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Wharf to Wharf elite field is strong and fast times are expected

The Wharf to Wharf race in California has a lot of history to it, some of which Flagstaff is tied to. In 2014, Ben Bruce became the last American male to finish in the top three of the six-mile race that starts at Santa Cruz Wharf and ends at Capitola Wharf. He recorded a third-place finish that year in 28:07.29. That same summer, Aliphine Tuliamuk, who now runs for NAZ Elite and has since become a United States citizen, finished third while running for Kenya, a country that has dominated the course over the years. Fast forward a year. A longtime Flagstaff running icon who moved from town in 2017, Nick Arciniaga crossed the finish line in 10th in 28:27.44. Then in 2017, former Northern Arizona Lumberjacks standout distance runner Diego Estrada took sixth at 27:47.81. Now, as the race enters its 46th year, NAZ Elite hopes to add to the history books as it sends Stephanie Bruce to compete on the women's side, and Scott Smith and Craig Lutz on the men's side. All three will face a stellar and challenging field. And the timing couldn't be much better for the team. "This made sense on the calendar," said NAZ Elite head coach Ben Rosario. Bruce, who placed fourth at Wharf to Wharf in 2013, is coming off her first-ever national title at the Peachtree Road Race USATF 10K Championships on the Fourth of July, and her body is feeling up to the task of taking on another race before breaking for the fall marathon season. She'll face an imposing field that consists of NYC Half-Marathon winner Buze Diriba of Ethiopia, 2015 Boston Marathon champion Caroline Rotich and Wharf to Wharf 2017 runner-up Monicah Ngige of Kenya, who finished behind only Diriba a year ago. (07/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Island Chill Marathon Defending Champion, Ben Ashkettle Hopes To Represent Fiji

Fiji-born Benjamin Ashkettle runs more than 250 kilometers every week in preparation for marathons . The Island Chill marathon defending champion Mr Ashkettle, 30, who has maternal links to Fiji gained his Fiji citizenship early this year. He’s currently coming back after some time out due to injury so will be running the half marathon this year.  Now with his citizenship he says, “It is an honor to represent of Fiji at world athletics events such as the Olympics, but more importantly to do it in the best way I can by sharing more about our culture and traditions, and perhaps make at the same time important relationships to boost athletics and opportunities in Fiji,” Benjamin said. “To start, I have been providing training and com­petition gear to those in need to boost participation and op­portunities in athletics here,” he said. (07/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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All eyes on Xavier Thévenard for Hardrock 100

Xavier Thévenard, a 30-year-old from France, headlines a men’s field that has changed drastically since the lottery was first drawn in December. Montana’s Mike Foote, a two-time Hardrock runner-up, withdrew from the race a little more than a week out from the start, making Thévenard the favorite if his body and mind hold up during the grueling 100.5-mile race through the San Juan Mountains. “It was tough when I got the email from Kilian a couple weeks ago,” Hardrock 100 race director Dale Garland said. “What it did to the men’s field was kind of blew it up in terms of being in the front.” While Foote and Jornet won’t race, Jeff Browning, a 46-year-old from Oregon, was a late addition from the wait list. He will join Troy Howard, a 45-year-old from Golden, as the top contenders to Thévenard. Thévenard finished third at Hardrock in 2016 in a time of 23 hours, 57 minutes, 10 seconds. That was the year Jornet and Durango’s Jason Schlarb finished as co-champions in a hand-in-hand finish. Since then, Thévenard hasn’t slowed down a bit. He was fourth at Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB) in 2017 and is coming off a fifth-place finish at the 45-mile Transculvania race in May. (07/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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At 77-year-old, Ron Wright refuses to let cancer slow him down, he has run 100 marathons all over the world ever since he was diagnosed

A cancer diagnosis can turn anyone's world upside down. But at 77-year-old, Ron Wright refuses to let cancer slow him down. He has run 100 marathons all over the world ever since he was diagnosed, including at least one in all 50 states. Wright is from Stillwater, Minn. He's in the Pacific Northwest this week for the Senior Games in Olympia, where he'll compete in the 1500, 800, 400 and 200 meter runs. (07/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Meb Keflezighi will be pacing at the 2019 Yuengling Shamrock Marathon

Meb Keflezighi will serve as a pacer for the Anthem Shamrock Half Marathon as well as make special appearances throughout St. Patrick’s Day Weekend. Keflezighi is the only athlete ever to have won an Olympic medal, the Boston Marathon, and the New York City Marathon. He retired from professional running in 2017 after competing in 26 marathons and countless other races. Keflezighi remains an active part of the running community with a particular focus on promoting youth health and fitness. “I’m excited to be spending St. Patrick’s Day at the 2019 Yuengling Shamrock Marathon Weekend. I know many runners travel to this event from all over the country because it is an amazing event and Virginia Beach has a vibrant local running community,” said Keflezighi. “I’m so grateful for the opportunity to run the half marathon and experience race weekend for myself.” As part of Keflezighi’s visit to Virginia Beach, he will pace a time group of runners at the Anthem Shamrock Half Marathon. Keflezighi will also make appearances at the Shamrock Sports and Fitness Expo, serve as the official starter for all of the races throughout Yuengling Shamrock Marathon Weekend, and visit the local elementary school that has the most students register for the Operation Smile Shamrock Final Mile.  (07/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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ultrarunner Harvey Lewis has finished running the 2,189-mile Appalachian Trail

Local ultrarunner Harvey Lewis has finished his run of the 2,189-mile Appalachian Trail Wednesday, according to his Facebook page. It took Lewis less than 50 days to run the trail from Georgia to Maine. Lewis is world-renowned in running circles. He's been running ultramarathons for more than 20 years, and is known for spending six days running in the Sahara Desert. He had aimed to beat the fastest known time for finishing the Appalachian Trail, 45 days, 12 hours and 48 minutes. The rugged terrain and significant elevation changes of the trail made this a particularly daunting run, even for Lewis. It ended up taking him about 49 days and 14 hours, according to the Facebook post. That's still pretty fast, likely putting him in the top 10 times for completing the trail. (07/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Julien Chorier Is hoping to run 273k (170 Miles) with 18,000m elevation gain in less than 60 hours

On July 27th at 08:00, Julien Chorier will set off on a large personal project, the Grand Tour de Tarentaise. On a course of 273km and 18000m elevation gain usually done in 25 stages, the Savoyard trail runner will try to establish the first reference time for completion in a single push. From Val Thorens to Val Thorens, Chorier has set himself a goal of between 48 and 60 hours to complete the mammoth course, taking in much of the Tarentaise Valley. Having won some of the biggest trail events on the planet trail (Diagonale des Fous, Mount Fuji Ultra-Trail, Hardrock Endurance Run, Madeira Island Ultra Trail), the Hoka team athlete decided so set his own challenge. And he doesn't want to go it alone. Julien's route will take him close to many resorts in the Tarentaise Valley, and he's inviting local runners to hop on a lift and join in for a short or longer run. (07/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Winter Games Olympian Erin Hamlin is running the New York City Marathon, her first ever Marathon

