Running News Daily

Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com  Get your race featured and exposed.  Contact Manuel@mybestruns.com or call 650-209-7820

Index to Daily Posts · Sign Up For Updates · Run The World Feed

Articles tagged #Boston marathon
Today's Running News

Share

Steven Hollander and his brother Spencer ultimate goal is to run all six marathon majors

Steven Hollander made one of his dreams come true April 15.

For the past 10 years, Hollander dreamed of running the Boston Marathon, the oldest annual marathon in the world and the most prestigious in the marathon community. Runners must qualify based on their age and finish time, which makes it extremely competitive to get into.

He qualified in January 2018 during the Houston Marathon with a time of 2:57:13, just under the 3:00:00 qualifying time for his age group. Three months later, nine marathons after he first set the goal, he and his brother, Spencer Hollander, ran the Boston race.

Out of nearly 26,000 runners, Steven finished in top six percent with a time of 2:54:35, which qualified him for next year’s event as well. He was the fourth runner from the state of South Carolina to cross the finish line, second from the Lowcountry region and first from the Summerville area.

Spencer finished with a time of 3:05:26. Their ultimate goal is to complete the Abbott World Marathon Series together, which means completing the Boston, NYC, Chicago, Tokyo, Berlin, and London marathons. Later this year, they will run in the Chicago marathon, step two of six.

(05/23/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Bank of America Chicago Marathon

Running the Bank of America Chicago Marathon is the pinnacle of achievement for elite athletes and everyday runners alike. On race day, runners from all 50 states andmore than 100 countries will set out to accomplish a personal dream by reaching the finish line in Grant Park. The Bank of America Chicago Marathon is known for its flat and fast...

more...
Share

Strong field is set for Bolder Boulder including Jared Ward and Tyler McCandless

Returning to race this year is Jared Ward who was the first American in the New York Marathon and finished 8th overall at the Boston Marathon and Tyler McCandless who won the 2018 Bolder Boulder citizen’s race.

“We feel that with the strong pool of runners this year that Team USA could possibly take first place,” said pro athlete coordinator, Don Janicki. “With three returning champions in the men’s field it will be a really great competitive race.”

Members of the Men’s Team USA also include national title winner Parker Stinson who shattered 25K American record at the USATF 25K in May 2019 by 30 seconds, Haron Lagat who placed second at the 2017 Fortitude 10K Pro Race Chase; Diego Estrada who has a 10K personal best of 27:57;  Reid Buchanan who has a 27:58 10K PR; Eagle Scout Reed Fischer who has a 10K PR of 28:38; Boulder Track Club member Tim Rackers; and Boulder based professional runner Jake Riley who has a 10K PR of 27:59.

The Women’s Team USA include Taylor Ward; a rising star in American women’s distance running who placed third at the 2018 Fortitude 10K Pro Race Chase.

Lindsey Scherf who broke the indoor marathon world record at the Armory NYC Indoor Marathon World Record Challenge in 2018 by nearly two minutes; Lauren Martin Masterson who was the first female finisher of the 2017 Bolder Boulder citizen’s race; Kaitlin Goodmen who has a 10K PR of 33:18; and Stephanie Bruce who set a PR at the 5,000 meters indoors (15:44) at the New Balance Boston Indoor Games; Former Colorado Buffaloes star Shalaya Kipp.

In addition to the Americans competing at this year’s race, the Bolder Boulder will be welcoming teams from all over the world including Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Tanzania, Bahrain, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Pan South America.

“We’re ready for a super competitive international event thanks to the athlete’s continuing commitment to the race, “said Race Director, Cliff Bosley. “Some of the top ranked teams are trained in both altitude and marathon running and bring a competitive edge that keeps the event exhilarating to watch each and every year.”

(05/17/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
BOLDER BOULDER

BOLDER BOULDER

In 1979 we dreamt of attracting a few hundred of our friends to race though the streets of Boulder, Colorado to celebrate Memorial Day with our families. Fast forward almost 40 years and the Bolder BOULDER has grown to become one of the largest and most highly acclaimed 10K’s in the world. Almost 1.2 million runners, joggers, walkers and spectators...

more...
Share

Hellen Obiri, Steph Twell, Andy Vernon and Stanley Biwott are among the big names racing the Great Manchester 10km on Sunday

The Simplyhealth Great Manchester Run returns on Sunday, with a number of top elite athletes set to battle for titles ahead of the 30,000-strong mass race.

Kenya’s world 5000m and recent world cross country champion Hellen Obiri is making her debut at the event and will be faced with a field containing Ethiopia’s Tokyo marathon winner Ruta Aga, while two-time world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat also features, as does Ireland’s Fionnula McCormack.

A healthy British contingent is headed by Steph Twell, who won the Brighton 10km in 31:58 last month, and she is joined by Mhairi Maclennan, Jenny Nesbitt and Aly Dixon, who was recently named part of Britain’s IAU 50km World Championships team for the event in Romania in September.

Ugandan world cross silver medallist Jacob Kiplimo is fastest in the men’s field with a personal best of 26:41, though he will be facing the likes of Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa, Boston Marathon runner-up this year, and Kenya’s 2015 New York marathon winner Stanley Biwott.

Mo Farah is not defending the title he won last year but the British presence will feature Nick Goolab, a man on form and the fastest Briton over 10km so far this year after breaking the course record with a run of 28:22 when winning in Brighton.

He will be joined by compatriots Emile Cairess, Ieuan Thomas and Dan Studley.

(05/17/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Great Manchester Run

Great Manchester Run

The Great Manchester Run, established in 2003, is an annual 10 kilometer run through Greater Manchester and is the largest 10K in Europe. Usually held in mid-May, it is the third-largest mass participation running event in the United Kingdom behind the Great North Run and the London Marathon. It is part of the Great Runs series of road races in...

more...
Share

The B.A.A. has announced that registration for the 124th Boston Marathon will open September 9, 2019

The B.A.A. has announced that registration for the 124th Boston Marathon, to be held on Monday, April 20, 2020, will open September 9, 2019. It will follow the same process as in previous years, except that qualifying standards for 2020 have been tightened up by five minutes across all age categories.

Registration is entirely online, at www.baa.org. The B.A.A. follows a process of allowing the fastest qualifiers to register first, with a rolling admission schedule.

How it works:

On Monday, September 9 at 10:00 a.m. ET, eligible runners who have met the qualifying standard for their age and gender by 20 minutes or more may register.

On Wednesday, September 11 at 10:00 a.m. ET, registration will open for those who have met their qualifying standard by 10 minutes or more.

On Friday, September 13 at 10:00 a.m. ET, registration will open for those who have met their qualifying standard by five minutes or more.

Registration will close for week one on Saturday, September 14 at 5:00 p.m. ET.

If space remains after the first week registration will re-open for all qualifiers from Monday, September 16 at 10:00 a.m. ET through Wednesday, September 18 at 5:00 p.m. ET.

As during the first week of registration, the fastest qualifiers by gender and age group will be granted entry as space allows.

If space remains after the first two weeks of registration:

On Monday, September 23 at 10:00 a.m. ET, registration will re-open to anyone who meets the qualifying standards.

Registration will remain open for valid qualifiers on a first-come, first-served basis until the maximum field size is reached, or until Sunday, October 27 at 5:00 p.m. ET (whichever comes first).

The qualifying window for 2020 began on September 15, 2018, and you may run a qualifying race anytime until the race is full or by Sunday, October 27, 2019, whichever comes first.

Qualifying standards for 2020 (all qualifying times are based on chip time):

Age Group Men & Women, 18-34 (3hrs, 3hrs 30min), 35-39 (3hrs 05min, 3hrs 35min), 40-44 (3hrs 10min, 3hrs 40min), 45-49 (3hrs 20min, 3hrs 50min), 50-54 (3hrs 25min, 3hrs 55min), 55-59 (3hrs 35min, 4hrs 05min), 60-64 (3hrs 50min, 4hrs 20min), 65-69 (4hrs 05min, 4hrs 35min), 70-74 (4hrs 20min, 4hrs 50min), 75-79 (4hrs 35min, 5hrs 05min), 80 and over (4hrs 50min, 5hrs 20min).

(05/16/2019) ⚡AMP
by
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Defending champion Geoffrey Kirui and two-time world champion Edna Kiplagat are among the athletes named by Athletics Kenya for the marathon at the IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha 2019

Nine athletes have been selected, but two of those will be reserves. As Kirui gets a wildcard entry by virtue of being the defending champion, Kenya will have four men on the marathon start line and three women. The final line-up will be decided nearer to the time of the World Championships.

Kirui, who also won the Boston Marathon in 2017, is joined on the team by Amos Kipruto, Laban Korir, Paul Lonyangata and Ernest Ngeno.

Kipruto, a 2:05:43 performer, finished on the podium in Tokyo and Berlin last year. Korir, a former winner in Toronto, has a PB of 2:05:54. Lonyangata set his PB of 2:06:10 in 2017, the first of his two Paris Marathon victories. Ngeno has reached the podium in nine of his 11 marathons to date, clocking a PB of 2:06:41 last year.

Kiplagat won back-to-back world titles in 2011 and 2013. She finished fifth in 2015 and returned to the podium in 2017, taking the silver medal in London.

The 2:19:50 runner is joined on the Kenyan World Championships team by Ruth Chepngetich, Sally Chepyego and Visiline Jepkesho.

Chepngetich won in Istanbul last year in 2:18:35 and then took the Dubai Marathon title earlier this year in 2:17:08, moving to third on the world all-time list. Chepyego earned the bronze medal at the 2014 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and set a marathon PB of 2:23:15 last year. Jepkesho, a former winner in Paris and Rotterdam, has a PB of 2:21:37.

Men: Amos Kipruto, Geoffrey Kirui, Laban Korir, Paul Lonyangata, Ernest Ngeno

Women: Ruth Chepngetich, Sally Chepyego, Visiline Jepkesho, Edna Kiplagat

(05/15/2019) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
Share
IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

The seventeenth edition of the IAAF World Championships is scheduled to be held between 27 September and 6 October 2019 in Doha, Qatar at the renovated multi-purpose Khalifa International Stadium. Doha overcame bids from Eugene, USA, and Barcelona, Spain to be granted the rights to host the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Having hosted the IAAF Diamond League, formerly...

more...
Share

Just how tough is the Boston Marathon? from Marathon Man Gary Allen File 6

Just how tough is the Boston Marathon and how many times are runners told to resist the urge to start too fast....a very common mistake at the Boston Marathon.

OK don’t take my word for it, statistics don’t lie, Dave McGillivray the race director shared the following, “Of the 26,658 finishers, onl 705 ran the 2nd half faster than the first half for a measly 2.64%.”

This of course means 97.36% of the entire field were slowed by the tough terrain of the second 13.1 miles. I personally believe it was less about the Newton hills and more about imprudent pacing.

You see, Boston’s early downhills are almost impossible to resist. Speaking from experience, I have run the Boston Marathon 24 times and I think I might have run negative splits just twice. Yes, I started too fast.

Is this a common phenomenon at the Boston Marathon? Check out these statistics from an experienced marathoner and a good friend Stephen Peckiconis, “it doesn't vary much.” His split stats show just 749 / 2.81% ran negative splits in 2016 and only 812 / 3.07% in 2017.

So if you want to have success at Boston, run conservatively early or you’ll join the vast majority who slow or struggle in the second half every single year.

Marathon Man Gary Allen is a regular writer for My Best Runs

(05/13/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gary Allen
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

A Long Run the movie tells one man's story, but it's every runner's journey. Bob Anderson's life connects us to many icons...by the end, you're left with a runner's high without the sweat says Dan Brown

Over 100,000 people have already watched A Long Run the movie with good reviews. Now you can watch the full length movie...compliments of MyBestRuns.com with speical arrangments with it's production company Around Town Productions.   

Actor Sean Astin who narrated the film wrote, "I loved A Long Run.  Thank you so much for letting me be a part of your wonderful journey Bob."  Boston Marathon director Dave McGillivray wrote," In watching A Long Run, you readily see the impact and influence Bob has had on our sport over the years.  This story is inspiring, motivational, educational and simply makes you want to go out the door and do a run..and a real 'long run' at that."

Joe Henderson writer and former Runner's World editor wrote, "I’ve always known Bob Anderson as a man of Big Ideas, one with a knack for making these dreams come true. He conceived a little magazine called Distance Running News, which grew into the biggest one, Runner’s World.

"He created a book division that published some of the sport’s best-selling titles...This all happened before Bob turned 30, but his idea-generating didn’t stop then. At more than twice that age, he dreamed up Double Racing and then to celebrate his 50th anniversary as a runner, Bob plotted a tough year-long course: 50 races, averaging better than seven minutes per mile overall, concluding the week he would turn 65."

A Long Run tells one man's story, but it's every runner's journey. Bob Anderson's amazing life connects us to icons like Bill Rodgers, Billy Mills and Paula Radcliffe but also to the low-budget thrill of a community 5k. The gorgeous cinematography captures The Avenue of the Giants, the beauty of Central Park in New York City, the San Francisco landscapes, resort cities like Cancun and Cabo, the lush island of Kauai and the vistas of Fort Bragg.

