Running News Daily

Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com  Get your race featured and exposed.  Contact sales at bob@mybestruns.com or call 650-209-4710

Index to Daily Posts · Sign Up For Updates · Run The World Feed

Share

Joan Benoit Samuelson Is Aiming to Go Sub-3:00 in 2020

In a stack of running resumes, Joan Benoit Samuelson’s sticks out like a neon sign. The running legend, now 62, has won Boston twice (in 1979 and 1983), became the first woman to win gold at the first women’s Olympic marathon in 1984, and set the U.S. marathon record at the time (2:21:21 at the 1985 Chicago Marathon), which still ranks as the fifth-fastest time ever run by an American woman.

What she’s done beyond her prime, however, is really what sets her apart. Last year, at age 61, Samuelson completed the Chicago Marathon with her daughter, Abby, in 3:12:13, averaging 7:20 pace per mile.

Shortly after that race, she announced an ambitious goal for 2019: finishing Boston within 40 minutes of her winning time 40 years ago, when she broke the tape in 2:35:15 in 1979. Samuelson conquered that goal with plenty of room to spare in April, finishing Boston in an even 3:04—just a few minutes shy of the 60 to 64 age group marathon world record (3:01:30 set by Bernardine Portenski in 2010).

Samuelson, who holds the marathon world record for the 55 to 59 age group (2:50:33, which she set in Boston in 2013), has been eyeing her current age group record since last year. After narrowly missing it in Boston, she recently told the Quad City Times that she’ll attempt to break 3:00 at a spring marathon next year—most likely Tokyo on March 1, 2020, or London on April 26, 2020. If she accomplishes her goal, she will be a member of an elite class of runners who have gone sub-3:00 for six decades.

[Smash your goals with a Runner’s World Training Plan, designed for any speed and any distance.]

This won’t be the first age group wall Samuelson has attempted to bust down. At age 50, she placed 90th in the 2008 Olympic Trials, running 2:49:08. Then three years later, when she was 53, she set a record for her age by clocking 2:47:50 at the 2010 Chicago Marathon.

Though Samuelson has never been one to back down from a challenge, she’s not immune to the fact that staying healthy and springing back from injuries gets tougher with age. Despite entering Chicago with lofty aspirations in 2015 and 2017, she was forced to withdraw a few days before the race both years, due to a stomach bug and a knee injury, respectfully. In Boston this year, she competed on a strained calf muscle, she told Runner’s World after the race.

In order to duck under 3:00 in the marathon next year, she’ll need to be diligent—as all runners do—about injury prevention.

“I’m up against the aging process,” Samuelson told the Quad City Times. “I just need to stay injury-free. That’s a hard thing to do these days.”

(07/20/2019) ⚡AMP
by Hailey Middlebrook
Share
Share

Host and film superstar Anne Curtis is looking to add another feather to her cap with her official participation in the 2020 Tokyo Marathon

Curtis, 34, announced on Thursday that her application for entry to the 42.2-kilometer marathon in the Japan capital has been confirmed.

The Tokyo Marathon, which is scheduled on March 1, 2020, will mark Curtis’ third participation in the six-city World Marathon Majors. She previously finished New York in 2016, and London in 2018.

A runner who finishes all six marathons — which also include Boston, Berlin, and Chicago — is recognized with the Six-Star Finisher title.

Pointing out she “stopped running,” in a reply to a fan on Twitter, Curtis said she will “have to start training” early, with only eight months away until the event.

During the 2018 London Marathon, Curtis, an appointed Celebrity Advocate of UNICEF-Philippines, had on the organization’s banner as a cape as she approached the 42-kilometer finish line.

Running “For the Filipino Youth,” as imprinted on her shirt at the time, Curtis raised funds for the group’s emergencry response program for children in Marawi.

Urging her supporters to donate what they can to reach the P84,000 goal — or double the number of kilometers she ran — Curtis surpassed that by over three-fold, with nearly P300,000 gathered for the cause.

Curtis has yet to announce a charitable cause for her Tokyo stint.

(07/05/2019) ⚡AMP
by
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Mo Farah says he will almost certainly not run a track race again and said his sights are now firmly set on running the Olympic marathon in Tokyo 2020

Speaking after winning the Vitality London 10km on Monday ahead of Andy Butchart, Farah admitted that, while he had wanted to defend his world 10,000m title in Doha, he had changed his mind because it was too close to the Chicago marathon.

“I would have loved to have won more medals for my country, as well as run Chicago, but the two events are only a week apart in October,” Farah said.

“If I did Doha how much would it take out of me for the marathon? At the marathon you can’t give these guys an inch. If you are not on your A game, you will get beat.” Asked if it meant that his track dream was now dead, he nodded. “I think so, at the minute.”