Erin Hamlin may have retired following her fourth Olympic appearance earlier this year, but she isn’t done competing by any means. Hamlin announced on Wednesday that she will run in the New York City Marathon in November, her first marathon ever, on behalf of the Women’s Sports Foundation. “Being challenged in sport is something I am very familiar with,” Hamlin wrote in an email on Wednesday. “Long distance running is something I most certainly am not!! It will be difficult, mentally and physically daunting, but a way to test my abilities in a sport so far out of my comfort zone. So naturally I am pretty excited.” Hamlin carried the flag for Team USA at the Opening Ceremony at the Olympics in February in PyeongChang, South Korea, and became the first American to medal in a single luge competition when she won the bronze medal in 2014. The 31-year-old took sixth in South Korea, and finished seventh overall last season in the World Cup standings. Hamlin said she hopes to raise more than $8,000 for the Women’s Sports Foundation before the marathon, which was founded by Billie Jean King in 1974. (07/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Cynthia Arnold smashed the triple-stroller half-marathon world record

People in Missoula, Montana were astonished last year when Theresa Marie Pitts set the first Guinness world record for a woman running the half-marathon while pushing three kids in a stroller, but that record has been broken–first by Ashlee Eskelsen in Montgomery, Alabama this past March her record is 1:47:29, and most recently this past Sunday, again at the Missoula Half-Marathon, by Cynthia Arnold of Polson, Montana. Arnold ran a blazing 1:29:08. Her record has yet to be verified by the Guinness organization. “I feel really good,” says Arnold, two days after her record-breaking run. “I can’t be as fast with the stroller, so I’m not as beat-up as I might be without it.” The 34-year-old mother of three is recognized as an accomplished runner in the area, having won the Governor’s Cup half-marathon in Helena, MT in 2016. Her result Sunday had her finishing 14th in the women’s division, and she was third in her age group (30-34). Her half-marathon PB (sans stroller) is 1:17. And her marathon PB is 2:48. (07/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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Usain Bolt is making a run at professional soccer in Australia

The Olympic sprint great has long expressed his love of the game. Since his retirement from track, he has tested himself with Germany’s Borussia Dortmund and the Norwegian club Stromsgodset. Now, at 31, he will try out for six weeks with the Central Coast Mariners starting next month. If all goes well, he could play for a season in Australia’s A-League. Australian agent Tony Rallis said Monday the Mariners and Bolt have a deal in principle, "subject to a couple of benchmarks." Rallis said the eight-time Olympic gold medallist would have to go through a tryout, and the Football Federation Australia would have to support his salary. "Once the FFA comes back and says that they’ll be part of the process, we’re going to the trial," Rallis said. (07/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Run The World Global Run Challenge team is one third of the way around the world

The Run The World Global Run Challenge team has logged in 8,138 miles so far which is almost a third of the way around the world in the first 14 days.  

These miles have been run in 21 countries.  The top ten counties based on miles logged are: 1. USA 2. Kenya 3. India 4. South Africa 5. Great Britain 6. Canada 7. Palau 8. Mexico 9. Japan 10. Costa Rica.

“We wanted this to be a Global event and that is what it has become,” says Bob Anderson who created the event.  70-year-old Bob Anderson has logged in 76 miles himself since the start date of July 4.  

“Our Mission is to celebrate running, motivate our team, inspire others and complete our goal of logging 24,901 miles, the distance around the world in as few days as possible with a team no bigger than 200,” says Bob.  

(Photo: Grace Padilla training at Mammoth Lakes, California last week and logging her miles in for the RUN THE WORLD Challenge.)  

(07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: After Paul Shimon watched Roger Bannister on TV set the world mile record he was hooked

RUN THE WORLD: Running is a major part of Paul Shimon's life.  "I hate being injured," Paul says.  But he doesn't stop.  "I try to limp along furthering my injury but mentally I am more adjusted! I get depressed if I can't run."  He also loves to read historical running stories and check out results from the past.  He has a good take on the sport.  " I make sure to run in tough conditions so ordinary days are a snap and a treat," he says and he feels that, "training tough makes racing easy."  He got interested in running in grade school in 1954.  "I watched Roger Bannister on tv set the mile record and I was hooked," he remembers.  Paul's marathon PR is 2:30.12 clocked at the third Olympiad Marathon in St. Louis. He has run 135 marathons.  Some other PR's include 4:26 for the mile, 14:34 for 5k, and 33:30 for 10k.  "I got to run in the San Blas International Marathon (Puerto Rico) back in the early 70"s.  Roberto Clemente's (famous baseball player) mother gave out the awards to the top 50 and I was lucky enough to receive one," he says.  Paul is married with a son and daughter. He is still teaching APE (Adapted Physical Education) and this will be his 49th year.  Why did he sign up for the Run The World Challenge?  "I love this challenge. It is getting me to run more and I already feel a higher level of conditioning.  I am quicker to get out the door too," Paul says.     (07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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World Record Endurance Marathoner Becca Pizzi will run the Falmouth Road Race

World Record Endurance Marathoner Becca Pizzi will run the Falmouth Road Race on Sunday, August 19th as part of the NF Northeast Team, a Burlington, MA based non-profit organization whose mission is to find a treatment and the cure for neurofibromatosis (NF). Pizzi is 38 years old and lives in Belmont, MA with her husband, Joe, and 10-year-old daughter, Taylor. Having been the first American female to run the World Marathon Challenge in 2016 - 7 marathons on 7 continents in 7 days - Pizzi recently went back and made history by running it again and breaking the World Record: 6 days, 7 hours and 58 minutes. Her current goal is to complete a marathon in all 50 states and to run the Kona Ironman. Pizzi was introduced to the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis through her good friend and running buddy Scot DeDeo.  His 2-year-old son Nat was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 when he was 7 months old. DeDeo says, “I'm super excited that Becca will be running with us at Falmouth. To have someone of her caliber is hugely motivational to the team and will really help us bring awareness to neurofibromatosis.” “I’ve run the Falmouth Road Race many times; it is one of my favorite races,” said Pizzi. “The race directors are very well organized, and they do an excellent job with the race and pulling the community together.” (07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Olympian Amy Cragg Joins 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon American Women’s Elite Field

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon announced today that two of the fastest women in U.S. history, Amy Cragg and Laura Thweatt, will join previously announced American Jordan Hasay to compete for the top spot on the podium at the 41st annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon. Cragg, a two-time Olympian, and Thweatt, the 2015 U.S. Cross Country champion and 2018 Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8K champion, make the 2018 Chicago Marathon the deepest American women’s field in Chicago’s storied history. Hasay currently ranks second on the list of all-time American marathoners with her 2:20:57 run at last year’s Chicago Marathon. Her time was also the fastest American time ever run on U.S. soil. Cragg moved up to the fifth spot in U.S. history earlier this year with her 2:21:42 performance in Tokyo, and Thweatt claimed the ninth spot in London last year after she finished in 2:25:38. The last time three American women finished in the top five in Chicago was 1994, and the last time U.S. women claimed the top two spots was 1992. Chicago’s history could be rewritten with Hasay, Cragg and Thweatt headlining this year’s American field. “There is an American tradition in Chicago of historic performances, competition and developing top talent,” said Executive Race Director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon Carey Pinkowski. “Amy and Laura are world-class athletes, and they are fighters. We expect to see them battling up front, and we are thrilled to welcome them to our elite field.” Cragg, a member of Nike’s Bowerman Track Club since 2015, joins this year’s elite field after opening her 2018 season by smashing her personal best to finish third at the Tokyo Marathon in 2:21:42. She competed in Chicago for the first time in 2014, finishing fourth in 2:27:03. Since then, she has experienced global success, winning the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon trials, finishing ninth at the 2016 Rio Olympics, and ending a 34-year medal drought for the U.S. after taking home a bronze medal at the 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon. She currently sits in 12th place on the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XI leaderboard, and a strong finish in Chicago could propel her further up the list. (07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ben True was the first American to win the Beach to Beacon and wants to do it again