And the smoothly intertwined stories - his 50-race challenge, the magazine, the running boom - are handled with Olympic-caliber pacing. By the end, you're left with a runner's high, without all the sweat.

This is an inspirational life long journey that takes you across the United States, into Mexico and introduces you to some amazing runners.

A Long Run features Bob Anderson who started Runner's World magazine when he was 17 with $100. He grew the magazine to nearly a half million circulation with monthly readership of nearly 2.5 million before selling it to Rodale Press in 1984. How did he do it and why did he sell the magazine he loved?

50 years after he started running, he started his 50 race challenge... one year - 50 races - 350 miles.

His goal - Average under a 7 min/mile average pace at 64-years-old. That's fast for any age!

In the running formula known as age-grading, Anderson’s mile pace is the equivalent of a 30-year-old running an average pace of 5:24 for 50 races covering 350 miles.

“I wanted to do something special, something that would be very positive for running,” Anderson said. “But I also wanted to do something that would not be easy.”

Did he reach his goal? How did he cope with injuries? Weather? Hills? How did he recover each week?

Bob Anderson first run took place Feb. 16, 1962. His first race was May 7 that year, when he covered 600 yards at Broadmoor Junior High in 1 minute, 39 seconds.  By 1963 at age 15 he placed first at the Junior Olympics in Missouri clocking 2:08.5 for 880 yards.  

By 17, Anderson wanted to tackle a marathon. He wanted to run the Boston Marathon. But neither he nor his high school coach (coach McGuire) knew how to prepare. So Anderson did the 1965 equivalent of a Google search: He sent letters around the country asking for advice.  

Coaches and top athletes replied not just with training tips, but also with addresses of other people Anderson should try. Soon he had a network of running experts at his disposal.

Recognizing the value of this collected wisdom, he turned to teammate David Zimmerman while on a bus trip to a cross-country meet for their Shawnee Mission West team. “I’m going to start a magazine,” Anderson declared.

With $100 from baby-sitting and lawn-mowing jobs, the 17-year-old launched Distance Running News. The magazine debuted in January 1966 with a 28-page issue that Anderson collated, stapled and folded himself.

The publication created a stir among a previously unknown army of foot soldiers. Thirsty runners plunked down the $1 subscription price (for two issues) — and often enclosed an additional $5 just to make sure the magazine stayed afloat.

“Until then, I wasn’t even aware that there was a running community,” said SF Bay Area runner Rich Stiller, who had been running with Anderson since the early 1970s. “I always think that Runner’s World was part of the jet-propulsion that really made the running boom take off and made people realize, ‘Oh, gee, I’m not doing this alone.’ ”

The magazine grew so quickly that Anderson dropped out of Kansas State University. He recruited a SF Bay Area writer and runner named Joe Henderson to be his editor, and moved the magazine headquarters to Northern California.

Anderson’s 50-for-50 goal was in jeopardy after he stumbled out of the gate or, more specifically, down a trail in Mountain View.

While on a training run in December, Anderson awoke to find his head streaming with blood and two people standing above him looking alarmed.

“There were no marks at all on my hands, which means I must not have even realized I was going down,” he said.

The fall required over 60 stitches and plastic surgery. But determined not to cancel the first race in his 50-race quest, Anderson limped to the starting line in San Francisco on New Year’s Day with a ruddy forehead and an eggplant of a bruise on his left knee. He finished that first race and then 49 more that year.  

When Bob was publishing Runner's World he got so consumed managing a staff of 350 and was not able to train enough to run the Boston Marathon.  However he did run ten marathons between 1968 to 1984 but none with enough training.  He would not run Boston until 2013 when at age 65 he clocked 3:32:17.

A Long Run the movie covers a lot of ground.  The year long event finished over six years ago but the story is fresh and a movie all runners and even non-runners will enjoy.  You will want to watch it over and over again.

Some of the runners besides Bob Anderson featured in the film include: Bill Rodgers, Paula Radcliffe, Joe Henderson, George Hirsch, Rich Benyo, Amol Sexena, JoAnn Dahlkoetter, Rich Stiller, Hans Schmid, JT Service, Pina Family, Wall Family, Billy Mills, Gerry Lindgren, Dave Zimmerman, Dean Karnazes, Monica Jo Nicholson, Coach Lloyd McGuire, Katie McGuire, Mary Etta Blanchard, John Young, Roger Wright and more...

It was produced by Around Town Productions and directed by Michael Anderson (third photo at one of the showings in a theater in Monterey). 

To watch the movie click on the link or go to: www.alongrun.com

(05/13/2019) ⚡AMP
by Dan Brown
Share
Share

Kenya’s Visiline Jepkesho says Kenya must change their tactics if they are to reclaim the title at the World Championships in Doha, Qatar

Under pressure to repay the trust shown in her by the coaches, Jepkesho has been offered another chance to showcase her talent and represent Kenya at the championships after having wasted her opportunity back in 2016 at the Rio Olympic Games.

"It is a major statement by the coaches to give me the ticket to the World Championships. Kenya has many elite marathon runners and this chance will certainly have gone to any of them, but they gave it to me. I must repay it by winning in Doha and that will call for a change in tactics because sometime we are so predictable," said Jepkesho on Saturday in Nairobi.

Jepkesho explained that she failed to finish on the podium at the 2017 World Championships and 2016 Rio Games due to poor strategy.

"This time Kenya has named the team early and this creates time for us to prepare well and even plan as a team," she said. "I am happy that I will represent the country at the World Championships for the third time in a row. We have to work as a team if we are to post good results."

Jepkesho had a stellar season in 2018, winning two marathons, respectively in Rotterdam and Ljubljana Slovenia. But her quest to win the World Marathon Championships title is a higher hurdle and she is ready to take a leap of faith and hope to clear it.

Jepkesho will have the company of two-time world champion Edna Kiplagat, former world championships 10,000m silver medalist Sally Kipyego and two-time Istanbul marathon winner Ruth Chengetich.

Kiplagat won the title in 2011 and 2013 and won silver in London in 2017 and a similar medal in 2012 London Olympic Games.

She also won New York City and Boston marathon in 2014 and 2017 respectively.

(05/11/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha

The seventeenth edition of the IAAF World Championships is scheduled to be held between 27 September and 6 October 2019 in Doha, Qatar at the renovated multi-purpose Khalifa International Stadium. Doha overcame bids from Eugene, USA, and Barcelona, Spain to be granted the rights to host the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Having hosted the IAAF Diamond League, formerly...

more...
Share

Tirfi Tsegaye was ranked amongst the world’s greatest marathoners is now returning from maternity leave to run the Ottawa Marathon

Three years ago, and prior to giving birth to a baby boy, Tirfi Tsegaye was ranked amongst the world’s greatest marathoners with some incredible performances. Now, after gradually returning to training, the Ethiopian Olympic runner makes her first start at the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, May 26th since the arrival of young Tilember Miresa.

Tsegaye, 34, ran the world-leading time of 2:19:41 in January 2016 in Dubai – her personal best time – then three months later finished 2nd in the Boston Marathon. At the Rio Olympics, she missed the podium by 17 seconds finishing 4th in 2:24:47. It was quite a year, indeed.

As if these credentials aren’t impressive enough, consider she also won the both the Tokyo and Berlin Marathons in 2014 and finished 3rd in London. Few athletes have made the podium in one World Marathon Major let alone four.

“Training is going good,” Tsegaye says from her home in Addis Ababa. “But, I’m not like how I was before. It’s been a little different for me coming back but still training. I’ve missed it a lot. I’ve even missed the training more than the actual competitions. I’m pretty excited about the Ottawa marathon.”

Under coach Gemedu Dedefo she has slowly regained her form and counts such stalwarts as Shure Demise, a two-time Toronto winner, and Alia Mohammed, 2018 Ottawa 10k champion amongst her training partners.

During her maternity leave, she split with her husband and is combining motherhood and marathon training, which would cause concern but for the fact she is such a disciplined and highly experienced athlete.

“It’s tough but I manage,” she admits. “I have a nanny and she helps me out with the baby and other errands. When I come back from training I get exhausted, so, it’s really nice to have some help around the house.

“Pregnancy takes a lot from you and the time I had off was really therapeutic. I feel like I’ve recovered enough for now.”

Tirfi grew up in the town of Bekoji, 220 kilometres south of the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa. Bekoji was immortalized in a documentary “Town of Runners” as an unusually large number of Olympic champions have ‘graduated’ from the training of local coach Sentayehu Eshetu. These include Kenenisa Bekele, Tirunesh Dibaba and Derartu Tulu.

“Growing up in Bekoji was an inspiration in itself,” she admits. “Tulu was a major inspiration for me since we were one of the same. My coach was Sentayehu Eshetu at the time when I was in Bekoji. I moved to Addis in 2008.”

“Yeah, Derartu, Haile (Gebrselassie), Kenenisa and others have inspired me to try and push myself and be my best. I fell in love with their work and dedication when I saw them on television.”

As her impressive curriculum vitae suggests, Tirfi places high expectations upon herself even for this comeback race. Although predicting marathon performances is a difficult proposition at the best of times, it is unlikely she, or coach Gemedu, would confirm her entry unless she was going to be ready. Still, there is that element of the unknown.

Her Italian manager, Gianni DeMadonna, has made her aware that the course record of 2:22:17 was set by her compatriot Gelete Burka last year but for the moment that is secondary to having a successful return.  Victory would bring her $30,000 CDN and the course record is worth an additional $10,000 CDN. That is also a significant factor.

“Ottawa is a big deal for me now because I need to get back to my winning form,” she stresses. “I have big expectations for Ottawa and I will try and do my level best.

“I figure it’s going to be a little hard for me to beat the record set by Gelete last year. But, I think if I try my best I believe that it is beatable. I’m not familiar with the course or the climate. And I have not yet talked with any other athletes about the Ottawa race. But, soon I hope.”

Should she cross the finish line first she would be the tenth consecutive Ethiopian woman to emerge triumphant in this IAAF Gold Label race. There are, without a doubt, plenty of resources then for her to approach when it comes time to seeking advice on how to run the Ottawa course.

(05/09/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon

Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon

Welcome to Canada’s largest and fastest marathon: the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon. As one of two IAAF Gold Label marathon events in Canada, the race attracts Canada’s largest marathon field (7,000 participants) as well as a world-class contingent of elite athletes every year. Featuring the beautiful scenery of Canada’s capital, the top-notch organization of an IAAF event, the atmosphere of...

more...
Share

Wayne Christopherson was the first Michigan runner to complete a renowned series of grueling 100-mile races

With his induction into the Alpena Sports Hall of Fame, Christopherson will become the first marathoner to be enshrined. He’ll be inducted as part of the Hall of Fame’s Class of 2018.

“I’m thankful that the sport of running is being recognized in and of itself. I’m not a multi-sport kind of a person; I run and I’m glad that’s being recognized,”Christopherson said. “I’m proud and honored to be recognized by peers and the community for the accomplishments I’ve had.”

Though he prefers to keep a low profile, Christopherson has gained a reputation as one of Alpena’s best distance runners during his long career.

He was the first Alpena (Michigan) runner to compete in the Boston Marathon and was the first Michigander to complete a renowned series of grueling 100-mile races.

Over the course of his career, Christopherson has completed 259 marathons and ultra-marathons.

“Running, to me, has always been personal, and it was only to test myself and what limits I might have,” he said.

While many athletes develop a passion for different sports at an early age, Christopherson’s love of running was born of inspiration. He watched Frank Shorter win the gold medal in the marathon at the 1972 Summer Olympics, a moment that’s credited with igniting the running boom in the U.S.

Christopherson and other Alpena runners also followed the career of marathoner Bill Rogers, who became a Superman-like figure in the running world in the 1970s. Between 1976 and 1980, Rogers won three consecutive Boston Marathons and four straight New York City Marathons.

What stuck out to Christopherson about Rogers and Shorter, aside from their accomplishments, was that they seemed like everyday people who just happened to be good at running.

“They’re not a whole lot different than us. They’re little, skinny guys and they can run,” Wayne said. “I latched on to, ‘Wow, that’s quite a distance. I wonder if I could.’ The next thing I knew, I was running longer distances and finding out what it was all about.”

It’s something that still drives Christopherson today as he continues to compete at age 70.

In 1986, Christopherson became Alpena’s first runner to compete in the Western States 100 in California, finishing in 23 hours, 17 minutes in his first attempt.

He completed the other three legs of the Big 4 in subsequent years–the Wasatch 100 (in Utah), the Old Dominion 100 (in Virginia) and the Leadville 100 (in Colorado). Christopherson was the first Michigander to complete all four.

Christopherson has never been afraid to challenge himself and his resume includes several other ultra-marathons, 33 Detroit Free Press Marathons, and more than 30 Bayshore Marathons in Traverse City. The Bayshore Marathon is a personal favorite, in part because it’s the site of his personal best time in a marathon: 2:45:13.

