Running News Daily

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A higher percentage of men dropped out of the 2018 Boston Marathon than women, here is why

In April, The New York Times published an article explaining why women had been less likely to quit the 2018 Boston Marathon than men.  The author, Lindsay Crouse, reported that 5% of men had dropped out, compared to 3.8% of women. That means the dropout rates had increased almost 80% since the 2017 race for men and just 12% for women.  Crouse spoke to a number of experts in different fields, including elite distance coach Steve Magness, who told her: "Women generally seem better able to adjust their goals in the moment, whereas men will see their race as more black or white, succeed or fail, and   if it's fail, why keep going?"  That is to say, for women, simply finishing the race may be important; for men, winning (or beating their personal best time) may be key. And the implications of this gender difference go beyond marathons, or athletic prowess. Muriel Niederle, a professor of economics at Stanford University, has done extensive research on gender differences in competitiveness. Generally, she's found that men are more likely to enter — and win — competitions than women are.  But Niederle could speculate as to why the Boston Marathon turned out the way it did.  "For women, just the fact that they finish the race has a higher value for them" than it does for men, Niederle told Business Insider. What's more, that's not necessarily something they decide in the moment, midway through the race — it's something they know from the very beginning.  "Women have more to lose in terms of how they think of themselves, or how they think others will view them, when they give up," Niederle said. "That could make it much more costly for her."  That's possibly because of gender stereotypes that suggest women are relatively weak, or not resilient. If they do quit — a marathon or any other kind of competition — they risk playing into those gender stereotypes, she said. (07/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Ram Venkatraman talks about the running scene in India and how important running is to him

RUN THE WORLD: Ram Venkatraman started running in 1997 when he was working in Uganda, East Africa. He had gained some weight and like so many of us could only run five minutes at first. However before long he moved it up to 90 minutes every day for six days a week.  “I ran along the beautiful roads fronting the Victoria River where the source of the River Nile is situated,” Ram says.  Running became a very important part of his life.  “Running is my meditation, my relaxation time. If I don’t run for a week, I start getting irritable. Running has improved my health as I used to get recurring bouts of cold and cough but that has diminished with running,” he says.  His club is the Mumbai Road Runners.  “The club came out of an idea to do a once a month long run along the Mumbai marathon route, basically in order to familiarise ourselves with the route, meet up and greet with friends at the end of the run, have breakfast and go home,” he says.  Subsequently it has grown by leaps and bounds and now have numerous other activities like monthly yoga, football, Frisbee, awards nite, workshops etc.  “We now also fund underprivileged runners by contributing to their registration fees, travel, stay etc.”  The running scene in India has taken off exponentially after the Mumbai Marathon came to India in the year 2004. “Since then there have been numerous marathons and half marathons in all the big cities plus Tier I and Tier II cities as well. Running clubs have sprouted up everywhere – some formal and most informal. People have begun to take running seriously mostly from the health point of view,” says Ram.  Asked what he thought of this challenge.  “It is a fantastic challenge which is bringing together people from all over the world for a single cause. It is magnificent. So many people – elites as well as amateur runners joining to achieve a target is monumental.”    (07/07/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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This Boston Marathon qualifier is going to be run on a track inside the Gillette Stadium, 100 Laps

Boston-area marathon runners and Patriots fans are about to have their biggest dreams come true. Gillette Stadium is hosting its first marathon on Sept. 28. The Boston Marathon qualifier is open to 100 runners. Participants will run more than 100 laps on the warning track around the field. The track is USA Track & Field certified and will be the first Boston Marathon qualifier ever run entirely in a NFL stadium. All runners must meet a $5,000 fundraising goal and the proceeds will benefit the New England Patriots Foundation. The race will begin at 5 p.m. Runners will also be treated to live music and appearances by Patriots alumni and cheerleaders. (07/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Six tips for running and dealing with hot weather this summer