The 36-year-old has changed his mind before but he accepts it is increasingly unlikely he would return to the track given he last raced there in 2017. “Whenever I watch the 10,000m guys, I speak to my coach and ask: ‘Do you think I could do that? Because I think I could.’

But at the same time you have to be smart and you have to think about not just this year but the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.”

When asked directly if he was going to run the marathon in Tokyo he said: “At the minute, yeah. The strategy is to build up in the marathon. The more marathons I do, and the more experience I get, the better chance I have of a medal.”

Farah also denied that his extraordinary row with Haile Gebrselassie had affected his performance at the London marathon when he finished a disappointing fifth. “To be honest I am kind of sick of it in a minute but I stick by every word I said. It is the truth,” he said.

“As an athlete you’ve got to put your hand up when things go well and when they don’t. I felt great, it felt good. I was running 2:03 up to 35k, then shit hit the wall, bang, I was gone. From that point my last 7k was just ‘boom’. It won’t happen again.”

(05/28/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Legese pulled away at 30k and ran alone to the finish line of the Tokyo Marathon clocking 2:04:48

 Ethiopian Birhanu Legese cruised to victory at the Tokyo marathon on Sunday, winning in a time of two hours, four minutes and 48 seconds in miserable conditions to claim his first major title.  It was raining and 41 degrees at the start and throughout the race.  

The 24-year-old was part of a small leading group for the first 30 kilometres before pulling away easily from runnerup Kenyan Bedan Karoki (2:06:48) and strolling to victory.

Karoki's compatriot Dickson Chumba, twice a winner in Tokyo, was third.

With rain lashing down for much of a frigid morning, it was never likely to be a fast race.

Japan fancied their chances of a homegrown male victory for the first time since 2010 but Suguru Osako, who set a new Japanese national record in October, struggled to stay with the leading group and pulled out with an injury 30 kilometres in.

The 27-year-old, touted as Japan’s best hope of delivering Olympic marathon gold when Tokyo hosts the Games in 2020, was distraught as he limped from the route.

Ethiopian Ruti Aga won the women’s race in a time of 2:20:40, edging out compatriot Helen Tola by 21 seconds.

While the cold and wet conditions served as an enemy for many of the elite runners, Legese put on a convincing performance and posted the second-best time in the event’s history, behind only Wilson Kipsang’s record 2:03:58, set in 2017.

“The weather was tough and it affected the result a little bit,” Legese said through an interpreter. “There were a lot of difficulties like the cold and the breeze, but because this course is a good course, if the weather had held up, I’m confident that I would’ve been able to run under 2:04.”

Ethiopians have now won the women’s marathon in Tokyo in six of the last eight editions.

(03/02/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Can Japan’s Suguru Osako Win the Tokyo Marathon on home soil? Yes it is possible but there are five Africans in the field with faster times

Japan’s national record holder Suguru Osako, is running Japan’s biggest marathon, Tokyo. And that’s exciting. Because as great as Japan has been at the marathon in recent years, Kenya and Ethiopia have still been way better.

Prior to last year, no Japanese man had broken 2:07 since 2002, which is almost a prerequisite to win a WMM these days: since 2013, 89% of men’s WMM champs have entered the race with a sub-2:07 PR. 23 Kenyans had broken 2:07 in 2018 alone.

But Japan is narrowing the gap to the East Africans. Last year, after going 15 years without a sub-2:07 marathoner, Japan produced three: Osako (2:05:50), Yuta Shitara (2:06:11), and Hirohito Inoue (2:06:54). And both Osako (3rd in Chicago) and Shitara (2nd in Tokyo) were in the mix for the win at majors.

This weekend kicks off an incredible 18 months of marathoning in Japan. It begins with the Tokyo Marathon on Sunday, the first WMM of 2019, and continues in September with the Japanese Olympic Trials, also in Tokyo.  Then there’s the 2020 Tokyo Marathon and, of course, the Olympic marathon in August 2020.

The biggest reason to be excited about this year’s Tokyo Marathon is Osako, who is based in the US and trains under Nike Oregon Project coach Pete Julian.

A win by Japan’s best marathoner on home soil just 17 months before they host the Olympics would be a huge story, and it could actually happen. That doesn’t mean it will happen — there are five guys entered with faster PRs than Osako, including four under 2:05 — but it certainly can happen!

(02/28/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Kenya’s Joan Melly Chelimo is upbeat ahead of her debut in the Tokyo Marathon Sunday

The Kenyan, 29, feels she has enough experience after a string of good results in China as she returns to Asia.