(05/07/2019) ⚡AMP
by James Andersen
Share
Bayshore Marathon

Bayshore Marathon

The Bayshore Marathon has become a “must run” for runners throughout the Midwest and beyond. Many runners return year after year to enjoy the scenic courses which run along the shores of beautiful Grand Traverse Bay. Hosted by Traverse City Track Club, Bayshore features a 10K, half marathon and full marathon. The number of runners in all three races is...

more...
Share

Yuki Kawauchi and fiancé Yuko Mizuguchi, yes fiancé won the BMO Vancouver Marathon titles

An engaged couple from Japan won the BMO Vancouver Marathon, the first time two Japanese runners who have taken home gold in 20 years.

And attendance was at an all-time high, with 18,000 runners from around 65 countries participating in one of three distances.

Yuki Kawauchi and Yuko Mizuguchi came out the champions with finishing times of (02:15:01) and (02:41:28) for the marathon.

The recently-engaged couple arrived in Vancouver last week for their first Canadian marathon, and won.

2018 Boston Marathon winner Kawauchi broke the course record of 2:18:37 set by Luka Chelimo from Kenya in 2015.

“They really pushed me to this record,” Kawauchi says in a press release, speaking of second and third-place finishers Feyera Gemeda Dadi and Chelimo. “It’s not an easy course, but it’s a very beautiful course, I would definitely recommend coming here to enjoy it and get the most out of it, it’s a great event.”

He was impressed by the scenery and support from the crowd, as was women’s title winner and fiancee Mizuguchi.

“Running around Stanley Park in the midst of all that nature really gave me a nice boost,” she says in a release. “Being able to see the ocean and the mountains – at some parts of the race, I found myself kind of distracted looking at how beautiful the ocean was.”

(05/06/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
BMO Vancouver Marathon

BMO Vancouver Marathon

The BMO Vancouver Marathon is one of Vancouver’s most iconic marathon events. The event features a full marathon, marathon relay, half marathon, 8k run, and streets lined with thousands of spectators. Runners can expect to experience a little bit of everything that Vancouver has to offer as they run a straight course that starts at Queen Elizabeth Park, and finishes...

more...
Share

Jordan Tropf was not well known by others at the Big Sur Marathon but he took the lead from the start and pulled away to the finish

The Big Sur International Marathon had more than 4,000 runners tackle the 26.2-mile course along the Pacific Ocean on Sunday.  

Jordan Tropf was the winner clocking 2:25:21.

This is the first year in a long time that a new face has won the marathon.

D'Ann Arthur, 31, of Redondo Beach won the women's overall division clocking 2:45:41. Arthur is in residency for orthopedic surgery in Southern California.

Tropf is a Navy doctor from Silver Springs, Maryland, who said that he set a personal record on Sunday. He was the race leader from start to finish. 

Defending male champion and local favorite, Adam Roach, 33, of Pacific Grove, placed second.  Michael Wardian placed fourth and was first master.  

Adam and Michael have dominated the annual race the past few years, having won the last seven races between them. But Wardian told Roach before the sun came up Sunday to be aware of Jordan Tropf, who won the Baltimore Marathon in 2017.

“I didn’t know he was even in the race until Michael mentioned him on the ride out,” said Roach, a Pacific Grove resident.

Tropf wasn’t on the list of elite runners entered in the race, although he is ranked among the nation’s top 200 marthoners having run 2 hours, 27 minutes and 23 seconds at the Boston Marathon on April 15 and 2:26.45 in the Marine Corps Marathon in October.

But Roach wasn’t sure which runner Tropf was until a few miles into race. By then, the Navy doctor had become a blur ahead of him, running off with the men’s division in 2:25:22.

“I had set a goal to get under 2:30,” said the 27-year-old Tropf, who is in the Naval Academy. “I just went out and ran my race and didn’t worry about anyone else.”

D’Ann Arthur of Redondo Beach didn’t let a night out for a wedding slow her down, as she went out and won the women’s race in 2:48.40 — nearly 13 minutes faster than last year’s winning time.

Tropf set a blistering pace that caught Roach — a five-time champion at Big Sur – off guard. He led from the start and gradually extended his lead throughout the 26-mile, 385-yard majestic course.

Running a 5:32 mile pace, Tropf’s time was nearly four minutes faster than Roach’s winning time last year and over five minutes faster than Wardian’s winning time in 2017.

(04/29/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Big Sur Marathon

Big Sur Marathon

The Big Sur Marathon follows the most beautiful coastline in the world and, for runners, one of the most challenging. The athletes who participate may draw inspiration from the spectacular views, but it takes major discipline to conquer the hills of Highway One on the way to the finish line. Named "Best Marathon in North America" by The Ultimate Guide...

more...
Share

Gene Dykes, 71, is looking to break the Big Sur International Marathon record for his age group this weekend

For someone who has done two marathons 24 hours apart, two weeks between Boston and Big Sur may seem like an eternity for Gene Dykes.

Unlike others that have challenged themselves by doing the two marathons in a short time span, it’s not the reason Dykes is running in Sunday’s 34th Big Sur International Marathon.

Instead, the Philadelphia resident is calling it unfinished business from his last trip out west to run the world-renowned course.

“They took my record away when I was 65,” Dykes said. “I owned the course record in my age class for about two months. Then it was discovered on paper that someone ran faster years earlier.”

Ray Piva set the record in the 65-69 age division in 1992 at 3 hours, 10 minutes. Dykes ran 3:26.44 in 2013.

Dykes, 71, can’t get that record back. But he’s looked at the record in the 70-older division — 3:46.36 by Heinrich Gutbier in 1997. His eyes are set on rewriting the mark, adding to his mantel of record-setting accomplishments of late.

“I shouldn’t have trouble beating that mark,” said Dykes, who broke the Boston Marathon record in his age group on April 15, clocking 2 hours, 58 minutes, 50 seconds. “It’s how fast do I want to go.”

What could derail Dykes from shattering the record is he will run the race with his daughter, who is roughly 30 minutes slower than him in a marathon.

“It will depend on how long we run together,” Dykes said. “I’m going to try and get her to run a little harder in the first half. Then I’ll do a negative split the last half of the race.”

While Dykes is six years older than during his last appearance on the Monterey Peninsula, he’s gotten faster covering marathons of all kinds. Most of his personal bests have come in the last year.

“I hired a coach a few years back,” Dykes said. “I just keep dropping time. It’s more of a retirement achievement.”

This will be Dykes’ third crack at Big Sur, but the first time he’s running it after tackling Boston in the same year.

“I guess I’ve always wanted to do Boston-Big Sur,” Dykes said. “Running marathons close together is nothing new to me. It seemed like a good time to do it. Two weeks is plenty of time to recover.”

Dykes’ accomplishments as an ultra distance runner have gained nationwide attention. Last year, the Wall Street Journal labeled him “Earth’s fastest 70-year-old distance runner.”

After setting the record at Boston, men’s winner Meb Keflezighi tweeted “Special shout out to 71-year-old Gene Dykes, who ran an outstanding 2:58.50.”

For someone who didn’t run his first road race until 12 years ago, Dykes has become one of the top ultramarathon runners in his age class in the world.

“I was a jogger my whole life,” Dykes said. “I wasn’t very good in track in high school or college. I was a mediocre runner at best. So I golfed and bowled a lot. I jogged for fun.”

That is until Dykes got in with what he now jokes as a bad crowd — a group of runners, who talked him into his first road race, a half marathon in 2006.

From that point, running became an addiction. Dykes ran well enough that his time allowed him to bypass the lottery for the New York Marathon.

“I could not pass that up,” Dykes said. “So I ran my first marathon. I ended up earning a qualifying time for Boston. So I had to do that.”

By his estimation, Dykes will do 10 to 20 road races a year ranging from 200 miles to the regular 26-mile, 385-yard marathon.

“I race longer and more frequent,” Dykes said. “I’ve done five 200 milers. It’s an endurance race. The clock is running. You run when you can and sleep when you have to. I’ve done them in four days.”

Six weeks before Boston, Dykes completed a 200-mile race, a 100-mile event and two 50-mile races in 2019.

“Every year I try and stretch the boundaries,” Dykes said. “I don’t know if I can do it. So there’s only one way to find out. The hardest part is finding time to sleep. Four hours over four days isn’t much.”

Dykes comes into each race with a plan. After completing his ultra road races — totaling 400 miles — he began preparing for Boston with the mindset of breaking the record in his age division.

“I told my coach you’ve got six weeks to get me under three hours at Boston,” Dykes said

(04/27/2019) ⚡AMP
by John Devine
Share
Big Sur Marathon

Big Sur Marathon

The Big Sur Marathon follows the most beautiful coastline in the world and, for runners, one of the most challenging. The athletes who participate may draw inspiration from the spectacular views, but it takes major discipline to conquer the hills of Highway One on the way to the finish line. Named "Best Marathon in North America" by The Ultimate Guide...

more...
Share

Bedan Karoki and Eunice Kirwa, both past winners of the Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon, will return to defend their titles this weekend

Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon, Also known as the ‘Naoko Takahashi Cup’ as it is held in the home town of the 2000 Olympic marathon champion, the men’s course record of 1:00:02 was set by Karoki when he won in 2014, while the women’s course record of 1:07:44 was set by world record-holder Joyciline Jepkosgei in 2017.

Karoki, world ranked No.13 in road running, will be aiming to become just the second two-time men’s champion in Gifu. Since his last run in Gifu, Karoki earned world silver medals at cross-country in 2015 and at the half marathon in 2016.

He also improved his half marathon PB to 58:42 in 2018 and earlier this year clocked a marathon best of 2:06:48 to finish second in Tokyo.

His main challengers are Eritrea’s Samuel Tsegay, who has a best of 59:21, Abraham Kipyatich, world ranked No.79, and Uganda’s Abdallah Mande, world ranked No.30. Tsegay’s best was recorded back in 2014, but Kipyatich and Mande both set PBs at various distances in 2018 so will likely be bigger threats to Karoki.

Yuki Kawauchi, the 2018 Boston Marathon champion, is the most famous Japanese runner in the field, but national half marathon record-holder Yuta Shitara is the fastest of the domestic entrants. Shitara’s half marathon best is 60:17 recorded in 2017.

Two time Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon champion Eunice Kirwa Jepkirui leads the loaded women’s field. The Olympic marathon silver medallist set an Asian half marathon record of 1:06:46 in Istanbul in 2017 in what was her last race over the distance.

The 2015 world bronze medallist didn’t race at all in 2018, though, and she may need to be at her best if she hopes to win her third title in Gifu.

Joan Melly Chelimo, world ranked No.3 in road running, has the fastest PB of the field. The Kenyan clocked 1:05:04 in Prague last year, making her the fourth-fastest woman in history for the distance.

Ruth Chepngetich, world ranked No.1 in the marathon, heads to Gifu in the form of her life. She won this year’s Dubai Marathon in 2:17:08, the third-fastest time in history, and followed it with half marathon performances of 1:06:09 and 1:05:29.

World marathon champion Rose Chelimo will be aiming to improve on her PB of 1:08:08, while Ana Dulce Felix, Mimi Belete and Gotytom Gebreslase are also in the field.

(04/26/2019) ⚡AMP
by Ken Nakamura
Share
Gifu Half Marathon

Gifu Half Marathon

The Gifu Seiryu Half Marathon is an annual half marathon road running competition held in Gifu, Japan. First held in 2011, the race is also called the Naoko Takahashi Cup, named after Naoko Takashi, the retired local runner who won the marathon at the 2000 Sidney Olympics and broke the marathon world record in 2001, becoming the first woman to...

more...
Share

Molly Huddle is set for her London Marathon debut

With her sights set on a return to London in a month, Elmira native Molly Huddle opened the outdoor track season with a runner-up finish in the 10,000 meters Friday night at the Stanford Invitational in Palo Alto, California.

Huddle, 34, posted a time of 30 minutes, 58.46 seconds at Stanford's Cobb Track and Angell Field. Emily Sisson won in 30:49.59. Sisson's time was the sixth-fastest ever for an American woman, with only Huddle and Shalane Flanagan having run quicker times.

Huddle's time was good enough to top the standard of 31:25 for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, though she would still need to qualify for Tokyo at next year's U.S. Trials. Huddle set the still-standing American record in the 10,000 at the 2016 Rio Olympics with a sixth-place time of 30:13.17.

After the meet, Huddle credited Sisson with helping to push her to a sub 31-minute race.

The meet included both professional and college runners. Allie Ostrander of Boise State took third in 32:06 in the 10K invitational race behind Sisson and Huddle.

Huddle is tuning up to compete in the London Marathon on April 28. It will be the fourth career marathon for Huddle, who finished fourth at the New York City Marathon in November after placing third in her marathon debut there in 2016. She ran the Boston Marathon last year. Sisson, who is Huddle's training parter, will make her marathon debut at London

(04/23/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

more...
Share

The US Men's Marathon scene over the last few years was all about one runner Galen Rupp until now, enter Scott Fauble and Jared Ward

The America's men marathon scene over the last few years has not been very impressive not includng some steller performances by one Galen Rupp. There were no sub 2:10 performances (not including Ruff) since Meb keflezighi won the Boston Marathon in 2014 clocking 2:08:37.  Things changed on April 15 in Boston.