It is a hot summer in many parts of the world.  Yesterday in Palm Springs it was 118 degrees. So how do we deal with this kind of heat? But it is not only the heat, the humidity can be a killer too.  There are a few tricks for beating the heat and getting in your runs this summer. 1. A simple tip - Run at cooler times of the day.  Run in the morning or in the evening. Times to avoid are noon till 3pm. 2. Wear light colored, loose fitting wicking running gear. 3. Run by your effort level rather than your typical pace until you acclimate.  Like a car, if the temperature rises too high you will overheat.  4. It takes about two weeks for your body to adapt to the heat and cool itself more efficiently.  Your body will gradually become better at cooling itself so you can run at your normal pace. 5. If it is just too hot like 119 degrees or if the air quality is bad, take your workout indoors.  Running on a treadmill might be a better idea than pushing yourself in dangerous heat.  6. Hydrate during your run.  For runs shorter than 45 minutes, water is just fine.  However for longer runs you might want to consume a cup of a sport drink every 15 to 20 minutes.   (07/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Former Army Major has been running extreme marathons to battle depression and post-traumatic stress disorder

Former Army Major Rob Shenton has been coping with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Having served in the military for more than 21 years, he was medically discharged in 2016 - but running has always been one of his coping strategies.  He completed the North Pole marathon in April.  The ultra marathon runner has just taken on the 'Race to the King', 53 miles of the South Downs Way that's just the latest on this ex-military man's growing list of epic marathons.  He's battled with depression for more than 18 years and admits it has hampered his life but running continues to help.  He says, "You end up with coping strategies... It's just a matter of realizing what your triggers are and being able to recognize them and being able to cope. "I enjoy running quite a lot... I run every single day. Even if it's half a mile, I'll put my shorts on and my running shoes and go for a jog because I find it lifts my spirits." Through his running, Rob has raised thousands of pounds for the military charity Help for Heroes, which he says continues to support him.  (07/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Running is an important part of who I am but it's not all that I am says Verity Breen

RUN THE WORLD: As a kid Verity Breen ran randomly. "I was beginning to tool my intrinsic nature inside where "the runner" lived," says Verity.   She was the youngest of four adopted children living in Australia.  When Verity was 22 (1989) she was engaged to be married to a guy who was doing the triathlon.  "I followed him when he swam, and swam too," Verity says.  She also started to run with him some nights after work.  "One night I felt a sudden gush of adrenaline and got bored with the pace and took off, beating him back to his parents house.  This was not well received. Anyway, for another reason he called off the wedding."  She got really into the triathlon and in fact in 1991 she was on the National Australia Team at the Triathlon World Championships.  "It was this ton of triathlon racing that lead me to realize that running was the great love.  Here I am three decades later of racing, still in love."  So how important is running to Verity?  "It's the one thing that is always there for you, it picks you up on down days, it carries you along on happy days and it makes me feel fully woke as I am using my entire body and mind as one.  However if you tie your identity up entirely with being seen as a runner you discount your other gifts and interests and are at a loss for who you are if at some points one must rest, recover or not race and be patient.  Running is an important part of who I am but it's not all that I am," she says.  She has run over 150 marathons and one stands out.  "Maybe on a amusing note was my Maui Marathon win in 2012.  My husband came home from work Friday afternoon and I asked him how he would feel about me flying to Hawaii to do a marathon.  He said, sure! When?  I said "tomorrow" he burst out laughing.  So on a cheap flight I managed to get for 300 bucks, he dropped me off with my small bag and wished me luck."  The next morning she was at the start line.  "Early into the hot race on an incredible one way coastal course I found myself in the lead.  Whoa.  With an 8 minute gap till the second female and the entire road to myself I was in racing heaven. As I rolled into the awesome finish chute in first hot as heck but so happy I was just amazed that I had pulled this off."  She is married to Randy. They met at Bondi Beach in Australia and got married exactly one year later.  They have two dogs, has a garden and lives in Northern California.  In 2007 she started Thirty Birds, her own brand of women's running apparel.  Asked about this challenge.  "The Run The World Challenge got my attention.   It's great to be accountable and to connect, to encourage people to move and run and share the challenge of piling up miles together as we virtually circle this amazing globe together one stride at a time.  Moving together. Love it." (07/06/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Ethiopian Buze Diriba Kejela has just confirmed she will be running the Boilermaker 15K

