:00).   "I still don't feel like it's quite a reality yet, but I'm really excited because it's definitely very motivating to try really hard and to train smart, because there's a lot of really good marathoners in the U.S.," she said. Sellers, a nurse anesthetist at Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona, qualified for the Olympic trials, which will be held Feb. 29, 2020. "I don't know what my potential is there, but I think I'm definitely motivated to do everything I can to do the best I can at the trials," she said. Sellers is taking it easy for a while to help her body recover from the marathon. She will try to incorporate things like strength training and biking, but doesn't anticipate running a race for awhile as she recovers. (04/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kate Landau win's Eugene Marathon after being forced to drop out of Boston

Two weeks after hypothermia forced her to drop out of the Boston Marathon, Tacoma's Kate Landau added another big win to her resume. Landau, 41, won the Eugene Marathon on Sunday morning in a personal-best time of 2 hours, 35 minutes, 44 seconds. Her time was the second best for a woman in the 12-year history of the event.  She beat the second-place woman (Becki Spellman of Ohio) by more than six minutes. Only six of the more than 800 male runners were faster than Landau. Landau's time earned the top qualifying standard for the 2020 Olympic Trials in Atlanta.  Eugene's historic Hayward Field seemed like a fitting place for Landau to accomplish this goal. It was there in 1996, that she finished second in the 10,000-meter race and sixth in the 5,000 at the NCAA championships while running for Georgetown. She went on to compete at the trials for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.  (04/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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2020 Olympic USATF Marathon Trials will be held Feb 29, 2020 in Atlanta

Atlanta will host the 2020 Olympic Marathon Trials. The city, which hosted the 1996 Olympics, won out over Austin, Texas; Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Orlando, Florida. USATF announced this Monday. "Atlanta's legacy in the sport, their creative commitment to athlete support, and the experience of their event management team were compelling. USATF looks forward to working with Atlanta Track Club, the City of Atlanta and the U.S. Olympic Committee on what promises to be an amazing Olympic Trials," said USATF CEO Max Seigel. The race is scheduled for February 29, 2020 and will take place the same weekend as the Atlanta Marathon. Though no course map has been released, USATF protocol calls for a loop-style course. Atlanta has a deep running and track & field legacy, Atlanta hosted the USATF Indoor Track & Field Championships from 1994-2001, while Atlanta Track Club has emerged as one of the running industry’s leading organizations. With 28,000 members, the Club has been part of the USATF Running Circuit since the circuit’s inception in 2002, regularly hosting the USATF 10K road racing championships in conjunction with the Peachtree Road Race. (04/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Shaluinn Fullove is running the Eugene Marathon not letting a double mastectomy get in her way

Shaluinn Fullove has been running competitively since she was five years old. After growing up in Los Angeles, she became an athlete at Stanford University, where she ran three cross country races during the 1996 NCAA Championships before graduating with an American studies degree in 2000 and landing a job at Google in 2002. Today, Fullove still works in human resources for Google in Palo Alto, California, where she lives with her husband and daughter. The past few years have tested Fullove’s commitment and perseverance. In 2017, she underwent a double mastectomy, followed by a breast reconstruction surgery. Between the two procedures, her dad and aunt both passed away. “Running is always the common thread — it is always the thing you can come back to. It’s an anchor…” said Fullove. The pain from that season of life was sharp, but it didn’t extinguish her drive. Fullove is planning to run the Eugene Marathon on April 29. She has embraced the difference that her new shape and circumstances bring, and she admits that her training cycle this time around has been different. In 2008, she qualified for the Olympic Trials as a way to prove to herself that she had beat thyroid cancer. Though she has the potential to qualify again, her focus has shifted this year. She said this race is a celebration of her ability to rebuild and condition her body to withstand the rigorous workouts that are required when training for a marathon. “To define success for the Eugene Marathon so narrowly to the Olympic Qualifier, I think that would be a missed opportunity,” she said. (04/23/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sarah Couch wins her third consecutive half marathon

America’s Sarah Crouch extended her half-marathon winning streak. She won her third consecutive half marathon Sunday in Spain, winning the Madrid Rock ‘n Roll Half Marathon. Her time of 1 hour, 18 minutes, 50 seconds won the elite female division by 1:45. Crouch won Rock ‘n’ Roll series half marathons in Dallas and New Orleans last month. Crouch’s victory capped a successful weekend for the Crouch-Porter sisters. Georgia Porter won the open division of the London Marathon in her first marathon. Her time of 2:44:50 qualified her for the U.S. Olympic Trials. (04/22/2018) ⚡AMP
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Victory for Michelle Jensen was simply the outcome of joy expressed

Michelle Jensen was the first woman to cross the finish line in the 2008 Race to Robie Creek. Jensen previously won the race in 1995 and 1999. Running was always a source of joy for Michelle Jensen. Each swift, steady step along the trail provided motivation for the next. But Jensen did not run with the end goal of victory in mind. Victory was simply the outcome of joy expressed. While she excelled in her own right as a nine-time All-American at Western State Colorado University in track, cross country and Nordic skiing, and later qualified for the Olympic Trials in the marathon, Jensen was equally skilled at bringing out the best in others. Race organizers plan to honor Jensen at the 41st annual Race to Robie Creek on Saturday. The 13.1-mile half-marathon starts at noon at Fort Boise and finishes at Robie Creek campground. Jensen, a three-time Robie champion, passed away peacefully on Nov. 19, 2017, at her Boise home from lung cancer. She was 47. “She had a subtle quietness, but also a real joy for the sport that she shared with everybody,” “She was an amazing runner, just a whole level above,” said Sherrie Haggett, a close friend and running partner. “Literally the only way I could run with Michelle, and granted I had a full-ride scholarship at Boise State, was to basically say, ‘Tell me your life story,’ and keep her talking so I could hang on tight. I was just so thrilled to be able to run with somebody who was making me a better runner.” (04/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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American marathon record holder Deena Kastor has been writing and decided in December to run Boston