Former University of Portland cross country and track star Scott Fauble was the top U.S. finisher and placed seventh overall in the 123rd Boston Marathon. Fauble’s time of 2:09:09 is the fastest time from a U.S. runner since 2014 besides Galen 2:06:07 at the 2018 Prague Marathon, 2:06:21 in Chicago the same year and two other sub 2:10 performances. 

After the race Soctt Fauble posted, "I don’t have the words to explain yesterday yet. Until those words come, I want to say thank you to so many people, but mostly to Boston. You guys were perfect out there. Thank you."

America's 25-year-old Jared Ward too had a steller day clocking 2:09:25 for eighth place. “I’ve been waiting on this 2:09 race for a long time. I think I’ve had it in me a little bit, but conditions today were good enough for running fast,” said Ward, now 30.

Fauble ran the 11th fastest time from a United States born marathon runner in history and the eight fastest time by an American in Boston Marathon history.

“When I was leading, I was thinking, ‘Holy bleep, I can’t believe I’m leading the bleeping Boston Marathon,’” Fauble said. “It was just a surreal experience to be leading a race I grew up watching on TV — not even just growing up, I watched it on TV the last four years and kind of idolized the race and the experience.”   

Fauble had a stellar career as a runner for the Pilots. A former University of Portland male student athlete of the year winner, he led the Pilots’ cross country team to a third place finish in 2014, their first ever podium finish. He earned All-American honors for three straight years in cross-country from 2013 to 2015 and earned similar honors in the 10,000 meter race in track.

“Scott’s success surprises nobody,” Portland men’s cross country and track & field head coach Rob Conner said in a press release. “He was always the hardest working guy on our team and he has taken it to a new level as a professional. We are extremely excited for him and proud of his accomplishments.”

A review of the US all-time marathon scene looks like this.  In 2011 Ryan Hall clocked 2:04:58 in Boston under perfect conditions and 2:06:07 in 2008 (London).  This ranks Ryan Hall 77th on the all-time world list.  America's Khalid Khannouchi clocked four times 2:07:04 or under in 2000, 2002 and 2006.  Plus Galen's performances noted above. 

Is this maybe the beginnings of American men moving up in the rankings? 

(04/22/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Shalane Flanagan is going to have knee surgery to repair tears in her patellar tendons

2017 TCS New York City Marathon champion Shalane Flanagan, who finished third at the same event last year and confessed she almost did not run due to knee pain, posted yesterday that she will need surgery to repair tears in her patellar tendons.

Flanagan has not raced since the 2018 NYC marathon.

Flanagan, who grew up in Massachusetts, sat in the broadcast booth at Monday’s Boston Marathon for WBZ TV, the local CBS affiliate.

Last year, she finished a disappointing seventh, in extremely challenging weather conditions, with a time of 2:46:31, though there was no indication she was dealing with injury until the late fall.

The marathoner has had one of the strongest running careers in American distance history. She began as a high school star, continued her dominance at the University of North Carolina, and then went on to win Olympic and World Championships medals, and set American records which still stand today.

(04/22/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
TCS  New York City Marathon

TCS New York City Marathon

The first New York City Marathon, organized in 1970 by Fred Lebow and Vince Chiappetta, was held entirely in Central Park. Of 127 entrants, only 55 men finished; the sole female entrant dropped out due to illness. Winners were given inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies. The entry fee was $1 and the total event budget...

more...
Share

Aidan Puffer continues to break world records. It started at age 11 and this week the 14-year-old clocked a 14:47 5000m, another world record for his age

Aidan Puffer is a 14-year-old high school freshman at Manchester.  When he crossed the finish line at the Bob Michalski 5000m Championship at the Connecticut Distance Festival on Thursday he had a relaxed demeanor. Placing third behind Xavier junior Robbie Cozean and Hall senior Trey Cormier, Puffer remained calm and stoic after his finish.

For those watching the bushy-haired 14-year-old, it appeared to be just another finisher.   

Except it wasn’t. Puffer had just broken a world record.

With his time of 14:47.66, Puffer broke Hans Segerfelt’s mark of 15:10.2, set in 1975, to claim the world’s fastest time in the 5K by a 14-year-old.

“The 14-year-old world record is like, 15:10,” Puffer said. “The freshman national record was like 14:59. The New Balance nationals standard for the 5K championship race is like 14:50. So I was just focused on hitting all of those, mostly just to get 14:50.”

Mission accomplished for Puffer, who trailed Cozean and Cormier for the entirety of the 5,000-meter race. Cozean (14:40.40) and Cormier (14:42.90) exchanged leads for much of the race, while Puffer trailed patiently, checking his watch and adjusting his pace when needed to assure he’d meet his goal.

“At the beginning I kind of got a little nervous,” Puffer said. “At the beginning I heard 68s and stuff [for 400m] and I was like ‘Oh man, we need to slow down a little bit.’ I mean, it wasn’t as painful as I thought it would be. I felt really good throughout the whole race.”

Puffer, trains about 40 miles per week and works with his own running coach, has previously set world records in the 5K for the 12- and 13-year-old age groups. 

“I’ve never worked with an athlete with as much natural ability as Aidan Puffer,” Manchester coach Mike Bendzinski said.

It all started a few years ago when Aidan’s father, Kyle Puffer decided to do a "Couch to 5K" training program to run a 5K road race.

His son Aidan was 10. He wanted to do it, too.

"I remember calling the pediatrician and asking, 'Is this safe for him to do?'" Aidan's mother, Martha, said. 

"We knew some other parents who were runners and he beat them and they were like, 'Wow,'" Kyle said. "We said, 'Do you want to do another one?' We found other 5Ks and he ran them and he just kept getting faster. He didn't run other than just racing."

That sounds like a typical kid interested in running. But Aidan wasn't a typical kid. At age 11, he set his first world record, the 11-year-old 5,000-meter record on the track. Then he broke the 12-year-old boys 5K record on the road. When he was 13, he broke another one, the 5K road world record for 13-year-olds.

Then at the BAA 5K, two days before the Boston Marathon, he found himself being called up to the podium where Hagos Gebrhiwet, the Olympic 5,000-meter bronze medalist from Ethiopia, had just accepted the silver loving cup trophy for winning the race.

Puffer had once again broken a world record by finishing the 3.1-mile race in 15:47.  A world record for 13-year-olds and now 14:47 5000m on the track, a world record for age 14.  

(04/20/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

2019 Boston Marathon champion Lawrence Cherono attributes his victory to his 2018 London Marathon heartache

Newly crowned Boston Marathon champion Lawrence Cherono has attributed his jaw dropping victory to the London Marathon heartache (Top photo). 

Cherono was in imperious form on Monday clocking 2:07:57 to win the title but the most intriguing part of the race was him edging Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa by a second in a classical finish that ensued between the duo.

And speaking upon arrival at the Eldoret International Airport on Thursday where business came to a standstill as close family members, team mates and admirers welcomed him, Cherono was quick to point out that the disappointing performance at the 2018 London Marathon where he finished seventh inspired him.

“My win in Boston was very important to me in that I wanted to make a mark after failing to win last year in a major race (London Marathon) and so I wanted to put that behind me,” said Cherono.

Although he had the fastest time on the start list, he did not wear the favourite’s tag.

Upon arrival at the airport, he was received by close family members led by his wife Winnie Cherono amidst song and dance from the huge contingent of his training mates.

The 30-year-old was also quick to point out how the Boston race was tough considering the harsh weather conditions combined with the nature of the course of one the oldest races in the world.

“The Boston course is very challenging because it is actually hilly thus you have to climb and descend and at 35km mark I could feel a lot of pain in my legs,” disclosed Cherono.

The athlete who trains at the Kaptagat in Uasin Gishu County urged athletics stakeholders to organize many races in the country so as to create more exposure to athletes.

“We should have as many races so that our athletes can get a chance to gauge themselves before they go for international events,” added Cherono.

Cherono’s wife Winnie (photo with daughter) was also full of praise for his exploits which she said has brought happiness to the family.

“I congratulate Lawrence for making us proud,” says Winnie.

(04/19/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Boston Marathon Race Director David McGillivray runs the course again for the 47th time after having triple by-pass heart surgery six months ago

Every year for 46 years David McGillivray had run the Boston Marathon course.  Since he is the race Director most have been run after the race had finished.  Six months ago David had triple by-pass heart surgery but that was not going to stop his streak of 47. 

“I started at 4pm and finished last again at 9:45pm...but I’m good with that...I just wanted to finish this one more that ever before...it didn’t matter the time.

“It definitely was my hardest one but perhaps my most meaningful one.  I’m glad I didn’t disappoint my heart surgeon after he said he would be disappointed if I couldn’t do this.  

“The weather was so unsettled – we had a little bit of everything.  Lesson learned, if we stay fit we can recover from surgery (triple bypass surgery for me 6 months ago) and get back out on the road...anything is possible.  

“I got a second chance.   I feel very good this morning, too.  Running with 15 friends (most ever) including my son, Luke and finishing my 47th Boston with little Jack Middlemiss, my heart warrior teammate made it all possible and very special.  

“Many thanks for all the kind words and well wishes.   It was a long day, especially with all the stress in the early morning with the thunderstorms and heavy rain but all ended up going well.  

“Congratulations to all the runners who competed and finished yesterday,” he said.  

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson runs Boston Marathon clocking 3:09:00

Monday morning, seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson ran a 3:09:08 marathon in Boston. The race car driver said on Instagram post-race that it was the most challenging thing he’d ever done.

This result really challenges those who say that race car drivers aren’t athletes.

The NASCAR champion told The Boston pre-race that he was looking to run under three hours. While he missed that mark, a 3:09 is an extremely impressive marathon debut, especially for a new runner.

Each year before the Daytona 500, one of NASCAR’s premier events, some drivers run the Daytona Beach half-marathon and often do well, but all-star driver Jimmie Johnson has always been a standout.

Johnson has previously competed in triathlons and half-marathons, but Boston was his first full.

(04/16/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Joan Benoit Samuelson and Gene Dykes clocked outstanding times at this year's Boston Marathon

There were many outstanding performances at the 2019 Boston Marathon.  Two that really stand out are: Forty years after her first win at the Boston Marathon, Joan Benoit Samuelson scored a victory of a more personal nature during Monday’s 123rd edition of the race.

The Cape Elizabeth native and Freeport resident met her stated goal of finishing the 2019 race within 40 minutes of her winning time in 1979, completing the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton to downtown Boston in an even 3 hours, 4 minutes while running much of the marathon with her daughter Abby (photo).

The effort not only enabled the 61-year-old Samuelson to place first in her age group (women 60-64) and 249th among all the women in the 30,000-runner field, but she also finished just 28 minutes and 45 seconds behind the 2:35:15 she ran to win Boston in her first-ever attempt at the distance as a college student four decades earlier.

“I did and I’m really happy about it,” Samuelson said during a postrace interview near the finish line with WBZ-TV.

“To have our daughter in this race with me meant a great deal to me. She’s as passionate about the sport as I am, and to be out there with everybody cheering us on and the weather backing off to maybe coming on a little too warm, I can’t complain,” she said.

On the men's side: 71-year-old Gene Dykes of Bala Cynwyd broke his own age-group record on Monday, posting the fastest course time for a 70-to-74-year-old at 2 hours, 58 minutes, 50 seconds.

Dykes set the previous course record for that age group in 2018 at age 70, posting a time of 3:16 in driving rain.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Desiree Linden put forth a strong effort but failed to defend her 2018 Boston Marathon title, fading from second place to finish the 26.2-mile course in fifth place clocking 2:27:00

“It was an honor to be back and I knew today was going to be a big test to defend but I had a blast out there,” Linden told NBC Sports Network. “Right around 18 (miles), I thought, ‘I think I’m done. Hang up the shoes, retire.' The Boston crowds are so phenomenal, they just kind of helped me regroup.”

Despite Linden joining the lead pack from the start and leading at times, it quickly became the chase pack as 28-year-old Ethiopian Worknesh Degefa separated from the group early and built about a 90 second lead before the 10 mile mark. Degefa won the race with a time of 2:23:30.

With much better racing conditions this year, 35-year-old Linden easily beat her championship time of 2 hours, 39 minutes, 54 seconds from a year ago.

Linden, who lives in Washington, Mich., put on a surge to take the lead of the chase pack with just over 10 miles to go, but the pack trailed Degefa by over two and a half minutes at that point. Linden and fellow American Jordan Hassay even moved into second and third-place, respectively, before Linden fell back from the pack. Hassay, 27, finished as the top American in third place with a time of 2:25:20.

“I think Jordan’s come here and done really well,” Linden said. “She’s in that third spot consistently and she’s going to have a breakthrough on this course. She’s going to make a name for herself. She is the future -- well, she is right now -- of American distance running. The future is bright.”

Linden went through the halfway mark at 1:13:09. Linden’s time has met the American Olympic qualifying standard. After claiming a $150,000 prize for winning last year, Linden will take home a $15,000 prize for fifth place this year.

What is next for Linden?

“Lunch right now, for sure,” Linden said. “Then, regroup ... You finish fifth and you go, ‘maybe there’s a little bit more.’”