The Elite Field for Sunday’s 41st running of Utica’s Boilermaker 15K has gotten stronger.  Buze Diriba Kejela, 24-year-old from Ethiopia has already won three major road races this season — including the New York City Half-Marathon, the Cherry Blossom 10-Mile Run in Washington, D.C., and the Lilac Bloomsday 12K Run in Spokane, Washington. Diriba Kejela ran her first Boilermaker 15K last year and finished fifth in the Women’s Open field with a time of 49:40. Wacera, the Boilermaker champion in 2014 and 2015, won her third title in four years with a time of 49:18, and she will join Catherine Ndereba as the only four-time winner with another victory Sunday. Diriba Kejela was one of 11,077 women running the New York City Half-Marathon on March 18, and she won that race with a late sprint past American Emily Sisson in a course record time of 1:12.:23. Sisson was only one-tenth of a second back at the finish. Two wins on the Professional Road Running Organzation (PRRO) Circuit — which the Boilermaker is a part of — has put Diriba Kejela in contention for the 2018-19 PRRO Championship bonus. On April 8, she won the Cherry Blossom 10-Mile Run in 53:45; she had finished second in the race the previous two years. On May 6, she finished the Bloomsday 12K with a time of 39:25 and won that race by a single second. (07/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sam Chelanga is retiring from running to enlist in the U.S. Army but why now?

Sam Chalange is going to retire from professional running after finishing 4th at the USATF 10k Championships at the Peachtree Road Race July 4 in Atlanta. Chelanga, 33, is going to enlist in the U.S. Army. On July 29, he will report to Fort Jackson in South Carolina for basic training.  Then it will be off to Officer Candidate School in Fort Benning, Georgia, beginning October 15.   Even though Chelanga says he grew to love running, he was never motivated by medals or glory. He won four NCAA titles and five U.S. titles on the roads as a pro (he became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2015).  Other things were moe important to him, a college degree, helping his family and home village back in Kenya, representing the United States, supporting his wife, Marybeth, and their two sons.  When asked what his proudest accomplishment in running was, he says that it wasn’t a race, but instead the moment when he realized he was actually going to graduate with a college degree “because that is why I started running.” The obvious question is why now? He was the top American finisher at last year’s World Cross Country Championships, finishing in 11th place. This year, Chelanga ran a half marathon personal best of 60:37 in Houston in January, finished 14th at the World Half Marathon Championships in March (again, he was the top U.S. finisher), and won the U.S. 25K title in May. He has plenty left in the tank. Which is precisely why Chelanga felt it was important to join the Army now. “I’ve done everything that I wanted to do in running,” says Chelanga, who achieved personal bests of 13:04 in the 5,000m and 27:08 (still the collegiate record, set in a very famous race where Chris Solinsky ran 26:59 and Galen Rupp 27:10) in the 10,000m. “I’ve got more than I asked for when I came in…I don’t want to wait until I’m old. I feel young, I feel fresh, I feel like I have a lot of energy and I want to take this job when I’m going to serve at the best level of my ability.” (07/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Shelby Houlihan surges past three contenders to win the 1500m while Semenya placed sixth

Shelby Houlihan of the US ran a new PR and set a meet record in the 1,500m at Lausanne Diamond League today, with the UK’s Laura Muir finishing second and the Netherlands’ Sifan Hassan third. Houlihan clocked 3:57.54. Caster Semenya of South Africa was well back, finishing sixth, with a time of 4:00.44. It was the third straight 1,500m win for Houlihan, an Olympic 5,000m runner who is having an incredible outdoor season in 2018, winning the 1,500m at both the Prefontaine Classic on May 26 and the USATF Outdoor Championships on June 23. Semenya holds South Africa’s national record in the event (3:59.92, set at Doha Diamond League in May). She won the 800m and set a new PB, without benefit of a pace rabbit, at Paris Diamond League on June 30 (07/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Carla moved to Rome in 1992 after seeing the movie Roman Holiday