Ben True, who became the first American runner to win the TD Beach to Beacon in 2016 and finished second in 2017, will return to the race this year. True, a North Yarmouth native and Greely High graduate, leads the men’s elite field for the Aug. 4 race, which was announced by race officials Monday. True is joined in the men’s field by two-time Olympian Lopez Lomong, 2012 Beach to Beacon winner Stanley Biwott, and Jake Robertson, who set the New Zealand record in the marathon earlier this year. This year’s top contenders will join a field of more than 6,500 runners who will wind along the fast, relatively flat course that begins near Crescent Beach State Park on Route 77 in Cape Elizabeth and ends in Fort Williams Park near Portland Head Light. (07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Two-time U.S. Olympian Molly Huddle will compete in Beach to Beacon

Molly Huddle a two-time U.S. Olympian, the reigning American record holder in the women’s 10,000-meter run, are among 46 professionals who will compete at the 21st TD Beach to Beacon 10K Aug. 4. Having Molly in our race this year is truly special, Olympic gold medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson said in a press release. Samuelson founded the TD Beach to Beacon in her native Cape Elizabeth. “But they’ve got their work cut out for them as the field is once again deep and talented and guaranteed to provide a highly competitive day of road racing on Aug. 4,” Samuelson said. Other elite runners set to take on the 6.2-mile route are U.S. Olympic gold medal triathlete Gwen Jorgenson, two-time U.S. Olympian Lopez Lomong, Ethiopian Buze Diriba, Kenya-based New Zealander Jake Robertson and 2012 Beach to Beacon champion Stanley Biwott of Kenya, as well as a host of other Olympians, All-Americans and rising stars from East Africa. (07/17/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: 13-year-old Elliot Daniels set a world record in the half at age 10 but his goals are much bigger

RUN THE WORLD:  Elliot Daniels started running when he was nine years old.  "I went to a parent participatory school starting in 4th grade. My dad participated by helping out with my school's running club. I decided to join the club just for fun and for something to do after school. For most kids, it was a way to pass time. For me, it became something I took seriously," says Elliot.  Running is not the most important thing in his life, "but with long term olympic goals and short term high school state champion goals, running is very important to me," he says. Two things really stand out for Elliot.  When he was 10-years-old he set the world record for that age-group in the half marathon (1:29:14). Secondly was when his high school cross country season started.  He has had a lot of sucess already and he shares this advice.  " Enjoy running, begin running with low mileage and very slowly build the intensity of your running and mileage. Do not be discouraged by others or by a lousy performance and most importantly, remember to consistently train hard and smart."  Is there a secret to Elliot's sucess? "I do not believe there is any trick or secret to succeeding in running. You must simply train hard and smart and never give up," Elliot says.  Why did he join the Run The World Challenge Team?  "I think this challenge is an opportunity for people to learn from each other from their training and an opportunity for people to look back at their training to figure out what worked for them and what didn't."  Elliot has big goals.  Not only does he want to make the US Olympic Team he wants to become a medalist in either the 5,000m or 10,000m.          (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Bill Rodgers never misses the Bix 7 even with lingering achilles tendinitis

In another year at another time, Bill Rodgers might have been looking at running the Quad-City Times Bix 7 in 51 minutes. The most revered marathoner in U.S. distance running history turned 70 in December, and that’s the Bix 7 course record for runners 70 and over — 51 flat by Warren Bystedt back in 2000. Rodgers already holds the course record for runners in the 45-49 and 50-54 age groups, but this time he figures he’ll be lucky just to get up and down the grueling, undulating hills of the Bix in one piece. "I’m running, but I’m not running very fast," Rodgers said. "Hopefully, I can keep myself together for the Bix." Rodgers admits that running an estimated 200,000 miles over the past seven decades has taken its toll. He hasn’t approached the 51-minute mark in the Bix 7 since 2009, and he’s been in the 55-56-minute range each of the past five years. This year, he has been plagued by an Achilles injury that has limited him to just a handful of races. But he wouldn’t miss the Bix 7. In 1984, he had such a serious case of the flu that doctors advised him not to even get on an airplane. He came and ran the Bix anyway. In 2010, he was battling prostate cancer. He still came to the Bix. He will be running the race for the 39th consecutive year, by far the most he has done any race. But he cautioned that what he will be doing may not qualify as running, at least not by the standards of a man who has won 22 marathons and hundreds of road races. Early in the year, Rodgers was doing most of his running in swimming pools just to limit the wear and tear on his legs. "That’s the interesting challenge for us older runners …," he said. "You have to adapt and do more cross training, like swimming or cycling. The other runners do it, too, but for older runners it’s really a prerequisite. (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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It took Christopher Regan just a little less than six years to run 50 marathons in 50 states

Christopher Regan continues to rack up the miles — on his treadmill at home in Wappingers Falls, at marathons around the country, and in the air traveling to the many marathons he runs each year. Regan logs hundreds of miles each month, thousands of miles each year, and most certainly tens of thousands of frequent flier miles in the air. After many years and many miles, it stands to reason that Regan would start accumulating some milestones. Among them: 100 marathon or ultramarathon races completed (his current count is at 109), and most recently, completing a marathon in each of the 50 states. He completed that daunting and amazing task at the Mayor’s Marathon in Alaska a few weeks ago. Amazingly, he completed the 50-state challenge in a little more than five and a half years. I'm not sure I initially thought about 50 states when I first started planning to run a marathon. The first year I found out I could qualify for the lowest level of the Marathon Maniacs by doing three in 90 days, so I did that. Then, I found out I needed to do 30 in 30 states/provinces to get to the highest level. It was at that point that I decided to do the 50 states. My first marathon was Wineglass 2012. It took me 5 years, 8 months, 25 days to complete to complete 50 marathons in 50 states. (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Melissa Manak wants to feel the music at the Rock 'n' Roll Chicago Half Marathon, she is deaf

There is a first-time runner in this year's Rock 'n' Roll Chicago Half Marthon that is hoping to inspire others to take on new challenges. Melissa Manak is doing her first 10K at the Rock 'n' Roll Chicago Half Marathon. "It has music and even though I'm deaf, I want to feel the music," said Manak. "That's more fun to me, feeling the music than listening to music. So I pity everyone that can hear it, but I can feel it, so I'm listening to them that way." Manak doesn't let her hearing impairment stop her and needs no modifications to take on this new challenge. She's been training since last fall and says running helps clear her mind. "It's a mental health thing for me," she said. "People listen to music, I don't. I'm deaf.  When I'm running, I'm thinking about life, fixing my problems." Manak wants to encourage other people with hearing impairments to take part in running and if you're coming out next week, stop and say hello. "If there are other deaf people, come up to me. I want to see other deaf people running. I enjoy other people like me running. You see a lot of hearing people, so hopefully I see other deaf people come."   (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Myrtle Miller, 85, had a bounce in her step as she crossed the finish line of the Missoula Half Marathon