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Ethiopian Worknesh Degefa took command of the women's Boston Marathon race by the 7 mile mark and built it to over two minutes by half way and held on to win as America's Jordan Hasay finished third

Worknesh Degefa, 29, built up a commanding lead and even through Kenya's Edna Kiplagat closed the gap in the last few miles Degefa went on the win clocking 2:23:31 at the 2019 Boston Marathon.  Edna Kiplegat of Kenya started to break away from the rest of the chase pack at about 30K, trying to run the Ethiopian leader down, but the gap was too wide. Edna Kiplagat finished 44 seconds back clocking 2:24:14.  Jordan Hasasy from the US finished third clocking 2:25:20.    

Going into the race Degefa was ready to run well.  This January in Dubai, Worknesh Degefa set an Ethiopian national marathon record with her 2:17:41 second place finish. With that result she became the fourth fastest women’s marathoner in history.

Historically a half marathon specialist, Degefa’s top ten half marathon times (2013-2016) were run with an average time of 67:30. Her personal best was recorded at the 2016 Prague Half Marathon where she finished second in 66:14. She earned the silver medal at the 2015 All African Games Half Marathon. Degefa made her debut in the marathon in 2017 with a win at the Dubai Marathon, which she says is her proudest accomplishment. 

Degefa trains in the Oromia region of Ethiopia in Arsi and Assela because of its altitude and good weather for training. Her coach is Gemedu Dedefo. Her favorite foods are rice and pasta and she enjoys traveling in Europe.

Jordan Hasay finished third again this year.  Choosing Boston to make her debut in 2017, Jordan Hasay ran 2:23:00 to finish third. She set an American women’s debut record by three minutes and recorded the fourth fastest time ever run in the race by an American woman behind Shalane Flanagan, Desiree Linden and Joan Benoit Samuelson.

After Boston, Hasay ran the Bank of America Chicago Marathon and once again finished third, but improved her time to 2:20:57, becoming the second fastest American woman marathoner of all time. Besides making the podium in both the Boston and Chicago Marathons, Hasay set a half marathon personal best time of 67:55 with her sixth-place finish at the 2017 Prague Half Marathon.

During the race she set a 15K personal best of 48:21 and a 20K personal best of 64:32. She also won the 2017 U.S. national titles in the 20K, 10 Mile and 15K. Hasay was injured during 2018, but after surgery on her foot has made a complete recovery.

Hasay has been running since she was 12 years old and grew up in Arroyo Grande, California. 

Last year's winner Desiree Linden finished fifth clocking 2:27:00.  The weather was not a factor this year unlike last year.  

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Lawrence Cherono wins the 2019 Boston Marathon Elite Men's race by two seconds

It was a sprint to the finish at this year's Boston Marathon.  A three-person race down the stretch on Boylston Street turned into a two-man, all-out sprint and Cherone of Kenya emerged in front of Lelisa Desisa.  Cheroono's time was 2:07:57, best time since 2011, while Desisa clocked a 2:07:59.  Kenneth Kipkemoi faded in the final 300 yards and placed thired in 2:08:06. 

Scott Fauble, in seventh, and Jared Ward, in eighth, were the top American finishers, crossing in 2:09.10 and 2:09.25, respectively.

Going into Boston Lawrence was the winner of six marathons and was the fastest man in the 2019 Boston Marathon field, Cherono brought both speed and strength to his Boston debut. His personal best was earned with a course record win at the 2018 Amsterdam Marathon (2:04:06). He also won the 2017 Amsterdam Marathon, the 2016 and 2017 Honolulu Marathon, the 2016 Prague Marathon and the 2015 Zurich Marathon. In his first Abbott World Marathon Majors event, he finished seventh at the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2:09:25.

Cherono’s coach is 2007 Boston Marathon runner-up James Kwambai. He says winning the Amsterdam Marathon in a course record time has been a career highlight.

Last year Geoffrey Kirui was intent on defending his Boston crown, but after pulling away from the front pack and leading many of the closing miles, he was caught by Yuki Kawauchi and had to settle for second in 2018.

This year at 20 miles Geoffrey was leading clocking 1:38:37 but in the end he faded to fifth about a minute behind the winner.

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

The weather is going to be so much better we hope than last year for the Boston Marathon unlike the previous forecast

While the weather will not be as dismal as what runners faced in 2018, unsettled conditions will still provide less-than-ideal conditions for the 123rd Boston Marathon on Monday.

The dry weather that dominated the Boston area on Sunday is not expected to last into Patriots' Day.

The same storm unleashing a severe weather outbreak across the South will cause a band of rain and a thunderstorm to sweep through Boston just prior to the start of the race on Monday morning.

The rain can fall heavy at times, and there can be a period of stronger winds that may rip away any banners that are not fully secured. Runners and spectators setting up before the race may have to find shelter for a time if a thunderstorm accompanies the rain.

Hundreds of thousands of spectators are set to cheer on the 30,000 runners of the 123rd Boston Marathon.

(04/14/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Because of wet and cool weather forecasted the Boston Marathon organizers are making some changes

The Boston Marathon are making changes to the scheduled start times for runners.

The Boston Athletic Association said it is planning for conditions similar to last year's race. StormTeam 5 meteorologists is forecasting rain and temperatures below 50 degrees at the starting line in Hopkinton.

Runners assigned to the fourth wave will start their race immediately after those in the third wave. Originally, a 25 minute gap was scheduled between those two waves.

Under the new plan, Wave 3 will start at 10:50 a.m. and Wave 4 will follow immediately afterward.

BAA organizers said the goal is to reduce the amount of time runners spend waiting in the Athletes' Village prior to starting the race.

Additionally, the BAA said it is adding additional medical aid capacity along the course, adding things like walls and heaters to tents and distributing ponchos to volunteers.

"Our race history has shown that the forecasted conditions will cause unique challenges for athletes whose participation requires specific equipment that limits contact with the ground.

“This includes participants in the wheelchair division, handcycle program, duo program, and runners competing with prosthesis. Eligible athletes who elect deferral will receive a complimentary entry into the 2020 Boston Marathon. For those athletes, qualifying standards will be waived if a deferment is selected," the BAA wrote in a statement.

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

After years of struggling with the aftermath of the 1999 Columbine shooting, Laura Hall and Sarah Bush have used running as a method to overcome the anxiety, and now are set for Boston

It was a regular school day. Laura Green, a 14-year-old freshman, threw on a powder-blue tank top, a matching cardigan, a khaki skirt and a pair of Doc Martens. She had two weeks left in the school year at Columbine High. After months of cold days, the sun was finally out. Her town, Littleton, Colorado, looked bright and majestic.

As she sat down in the passenger seat of the car her older sister, Sarah Green, 16, was driving on April 20, 1999, Laura thought to herself, "It's going to be a good day."

Three hours after they left their house. That's all it took for their lives to change forever when one of the school's janitors yelled, "Run, somebody is shooting." Laura dropped her pizza and sprinted up the stairs from the cafeteria. She stood shoulder to shoulder with 40 other kids in the choir office. She fixed her eyes on the ceiling, hoping the space above them might help her breathe through the intense claustrophobia. They had barricaded the door with two desks and a cabinet.

During the same time, Sarah was taking a math test. She dropped her pen in fear when baseball coach Robin Ortiz slammed the door open and told them to "get the hell out; somebody is shooting." She ran out the main entrance and stopped only when she found some classmates in the field across from the school. She watched as the SWAT team members arrived 47 minutes later and positioned themselves behind their vehicle just as bullets began to fly toward them.

Chaos ensued, and it wasn't until four hours later that the SWAT team kicked down the door of the choir office and ordered the kids to place their hands on their heads and walk out in a single file.

They were taken out through the back entrance, the glass windows shot in, the doors unhinged. With her hands on her head, Laura had to step over the dead body of a classmate she had grown up with since second grade. She was hyperventilating, and tears poured down her face.

That was 20 years ago. The 1999 Columbine High School shooting, in which 12 students and one teacher were killed, changed the Green sisters' lives forever, robbing them of a normal high school experience, of being able to sleep in their own rooms at night, of feeling safe at school. But through the uncertainty of it all, they found one thing -- one common thing -- that saved them. Running.

Running gave them a sense of purpose and focus -- it gave them a chance to slowly heal. On Monday, Laura and Sarah will tackle their ultimate goal and compete in the Boston Marathon.

Training together for Boston has been special for Sarah and Laura. They ran the Orcas Island 32-miler together in February, finishing hand-in-hand. When Laura needed a water break, Sarah waited for her, and when Sarah needed to catch a breath, Laura held her hand as they slowed down. They found an emotional release, a sense of accomplishment, especially after a long race.

Finishing the Boston Marathon together a few days before the 20th anniversary of the April 20, 1999, shooting would be their way of showing the world that it's possible for survivors to move forward and find a sense of serenity after a life-altering event. Not to mention tackling one of the toughest and most prestigious marathons in the world.

"When we see the famous Citgo sign, we know we will only have 1 mile left," said Laura, referring to the iconic image near the end of the Boston Marathon.

"And I asked Sarah, 'How am I supposed to keep it together?' She said, 'You won't, you just have to allow yourself to cry.'"

(04/12/2019) ⚡AMP
by Aishwarya Kumar
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Kellyn Taylor, the seventh-fastest USA marathon woman will run her next marathon at the Volkswagen Prague Marathon

Kellyn Taylor, the seventh-fastest USA marathon woman under all conditions with a 2:24:29 personal best, will run her next marathon at the Volkswagen Prague Marathon on Sunday, May 5, her HOKA Northern Arizona Elite coach Ben Rosario told Race Results Weekly.

Taylor, 32, who finished fourth at the 2016 USA Olympic Trials in the 10,000m and sixth in the marathon, sees running on Prague’s flat, fast course as an opportunity to lower her personal best and get a 2020 Tokyo Olympic qualifying mark (sub-2:29:30).  She last ran the 42.195-kilometer distance at Grandma’s Marathon last June in Duluth, Minn., where she clocked her personal best.  The mark was also an event record.

“After a season off of marathoning, I think Prague is the perfect fit for my next go at 26.2,” Taylor said through a statement. “The field looks fantastic and I’m heading there to compete with the best in search of a win and a new PR.”

Under Rosario’s training, Taylor has moved solidly into the first tier of American marathon women.  She made a very good debut at the Chevron Houston Marathon in 2015 clocking 2:28:40 before finishing sixth at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Los Angeles in hot conditions (2:32:49).  In 2017 she finished 13th at London (2:28:51), 8th at New York (2:29:56) and was the ninth-ranked American marathon woman for 2017 by Track & Field News.  Nearly a year ago, Taylor was unable to finish the 2018 Boston Marathon, held in heavy rain and near-freezing temperatures, but bounced back with her fast run at Grandma’s less than two months later.  Taking last fall off, she will be running Prague on fresh legs.

“Kellyn wanted to try and build on her performance last year at Grandma’s by picking a race where she could battle for the win against a great field and have the opportunity to run a fast time as a result,” coach Rosario told Race Results Weekly in an e-mail.

In Prague, Taylor will face a quality field, including Ethiopia’s Amane Beriso (2:20:48 PB) and Mamitu Daska (2:21:59 PB), Kenya’s Bornes Jepkirui Kitur (2:24:19 PB), and Israel’s Lonah Chemtai Salpeter (2:24:17 PB).

The Volkswagen Prague Marathon is an IAAF Gold Label road race.  Under the new IAAF qualification system for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, a top-5 finish in a Gold Label marathon shall be counted as an Olympic Games qualifying mark regardless of the time.  Nonetheless, Taylor is hoping to run fast.

“Her training has, without a doubt, been as good as ever over the last few weeks and I am excited to see what she can do on the streets of Prague,” concluded Rosario.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
by David Monti
Share
Prague Marathon

Prague Marathon

The Volkswagen Prague International Marathon is considered by many, to be one of the top 10 marathons and invariably contains a number of high profile runners. Winding through the streets of one of Europe's most beautiful cities it is a spectacular race. And with a mainly flat course there is the chance for a personal best. Since its inception in...

more...
Share

Mika Kawauchi the mom of Yuki Kawauchi is going to be running the Boston Marathon this year

The JapanRunningNews.com site reports that Boston Marathon defending champion Yuki Kawauchi’s mother, Mika Kawauchi, is also running the Boston Marathon this year. She will start in Wave four.

Mika is an accomplished middle distance runner, and according to a story in the New York Times last October, she was Yuki’s first coach.

The B.A.A. invited her to race at Boston this year. “We are excited to have her run this year,” says B.A.A. communications manager Chris Lotsbom, whom we reached by email today, “and believe it is the first time a parent of a defending champion has competed in the same race their son/daughter was racing in as defending champion.”

What few people know is that the Kawauchis are a running family. Yuki’s brothers Koki and Yoshiki are both runners. Mika ran her first marathon at Gold Coast in Australia in 2016 at age 52, finishing in 3:53.

Yuki runs the Gold Coast every year and has stood on the podium four times. (He has an ongoing rivalry with Kenyan runner Kenneth Mungara, who holds the course record and Australian all-comers record of 2:08:42, set in 2015).

The four Kawauchis all raced at the Gold Coast together last year, Mika and Yoshiki running the Southern Cross University 10K, and Koki the half-marathon. Mika finished in 46:27, for eighth in her age group. 