RUN THE WORLD:  Carla van Kampen (57) from Westport Connecticut has lived in Rome, Italy for 26 years now. "I have never stopped feeling like a tourist," Carla says. "When I first came in 1992 Rome was a very different city, a bit gentler in some ways and definitely frustrating in others. Customer service was an unknown concept." However training in Rome was and is a dream. "I workout year-round at the Stadio delle Terme di Caracalla, with spectacular views of the ruins of the Baths of Caracalla! I rarely have to cancel a run because of bad weather, short of a torrid downpour. And the Italians are running crazy with races of all kinds every weekend of the year." she says.  She has been running since she was 11 or 12 years-old, motivated by watching the 1972 Olympics. "We would hold neighborhood 100 yard dashes on the private road flanking our house, boys and girls mixed. I loved the feeling of beating a boy! In high school I ran the 880 and the mile and was the captain of the first girls cross country team under the Title IX rule." Carla did not abandon running but did not run competivity for a few years.  "I only started running competitively again in my late 40s when I decided to run a marathon. To help prepare for the Florence Marathon in 2007 I enlisted the services of my club trainer and the rest is history...we have been together for 10 years (four marathons and more than 20 half marathons later)." Carla, however first love is racing on the track. "In 2012 I made the switch from the road Back to the track with success in my age-group in the 400 and 800 meters, and in June, winning a national 4x400 title in the category 50-54." Asked about this challenge, "The Run The World Global Run Challenge is what I love about running: from the fastest elite-level athlete participating to the non-competitive jogger, we are all part of a community passionate about this sport!" (Photo is from a race in Rome Called the "Miglio di Roma"....they were trying to re-create a 5th Avenue Mile. Carla is in red.) (07/05/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Running does not define Michael T Anderson but it is an integral part of his daily life

RUN THE WORLD: Michael T Anderson started running as a sophomore in college after he quit the baseball team, had put on weight and realized he needed to get back in shape.  "There was a race in November called the Turkey Trot which I wanted to run," he says.  "I trained all summer, losing about 30 pounds in six months."  Michael ended up coming in 8th overall and shocked everyone. "I was totally hooked. A year later in 1978 I ran my first marathon in 2:50 at the New York City Marathon at age 20.  That began a life long love with this sport that has never stopped," he says.   Running is an integral part of his daily life.  "I love running and it is part of my daily life. It doesn't define me, but has provided motivation, focus, competitiveness, dedication and spirit to my life."  He has logged in almost 130,000 miles since he started back in 1977.  He has run 53 marathons and two ultra-marathons.  "My PR is 2:25:02 at the New York City Marathon in 1981."  He has won four marathons and was part of a masters relay team that won the overall masters title at the Hood To Coast Relay (10th overall).  I asked him about being part of this challenge.  "I think this is an amazing endeavor! To show that this can be done with a little organization, determination and passion by so many people who are involved in this sport/activity is beyond description."  Michael (60) has lived in Atlanta GA since 1982.  "I have been married for 31 years to an ex-marathoner, Molly who has a PR of 3:15 and now is an endurance swimmer due to knee problems."  They have two children.  Most recently Michael ran the Peachtree 10K on July 4th logging these miles for Run The World.     (07/05/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Wilson kipsang, Eliud Kipchoge and Zersenay Tadese will face off at BMW Berlin Marathon

Wilson Kipsang is a strong contender.  Now 36, the Kenyan set his world record time of 2:03:23 in 2013 in Berlin. Kipchoge and Kipsang lined up last year with the target of breaking 2:03 as a key objective but such hopes were dashed by steady rain throughout. Kipchoge won in difficult conditions clocking 2:03:32 while Kipsang dropped out do to stomach issues. Another runner to be taken into consideration is Zersenay Tadese of Eritrea, five times a winner of the world half marathon title as well as world record holder for the distance. Eliud Kipchoge has a strong claim to be the greatest marathon runner of all time. He is the reigning Olympic champion, having won the title in Rio in 2016, three times a winner in London (2015, 16 and 18), twice winner of the BMW Berlin Marathon title as well as winner of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in 2014. He finished runner-up in Berlin in 2013 when Wilson Kipsang broke the world record. He broke into new territory in May last year when running 2:00:25 for the marathon distance, achieved on the Formula One circuit of Monza in Italy though substitute pacemakers made the time ineligible as a record. In Berlin on September 16 Eliud Kipchoge is keen to show what he can do in regular competition and under hopefully favorable weather conditions: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on Berlin. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.”  With good weather conditions the world record could fall Berlin.   (07/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tyler Penner says he surprised himself by placing third at the Peachtree 10k today