For the first time since Miller started running competitively more than 50 years ago, all three generations of her family strode across Higgins Bridge together, cowbells and cheers giving them energy for the final few yards. Miller ran her first marathon at age 51 and is still a staple participant in Run Wild Missoula’s walking community, inspiring all those who hope to stay active and healthy as they age. “I’m going to keep going till I drop,” Miller laughed after the race, hugging her family. Her son, Brian Miller, and grandson, Kyle Miller, ran the full marathon, so she had four family members with whom to celebrate. Her daughter Heidi is a busy physician in Billings, but Miller finally convinced her to walk the half this year, together with Mara. “I have never done the half before with my mom,” Heidi Duncan said. “It’s ridiculous. I’ve never been over to cheer her on at the finish line, mostly because we’ve been on other trips. But last year I decided for sure I’d be there at the finish line. Then I thought about it a little more, and decided we should walk with her. She’s amazing.” Miller credited her daughter with pushing her this year, giving her a time of 3:37:51, a good half-hour before she anticipated crossing when she spoke with the Missoulian on Friday. “She really helped me,” Miller said. Miller trains four to five days a week, averaging about 15 miles as she trains. (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mark Messmer runs a PR to win the 2018 Missoula Marathon

The winner of Sunday's Missoula Marathon knows the area well. Mark Messmer, the former Missoula Sentinel Spartan, took first in the men's 2018 Missoula Marathon. Messmer ran the marathon in 2:27, a personal record.“I feel like I never reached my full potential in college, definitely not in high school,” said Messmer. “And it was always the longer the race the better, so moving up into the marathon was kind of just a natural progression for me.” Keeley Baker, who finished second in the 2017 race, took first place on Sunday. Missoula's Trisha Drobeck finished second.  Keeley victory makes it a clean sweep for Montanans in the 2018 Missoula Marathon. (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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One lucky finisher will win a new Hyundai Grand Car at the 2018 Island Chill Suva Marathon

A brand new Hyundai Grand i10 car can be won by one lucky finisher at the 2018 Island Chill Suva Marathon on July 21. The Suva Marathon Club is delighted that the major sponsor, Island Chill and the wider Carpenters Group has sponsored a car as an incentive to participate in the annual Suva Marathon event as part of their 150 years celebrations of being in Fiji. “This is our opportunity to support health and wellness in Fiji and also give back to the country and our customers. MH’s 150 years in Fiji is dedicated to our loyal customers that have supported us through the years and we are very excited about giving a car to one of them after the Island Chill Suva Marathon”, said Carpenters Fiji Ltd’s director retail and marketing, Kuna Sabaratnam. The South Pacific’s road race will start from the Albert Park in Suva and has four divisions – the full marathon (42.2km), half Marathon – 21.2km, team marathon – 10.55km x 4 and the 10km fun run. The marathon is open to both local and international runners, corporate groups, families, individuals and people with disabilities to encourage people from all walks of life to take part. (07/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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IAAF releases the biggest ever biomechanics study for Track and Field

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) today released the results of, what they claim, is the largest biomechanical study in the sport’s history. Almost everything that moved in the Olympic Stadium at last year’s IAAF World Championships was recorded by 49 high-speed cameras and has now been measured and analyzed as part of the study.  "Biomechanics are crucial to the development of athletes where milliseconds and millimeters can make the difference between qualifying for a final, or not, and winning a medal, or not," says IAAF President Sebastian Coe. Among the highlights of the research was that on the steeplechase, which was recorded in detail for the first time. It is claimed the outstanding technique of American athletes Emma Coburn and Courtney Frerichs in the women’s 3,000m steeplechase clearly showed that medals were won and lost in the water. The research showed in detail that the United States team’s effective water jump clearance techniques were key to their performances.  The data captured on women's 10,000m champion Almaz Ayana of Ethiopia, meanwhile, shows a difference of up to 20 centimeters between the length of her strides from right to left - her right to left is longer than left to right. While it is hoped the reports will provide useful insight for coaches and athletes, it is anticipated they will also help the sport innovate by providing new data and graphics that can be shared with the media and fans around the world. (07/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Getting into shape, it’s not glamorous says John Quinn who almost died from a heart attack. It’s hard. You can’t fake it.

John Quinn, a retired newspaper editor, likes to wear the teal cotton T-shirt he got from the 2012 Broad Street Run, a 10-mile race in Philadelphia. It was his first 10-mile event, and he’d come a long way to get to that 2012 starting line: losing more than 60 pounds and going from calling himself “John 316,” a reference to his previous weight, to being a dedicated runner. “Getting into shape, it’s not glamorous,” he said. “It’s hard. You can’t fake it.” But less than four years later, in 2015, Mr. Quinn, now 64, had a heart attack from a complete, sudden blockage of his right coronary artery. That led to part of his heart dying and a tear in the muscle bridge that separates the left and right ventricles. If that all sounds bad, it was. Repairing that bridge is a delicate procedure, and about 50 percent of patients die within 30 days after the operation, according to Dr. Matthew L. Williams, assistant professor of cardiac surgery at Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia and Mr. Quinn’s surgeon. Today, many doctors prescribe exercise for their patients who have had heart attacks. Any exercise regimen requires careful monitoring and medical supervision. But for many, exercise post-heart attack has been shown to improve quality of life and decrease the risk for another cardiac event. “In the long run, we know that engaging in running and other cardiovascular activities prevents heart attacks,” said Dr. Mutharasan. Something like running helps the heart use oxygen more efficiently and regrow blood vessels. (07/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Joel Flora wants to make this year's Boston Marathon be number five

Joel Flora recently qualified for his fifth Boston Marathon. He is able to register in September and if successful, he will run the marathon in April of 2019. Flora’s journey began when, at the age of 35, he quit smoking. This led to him gaining some weight he wanted to get rid of. He was watching the Tour de France and got inspired to start bicycling again, something he did often as a teenager. He began biking a couple miles a day, and before he knew it, he was biking 20 miles a day. When he was 36, he got a membership to the YMCA to continue his training in the winter months. There, he started running. Unfortunately, he developed shin splints, but he didn’t let it stop him. He began walking on the treadmill and strengthened his shins and lower legs. When he turned 37, he was able to run without shin splints. This year, he plans to run 12 marathons. “I’ve always had a fall challenge, it has been going on for nine or 10 years now. Why I have these is because I’m a football fan. If they can do it every week, I can do it every week. My goal, I try to get eight to 10 races weekends in a row. Last year, I ran 17 in a row. They were 13 halves, one full, 10K, 7K, and a five miler,” Flora said. (07/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Lifetime runner Fred Martin (74) remembers when races did not have an age-group over 59