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
by Anne Francis
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Don't spend any energy worrying about the weather for this year's Boston Marathon says Marathon Man Gary Allen File 5

You can’t control the weather. Don’t spend any energy worrying about it. Instead prepare for anything and everything for this year's Boston Marathon.  

1. Wear lots of throw away clothes to the start. Layers rule. Make sure your outer layer is a green trash bag to keep you dry. Hours of waiting to start being cold and miserable is not good.

2. Carry your race shoes and wear some old beaters to tromp around in the mud at athletes village. Change into your dry kicks in the corrals and toss your old shoes.

3. Bring some Mylar blankets to wrap up in and sit on in the corrals.

4. Don’t over dress for the actual race. If it’s raining you will be weighted down by sopping wet not needed gear. Remember the faster you run the more heat you generate and you can’t run fast if you have 15 lbs of soaked gear on.

5. Hat and gloves are key. Race singlet will work just fine, maybe arm sleeves. If below 40 I sometimes would wear two singlets.

6. If windy use the people around you to draft. In the infamous nor’easter in 2007 we had gusts of 30 mph right in our faces all damn day. I tucked in whenever I could conserving energy and would pop out when the gusts subsided. I ran 2:55:17 good for 9th OA AG.

7. Start with a 12 oz Poland spring water bottle in your hand and skip the congested mile 2 and 4 water stops. I found in big urban marathons I’d drink 6oz at mile 2 and then finish it at mile 4 but most importantly I skipped the crowded chaos of those first 2 stops.

8. Don’t follow the crowds. If village is insane you don’t need to go there. The hopkinton green right at the start is a fantastic place to wait. Plenty of Porto’s and you can head straight to your corrals when called. Lots of big trees to help shield you from weather.

9. Have fun and even if Mother Nature kicks you in the face Smile and yell, “yo bitch, BRING IT....IS THAT ALL YOU GOT!”

From Marathon Man Gary Allen who has run many Boston Marathons over many years. 

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gary Allen
Share
Share

John Hancock 2019 Boston Marathon US Elite Open Team

Featured video: 2019 Boston Marathon John Hancock U.S. Elite Open Team for Monday April 15.

Abdi Abdirahman, a four-time Olympian, placed sixth at the 2017 Boston Marathon. He is a multiple national champion in the 10,000m, 10K, 10-mile and half marathon. 

Shadrack Biwott finished third this year in Boston. Last year, he was second American and fourth overall. Biwott placed fifth at the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon in a personal best time of 2:12:01.

Aaron Braun, 13th at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, is a versatile road runner. Braun is a national champion in the 12K and was top American at the 2015 Houston Marathon.

Sarah Crouch has finished top-ten three times at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, including this year where she was top American and ninth overall. She is a past champion of the Tallahassee Marathon and finished 11th at the 2016 Boston Marathon.

Jeffrey Eggleston has raced on three IAAF World Championships Marathon teams, placing as high as 13th in 2018. He has won the Pittsburgh, Woodlands, Lima and San Diego Marathons and has been runner-up in Brisbane, Pittsburgh and at Twin Cities.

Scott Fauble was the second American and seventh overall at the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon. Fauble placed fourth in the 10,000m at the 2016 Olympic Trials and represented the United States at the 2017 IAAF World Cross Country Championships.  

Lindsay Flanagan, the 2015 Pan American silver medalist in the marathon, finished 11th at the 2017 Boston Marathon and set her personal best of 2:29:25 at the Frankfurt Marathon this year.  

Sara Hall is the tenth fastest U.S. women’s marathoner of all time having set her 2:26:20 mark at the 2018 Ottawa Marathon. Hall has earned national titles in the marathon, 20K, 10-mile, mile and cross country. She is married to Ryan Hall, who is a John Hancock Elite Athlete Ambassador and holds the American course record of 2:04:58 at the Boston Marathon. 

Jordan Hasay set an American debut record of 2:23:00 with her third-place finish in Boston in 2017. She then ran the second fastest marathon of all time by a U.S. woman at the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, where she placed third in 2:20:57. Hasay is an 18-time All American and a national champion at 15K and 20K.  

Elkanah Kibet, a member of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, has had two top-ten finishes at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon. At the 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon, Kibet finished top American and 16th overall. He was 8th in Boston in 2018.

Desiree Linden, a two-time Olympian, returns to Boston as defending champion. A top-five finisher in eight Abbott World Marathon Majors, additional accomplishments include placing seventh at the 2016 Olympic Games Marathon, tenth at the 2009 IAAF World Championships Marathon, second at the 2012 and 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and second in the 10,000m at the 2015 Pan American Games. In addition to her 2018 win in Boston, she placed second in 2011.

Timothy Ritchie, the 2017 U.S. National Marathon champion, ran for the U.S. at the 2016 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships where he placed 23th. Ritchie is the head men’s cross country coach at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Dathan Ritzenhein is the fourth fastest U.S. marathoner of all time with a 2:07:47 personal best. Career highlights for the three-time Olympian include finishing ninth at the 2008 Olympic Marathon, winning the bronze medal at the 2009 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and finishing 13th at the 2012 Olympic Games 10,000m. 

Sarah Sellers ran through freezing rain and torrential wind this year to finish second behind Des Linden. In her 2017 marathon debut, Sellers won the Huntsville Marathon. In New York this year she finished 18th.

Brian Shrader is a versatile runner on the track and roads. He made his half marathon debut in Boston this year at the B.A.A. Half Marathon, running 1:05:26. He also made his marathon debut in 2018, running 2:13:31 at the USA Championships in Sacramento.  

Becky Wade, a champion of the California International Marathon, finished 11th at the 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon and tenth at the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon. 

Jared Ward placed third at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials and followed with a sixth-place finish at the Olympic Marathon in Rio de Janeiro, less than a minute and a half out of medal contention. In 2017 Ward was tenth at the Boston Marathon and this year, he finished top American and sixth overall at the TCS New York City Marathon. 

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

The current weather forecast for the Boston Marathon is similar to last year but things can change by Monday

For the second year in a row, rain and wind could lead to sloppy conditions for the Boston Marathon next Monday, Patriots' Day.

Hundreds of thousands of spectators will cheer on 30,000 runners along the course from Hopkinton, Massachusetts, to downtown Boston.

During last year's marathon, over 1.50 inches of rain and chilly conditions led to a downright raw and miserable race with slower times than previous years.  Many elite runners had to drop out due to the weather.

Those participating in this year's event should make sure they have waterproof gear at the ready, as there is the potential for similar conditions to unfold.

"As a storm moves toward the area next Monday, soggy conditions are in store for the Boston Marathon," said AccuWeather Meteorologist Ryan Adamson.

Depending on the exact speed of the storm, the rain could pester the area for much of the day, affecting all waves of runners. The water on painted surfaces, such as pedestrian and motor vehicle lines, can make for slippery conditions for the runners.

The rain could be heavy enough to cause ponding of water on the course, like what occurred in 2018.

Timing is everything. The storm looks to bring Beantown its worst between sunrise and noon. The first batch of marathon runners departs Hopkinton at 9:02 a.m., with the remaining participants setting off in waves through 11:15 a.m. A chilly rain is possible and, if downpours develop, a half to three-quarters of an inch of water could fall by early afternoon.

As the race is six days away, however, the specifics of this forecast could change.

The official forecast is calling for temperatures around 50 degrees, though it’s likely an easterly wind off the water — coupled with cold air draining down from the north — could knock Boston back into the low to mid-40s.

The atmosphere can be fickle this time of year in southern New England. On Monday, New York City warmed to 78, while Hartford — a mere 100 miles away — held steady at 43 degrees.

Past Boston Marathons have seen all sorts of wild weather. In 2017, Logan Airport peaked at a balmy 75 degrees — just a day after a record-setting 86 degrees. But in 2015, temperatures struggled to hit 50, and 0.61 inches of rain fell. And if you’re looking for variety, try 2014 — the race began in the 30s, flirting with 70 in the afternoon.

Eric Fisher is the chief meteorologist at WBZ-TV in Boston, and has run the marathon a number of times. He said the rain predicted to drench this year’s race could be dangerous to runners.

“Heavy rain like last year can be tough,” he said in a message. “There were quite a few cases of hypothermia on the course.”

If the rain clears out sooner though, that could be good news for runners. Most athletes would prefer a cooler day over the summerlike weather that’s baked the course in years past.

“After a winter of cold training, the ideal day for runners is mostly cloudy and somewhere close to 50 degrees,” Fisher said. “That’s actually a pretty standard day for Boston in mid-April.” The average high this time of year is around 56 or 57 degrees.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Matthew Cappucci
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Sara Sellers placed second at the 2018 Boston Marathon and is ready to run it again on Monday

When Sarah Sellers rises at 4 a.m., it’s not to sip coffee slowly in the still of the morning or head off to an early shift at the Tucson hospital where she works as a nurse anesthetist. Instead, Sellers hits the blaring alarm and gets out her shoes to tackle another early morning run.

Sellers is preparing for her second appearance in the Boston Marathon after a long love affair with running. The 27-year-old started in middle school with her parents on the trails behind their house in Ogden, Utah, and went on to run in college for Weber State from 2009–13.

For someone who has spent most of her life running, qualifying for the Boston Marathon came easy. But competing among the elites was another task all together. In 2018, Sellers arrived on the starting line in Hopkinton as a relatively unknown runner and had only competed in one marathon, in Huntsville, Utah, in Sept. 2017. She won her debut in 2:44:27—nearly 15 minutes ahead of the next woman.

“In some ways last year it was really nice to be totally naïve and do my own thing and not have anyone besides a few family members and my coach interested in how I did,” Sellers says.

The conditions at the 2018 Boston Marathon were anything but ideal. At the start of the race temperatures hovered around 37 degrees. A torrential downpour, which amounted to over a half inch of rain, soaked runners for the entirety of the race. The worst part, according to Sellers, who compared running in the heavy rains to being in a car wash, was the strong headwinds that reached up to 35 miles per hour. More than 2,500 runners visited medical tents during the race and 1,123 participants did not finish.

When Sellers crossed the finish line in 2:44:04 as the second runner in the women’s division behind two-time Olympian Desiree Linden, who became the first American woman to win the race in 33 years, her anonymity to the general public quickly vanished. Suddenly, the media was clamoring to talk to Sellers, who was in a state of disbelief over her second-place finish. “Who is Sarah Sellers?” started popping on search engines, running message boards and social media. The reality sank in after she found her husband, Blake, and he confirmed that the result was no fluke.

“It was the mixture of excitement and almost this daunting feeling,” Seller says. “It was a little bit scary because I knew it was going to be a big deal but I also asked myself ‘What did I just do?’”

Before April 16, 2018, not many people would’ve cared that Sellers ran track and cross country in middle school and high school before joining the teams at Weber State in her hometown. She was a nine-time Big Sky conference champion during her college career and was voted the university’s 2012 Female Athlete of the Year. After she was diagnosed with a stress fracture in the navicular bone in her foot during her senior year, Sellers didn’t know if she would be able to run again, because that specific bone doesn’t get much blood supply, which makes it hard to heal. She never finished her final year of NCAA eligibility at Weber State.

She went a couple of years without being able to run or could run very little,” says Paul Pilkington, Sellers’s coach at Weber State. “She wasn’t training a lot when in grad school but I think that helped her get healthy again. It’s the whole thing of ‘Hey I may never be able to run again’ that makes her appreciate it a lot.”

Sellers eventually did start running again as a graduate student at Barry University in Florida. She decided to target the 2018 Boston Marathon after her brother, Ryan, signed up. She earned her Boston qualifier in Huntsville and then reached out to Pilkington and asked him to help her train for the marathon.

(04/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Jenna West
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

This year's Boston Marathon will be Beofra Butler's 100th marathon and her sixth Boston.

It all started when she was stationed in Virginia 12 years ago. That's when Chief Warrant Officer Beofra Butler saw everyone training for the Marine Corps Marathon and decided to give the marathon a try.

As a Soldier, running was already a part of her daily life and physical fitness routine. She had ran several other shorter races to include the Army 10-miler and a few half marathons, so the challenge of a full marathon appealed to her. She wasn't even afraid of the dreaded "wall" that everyone told her she would hit around mile 20 when her body would start shutting down as energy stores ran low and fatigue set in.

"I had never experienced the wall and was feeling pretty great," recalled Butler. "I saw the mile markers for mile 19, then mile 20, then 21. I was feeling good and thinking to myself that maybe I avoided the wall. Then at mile 22, everything from my waist down locked up -- it felt like I really did hit a wall. My muscles were in knots, my toes were cramping and every time I took a step it just hurt.

"A lady tapped her on the shoulder and encouraged her to move off to the side and stretch before resuming the race."I wanted to cry," she said. "I knew it was just four more miles. I wobbled to the finish along with a bunch of other people doing the exact same thing.

"After the race later that night, with ice bags on her legs and a computer on her lap, Butler signed up for her next marathon. "I just had to do it again for myself so I could figure out how to do it without pain," she said.Butler ran her second marathon during a deployment, followed by another and another and another.