America’s Tyler Penner surprised himself today at the AJC  Peachtree Road Race 10k.   He wrote, “In such a strong field I didn't know how well I could run. I had been working out alright, but not fantastic. Last week, I felt awful, and my confidence was not where it usually is. All that carried over to the race. I felt terrible in the first half, with doubts creeping into my mind. I was drifting off the back of the back at times, almost just wanting to let them go. I took a few minutes regroup and reset. I told myself, "I've made it this far, be tough, all that strength from the marathon should be kicking in anytime now." Surprisingly that worked. I began to stick my nose in the race, eventually getting to the front truly believing I could win. Unfortunately the speed at the end was not quite there, but it's coming back.”  Tyler finished third clocking 28:49 only four seconds back of Bernard Lagat.  It was a hot and humid day and this is a challenging course.   (07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Many experts consider running to be the closest thing to a miracle drug

Many experts think human bodies are shaped the way they are because we evolved to be extremely effective endurance runners. The shapes of our hips and feet, the length of our legs, our shock-absorbing spinal discs, and our ability to sweat make it possible for us to run mile after mile. So it's perhaps no surprise that running is strongly associated with a number of benefits for our bodies and brains.   As a form of cardio exercise that's easily accessible, running is one of the most straightforward ways to get the important benefits of exercise. Since it improves aerobic fitness, running is a great way to help improve cardiovascular health. Plus, it burns calories and can build strength, among other things. There's also a long list of psychological benefits runners gain from their sport. Getting used to running, if you haven't done it in a while or ever, can be brutal. But once your body and mind start to acclimate, running can be blissful, meditative, and provide a sense of freedom.  One piece of advice from several experienced runners made a big difference during a race when they said: remember that you're running to have fun. (07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Liz Dumon speical moments are training with a buddy when the conversation is your breathing and sounds of your feet hitting the ground

RUN THE WORLD: At the age of 49 Liz Duman joined the gym. Once fit enough she started running and it was love at first run. Running helped her lose 38 pounds.  A year later she ran her first half-marathon. "I live in a small town in South Africa next to the Kruger National Park and the Blyde Canyon," says Lize.  Running has become a very important part of her life.  "I have made the best friends, I love the challenges, grit and achievements. Running has become part of who I am," she says.   She likes running races, however.  "Running races is great, but the most special moments remain those training runs when you run with a running buddy and at times the only conversation is your breathing and sound of your feet hitting the ground."  Liz has been married for 25 years and have three boys.  Asked about why she joined this challenge.  "Run The World Challenge is a fantastic challenge, joining us together across age, gender, proficiency or location to celebrate the one thing we all love - running."  (07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Yuki Kawauchi confirms another marathon and says he wants to match up races to his desire to travel the world

Yuki Kawauchi has confirmed another marathon.  He will run the 33rd annual Huawei Venice marathon October 28.  One of Yuki’s goals is to run 100 marathons under 2:20 and he wants to do that or better in Venice.  He just ran his 80th Sub 2:20 in Australia.  Kawauchi is much loved in the running community for not only winning Boston but in challenging weather conditions, but because he embodies that ideal of an athlete who makes running his hobby.  The marathon runner of the "next door" or the "citizen runner" as many say. He plays extravagantly, as when he ran a half marathon disguised as a Panda or in moccasins, a jacket and a tie. But Kawauchi is above all the man of the records. He is the only athlete in history to have run two marathons in 2:09 within 14 days.  He ran two 2:08 marathons within 42 days.  And he is the only one to have raced for 26 times under 2:12' and 78 times under 2:20.  Since the beginning of this year has already run five marathons (winning four), 11 half marathons, 2 ultras and by the end of 2018 he has plans of running five more marathons including Venice.  "The Venice Marathon has an important double meaning," says Yuki, "my first Italian marathon and my first time in Italy and in Venice. I come to win and I can not wait to do it because, in addition to running, I would like to taste Italian cuisine and your tiramisu that I love. Food and marathon will make this weekend unforgettable. My dream is to run 100 marathons under 2:20." continues Kawauchi, "but what matters most to me is to match races to my desire to travel and get to know the world." (07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Aaron Salvador lives and runs on the Beautiful Island of Palau