Chelimo, who has picked up two wins in 2018 in Prague and Boston over the 21km distance, will jump into the firing line in Tokyo as she seeks to transform her prowess on the half marathon to the full distance, with a hope of returning to the Japanese capital to compete at the 2020 Olympic Games.

"It is a bag of mixed fortunes for me. I want to run fast and win the race, but it is a new venture and I have no idea of how my body will react. I have done more training to build on the endurance and hopefully it will pay dividends in Tokyo," Chelimo said on Tuesday in Nairobi.

The former Kenyan-turned Bahraini trains in Kapsabet, near Eldoret and will launch her title campaign in Tokyo after winning the Asian Games.

Chelimo, alongside winning gold for her adopted country in London in 2017, she represented Bahrain at the 2016 Olympic Games, placing eighth in the women's marathon.

"It is a new challenge for me in Tokyo. I have trained hard for the race since I want to win a gold medal," said Chelimo. The Bahraini says she is injury free after returning to fitness last year.

The two women will come up against Ethiopia's Ruti Aga, who recorded the personal best of 2:18:34 at the Berlin Marathon last September.

In addition, there are three other runners with the personal best of 2:19 including Florence Kiplagat, the former Chicago Marathon champion.

Barcelona Marathon champion Ruth Chebitok, who holds a personal best time of 2:23:29, will seek to steal the limelight as she makes her debut in the 2019 season.

Last year, she competed in three marathons winning in Barcelona and Gold Coast and finished third in Toronto.

"I have high expectation to win in Tokyo. There are a few Ethiopians in the race who can spring a surprise and I will be prepared for them.

(02/26/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

World record holder Kenenisa Bekele has withdrawn from Tokyo Marathon with Stress Fracture

The Tokyo Marathon announced that 5000m and 10000m world record holder Kenenisa Bekele(Ethiopia) has withdrawn from the Mar. 3 Tokyo Marathon 2019 due to injury.

The statement read, "He has a stress fracture that is going to take a little more time to heal. His motivation to recover and set his sights on a new goal is high, but unfortunately it seems that is still going to take a while."

"I am hungry and motivated to still achieve big results on the marathon as I know what I am still capable of when my body can fully co-operate. It is therefore that I must now take the time to recover fully, get healthy in order for me to achieve the goals that I have left to prove for myself on the marathon."

Bekele is confident that with a strong and healthy body he is able to flash his greatness once again.

"My body is starting to feel that I have over 20 years of the highest level in sports in my body. Injuries have plagued my move to the marathon a little bit but I have also really great memories since becoming a marathoner. My time in Berlin for example but also my win in Paris are races that I am really proud of."

"I have a desire and dreams that I have left to achieve and I am not finished with the marathon. If I didn't had the fire burning anymore I would have walked away already. My full focus now is on becoming 100 per cent healthy and in shape so that I can reach my goals."

(02/20/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Tanaka Holdings will produce and donate Pure Gold, Pure Silver, and Pure Bronze Medals to the top three men and women finishers at the Tokyo Marathon valued over $100,000US

Twelve medals produced and donated by Tanaka Holdings are pure gold, silver, and bronze will be awarded again to the top three men and women finishers of the marathon and wheelchair marathon events of the Tokyo Marathon 2019.

The Tokyo Marathon 2019, organized by the Tokyo Marathon Foundation, will be held on March 3, 2019. 

These medals made from pure gold, silver, and bronze, make their rarities of considerable value even among medals presented at sports competitions. The medals to be presented to the marathon winners are approximately 65 mm in diameter. The pure gold medal weighs approximately 200 grams, the pure silver medal approximately 110 grams, and the pure bronze medal approximately 90 grams. 

The spiral expanding out from the heart expresses this sense of excitement, of expectation. The medal ribbons have the motif of the marathon logo. The marathon logo is formed like a tapestry, created by weaving together strands that express each individual person, whether a runner, a volunteer, or a spectator. The reverse sides of the gold, silver, and bronze medals that will be presented to the top three winners of each marathon event depict the course map and the Tanaka Kikinzomu Group logo.

These medals express the dreams and vigor of people as we move from the current year of 2019, to the future year of 2020, when the Tokyo Olympics will be held.

These 12 medals have a value of over $100,000US not even taking into consideration of how rare they will be.  The current value of 200 grams of 24k gold is $8673US.  Within a few years these rare medals could be valued will above these numbers. 

Since its foundation in 1885, the Tanaka Precious Metals group has built a diversified range of business activities focused on precious metals. Tanaka is a leader in Japan in terms of the volumes of precious metals handled.

Over the course of many years, Tanaka Precious Metals has not only manufactured and sold precious metal products for industry, but also provided precious metals in such forms as jewelry and resources.