At 45, Deena Kastor has been writing and training at her high-altitude home in Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Her newly-released book, "Let Your Mind Run, A Memoir of Thinking My Way To Victory" (Crown Archetype), is a gem. She's also in the final stages of her training for the Boston Marathon on Monday, a race she has only run once before. At her last Boston Marathon in 2007, she battled the rain and wind which was so strong that organizers nearly canceled the race. Kastor sloshed her way to fifth place and won the USA marathon title, a prelude to her victory one year later at the USA Olympic Trials Marathon which were also held in Boston, but on a different course. "It wasn't my intention to be part of this phenomenal American field that is being put together," said Kastor, who admitted that she only got the idea to run Boston at the end of December after finishing up the bulk of her writing on the book. "It was my intention, when I finished with this book, I couldn't wait to get in shape again because I had spent so much time in front of that computer." She added: "I needed to put something on the calendar again. Why not go big and choose the most historic marathon in our country?" (She was speaking with David Monti from Race Results Weekly) (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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I just think if you could pick a day and place to win, it would be Patriot’s Day in Boston says Molly Huddle

Molly Huddle is a two-time Olympian, owns the U.S. women’s record in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meter races, and recorded a third-place finish in the 2016 New York City Marathon. Yet in 2018, at the age of 33, she will be making her Boston Marathon debut. It won’t be her first race in Boston, as Huddle has run (and won) multiple versions of the Boston Athletic Association 5K. Yet as she enters a new period in her career oriented more around marathons, Huddle is eyeing Boston as a challenge and opportunity. Asked about the Elite women's field Molly said, "I feel like that’s one of the main storylines of the race is just having such great head-to-head match-ups on the women’s side. Shalane has just won a major in New York, and Desiree [Linden] has always run so well in Boston. Jordan is running really fast in the marathon right now. I think between the four of us it’s just going to be a story within a story on race day. I like that... Competition I think brings out the best in people, so all four of us in the same race on the same day will kind of be like a preview of the Olympic trials in a few years. I’m sure it’ll be exciting and kind of dramatic. I personally was thrilled to see that field." (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Don’t make plans just yet to attend the USATF 2020 Olympic Trials at Mt Sac

The USATF awarded the 2020 Olympic Trials in June of last year to Mt. SAC, located in suburban Los Angeles. The decision, made by USATF's board of directors in an 11-2 vote, came after Eugene had staged the trials successfully at Hayward Field in 2008, 2012 and 2016. Eugene and Sacramento both submitted bids for 2020. In theory, the trials could go to one site or the other if the Mt. SAC renovation gets tied up in court and falls too far behind schedule. The University of Oregon is expected to begin a complete razing and reconstruction of Hayward Field this summer to transform it into something UO Foundation president and CEO Paul Weinhold terms "spectacular." The new Hayward Field is expected to cost more than $200 million, Money for the project has been privately raised, much of it reportedly contributed by Nike co-founder Phil Knight. If the Hayward project begins this summer it is expected to be completed by April of 2020. That might be just in time. (This photo was taken during the women's Steeplechase at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Eugene.) (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Middle Distance Superstar Bernard Lagat at 43-years-old move to the roads has been impressive

Every sport has examples of athletes who seem infuriatingly immune to senescence, 43-year-old Bernard Lagat is in another league entirely. Lagat has competed in five Olympics, a distinction that puts him in very select company among track and field athletes. The fact is all the more impressive when you take into account that his first games didn’t happen until 2000, when he was 25...In the men’s 5,000 meters at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, the 41-year-old Lagat was in sixth place going into the last lap of the race. He proceeded to unleash a 52.82-second final 400 meters to win the most competitive 5K ever held at a U.S. Trials. Lagat had the decency to retire from track racing at the end of the 2016 season, he is once again redefining what should be feasible, only this time on the roads. In January, he ran the Houston Half Marathon in 62 minutes flat, breaking Meb Keflezighi’s U.S. masters record for the distance by over a minute. In March of this year Lagat was the second American finisher at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships. For someone who holds the third-fastest 1,500-meter time ever, Lagat seems to be having way too much fun competing in the half marathon. Full story at Outside Online (04/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympic Trials Trouble: Let's make Eugene the permanent Trials host site

Are the US 2020 Olympic Trials in Trouble? It's looking less likely all the time that Mt SAC will be hosting our next Oly Trials after multiple stop work orders have been issued. That being said, Eugene too is fighting stadium issues. Personally, I am not at all for the elimination of Hayward Field's historic elements. I am of the sensibility that I'd rather retain the heritage even if that means potentially losing the status of host site for the 2021 World Athletics Championships. Oregon track writer, Ken Goe, guesses that if the 2020 Olympic Trials were moved, it may be to either Sacramento or Drake...neither of which are ideal options. In my track nerd brain, I'd like to see Eugene ditch their big re-do and give the IAAF back their World Championships...and instead host the Trials. In fact, I'd like to see Eugene named as the meet's permanent Trials host site...period. (03/19/2018) ⚡AMP
by Mike Fanelli
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