RUN THE WORLD:  “I will be 75 in six months,” says Fred Martín, “and my running journey has taken many twists and turns since 1960. I ran my usual weekend long run this morning (single track in woods in Northern California).  My thoughts were to savor the moment since it could be my last run,” Fred said. “It is something we all (in our age group) should think about.”   Fred went out for track his freshman year of high school (1959) and got pretty good by his junior and senior year.  Good enough to get a scholarship to Montana State. In college he competed against some of the best runners in the Pacific Northwest like Doug Brown and Tracy Smith. He ran on the US Army team from 1968-70.  He placed fifth in World Master’s 800 meters in 2011 and his team (Len, Hans and himself) won the National title for 70-79 year olds in the 8K for two straight years.  He has been racing well now for nearly 60 years. Fred has this to say about aging.  “There are more 70-year-old runners now than decades before and setting new standards, hell I remember races in the seventies that never had an age group over 59.  “As aging becomes more noticeable in our own personal lives we will be challenged more and our experience in years of training discipline comes into play.  “Times will become less important vs staying healthy and injury free, remember the old saying “if you don’t use it you’ll loose it.”  We will take our falls and mend broken bones, ward off cancer, deal with painful arthritis and tolerate medication to fix heart issues but we will be back out there doing what we love.  From the heart of a lonely long distance runner,” says Fred.  His goal is to be able to keep running into his 80’s.  What’s his thinking on the Run The World Challenge?  “I think it’s a good incentive and another tool to keep our running schedule in check,” he says.  Photo: Fred on the right end with the gang.   (07/14/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Mark Garrigan ran his first ultramarathon in 2012 and that race planted a seed to pursue a dream to build a trail running community in his home state

Mark’s big goal is to bring people together to run on trails. That message is all over the nurun co. website, which he designed, and it really drives every decision he makes. Mark enjoys introducing people to trail and ultra running and he is always very excited to welcome new trail runners to his races. He puts on training runs leading up to this events and is always there to answer any questions or help runners with their concerns.  As a race director, Mark’s appreciation for everyone who runs his races starts with a hand written thank you note sent to them after they register.  Besides planning and directing races and other trail events, Mark also designs all the logos and graphics for T-shirts, medals, signs, and the website. To say he puts his heart and soul into this would be an understatement. “I got into trail and ultra running because of… a girl,” said Garrigan. “I met her at my former place of employment and it just so happened she was on a relay team for a 50 miler. Since the team was full, I thought it would be a good idea to tell her I was running the solo event. Little did I know, I would not only fall in love with and marry that girl, I would also fall in love with a sport I didn’t even know existed.” Since his passion was ignited for trail running, he has completed a variety of races from marathon distance to 100 miles. What he found in the sport was an endless supply of inspiration, encouragement, and optimism. “It’s amazingly obvious how awesome the people in the trail and ultra community are,” said Garrigan.   (07/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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I needed to suffer, says Kílian Jornet after breaking a record that had stood for 36 years

Early on Sunday morning, as the Lake District began to buzz with hikers walking in the glorious sunshine, Kílian Jornet took the first step towards another remarkable record. The Catalan, who last year climbed Everest twice in a week, and can run up and down Mount Blanc in under five hours, is one of the best known athletes in the fast-growing world of adventure sports. He had his sights on tackling the Bob Graham round, a challenge that involves running a 66-mile circuit of the Lake District, climbing and descending 42 of its highest peaks, in 24 hours. Only 100 hardy souls attempt it each year, and barely a third finish. Jornet, though, flew around and smashed the fastest known time for the route, which has stood for 36 years, by more than an hour. He reached the finish at Moot Hall in Keswick in an astonishing 12 hours and 52 minutes. “I knew I needed to suffer,” Jornet told the Guardian. “But it was a beautiful suffering.” The 30-year-old, who is 5ft 6in tall and weighs barely nine stone, started racing up and down the mountains in Catalonia as a three-year-old, and has been an ultrarunning star for a decade. But he conceded that the Bob Graham Challenge was among the toughest of his career. (07/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Catra Corbett Smashes the 310 mile John Muir Trail record

Vegan ultramarathon runner Catra Corbett has set a new record on the legendary John Muir Trail. The 53-year-old athlete, who has openly spoken out about her previous abuse of crystal meth and alcohol, had already set a previous record on the 212-mile course.

Now she has just set another in the 310-mile course known as the Muir ramble route, which covers 310 miles of California, and was originally explored and recorded in 1868 by John Muir. Corbett's new record is for the Fastest Known Time (FKT) for completion.

She finished the 310 miles - which became 323 miles with diversions - in seven days, nine hours, and 49 minutes. Corbett, who has run over 100 races of 100 miles or more - and is world famous for her exploits and her commitment to positive thinking and living - was supported by a small team who paced and equipped her during the record attempt.

"There is no way I could have done it without Phil Nimmo help but mostly Dave Wiskowski and Chubky they were my crew on foot the last 66 miles," Catra told followers on social media. "We spent the night in the wilderness huddled together. They pushed me and helped motivate me. We all fell apart many times out there but kept it together.

"There were places there were no trails, and we had to route find our way. I'm happy I knew the last 15-mile section. We crossed slowly over two miles of rockfall, but the views were amazing. We almost had to turn around because the trail was completely gone due to a recent rockfall. Dave navigated us safely up and over it. We worked as a team to get it done."

(07/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Nicky Spinks pushed the barriers of human endurace by running 116 Miles over Peaks in under 56 Hours

At the age of 51, a little-known Yorkshire (UK) farmer has completed an extraordinary mountain challenge. Nicky Spinks, a long-distance fell runner and breast cancer survivor, pushed the barriers of human endurance by twice running a brutal circuit of Scottish highland peaks that makes a marathon seem like a walk in the park. The first-ever ‘double Ramsay Round’ involved running 116 miles over the summit of 48 peaks in 55 hours and 56 minutes. Battling heat exhaustion, dehydration and sleep deprivation, she took just seven breaks of no more than a few minutes, running through two days and nights around the hills and mountains above Fort William. The ‘superwoman’ athlete had hoped to complete the run within 48 hours and admitted being ‘disappointed’ that she failed to achieve her target time. But the record-breaking run made in soaring heatwave temperatures is just the latest mind-blowing achievement of this remarkable married middle-aged beef farmer from Huddersfield. Two years ago Miss Spinks celebrated ten years of surviving breast cancer by running twice around the Bob Graham round in the Lake District. (07/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Long distance runner Felicien Muhitira is optmistic to break a six-year record at the forthcoming Marvejols-Mende half marathon

Rwanda international long distance and cross country runner Felicien Muhitira is upbeat about defending his title and even break the current record of the forthcoming 46th edition Marvejols-Mende half marathon in France. The annual 22.4kilometre race is scheduled for July 29 where about 5000 athletes from around the world are expected to participate. Last year, 24-year old Muhitira debuted and sensationally claimed a gold medal after posting one hour, and eleven minutes beating his closest contender John Lotiang from Kenya who clocked one hour, twelve minutes and five seconds. Later, Muhitira went on to compete in the 98th edition of the 24.3km Sedan-Charleville race which he won breaking a 54-year record of the fastest time in that race that was set by French Norman Ameur. “I had a good campaign last year in France and am hoping to repeat this feat this time, I have been training extensively for almost two months now, I want to defend my title but more importantly I want to set a new record there,” said Muhitira in an exclusive interview with Times Sport on Wednesday. The current standing record was set by Kenyan Luka Kanda during the 39th edition back in 2011 who won the race with a time of one hour, 10 minutes and nine seconds.“I have been trying to deduct a minute on the time I used last year which would be enough to set the new record and so far, am starting to get to the level I wanted,” he added. (07/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Deena Kastor is the honored guest at the 12th annual Missoula Marathon weekend