(02/20/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Former Chicago marathon champion Florence Kiplagat is ready for Tokyo marathon challenge

Former Chicago marathon champion Florence Kiplagat believes she will be ready for the challenge on March 3, when she lines up at the Tokyo marathon. Kiplagat, who turns 32 on Feb. 27, still dreams of running at the Olympics for Kenya team and believes a good show in Tokyo marathon in March will offer her leverage when the coaches will be naming their team for the Games next year.

Kiplagat, who holds a personal best time of two hours 19 minutes 44 seconds set in Berlin in 2011, will be keen to register her first win in almost two years. "I want to win this year and I will not be looking at those who will be at the race but at my own running. My body has fully recovered after I got injured in 2017 when running in Chicago," she said on Monday from Iten.

"Whenever I enter the race, I believe I'm the best in the line-up and I will be going for the top prize in Tokyo," said Kiplagat, whose last win was in October 2016 in Chicago before injury set in when defending the same race in 2017. She has since returned to competition finishing fourth in Chicago last year clocking 2:26:08 in a race won by compatriot Brigit Kosgei.

"In Chicago, I was fit and was unlucky to finish fourth. Now I target to win in Tokyo and it will be nice if I can improve on my best time," said Kiplagat. In December, Kiplagat was fifth competing at the unique Kolkata 25km where she clocked a fast time of one hour 27 minutes and 57 seconds.

The former World Cross Country champion is over her rehabilitation process. However, the 32-year-old will have strong competition in Tokyo coming from Mimi Belete and Berlin marathon silver medalist Ruti Aga. There is also Bahrain's Rose Chelimo, Kenya's Ruth Chebitok and Joan Chelimo in the line-up.

(02/18/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Two-time Tokyo marathon champion Dickson Chumba going for victory again March 3

Dickson Chumba, who also won the Tokyo Marathon in 2014, has a life time best of 2:04:32 having finished inside 2:05 in both of his Tokyo victories. He also finished third at the 2015, 2016 and 2017 editions of the race. He faces a stellar line-up that includes multiple world and Olympic champion Kenenisa Bekele.

Bekele set a national record of 2:03:03 when winning the 2016 Berlin Marathon but he has struggled in some of his races since then. He failed to finish in Dubai in 2017 but rebounded to finish second in London in 2:05:57 three months later.

He then withdrew from the Berlin Marathon later the same year before returning to action at the 2018 London Marathon, where he finished sixth in 2:08:53,. He recorded another ‘DNF’ at the Amsterdam Marathon in October 2018.

Bekele’s last race in Japan was at the 2007 IAAF World Championships in Osaka, where he won the 10,000m—one of his six global titles at the distance.

He is one of five men in the field with PBs faster than 2:05. Fellow Ethiopian Birhanu Legesse ran 2:04:15 in Dubai on his debut at the distance last year and will contest his third career marathon in Tokyo.

Bahrain’s Asian record-holder El Hassan El Abbassi and Ethiopia’s Seifu Tura, both of whom recorded their sub-2:05 lifetime bests last year, are also in the mix.

Most of the local fans, however, will be focused on Suguru Osako, who broke the Japanese record when finishing third at the Chicago Marathon last year in 2:05:50.

Two sets of pacemakers are planned for the men’s race. The first set will aim for 2:57-2:58/km pace until 30km, targeting a finishing time in the region of 2:04:30 to 2:05:10. The second set will run at 3:00/km pace with a target finishing time of about 2:06:35.

(01/27/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

Ethiopian Ruti Aga wants to win the title at the Tokyo Marathon

The women’s field at the Tokyo Marathon is led by Ethiopian Ruti Aga.  She has a personal best of 2:18:34 and is joined by three other female athletes who have run better than 2:20.

Aga ran her 2:18:34 PR when finishing second behind Kenya’s Gladys Cherono in Berlin last year and she’ll be joined in Tokyo by Kenya’s Florence Kiplagat (2:19:44 PR) and Ethiopians Boru Feyse Tadese (2:19:30 PR) and Yebrgual Melese (2:19:36 PR), plus world champion Rose Chelimo (2:22:51 PR) and Mimi Belete (2:22:29 PR) of Bahrain.

Kenya’s Joan Chelimo (65:04 half-marathon PR) makes her marathon debut.

Among the Japanese entries is Honami Maeda (2:23:48 PR), who was second in the Osaka Women’s Marathon last year and seventh in Berlin.