She's preparing to run her 100th marathon in Boston on April 15. The race will be her sixth Boston Marathon and she says that it is fitting because it's her favorite event."There's something special about running in Boston," she said. "It's the only race you have to qualify for to get in and after working so hard to be a part of it, you really enjoy the moment when you get there.

The support of the crowd is amazing and it's just a great place to be."She got there by figuring out how to avoid that wall of pain."For the most part, I don't hit a wall anymore," Butler said. "Now I know what that feels like and I never want to feel it again.

"How does she do it? The way anyone in the Army does anything -- with an abbreviation. According to Butler, the key to running a successful marathon comes down to the 3P's: pacing, patience and practice. She says that you need to control your pace throughout the entire marathon and exercise patience as those around you start out fast or crowd the track.

To refine your pacing and patience, you need to practice."It comes down to having time on your feet," said Butler. "You have to put in the time and stay positive.

"Her time comes from running at least five days a week. She averages 10 miles a day with Saturdays being her long run day of anywhere from 13 to 20 miles. She does speed work on Wednesdays, often bringing others along with her to help them train to meet their goals. 

Butler says that running is wonderful because you can do it wherever you are and with no special equipment. For those aspiring to run in races of any distance, she said that it's important to find a training plan.

"Training is a part of learning yourself," she said. "It helps you become more comfortable when you're out there. You need to trust your training and just enjoy the moment." 

(04/09/2019) ⚡AMP
by Eve Meinhardt
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Former Boston Police Commissioner William Evans is running the Boston Marathon for the 21st time

“I hope I set a good example for all those in law enforcement. That even after 38 years, I’m still running.”

William Evans is once again gearing up to run the Boston Marathon.

This year marks the 21st time the former Boston police commissioner will compete in the event.

It will be his 54th marathon overall, and the 60-year-old’s first Boston Marathon since he retired from the Boston Police Department last year to helm the Boston College Police Department. 

Asked about his favorite part of the course?  “The end — when I finish obviously! 

“No, the best part — I’ll always remember it. My first marathon I ever did for Boston, I did a 2:53 believe it or not, but I’ll always remember coming up Hereford Street. I think for every runner that’s a special time because you take that left onto Boylston and finally you see the crowds, you hear the roar. And you see the finish line. And I remember it brought tears to my eyes the first time I accomplished that. 

“So the favorite part for me is when you take that right off of Comm. Ave., going up Hereford, and then finally taking that left onto Boylston. Because there’s no crowd like Boston. There’s no excitement like it. To come down there and see that finish line —  it’s the best feeling in the world,” he says. 

(04/09/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

2018 Boston Marathon champion Yuki Kawauchi perhaps is Japan’s most famous marathon runner

During the past decade, Yuki Kawauchi has been perhaps Japan’s most famous marathon runner. He’s been known as the “Citizen Runner” or the “Civil Service Runner.”M

But he no longer carries these catchphrases when he runs.

Kawauchi became a professional runner on Monday, meaning he will be able to devote all his time to the sport.

While he has taken pride in his accomplishments as an amateur runner, Kawauchi is excited about the dawn of his new full-time athletic career. He believes that he can now commit himself 24/7 to the sport, which was not possible when he was a Saitama Prefectural Office employee working full time at Kasukabe High School.

The 32-year-old said that he began thinking about turning pro in 2017, when he competed at the IAAF World Championships in London. It was his third appearance at worlds. He barely missed a top-eight finish, placing ninth.

While he regretted the result, the experience to stay in England for 10 days to prepare for the race opened up his eyes.

“I had never had a chance to be away from home for nine nights or for 10 days,” Kawauchi told The Japan Times after a Tokyo news conference to announce his advisory role for sporting apparel company Asics on Tuesday. “And spending nine nights, my condition went up as the time wore on.

“And then, I asked myself what kind of potential I would have if I spent a month, a year or two years.”

The idea of becoming a pro dwelled on Kawauchi’s mind later the same year at the Fukuoka International Marathon, where he participated along with his younger brother, Yoshiki. Kawauchi said that his brother, who had just turned pro after working for a private company for three years, impressed him by improving his personal-best time by five minutes.

“I had not come up with a new personal best for a long time either,” said Kawauchi, whose personal record is 2 hours, 8 minutes, 14 seconds at the 2013 Seoul International Marathon in 2013. “So I made up my mind to become a pro runner. I decided so by watching my brother’s performance.”

On Tuesday, Kawauchi was ecstatic while appearing before the media and talking about what he will do next. He said that now he would be able to do a lot of things he “had envisioned” he could do as a pro.

The Tokyo native, who grew up mostly in Saitama Prefecture, announced that he plans to hold a two-month training camp in Kushiro, Hokkaido, starting in June.

To make up for a lack of practice time as an amateur, Kawauchi competed in races nearly every weekend, treating them like training sessions. But he admitted that he was sacrificing his body, which could not fully recover before the next race. That said, he’s thrilled to now have proper time for medical care if needed.

Interestingly, Kawauchi, who has completed 92 full marathons in his career, insisted that he would have less pressure on his shoulders as a pro because he would essentially compete for himself.

(04/06/2019) ⚡AMP
by KAZ NAGATSUKA
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

John Stifler to be awarded Road Runners Club of America Excellence in Running Journalism award

John Stifler has been writing about runners of all abilities for over four decades, from small races to major marathons.

The Florence, Mass native was recognized for his career and was awarded the Road Runners Club of America Excellence in Running Journalism award for 2018.

Each year, the RRCA honors individuals for their service to the organization and contributions to distance running. Stifler is the 45th recipient of the journalism award, which recognizes writing about grassroots, community-based running that is memorable, creative and inspiring.

Stifler was recognized at the RRCA National Running Awards Banquet and Ceremony on March 30 in New Orleans. The club also inducted three members into its distance running hall of fame: Nancy Ditz Mosbacher, Oscar Moore and Joan Ullyot.

“It’s very flattering,” Stifler said. “I am on that list along with Olympic athletes and stars of the sport.

Stifler has been covering the sport since 1974, writing pieces for the Valley Advocate and Sugarloaf Mountain Athletic Club newsletter. He has since contributed to New England Runner Magazine and was a longtime columnist for the Daily Hampshire Gazette.

In 1988, Stifler started writing a running column for the Gazette on a bi-weekly basis. One of Stifler’s fondest memories covering the local scene was the opportunity to write a feature on running legend Nancy Conz.

“She was probably the greatest runner to ever come out of western Massachusetts, certainly Hampshire County,” Stifler said. “Between 1978 and the mid-80s she was pretty much approaching world class. She won the Avon Women’s Marathon and she had to beat Joan Samuelson.”

While the column came to an end, Stifler felt the impact his writing had on those throughout the community, even those who weren’t involved with running.

“What meant so much was that running is a community sport the same way that the kids’ hockey and basketball games are community sports,” Stifler said. 

The freedom Stifler had with the running column gave him the chance to cover many topics and events. He covered Boston Marathons as a participant and through other local runners.

The experiences he had, and the recognition he received from this award, has given him an appreciation for the connection to the community that he values to this day.

(04/06/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Dr. Sarah Ruff was selected from more than 500 applicants nationwide to run the Boston Marathon

Sarah Ruff, MD, a physician at UNC Family Medicine at Southpoint, was selected by Hyland's, a maker of homeopathic medicines, from more than 500 applicants nationwide to run the Boston Marathon with a team of 18 health professionals. 

As a family physician, Dr. Ruff often sees families during some of the most important moments of their lives. “I am with them in the highest of highs and the lowest of lows,” she says. “I never take my responsibility as a healer for granted. I look at my job as more of a collaboration between me and my patients, me helping them to live amazing lives.”

Part of that, she explains, is to model health and fitness to them. “As a doctor, I want to set a good example to my patients of what true wellness can be,” she says. “Running has been a way that I have been able to model fitness and wellness for my patients at work. Running has given me the confidence to accomplish anything in my life.

So, when patients take steps to better their health, whether it’s starting a Couch to 5K program or seeing our dietician, I praise them and continue to encourage them to take small steps towards a healthier lifestyle.”

Dr. Ruff has been a runner for 23 years and has run ten marathons in that time. Now, preparing for her debut on the largest marathon stage in the country,

she’s reflecting on the path that led her here, and her chance to join a community of likeminded professionals. “With each marathon, I have grown in strength and knowledge,” she says. “Running the Boston Marathon has been one of my dreams and being able to run it as part of a team truly exceeds my expectations. 

I can't think of a better honor than to represent my profession of Healing at such a prestigious event as the Boston Marathon.”

(04/05/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Sharon Cherop of Kenya is running the Boston Marathon aiming to reclaim title

Cherop, the 2010 Hamburg marathon champion is making a comeback to Boston where she will face an elite field of 21 other women marathoners comprising her compatriot Edna Kiplagat, the 2017 Boston marathon winner.

Of the 22 women in the elite field, 11 have under 2 hours, 23 minutes personal bests.

Cherop, who had finished third in 2011 will also have the reigning champion, Desiree Linden of the USA, to contend with during the April 15 race.

“This time, I am going back to Boston to do my best. I can only say that I want to be among the podium finishers,” Cherop told Standard Sport.

Cherop, who has relocated her training base from Eldoret to Kararia — a mountainous area in the Marakwet highlands said she is in top shape and her preparations for the Boston race are going on well.

“I have shifted my training base because Boston is a hilly course and I have to train in similar conditions. The altitude in Kararia is also high and is good for my preparations. I have been here for three weeks now,” the Eldoret City Marathon reigning champion said from the new training base.

When asked on the bruising battle expected from Ethiopia’s Aselefech Mergia with a 2:19:31 personal best she recorded at the 2012 Dubai marathon as well as her compatriot Edna Kiplagat, Cherop said:

“Before the race, everyone is a winner and I am ready and well prepared for the challenge.”

(04/04/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray will attempt to run his 47th consecutive Boston Marathon just six months after undergoing open-heart, triple-bypass surgery

Renowned race director and endurance athlete Dave McGillivray will attempt to run the 123rd B.A.A. Boston Marathon just six months after undergoing open-heart, triple-bypass surgery on October 12, 2018. This will be McGillivray’s 47th consecutive running of the world-famous marathon, of which he is race director. McGillivray will make his attempt after completing his official race day duties.

“Without question, this will be my most challenging marathon ever,” said McGillivray. “The 30,000 runners in the race are my number one priority. I only start thinking about my own run later in the afternoon when the final finishers are nearing the end of the race.” Depending on how the day unfolds, he expects to start in the late afternoon and finish between 10:00-11:00 pm.

McGillivray added, “This is not the best way to prepare to run a marathon, but I really don’t have many other choices.”  This will be McGillivray’s 156th competitive marathon, his 47th Boston Marathon, and the 32nd time running the race at night.

McGillivray’s medical team is supportive but also cautious about his attempt to run the marathon so soon after surgery. “As long as Dave prepares adequately, listens to his body, and is prepared to adjust his expectations as appropriate for being 6 months out of open- heart surgery he should do fine,” said Dr. Aaron Baggish, McGillivray’s cardiologist.

“Dave knows his own body better than anyone and I support his efforts as long as he takes it slow and remains patient throughout his run,” said Dr. David D’Alessandro, McGillivray’s heart surgeon from Massachusetts General Hospital. McGillivray said he asked D’Alessandro before the surgery if he thought he could run the marathon six months later, and his surgeon said, “I would be extremely disappointed if you couldn’t.”

McGillivray was released from Massachusetts General Hospital four-and-a-half days after his surgery. He first started a walking program and eventually progressed to running without walking. He ran a half marathon in early March; his longest run the past seven months has been 18 miles. “I have my good days and I have my not-so-good days,” McGillivray said. “My breathing is still labored but I’m making progress. For me, the only bad day I could ever have anymore is if I didn’t wake up at all. I consider every day now as a gift.”

This year, thirteen other running friends will be joining him, including nine who participated alongside McGillivray in the 2018 World Marathon Challenge, running seven marathons in seven days on seven continents. They will be supported by McGillivray’s brother, Bob, and long- time friend Ron Kramer, who will leap-frog the group down course while providing water and food as needed.  A few medical professionals will also join them as a precaution.

(04/03/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Yuki Kawauchi has signed a three-year sponsorship deal with piano maker Yamaha Music Japan Company

Having left his goverment job at the end of the Japanese fiscal year in March to make a go of it as a professional runner, it was announced today that 2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi, 32, has signed a three-year sponsorship deal with piano maker Yamaha Music Japan Co., Ltd.

 “What I like about a Yamaha piano is that it’s all there in front of you in black and white, like life,” said Kawauchi, an avid pianist as a child before his parents made him pursue running.

“I hope that we’ll have a long and harmonious relationship, with just a hint of dissonance for depth.” 

The endorsement deal includes the introduction of a “Make a Breakthrough” Kawauchi signature model acoustic grand piano, proceeds from the sales of which will go toward supporting Kawauchi’s training in the lead-up to the 2021 Eugene World Championships.

A delighted Yamaha president Naoji Suda told reporters, “Kawauchi’s values are well-tuned to ours, one of the keys to any successful relationship.