Deena Kastor started running at age 11 in 1984, after witnessing Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first American to ever win the Olympic marathon, and she ended up breaking Benoit Samuelson’s American record at the London Marathon. Kastor is here this weekend as the honored guest of Run Wild Missoula for the 12th Missoula Marathon weekend. She described her start in running at a very young age. “I set the American record 15 years ago at the London Marathon, and it was Joan Benoit Samuelson’s record,” said Kastor. “She is a hero and mentor of mine for many years. The year she won the first ever women’s Olympic Marathon in 1984 in the L.A. Olympics.” Kastor recently completed a book about the true challenge in running, the mind. The book is titled ‘Let Your Mind Run’. “It’s a memoir of my running life, but it only takes place in my head,” she said. “It reveals the mental twists and the great qualities of the mind that we get to cultivate over time. We just fall into habits of thinking, but it’s our job to create the right habits of thinking. So, I like to think of it more of an instructional memoir and the feedback I’ve gotten has proven that I’ve done a good job of doing that.” (07/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Mary Menton has been running for over 25 years and loves it as much now as ever

RUN THE WORLD:  Mary Menton has been running for over 25 years.  She works full time as a family Advisor Dignity memorial.  "I protect families on the worst day of their life before someone passes," Mary says.  "I have been doing this for 3 and half years and I love it as much as running."   She gets up around 5 am to run before work and if needed does a second workout in the evening.   "Running to so important to me and it always will be.  It provides peace, its like a drug.  It not only is a physical addiction for me but it is mental as well.  I need to be exercising and running.  Its a feeling and enjoyment people who don't run can't understand what it is like to be a runner," says Mary.  She was one of the top 10 Americans at the Boulder Boulder 10k and she qualified for the Marathon Olympics Trials three times.  "As a Master the work is more difficult," she says, "because we are older the injuries are much higher.  I am dealing with an injury now.  As a master it is much more relaxing and I am not so hard on myself."  She discovered running as a young girl while, "watching my older sister and a AAU sprinter.  My mom would pack PJ’s because track meets were all day. So my little sister and I would be let loose running around the stadium.  I was in awe of the runners."   Mary has three girls.  "Sara is working for the Court of Appeals in Denver. She is a lawyer.  My daughter Megan is a RN living in Denver.  My 3rd daughter Ryan will be a Senior at Trinity Catholic."  What does she think of this challenge?  "The Run The World challenge is another one of Bob Anderson's fantastic ideas.  His passion for the sport is infectious. He is not only an advocate of running but a motivator to everyone. Having the Run The World challenge spreads the importance of running and keeps people together for a common interest."  Mary's current goal is to start running regularly again and get back to 50 miles a week.  (07/12/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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George Kraehe wanted to finish a marathon in all 50 States, Missoula will be number 50

Coming up this weekend is the extremely popular Missoula marathon. Thousands of runners are expected to race in both the half and full distance races. One runner is looking to accomplish a lot more by finishing the race this weekend. George Kraehe set out to run a marathon in all 50 states and Sunday will be number 50. Kraehe is doing it for an organization called the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors. Team TAPS does endurance races to raise money in remembrance of fallen heroes. TAPS provides all sorts of resources for families who have lost a loved one in the armed forces, such as counseling, support groups and a 24/7 hotline if you need someone to talk to. They provide this service to families for free. (07/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mel Sturman set a British record by finishing 10 marathons in 10 days, five times

Mel Sturman became a British record holder by becoming the first woman to have completed 10 marathons in 10 days five times. Mel Sturman completed the Great Barrow Challenge in sweltering heat to claim the title. Over 10 days she ran 10 marathons on various trails across the Suffolk and Norfolk countryside. The marathons are all logged through the 100 Marathons Club. Although a seasoned runner, having completed more than 230 marathons, the Thetford parkrun director said this was the hardest challenge yet.“It was horrible,” said the 47-year-old. “It was the toughest one of the lot because of the heat. I was starting to get really bad blisters on days six and seven I could not even get my shoes on. “I was sobbing and saying that I did not want to give up. I just had to pop them and salt water them and just shove my feet in the shoes and just deal with it.” She added: “If you really want something you can turn your mind to do it. But I was close to giving up.” (07/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Missoula’s Mark Messmer hopes to win his hometown marathon this weekend

Missoula Marathon spectators cheer for every winner, whether they come from Polson, Corvallis or Kenya. But they haven’t celebrated a hometown win in the men’s full race since 2010. Mark Messmer hopes to change that this Sunday. Messmer has considered himself a competitive runner for as long as he can remember, but the former Missoula Sentinel Spartan and Montana Grizzly feels he is just now catching his stride. “I feel like I never reached my full potential in college, definitely not in high school,” said Messmer. “And it was always the longer the race the better, so moving up into the marathon was kind of just a natural progression for me.” Messmer knows it will be painful and difficult to reach his goal on Sunday, but he admits to dreaming of a possible victorious scene in downtown Missoula. “I’ve always kind of been obsessed with the banner you run through,” said Messmer. “I want that. I know they give that to the winner. That’s something since a little kid I’ve thought about.” (07/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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New virtual marathon will allow runners to qualify for the 2019 New York City Marathon from anywhere in the world

Runners may now qualify for the New York City Marathon without setting foot in the Big Apple. The New York Road Runners opened registration Wednesday for its first-ever virtual marathon race, which will take place Nov. 1-4. All participants who complete the virtual race in less than 6 1/2 hours will earn a spot in the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon, according to Michael Capiraso, the president and CEO of the Road Runners. Available spots are limited and will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis, according to the Road Runners website. “The TCS New York City Marathon is already the largest marathon in the world, and we are excited to extend the opportunity to runners all over the world,” Capiraso said in a statement. Athletes from around the world can complete the 26.2-mile run at any outdoor location. Runners must document their route via a GPS running device, and log their time through the Strava app. Qualifying virtual marathon runners will receive a complimentary virtual trainer program and a medal in addition to their 2019 marathon spot, the Road Runners said. (07/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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The first ever Run The World Challenge Team has already logged in 4,092 Miles since July 4

The Run the World Global Run Challenge started July 4th.  Our goal is to login 24,901 miles (40,072k) within 30 days.  We wanted this to be a Global event and it is. Our team of 200 has already run and logged in miles in 17 different countries.  Our mission is to reach our goal but we also want to motivate, inspire others and celebrate running.  A sport we love.  Our team range in age from 11 to 81.  Team member Abbey Cannon sums up our mission,  "I think the Global Run Challenge is great because it shows that even though we are all at different levels and may run for different reasons, we in the running community from all over the globe can all come together to work for the same goal." Our team is amazing.  Willie Korir from Kenya has already logged in 173 miles. 51-year-old JR Mintz has logged in 112 and 74-year-old Frank Bozanich has logged 112 miles as well.  Grace Padillia has logged in the most miles for females with 72 miles.  Becca Pizzi who ran a marathon on each continent in seven days earlier in the year has logged 60 miles.  There are many amazing performances.  You can follow all the action on our Run The World feed.  We still have a long ways to go but we have almost already covered the distance between San Francisco and Iceland in eight days.  This is more than just logging training and racing miles.  It is a celebration of running.  To help remember what we are doing we have an official shirt and a medal when we finish.  Just click on the link and we will get out the shirt to you right away.  If you didn't join us this time, we will be doing this same Global Challenge again starting August 29.   (07/11/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Sara Lucas is training to run the New York City Marathon in memory of relatives