(01/23/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World Marathon Majors. Sponsored by Tokyo Metro, the Tokyo Marathon is an annual event in Tokyo, the capital of Japan. It is an IAAF Gold Label marathon and one of the six World...

more...
Share

The 29-year-old Olympian Mary Joy Tabal will be running the Tokyo Marathon in March

The 29-year-old Olympian plans to take part in the Tokyo Marathon on March 3 in an attempt to qualify for the quadrennial meet that will be held in Tokyo, Japan next year.

This year will be a busy one for Cebu’s Mary Joy Tabal will be an understatement as she will be eyeing the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and will compete in the Southeast Asian Games.

“It’s still an initial plan since there has been no release yet of the IAAF Olympic qualifying time for the marathon,” Tabal told SunStar Cebu. “But that’s one of the races we are looking at.”

Tabal of Motor Ace Kawasaki Racing Team made it to the 2016 Rio Olympics by clocking 2 hours, 43 minutes and 32 seconds in a qualifying race in Canada. The qualifying time for female marathoners in the 2016 Olympics was 2:45.

“The Tokyo Marathon is part of the plan to be our first race then the Ottawa Marathon in May before I start my preparation for the Southeast Asian (SEA) Games,” she said.

The Ottawa Marathon is the same race where Tabal got the Rio Olympics qualifying time.

For the SEA Games, Tabal is looking to defend her crown in the 42-kilometer race, especially since the country will host the 30th edition of the biennial regional meet on Nov. 30 to Dec. 11.

“It’s a different feel when you compete in your hometown. That makes the 2019 SEA Games exciting for us,” Tabal earlier said.

(01/05/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Bedan Karoki, the 2016 World Half Marathon silver medalist says his biggest target for the 2019 season is clinching the Tokyo Marathon title

Bedan Karoki, a usual half marathoner has been slowly transiting to the full marathon and his best result was in 2017 when he finished third at the London Marathon.

“Right now I am preparing for the cross country season as well as the Tokyo marathon in March. I am expecting to perform better this year. 2018 Wasn’t very bad though there were struggles here and there especially because I had to struggle with some tendon injuries. But now I am back to full fitness and working towards the new season,” Karoki said on Sunday in Nyahururu.

The 28 year old wound up the year by winning the inaugural Nyahururu Athletics Kenya branch championship held in Nyahururu town on Sunday

Karoki hit the finishing line by clocking 28:22 to beat Commonwealth Games 5,000m champion Emmanuel Bett who finished second in 28:23:2.

Bett, just like Karoki is already shifting his focus on a better 2019 and his target remains getting into the Kenyan team for the 2019 World Cross Country Championship to be held in Denmark.

(01/04/2019) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Berlin marathon silver medalist Amos Kipruto is in his preparations for the Tokyo marathon in March 2019

Berlin marathon silver medalist Amos Kipruto is optimistic he will excel at the Kolkata 25km road race in India on Sunday and boost his preparations for the Tokyo marathon in February 2019.

Speaking in Nairobi on Thursday, Kipruto, who was overshadowed by the world record set by Olympics Champion Eliud Kipchoge at the Berlin Marathoin in September, where he settled for silver medal, said it is time for him to become a man on his own and stake claim to the gold medal in the Indian city.

"In 2018, I was third in Tokyo and second in Berlin. In both cases I was not given the required attention. But I have a chance to correct that and win with a course record time in India. That is what is motivating me to go for the title," he said. Kipruto together with World half marathon record holder Eric Kiptanui together with former Chicago marathon champion Florence Kiplagat is departing Nairobi on Thursday for India.

Kipruto did not mince his words saying his eyes are firmly on the course record of 1:13:48 set by Ethiopia's Kenenisa Bekele last year. "I am fit and strong and want to break that record," said Kipruto. I have a fast best time in half marathon of 1:00:24 from Sweden and I believe running fast in 25km is achievable."

(12/13/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

2020 Tokyo Olympic Marathon officials are collecting data by drones and body monitors to better understand racing in hot weather

Tokyo is set to host the 2020 Summer Olympics for the first time since 1964. But researchers in Japan and the United States have raised concerns about how the city’s high July and August temperatures, which have grown increasingly common in recent years, will affect athletes competing in endurance sports such as the marathon. According to NHK, Japan’s national public broadcasting organization, researchers from Hosei University and the Japan Weather Association (JWA) are using drones and body monitors to gather data from the course in an effort to minimize exposure to heat for both athletes and spectators. The drones, which use a camera to measure heat through infrared light, collected temperatures at different heights, over various surfaces, and in and out of the sun. Students then measured their heart rates and how much they sweated in the same areas. The Hosei and JWA effort comes after the work of several other groups of researchers on the effects extreme heat might have on the Olympic marathon. (09/19/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Mo Farah knows that he must improve dramatically to be in the medal mix in Tokyo

Farah, 35, retired from the track last year in order to switch his focus to road running. He is ranked 27th in the world over the marathon distance but is targeting a top-three finish in London this weekend. "It's going to be different, but every race I go into I aim to fight for a podium place," he said. He is moving to marathon and has not ruled out a shot at Tokyo 2020. Many distance runners have transitioned to marathon, few have had a day at the world championships more-or-less dedicated to their final track appearance. Farah’s long-term goal is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in the marathon. He knows, however that he must improve dramatically to be in the medal mix in Tokyo. (04/17/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

How fast did Amy Cragg run at the Tokyo Marathon?