RUN THE WORLD: Aaron Salvador says, "Running in Palau is a great experience."  Palau is a little country made up of hundreds of islands in the western Pacific Ocean.  Originally from the Philippines 27-year-old Aaron currently is residing in Palau for the last three years. He works as a full time waiter in a restaurant.

"I love to read books, snorkeling and strolling around the islands with natural sceneries and historical sites," he says.  While in school he discovered that he had potential in running. 

"But because of the ways of life I've been apart of running due to work. But then when I came here to the Pristine Paradise of Palau I started running again and enjoy every mile." He has done a lot of 5K's, 10K's and always finishes in the top three. He also won the 2017 Palau Marathon half marathon the the 2018 full marathon. Asked about running in Palau. 

"I'm not Palauan by blood but in my heart, Palau is my home. There are lots of hills and beautiful sceneries,” he says. Aaron’s passion is running. "After reading the stories of Runners doing the challenge, it gave me reason to join this Run The World Challenge, because I was inspired.  If they can, why can't I. 

“I want to challenge myself to where my capabilities lasts, to test myself and to prove that noting is impossible. With great determination l am aiming for my goals. Ill start, i will go through and I will run until the end."  Aaron set his goal at 50 miles per week and already logged in 10 miles on the first day of Run The World. 

(07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Mission accomplished, a five-time Olympian Bernard Lagat wins AJC Peachtree Road Race

Bernard Lagat wanted to see it again. He was determined to return to Atlanta and win The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race after finishing fifth a year ago. Mission accomplished: With a time of 28:45, Lagat won the 2018 Peachtree Road Race.  “I wanted to come back again, and I wanted to win this,” Lagat said. “So I trained so hard. I decided not to race in some other races before this. My last race was in March. From March until this, there’s a lot of races I missed. But I thought it wouble be worth the sacrifice.” Lagat, a five-time Olympian, prepared for the hill challenges presented in the course. He had a much deeper understanding of it than a year ago. (07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Stephanie Bruce wins the women's elite at the AJC Peachtree Road race

Stephanie Bruce, of Flagstaff, Arizona, won the 2018 Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race. It was Bruce’s first Peachtree win with a time of 32:21, defeating defending champ Aliphine Tulimuk (32:29). The victory also clinched Bruce the USA Track and Field 10K championship. “It was a long time coming,” Bruce said. “I’ve been trying to win a national title for the last 10 years.” Bruce has two sons, Riley and Hudson. She was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2010, but has battled through the condition as one of the country’s top runners. She won first in the Synchrony Financial Rock ‘n’ Roll Arizona Half Marathon in January. She won second in the Freihofer’s Run for Women 5K on June 2, and third in the USATF Outdoor Championships 10,000 meters in June 21. When she crossed the finish line, Bruce dropped to her knees. “It was relief, it was all the years of putting in hard work,” she said. “It was the heat and humidity Atlanta provided. The crowds were incredible. This really is ‘Running City USA.’” (07/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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The RUN THE WORLD Global Run Challenge 1 has Started, the team is 175 strong from 15 countries