After furthering her running career at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City, where she is now an assistant track coach, Sparta native Sara Lucas is now training for something bigger: running the New York City Marathon. In 2008, Sara's mother Sabrina, the head cross country coach at Wallkill Valley Regional High School, ran the same race in memory of her father, who lost a battle with esophageal cancer.  Sara Lucas earned 12 varsity letters in cross country and track and field.  She needs to hit a fund-raising goal of $3,500 to take part in the race on Nov. 4. Lucas' contribution will be going to the V Foundation for Cancer Research. "I knew that since my mom ran it 10 years ago and that I was there last year to see it in person that I really wanted to run it," Lucas said. "And to do it for the cause that I am, growing up so close to the city and going to school there for four years of my life, being able to run the streets that I had my first internship at or saw my first Broadway show, really means a lot." It is expected that nearly 60,000 competitors will participate in this year's race. And the fact that the V Foundation only selects between 35 and 40 applicants to run for their foundation, the meaning behind Lucas' journey on Nov. 4 will go even deeper than running on those familiar New York City streets. "The fact that I had grandparents be affected by cancer and other people that I know as well, it was the right fit." "The training is very different than in high school, but I enjoyed the experience doing it," Lucas said. "In high school, I also competed in dance so the transition from being that busy in high school to college wasn't that hard. You have to be on top of everything at the Fashion Institute, so it was kind of tough to balance it all, but I think I kind of thrive when my schedule is full." (07/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Brian McArthur says managing the pain levels at the Sinister 7 ultra helped him place ninth

Brian McArthur (Right), 46, finished ninth overall and second among racers in the Masters Category with a time of 22 hours, 21 minutes and 32 seconds. He said his goal was to finish the race in under 24 hours and added he was happy with his time as well as the top 10 finish. Of the 286 runners registered, only 86 managed to finish. Last fall, McArthur raced in the Ultra-Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB), a 171km trek through France, Italy and Switzerland. That race brought him through elevations of more than 2,500m and McArthur said the experience helped prepare him for the Sinister 7. “This race, I needed to take it easy and not run too hard,” he said. “It’s a long day and you need to save yourself because there’s lots of time to run hard at the end. I laid back and took the first three stints fairly easy in the first 80km. Then started to feel recovered, then the last half I ran fairly hard and the last 40km I felt great and I ran about 20 people down.” The Sinister 7 race traveled through 6,400m of elevation and was a grueling endeavour, but McArthur said his biggest challenge was overcoming the mental fatigue. “Managing the pain levels and realizing that it will go away. That it’s just temporary. Think about other things, like the beautiful environment you’re running through,” he said. “Enjoying the moment and the other runners that you come across. Just enjoying the experience and being able to appreciate the moment.” McArthur added that he was motivated to start ultramarathons after joining a running club in Red Deer and participating in a marathon. It was through the club that he heard about longer races. Originally, he thought the idea was crazy. “Six years later, that’s what I’m doing. It kind of creeps up on you,” he said. (07/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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After 11 straight days on the road, ultrarunner Dave Proctor and his support crew arrived in Calgary Monday

Proctor is running across Canada with two large goals in mind: to raise over $1 million for the Rare Disease Foundation, and to beat the cross-Canada speed record set by Al Howie in 1991. Proctor, who is from Okotoks, Alberta south of Calgary, is a highly accomplished and decorated ultrarunner who holds various records in ultrarunning. He was met by a crowd of several hundred people at a local Staples store, who joined him in a 5K as his journey continued eastward.Proctor must average 108K per day in order to meet his goal of getting to the east coast in 66 days. Howie’s run took 72 days. (07/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Canadian trail ultrarunner Adam Campbell has withdrawn from the Hardrock 100

Eleven days before the race, Canadian trail ultrarunner Adam Campbell has withdrawn from this year’s Hardrock 100. The celebrated runner had a near-fatal mountain fall in 2016, breaking his back and pelvis and suffering numerous other injuries. This spring, less than two years later, Campbell finished third at the Lijiang Skyview Adventure in China. Campbell says he pulled out for various reasons having to do with a combination of his busy travel schedule, he is leading run clinics in Chamonix and Squamish, the resultant lack of training, and family obligations. “I respect the race too much to do it undertrained,” says Campbell. Campbell’s withdrawal yesterday made it possible for Jeff Browning of Bend, Oregon to move from the waitlist to the start list. Browning was fifth at Western States late last month, and could be a serious contender at Hardrock, certainly in terms of the “double,” for which he holds the record, set in 2016. (07/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Gabriel Geay is the hottest road racer in the US right now will be racing Crazy 8s Saturday

Crazy 8s race organizers announced Tuesday that Tanzania’s Gabriel Geay and Kenyans Isaac Mukundi, Cleophas Ngetich and Linus Kiplagat have committed to race Saturday in downtown Kingsport. Geay is on a hot streak, recently winning the BAA 10K over a stacked field that included defending Crazy 8s champ Teshome Mekonen and previous 8K world record-holder Stephen Sambu. Geay followed that with an impressive win at the Boilermaker 15K this past Sunday, once again outracing Mekonen to the tape. “Geay is arguably the hottest road racer in the U.S. right now, and we are very excited he has decided to come to Kingsport,” said Crazy 8s co-director Hank Brown. “He might just be the first runner from Tanzania to win Crazy 8s. That would be pretty cool.” He’ll have plenty of competition in Mukundi, Ngetich and Kiplagat. Mukundi, who finished second in the 2016 Crazy 8s, has won such major races as the Bay to Breakers 12K (twice), Bolder Boulder 10K and Wharf to Wharf 6 Mile. His 10K personal record is a sizzling 27:45. Ngetich is a past winner of Crazy 8s, clocking 22:28 to win in 2015, and has 13 victories over his road-race career. Kiplagat owns victories this year at the Cleveland Marathon 10K, Cotton Row 10K, in which he broke the course record, Orange Classic 10K and the Monumental Mile. The starting line will once again be stocked with superstars from around the globe, all going for The Regional Eye Center $10,008 World Record Bonus — which goes to the first runner to break the existing 8K world-best time, currently 21:45. The winner will claim the Teleperfomance $5,000 Dash For The Gold. “It should be another fast race,” Brown said. “Even though the record is tougher this year, we’re still going after guys who think they can break it. All we can do is shoot the gun and see what happens.” (07/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Pulkit Singh went out one morning at 3:30am to escape the pressure of his job and started running

RUN THE WORLD: Pulkit Singh (26) took a high pressure job after graduation in 2015 in the Steel City of India, Jamshedpur.  He started feeling burned out and he needed to do something.  "It was one normal working day that I woke up on unearthly hours and went out for a run.. It was 3:30am, I started to run and since then I have never looked back. I got infected by the running bug."  Running has changed Pulkit's life. "Running is like a tonic/medicine to my everyday routine. The pressurized work culture of my company hasn’t changed but my patience, tolerance and attitude has completely changed. Today I remain active even after working for 12+ hours a day. Running has taught me the art of ‘perseverance," he says.  He completed his first marathon in 6 hours 9 minutes.  " I am proud of the fact that I was on my feet for 6 hours. Under hot blazing sun I completed my first marathon (FM). People criticize runners who walk while running their FM. I have an altogether different aspect for this. Many a time it came in my mind that I should give up and consider a respectable DNF and come back next year in a stronger avatar. But the glory which waits at the finish line motivated me to complete."  He has many goals but one is to run the 100th annual Comrades Marathon in 2021.   Pulkit has to say about this challenge.  "The fact that you have a challenge in front of you motivates you to bring out the best in one’s own self. Once the Run The World Challenge concludes we are all winners, no matter how many miles we have logged. The fact that an individual takes up a challenge is in itself terms him/her to be a winner because they all gave up their comfort zone for a better/fitter tomorrow. You never know whom you are motivating indirectly"       (07/10/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Jennifer Bayliss is working on one major goal - to qualify for the Olympic Marathon Trials