How fast was Amy Hastings Cragg at the Tokyo Marathon Sunday? Think about this. Only four separate American women have ever run faster. Ever. Here are the top seven times: 2:19:36 Kastor, Deena USA London 4/23/06, 2:20:57 Hasay, Jordan USA Chicago 10/8/17, 2:21:14 Flanagan, Shalane USA Berlin 9/28/14, 2:21:16 Kastor, Deena USA London 4/13/03, 2:21:21 Benoit, Joan USA Chicago 10/20/85, 2:21:25 Kastor, Deena USA Chicago 10/9/05, 2:21:42 Cragg, Hastings, Amy USA Tokyo 2/24/18. from Gary Allen posted on FB. (02/27/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

We now know what Yuta Shitara picked up at the 40K Aid Station

Yuta Shitara, who won a million dollars (US) breaking the Japanese marathon record in Tokyo Sunday, picked up this arm sleeve at the 40km aid station, and then blasted onwards to the finish in 2:06:11.

We asked our Japan's contributor Osamu Tada about the arm sleeve. "His family gave him his portrait," says Osamu. "Maybe it is a new way of cheering...as an aside his twin brother is going to run the Biwako Marathon this weekend."

The mystery behind this event certainly caught the attention of many. "I think this is great," says Bob Anderson. "Yuta is one good runner and if more people now know his name because of this event, all the better."

(02/27/2018) ⚡AMP
by Osamu Tada (in Japan)
Share
Share

What happened with Wilson Kipsang on Sunday at Tokyo Marathon

Former Olympic bronze medalist Wilson Kipsang of Kenya said Sunday stomach problems forced him to stop midway through the Tokyo marathon course on Sunday. Speaking moments after he dropped out of the race with only 15km done, the former world record holder said, "I really wanted to go fast, but after suffering from stomach problems the last two days before the race, I didn't have the power to run a decent race today." In the absence of Kipsang, Kenyan Dickson Chumba was the strongest as he recaptured the title he last won in 2014, timing 2:05:30. However, the hero of the day was Yuta Shitara of Japan, who was second clocking a national record time of 2:06:11. He improved the mark after 16 years and got 1 million U.S. dollar bonus for it. (02/27/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Details of Japan's Project Exceed and the Million Dollar Payout

Yuta Shitara set a National Japan Marathon record yesterday at the Tokyo Marathon and walked away a millionaire...The bonus comes from Project Exceed, a program launched in 2015 by the National Corporate Federation to encourage national marathon records before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Here is how it works, any Japanese citizen, who broke the men's national record of 2:06:16 or the women's record of 2:19:12 on a record-legal course would receive 100 million yen, roughly $937,000 USD currently. The runner's coach or team would also receive a separate 50 million yen ($468,000 USD) bonus. Info from Brett Larner @ Japan Running News (02/26/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Months of work, time, sacrifice and determination paid off for Amy in Tokyo

Amy Cragg finished third at the Tokyo Marathon in 2:21:42. That is a PR of over five minutes and good for number five on the U.S. all-time list and the sixth fastest time in Tokyo. Amy posted this right before the start on FB: “Months of work, time, sacrifice and determination...here we go!!! She did it. At the press conference Friday she said, “she hoped to run 2:22:59 with the caveat that while she'd like to run a fast time her priority would be placing in the top three.” Amy made good on that promise. Shalane Flanagan posted this before the start, “When (Amy) is about to race I feel like I am too!!! My heart rate is already through the roof and butterflies in my stomach....still have 5hours until gun goes off.” There were a lot of people cheering for Amy thousands of miles away. (02/25/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

What did Yuta Shitara strap to his arm at the last aid station at the Tokyo Marathon?

Yuta Shitara ran the fastest marathon of any Japanese runner ever at the 2018 Tokyo Marathon on Sunday. He clocked 2:06:11.

At the last aid station he pulled something from his bottle set-up and put it around his right arm bicep. One person on Let's Run suggested it was a "a giant nicotine patch." Another said it was a "Hello Kitty Coin Purse."