The time has come for our 175 strong RUN THE WORLD Global team to start logging miles.  The goal is to login 24,901 miles or 40,072k within 30 days.  “We have put together a strong team,” says Bob Anderson, team leader.  “Our runners come with lots of experience to runners who are just getting started.  We have ultra marathoners capable of running 100 miles in a day, world class runners, past Olympians,  middle distance runners, trail runners, 80 plus runners, kid Runners, coaches, Race directors, recreational runners, marathoners, and more,” says Bob.  Some of the team will be logging in five miles a week while others will be logging in over 130 miles weekly.  “It is the type of team we were looking for.  Once the word got out there, we reached 200 easily.”  We established guidelines we needed to follow.  1. A team can not have more than 200 active runners.  2. There has to be at least one member in each age group, 19 and under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70 plus.  3. At least 25% of the team must be either male or female (mixed team). 4. There needs to be Runners from at least 10 countries.  The runner can either have a passport from that country or live in that country.  5. The first 200 who log miles are on the team after the start date.  Each member have to set a weekly goal, post a short bio and agree to try to reach their goal and log the miles.   6. Miles can either be running, run/walk or walking miles.  Only “real miles” can be posted.  “Our team meets all these guidelines.  I am so proud of all our team members,” says Bob.  What is the mission? First it is a celebration of running.  Second, to inspire others to include running into their daily life.  (This is why we are publishing inspiration stories about our members).  Third, to motivate (Team members set a weekly goal which they want to reach or more.) Four, to bond (bringing Runners from around the world closer together.  “We are Runners” Five, to educate and inform (our My Best Runs website offers advice and reports on the best, most interesting and unique races in the world). “Our team is excited to finally get this under way.”   (07/03/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Walter Cheung runs 70 marathons in Rome and is now determined to inspire others

Walter Cheung, head of communications at Hang Seng Bank, ran his 70th marathon in Rome and is now determined to inspire others. “Without marathons I think I would be very miserable,” he said. “Before marathons, career-wise I had many achievements, but I was not content even as I was enjoying my job. I wanted a breakthrough. I didn’t feel satisfied. I thought of doing something unconventional.” Swerving selfies and mental releases – what to avoid and what to embrace at Hong Kong Marathon. Cheung ran his first marathon in 2002 aged 45 and has not looked back since, racking up finishes all around the world from New York to Everest Base Camp.The hobby gave him a new lease of life, boosting him at work as well as physically. And so, he wants others to experience his joy. “People say I am a running ambassador,” Cheung said. “I don’t want to waste my experience but see if I can help people.” If 10,000 ‘runners’ want to stay in bed, make sure they do so at next year’s Hong Kong Marathon. Cheung said he was inspired by to run by a friend, who shared his joy for the sport. Cheung also read Richard Branson’s autobiography and saw all the projects and adventures the Virgin millionaire embarked on outside his work. Now, he wants to emulate that inspiration for others. After Rome, Cheung became the first Hongkonger to run a marathon in Bhutan. He has one eye on completing 100 marathons. And all the while he hopes people will see that he is running, despite having to balance a high powered job, family life and his commitment to attend church every Sunday. “I feel joyful,” he said. “It is not to inflate my ego, it is to get more people running.” (07/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ray Urbahn is 88-years-old and he will be running his 84th marathon

Ray Urbahn is 88-years-old and staring down his 84th marathon. He's fitter, healthier more active than many people half his age, and says it is all due to the running. Ray runs on average two marathons a year and is planning on running two more this year in Rotorua and New Plymouth. Ray turns 89 in three months and only started running at 46. He was the only 85-89 half marathon competitor at last year's World Masters Games in Auckland and beat people in the 35-39 age bracket, running it in just 2 hours 28 minutes. He estimates he has run almost 100,000km to date, but "it didn't seem that long"."It doesn't seem that far. I'm not worn out, so 97,000km is no big deal, really." (07/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Meghann Stewart reconnected with the joy of competing and training after a 30 year break