RUN THE WORLD: Jennifer Bayliss (47) discovered running in the third grade.  She says, "Laura beat me in the 50 yard dash on the sidewalk in P.E. class at school. I did not like that. I really wanted to beat her and all the boys."  In high school and college she still wanted to beat all the Laura's and the boys. She did until injury took over her collegiate career. "I did manage to capture All American status, a conference championship title and run at the NCAA's before having to call it quits."  15 years later she returned to running as a master once her kids started driving and she found a little time to lace up her shoes.  How important is running?  "Running is where I push myself to reach goals, believe in myself, have confidence, trust the plan, feel fit and healthy, connect with people, see beautiful places, have stories to tell, learn how to deal with good and bad stress, and mostly have a blast."  Just recently she ran the Boilermaker 15K in Utica, New York. She clocked 56:59 (which is 6:05 per mile).  She was the 5th American Master woman. She was pleased with her performance as she pursues her ultimate goal.  "My goal is to run an Olympic Trial qualifier for the Marathon. For women, that means at least a time of 2:45. My plan is to race myself into shape with a hybrid of a plan- a little short, long, trail and training and racing distances from the mile to the marathon."  Jennifer is a Road Runners Club of America Certified Coach.   How did you find out about this challenge?   "I heard about the Run The World Challenge from Rosaura Briceno-Tennant and Bertrand Newson and thought- these are my friends, my people-I want to do what they are doing because they are awesome people and runners." (07/10/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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World Cup Soccer, Wimbledon and British 10K all this weekend

This weekend more than 10,000 runners will descend on the streets of London for the 18th Virgin Sport Westminster British 10K. Hosted by ASICS, the race takes in London’s most iconic landmarks, from Big Ben to Trafalgar Square. This year, it’s a celebration of movement and music: the streets of Westminster will be transformed into a British street party – expect Union Jacks, summer vibes and live bands and DJs at every kilometre. You’ll pound the streets to the beat. It’s set to be the hottest sporting weekend of 2018 – and not just thanks to the heatwave. The race takes place on Sunday, the same day as both the Wimbledon men’s final and the World Cup final – even more incentive to cross that finish line in record speed. (07/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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There is something magical about 26 miles 385 yards say Rory Coleman who has done it 1000 times

In 1994 I had an epiphany, a real Road to Damascus moment. I was 31 at the time, and I clearly remember looking in the mirror one day and not liking the person staring back at me. I felt toxic – I didn’t want to smoke or drink anymore, and I wanted to lose some weight. I thought, runners are thin. Maybe if I go for a run that could speed up the process. I never set out to run 1,000 marathons or to coach people or run across the Sahara Desert. All I knew was on that day in 1994 I simply had to go for a jog. I ran 100 steps and I was flat out on the pavement. But I was totally euphoric because I’d found my therapy and the framework that I was going to hang the rest of my life on. I was totally ignorant of how to train. I went for my first run in my work clothes wearing leather shoes, jeans and a puffer jacket – it was at least a month before I bought any running shoes. There wasn't a lot of information about running, so I had to work things out for myself. The initial results were amazing. You lose weight quickly when your body is used to doing nothing. I exercised every day and within three months I’d done my first half marathon. It was my local one in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. There’s something magical about 26 miles and 385 yards. The first marathon I ran in November 1994 was such an achievement. I wrote in my journal that it didn’t matter whatever else I did in running, no one could take the achievement of running that marathon away from me. I felt it was such a positive thing to do, all I wanted was to do it again. My next one was the 1995 London Marathon 56 days later and once I’d finished that I was hooked. Being in a field of 30,000 running around the Cutty Sark and Tower Bridge is such an iconic thing and had a real wow factor. I ran another one the week afterwards and I’ve been running one every week ever since. I’d think that if I didn’t do them, maybe I’d return to the old Rory Coleman who I didn’t like very much. If you can make your passion your career it’s a huge bonus. In 2008 I’d come to a career break: I’d spent 25 years in print and brand development and come to the end of wanting to work for someone else. I thought, well I’m always teaching people how to run, so why not become a personal trainer? Although it’s difficult to return to school when you’re 46, I went back and did my qualifications. What had real value though were my 20-plus years of running. I always say my Guinness World Records hanging up in the kitchen are my qualifications, they’re what allow me to teach other people. I’ve been there, done it and got thousands of t-shirts! (07/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Top Ultra runner Lorena Ramírez runs in her traditional dress including basic sandals made from recycled tires

Wearing her traditional long dress and a pair of sandals, there was no mistaking one of the runners in Saturday’s Cajamar Tenerife Bluetrail ultramarathon. It could only be one of the famous Rarámuri runners from northern Mexico. Lorena Ramírez won third place in the annual 102-kilometer marathon on the Spanish island of Tenerife, competing in the seniors’ category, ages 18 to 39. She finished the course in 20 hours, 11 minutes and 37 seconds. It is the second highest such race in Europe, with part of the course reaching 3,500 meters, and this year attracted 2,400 runners from 38 countries. Ramírez, 23, was accompanied in Spain by fellow runners, her brother Mario and sister Juana, all of whom grew up running in the mountains of the Tarahumara Sierra in Chihuahua. Lorena Ramírez had already made a name for herself with other wins, along with the fact that she became the first Rarámuri woman to compete at Tenerife when she entered last year. She was invited to attend after she won the females’ 50-kilometer category of the Ultra Trail Cerro Rojo last year in Puebla. In that race, she ran “without a hydration vest, without running shoes, without Lycra and compression socks, without any of those gadgets used by the runners of today.” Besides, as in the Tenerife Bluetrail, she wore traditional dress including basic sandals made from recycled tires. (07/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Joseph Gray of Colorado Springs captured his 14th USATF National Championship at the Loon Mountain race

Joseph Gray of Colorado Springs captured his 14th USATF National Championship at the Loon Mountain race in Lincoln, New Hampshire on Sunday, July 8. The event hosted the US Mountain Running Championships and a deep prize purse. Gray, 34, completed the course in 50:28. The event was the selection competition for the four men and four women who will compete for the United States at the 34th World Mountain Running Championships in Canillo, Andorra on September 16. Second in the men’s field was Andy Wacker of Boulder in 51:49. David Fuentes placed third and Boulder’s Matt Daniels, running for Hudson Elite, earned fourth in 52:37. The 6.6-mile course climbed 3,200 feet and included grades of up to 48%. Despite the challenging course, the event had more than one thousand registrants. In the women’s race, Allie McLaughlin took top honors in 57:45, while Addie Bracie of Longmont placed third in 1:00:26. (07/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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