I can’t think of a better brand ambassador for our flagship line of acoustic grand pianos. He may not be the fastest pianist in the world, but nobody carries a tune, or a piano, quite like him.”

(04/01/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Andy Burnham, the Mayor of Greater Manchester is set to run Boston Marathon to bring cities together

The mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, is set to pound the pavements of Boston on 15 April, running the marathon to raise funds for charities set up by some of the families who lost loved-ones in the 2017 Manchester Arena attack.

Boston is the oldest annual marathon in the world and takes place each year on the third Monday of April, Patriots’ Day in the United States. It was the target of a terrorist attack in 2013 when three spectators were killed and an estimated 264 were injured.

The Mayor has been invited to run by One World Strong Foundation, an organisation founded by survivors of the Boston bombings who bring together victims of terrorism around the world. They came to Manchester on the one-year anniversary of the Manchester attack.

Andy will dedicate his second-ever marathon to all the families who lost loved ones and will raise money for a number of charities and causes set up or nominated by them.

Andy said: “I know this is a very difficult time for all the families as we approach the second anniversary and, in a small way, I just wanted to let them know we continue to think about them. Greater Manchester will always be there for them.

“Many of the families affected have set up charities in memory of their loved ones and are doing amazing work in their communities to bring people together and give them hope. It is a great honour for me to run this prestigious Marathon for them and I will be doing my best to raise funds for their important work.

“I would also like to thank the One World Strong Foundation for coming to Manchester to support people here and for extending this invitation to me. They are an inspirational organisation working across the world to unite victims of terrorism and build a network of cities standing up against hate of all kinds.

“I’ve done one marathon before and can say without hesitation that this will definitely be my last. If I have a target, it is to beat my last time of 4 hours 28 minutes. But, really, I just want to finish and show how Manchester stands with Boston, Christchurch, Pittsburgh and all the cities around the world who have suffered from appalling acts of hate in recent years. 

Dave Fortier from One World Strong said: “We were initially connected with Manchester through an exchange developed by the US Embassy in London aimed at supporting our two countries shared security priorities—to prevent terrorism, assist community recovery following the traumatic experience of a terror attack, and build resilience to all forms of extremism.

"But now, Boston and Manchester survivors are bringing our two countries even closer as partners engaging around the globe to support survivors and families worldwide who are recovering from terrorism and trauma. Running the Boston Marathon alongside Andy—in support of British, American, and international charities—is a beautiful expression of that partnership.”

Funds raised will be shared equally between charities and causes either set up or nominated by the families of some of those affected by the Manchester Arena bombing.

(03/31/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

John Almeda a Sacramento runner with nonverbal autism will be competing in the Boston Marathon

The story of John Almeda keeps getting better. The Sacramento young man with non-verbal autism is preparing to leave for Boston next week. He won’t be there to do any sightseeing.

He has his sights set on the Boston Marathon. John qualified while finishing the California International Marathon last year on a broken ankle.

A local company was so inspired by his story, they decided to sponsor him. Total Nutrition asked for a meeting and John’s mother Vanessa tells said she was shocked to hear what they had to say.

“The first thing out of their mouths was–we sponsor athletes and we would love to take John on. We think he’s amazing and they’re paying all of our airfare,” Vanessa said.

Even with the sponsorship, John still needs some help to pay for other parts of his journey to Boston. His family and friends are throwing him a send-off party Saturday, March 30th at New Helvetia Brewing on Broadway in Sacramento.

They’d love to have the community stop by from 1 to 4pm. As for the marathon itself, John will be among the first wave of runners on April 15th in Boston.

His mother tells us, “The thing is, this was his dream–he’s been watching Boston on YouTube videos for years and this is his dream and he’s made it there.”

(03/30/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

John Hancock today announced its Elite Athlete Ambassador Team for the 2019 Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon champions Meb Keflezighi, Tatyana McFadden, Bill Rodgers, Joan Benoit Samuelson, Greg Meyer and Uta Pippig will join Shalane Flanagan, Ryan Hall, Deena Kastor, Becca Pizzi and Team Hoyt as ambassadors for this year’s race.

“As Patriots’ Day nears, we welcome our 2019 Elite Ambassador Team for the Boston Marathon,” said John Hancock Chief Marketing Officer Barbara Goose.

“Through their mentorship and inclusiveness, these accomplished athletes inspire runners of all ages and abilities during race week and throughout the year at John Hancock sponsored events.

The team has become an integral part of our community.”

Ambassadors will cheer on the 30,000 participants racing from Hopkinton to Boston on Patriots’ Day and attend media, community and race week events, including making appearances at the Runner’s Seminar at the Expo, surprise “meet and greets” near the finish line, and at the John Hancock Elite Athlete press conference on April 12 at 10 a.m. at the Fairmont Copley.

(03/28/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Brendan Beauregard is running his first Boston Marathon to honor brother fighting colon cancer

Brendan Beauregard has never been a long distance runner, but that isn’t holding him back from running the Boston Marathon in honor of his older brother.

“He’s trying to fight for his life, trying to live on so it’s what I want to do and I just think about that whenever I hit a tough mile or a tough hill,”said Beauregard.

In September 2017, Patrick Beauregard, a corporal in the Marines and a newlywed, received the devastating diagnosis.

“I had severe stomach pains and that was it just out of nowhere. It wasn’t improving so the next day I went into the ER. They were almost a split-second away from sending me home. They finally decided to run a CT scan of my abdomen and that’s when they saw the tumor,” Patrick says.

Doctors told the 29-year-old he had stage four colon cancer. It had spread to his lungs.

“Complete shock. Utter disbelief,” said Patrick Beauregard. “You’re going through life, you’re young, you’re healthy. You think, no way. There’s no way.”

“He was really the picture of health, yet he was diagnosed with stage four disease and the reasons underlying that are unknown,” said Dr. Kimmie Ng, the director of the Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Center.

What doctors do know is that there has been an alarming increase in the number of young adults diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

“The most frustrating thing is not knowing what caused this,” said Patrick. “I’m glad they’re doing all this research now and hopefully they find out the reason or reasons why there is such an uptick.”

Patrick has been through 33 rounds of chemotherapy. Next month he will start a clinical trial. Despite all the hardships and uncertainty, he’s still working, staying positive, and on a mission to increase awareness among young adults and medical professionals.

“The doctors and physicians, they also thought there’s no way I had cancer so I’m glad that now that there’s more awareness and I hope we break that stigma.” said Patrick.

But, more than anything, Brendan hopes to make his brother proud.

“He’s always been my hero and my best friend in life,” said Brendan.

(03/28/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
Share

Deena Kastor is still getting American records and now owns the american W45 record in 8k

Thirteen years after she ran her American marathon record of 2:19:36, Deena Kastor is still setting American records. On Sunday afternoon at Chicago’s Shamrock Shuffle, the 46-year-old ran an American masters 8K record of 27:12, besting the previous mark held by Carmen Troncoso at 27:45. 

Kastor also holds the outright national record at this distance (24:36), and she set it at the same race, back in 2005. This time though, it looks like she didn’t set out with the goal of breaking the master’s record–it just happened.

Kastor struggled recently at the Tokyo Marathon, finishing in 2:51:58 in cold, wet conditions that some said rivalled those at last year’s Boston Marathon. It was her fifth of six Abbott World Major Marathons, the final one being Berlin, which she may race in September.

Deena says this on her website.  “As an athlete I’ve found aside from hard work, the greatest tools for success are optimism and gratitude.These practices have led to happiness and the routine pause to realize I’m living the life I love and dreamed of.”

She continued, " I have been running since I was 11 years old and have learned over the years that there is no greater influence on success than the power of optimism. When we are positive, we master our physical potential. The power of our own thinking can open doors and elevate our performances. With optimism I have been able to pursue every goal, win medals, earn American and world records, but more importantly, I’ve been able to be resilient in the face of injury and falling short. Optimists are dreamers, believers and solution seekers. I believe that these lessons are universal and not running exclusive."

She goes into details in her new book Let Your Mind Run.

 

(03/25/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K

Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K

The Shamrock Shuffle 8k is a huge celebration of the beginning of running season. It is the world's largest timed 8k, starting and finishing in Chicago's Grant Park. Runners feel the energy of over 30,000 runners and a big cheering crowd (present during the entire course.)The excitement lasts throughout the after-party, where participants find beer, food and live music. The...

more...
Share

82-year-old Jim Mackert will be the oldest runner in the Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon race, he has ran all 42 of them

Jim Mackert is no spring chicken. He's an 82-year-old marathon runner. The legacy runner has run 65. And, he's the oldest person running 26.2 miles in this year's Rite-Aid Cleveland Marathon.

Crossing that finish line in May means that Mackert is the only person to have competed in all 42 of Cleveland's marathons. 

"Determination. Desire. I enjoy it, I enjoy the people that I see there," the father of six said.

Mackert is a master. Not just with running. He's mentally tough as nails, which has propelled him to push through injuries to qualify for the Boston Marathon three times.

"When I went in 2007, I was 70 years old and in training I pulled a muscle doing my hill workouts," he explained. "But I said I was going no matter how my leg felt."

And, he did.

These days, Mackert racks up about 40 miles a week. He was, however, getting attention long ago, even appearing on Channel 3 back in 2000 with Jimmy Donovan when he was 63 and gearing up for his 23rd Cleveland Marathon.

Mackert has no plans to slow down. He says he's fueled by his family, while inspiring others on his path.

"I feel good doing it. And as long as I feel good doing it, I try to keep doing it," Mackert said.

(03/22/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon

Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon

The Cleveland Marathon features a relatively flat and fast course, great volunteer support and a scenic view of downtown Cleveland and its major landmarks. The course has been designed for our athletes to enjoy views of Browns Stadium, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Lake Erie and many other Cleveland highlights. The Cleveland Marathon began in 1978 in an...

more...
Share

Members of the Manhattan Beach-based Skechers running team will take part in the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon on Sunday

Every Thursday evening, the South Bay Running Club starts its training runs at the downtown Manhattan Beach Skechers store. On Sunday, 120 of its members will join an estimated 24,000 other runners at Dodger Stadium to compete in the Los Angeles Marathon. South Bay Running Club’s sponsor Skechers is also the title sponsor of the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon.

The races begin at 6:30 a.m. with the Wheelchair division followed by Handcycles (6:42 a.m.), the Elite Women (6:45 a.m.), and the Elite Men and the rest of the field at 6:55 a.m. The race finishes on the Santa Monica bluffs, overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Skechers’ support of the South Bay Runners Club has helped the club grow to over 360 members in only four years. Members run for reasons ranging from raising awareness for Train 4 Autism (the official charity of the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon), to running in memory of loved ones, to putting a modern spin on race prep through virtual training across the country.

“Most of our participants are runners but quite a few are run-walkers and race walkers,” Weisberg said. “Some will be running to get a personal record or qualify for the Boston Marathon. Some run to raise money for charity and others just want to check it off their bucket list.  

(03/20/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Los Angeles Marathon

Los Angeles Marathon

The LA Marathon is an annual running event held each spring in Los Angeles, Calif. The 26.219 mile (42.195 km) footrace, inspired by the success of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games, has been contested every year since 1986. While there are no qualifying standards to participate in theSkechers PerformnceLA Marathon, runners wishing to receive an official time must successfully complete...

more...
Share

Secret service agent Garrett Fitzgerald fighting paralysis is training for the Boston Marathon

Three years ago a driver, high on heroin, crashed into secret service agent Garrett Fitzgerald’s work vehicle, paralyzing him below the neck.

Now he can walk with electrodes places over his muscles and is now training for this year's Boston Marathon with some help from his coworkers. They're called Team Fitz and they're raising money for the center that's trying to help him walk again.

It was Don McGrail’s idea to start Team Fitz two years ago.  

"It's really tough to see a colleague and a friend struggle as much as he's had to struggle. But it's been inspirational at the same time to watch his attitude the way he approaches things," said McGrail.

Now Fitzgerald spends much of his week at Journey Forward in Canton, a non-profit rehabilitation center that helps those paralyzed through an intense exercise-based program.

"This is an organization that takes people when they're at their worst and helps them improve. Helps them get to a place where they want to be. Get to a place that's healthier, that's stronger, that’s better," said Fitzgerald

Most of the people who come to Journey Forward were told they'd never walk again. For Dan Cummings, he's living proof they can. He broke his neck almost 20 years ago from diving into shallow water.

"They said I would be a dependent c-6 quadriplegic. I would spend my life in a wheel chair and I'd be lucky if i could ever feed myself," said Cummings.

Cummings started Journey Forward after spending four years rehabilitating at a clinic in Southern California. He now walks with the assistance of a walker.

"Why did I have to move 3,000 miles away not only to walk again, but a place to give me my life back," says Cummings.

Recovery for spinal chord injuries isn't measured in inches, but in millimeters. Cummings says that at least 15 people who were told they'd never walk again have taken their first steps at Journey Forward. 

Garrett's goal is to walk on his own again and return to the Boston field office.

(03/20/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England's most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts over 20,000 registered participants each year. You have to qualify to participate. Among...

more...
349 Tagged with #Boston marathon, Page: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7


Running News Headlines


Copyright 2019 MyBestRuns.com 2,405