Michael Capper on FB said "Never seen this before." Gary Rush stated, "Maybe a gel fluid holder? I think its against IAAF rules for elites to wear or use communication devices or receive electronic updates during a race."

Bob Anderson says, "After looking at more than ten photos of Yuta finishing races, I did not see a similar 'thing' strapped to his arm."

In any case he blasted the last few kilometers wearing this 'thing'. Did it give him an unfair advantage? "First of all we need to know what it was," says Bob.

(02/25/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Yuta Shitara sets Japanese National Maraton Record and wins $936,000 bonus

Seventh at 35 kilometres, Yuta Shitara roared back to second soon after 40k to finish second in 2:06:11, breaking Toshinari Takaoka’s Japanese national record of 2:06:16 set in 2002. Shitara’s accomplishment was significant, with the applause as he crossed the finish line heard far and wide. Shitara, 26, is now the first Japanese man to simultaneously hold the national records in both the marathon and half marathon. Yuta earned a 100 million Yen bonus (936,000us) for setting the record. This bonus was established a couple of years ago to encourage Japanese’s runners be prepared for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. With six runners from Japan running faster than 2:09, the program is working. (02/25/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Dickson Chumba wins the Tokyo Marathon again...six Japanese Runners under 2:09

Kenya’s Dickson Chumba (the 2014 Tokyo and 2015 Chicago champion) opened a nice gap as they approach 38km and went on to win in 2:05:29. At 40k Japan’s Yuta Shitara takes another swig from his festive bottle and grits his teeth as he hunts down and passes Amos Kipruto. This is a man on a mission! Yuta Shitara did not let up and accomplished the following: 1. Ran a Japanese marathon record of 2:06:11 2. Finished 2nd in the Tokyo Marathon (highest finish ever by a Japanese man at a World Marathon Major) 3. Won 100 million yen for setting the NR. That's $936,000US...Wilson Kipsang dropped out at 15k...Amy Cragg finished third in the women’s race taking five minutes off her PR. (2:21:42). Ethiopian’s Birhane Dibaba won the female race in 2:19:51...This year’s race was the biggest field ever with 35,500 starters. (02/24/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Some bold predictions at the Tokyo Marathon press conference Friday

After stepping up to the big leagues last year with course records in the 2:03 and 2:19 range, the Tokyo Marathon hopes to go one better this year. Men's course record setter Wilson Kipsang (Kenya) is back, stepping up from a 2:03:50 prediction for Tokyo in January to a 2:02:50 world record prediction at Friday's pre-race press conference. The top-ranked woman is Ruti Aga (Ethiopia), coming in hot off a 1:06:39 win last month in Houston and turning heads at the press conference with a boldly mumbled 2:18:00 prediction. Alongside Aga's brash 2:18:00 prediction, Amy Cragg (USA) said she hoped to run 2:22:59 with the caveat that while she'd like to run a fast time her priority would be placing in the top three. (02/23/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

America’s Amy Cragg wants to PR at the Tokyo Marathon on Sunday

Most of the talk about the Tokyo Marathon has been focused on the men’s race. Tad Hayano, the Tokyo Marathon Race Director says, “In women’s race, the 2015 world marathon silver medallist Hellah Kiprop and Purity Rionoripo, who clocked her personal best of 2:20:55 to win Paris Marathon last year, are the only Kenyans in the race. They will face Ethiopia’s two-time Olympic 5,000m champion Meseret Defar, who is making her marathon debut after being out of action for two years. The other Ethiopians in the line-up include Shure Demise, Ruti Aga and Birhane Dibaba, who makes her fifth consecutive appearance in Tokyo Marathon.” World marathon bronze medallist Amy Cragg (USA) has said her main goal at the Tokyo Marathon is to improve her 2:27:03 PR. (02/22/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Ethiopian´s Meseret Defar, To Make Marathon Debut In Tokyo

2-time Olympic 5000m champion Meseret Defar of Ethiopia will make her marathon debut at the Tokyo Marathon on February 25th. Ethiopia’s Meseret Defar is the leading name in the women’s field. A winner of 2 Olympic 5000m titles, 2 world 5000m titles and 4 world indoor 3000m titles, the 34-year-old has spent the past few years – when not injured or pregnant – making a gradual transition to the roads. She has won three half marathons on US soil and finished second at the 2013 Great North Run in 1:06:09. With track PBs of 8:23.72 for 3000m, 14:12.88 for 5000m and 29:59:20 for 10,000m, athletics fans will be keen to see what Defar manages on her marathon debut. (02/19/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Kipsang looking at running a flying fast time at Tokyo Marathon

Kenyan's Wilson Kipsang said on Friday he is confident he is going to retain his title and improve on the course record he set in his victory last year at the Tokyo Marathon. Organizers have also said the course has been changed and is flatter and faster. "Don't be surprised if the world record went down in Tokyo. I have my eyes on the target. Winning Tokyo Marathon in a flying fast time," Wilson Kipsang said. His main competition is Tesfaye Abera from Ethiopia whose best time is 2:04:24 and Feyisa Lilesa, the Olympic marathon silver medalist and Dickson Chumba. (02/17/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

He was lucky to be choosen twice in four tries to run the Tokyo Marathon

The Tokyo Marathon has more than 320,000 applicants each year. And of those applications, only 35,000 are selected to participate in the race. That means, each year nearly 300,000 applicants are left disappointed. The Feb. 25, 2018 version of the marathon is no different. Hundreds of thousands of runners will be sitting at home, while the lucky few get to run through Tokyo. But 49-year-old Kiochiro Sakaki won’t be sitting at home. He was one of the lucky ones that was chosen to run – again. Sakaki was lucky enough to be chosen to run in 2009 and now again in 2018. So, with roughly 1 in 10 odds of being selected, Sakaki has been chosen twice in four tries. (02/16/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Tokyo Marathon Medals will be PURE Gold, Silver and Bronze for top Three

The Tokyo Marathon medals (for the top three men and women) provided by Tanaka Holdings are made from pure gold, silver, and bronze, which are extremely rare even among medals presented at sports competitions. The medals for the 12th annual Tokyo Marathon Feb 25. 2018 overlapping design represent the runners who compete in the Marathon as well as the volunteers who support the event and the spectators who encourage the runners. The gold medal is 24k and is 200 grams. Current value of the gold alone is worth $8,476US. (02/09/2018) ⚡AMP
Fast Marathons
Share
Share

Kipsang is focused on setting a new World Marathon Record in Tokyo Feb 25

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang is excited, focused and ready to set a world record at the Tokyo Marathon on Feb 25. This will be Kipsang second attempt at the Japanese premier marathon competition. He has intensified his training in Kericho, Kenya, running at high altitude and is hopeful that hard work will bear fruits. He knows his rivals will be on a similar mission in April at the London Marathon. "I surprised everyone when I almost won the New York marathon in Nov. last year. Well, this year I will just go ahead and do it in Tokyo," Kipsang said on Tuesday from Kericho. Last year, Kipsang missed the world record (2:02:57) but still ran the fastest time ever on Japanese soil to win in 2:03:58. "I will run fast and let the rest fall in place," he added. (02/07/2018) ⚡AMP
Training
Share
Share

One more race to go: Jeannie Pardy prepares for Tokyo marathon

Jeannie Pardy has been running for 20 years and participating in marathons for ten. She runs 30 miles a week. Now she is preparing for a race that will mark a significant milestone in her career. She is preparing to run the Tokyo Marathon on Feb. 25; when she completes it, she will be the first person in Central Newfoundland Canada to complete all the Abbott World Marathon Majors. One thing is for certain. “I’ll run till I die – till I drop. I don’t want to give up running,” Pardy said. It is the satisfaction of running that keeps her moving. (01/30/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Amy Cragg, among the only top U.S. women not included in the field?

After the Boston Marathon released its all-star U.S. women’s lineup for the 2018 race, the first question many fans asked was: Why isn’t Amy Cragg running it, too?. Indeed, it seemed like she was among the only top U.S. women not included on the field. But the combination of the 2020 Games taking place in Japan and Cragg’s desire to get faster at the 26.2-mile distance made the Tokyo Marathon on February 25 an enticing choice for her four-year career plan. (01/23/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

Wilson Kipsang Has Confirmed That He Will Be Running Tokyo Marathon

Kenya’s Wilson Kipsang, former marathon world record holder, has confirmed according to Japan Running News, that he will be running the 2018 Tokyo Marathon Feb 25. Last year he stormed to victory in 2:03:58, the fastest marathon time ever run in Japan. He was hoping to break the world record. We are sure he will be going after it again in Feb. (01/21/2018) ⚡AMP
Share
Share

2019 Tokyo Date Moved Due to Emperor's Birthday

MBR BEST 100: Tokyo Marathon will move its current date from the last Sunday of February to the first Sunday of March. The next Imperial succession is set to take place in 2019, meaning that February 23 will become the Emperor's Birthday national holiday starting in 2020. The race date is being moved to avoid any potential overlap since the finish area is in front of the Imperial Palace. There were concerns due to the large number of people in the area to celebrate the Emperor's birthday. (12/12/2017) ⚡AMP
Share
35 , Page: 1


Running News Headlines


Copyright 2019 MyBestRuns.com 2,808