RUN THE WORLD: "I use to run at school," says 53-year-old Meghann Stewart, "but it faded from my life."  Then some 30 years later she decided to get fit with a friend and joined a morning Bootcamp.  "12 months later I entered a local Masters Athletics meet in the 200m and 800m and reconnected with the joy of competing, training and running with a bunch of like minded people," she says. Running is a part of her lifestyle in New Zealad and she enjoy all the benefits that come with it. The biggest highlight was entering her first International event in Italy in 2013. "I came second in the 800m and won the 1500m."  She has taken some years off from competing but is hoping to make a come back 2019. "That’s the best thing about the running community, there’s always another event/race to look forward to."  Asked about the Run The World Challenge she wrote. "As soon as I saw the Run The World Global Run Challenge and what it represented I signed up immediately."  She is a Personal Trainer in New Zealand to help, support and encourage everyone to see the benefits of running and include it in their life some way. Meghann is a wife and mother of three children, one dog and a cat. "I do private PT sessions and do commission artwork (oil painting, stencils and fabric art). I enjoy all kinds of functional mobility and did a Yoga teacher training course in 2017."  One of her goals is to achieve a top age-group time for 800m while experiencing as many running opportunities as possible. (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Dakota Wagner two years ago was terrified of the marathon, on June 23 he ran the Black Hills 50 Miler

Dakota Wagner hasn't allowed his asthma to stop him from running a ultra marathon. "Two years ago I was sitting on a bus riding to my first marathon and I was terrified," says Dakota. "Today I’m on my way to the start of my first ultra marathon." The former Jamestown (North Dakota) High School and current UJ runner competed in the Black Hills 50 mile race in Sturgis, South Dakota, on June 23. Wagner placed 27th out of 57 finishers with a time of 12 hours, 51 minutes and 39 seconds. "I was pretty battered by the end," Wagner said, a computer science major. "The climbs tired me out but the descending also destroyed my legs. The day after, on Sunday (June 24), I was having difficulties walking, which is typical."Overall, I think it went really well and I trained pretty hard for that race." Coming into the race, Wagner said his strategy was to consume GU energy gels every 30 minutes to intake 200 calories an hour.  About every seven miles there was an aid station to allow Wagner to eat and drink. "Every time I would get to an aid station I would eat real foods like peanut butter and jelly, chips and Coca-Cola," he said. "You're taking in enough fuel to sustain a run." The course featured six major climbs and a couple of smaller ones. Overall, there was an 8,656-foot elevation gain and a 9,990-foot loss. Despite muddy conditions that caused 41 competitors to drop out early in the race, Wagner cruised through the first 20 miles of the race. But at Mile 32, Wagner's legs hit a wall.Wagner managed to rally and finish the remainder of the race, even though his legs were telling him otherwise. Once he crossed the finish line he celebrated with his "crew" of best friend Alphonse Schoeneberger and brother Dustin.  "I learned more about myself and what I was capable of than all my years of running before this moment. For the first time I felt like I completed exactly what I set out to do, and met all of my expectations and more," Dakota posted on Facebook.  (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Grace Padilla believes running is her fountain of youth

RUN THE WORLD: Growing up being the middle child out of seven kids was challenging for Grace Padilla Leong.   "I didn’t feel notice. I discovered running when I was 12 years old," Grace says.  Her younger brother started running and racing back in 1984.  "I was jealous of him because our parents spoiled him with running gear, eating out, and money when he won races. I wanted to feel special too." She tried the 3,000m steeplechase back in 1995.  "I wasn’t much of a hurdler, but I learned to step over barriers and run fast between them. I got better every time I jumped. I really enjoyed the extra challenge the barriers gave me."   She took pride in almost completely clearing the water barriers.  In 1996, she broke the America record and actually held the World Record before it was recognized.  "I was blessed to compete in the 1996 Olympic Trials in Atlanta, Georgia. Unfortunately, I had the flu and really struggled in the 114 heat during our race," Grace says.   She took time off after this to have a family. Then 16 years later, she decided to try the 2,000m steeplechase as a master runner in the World Masters Championships.  "I was nervous and went out too fast (75 for 400m) this came back to haunt me on the last 300m. I was running world record pace and missed winning by a few seconds. I wasn’t the same brave kid, now I was afraid of the barriers and landed in the middle of the water pit with two feet."  After getting hurt from all the impact from jumping the barriers, she decided to give steeplechasing a break."Running is my life so I make it one of my priorities. I get up early to feed my children, take them to school, feed all our pets. Then I teach part time, followed by coaching at our local high school my children attend. I usually run with my kids, except on the Track interval days. I do my speed work with my husband’s running club, SoCal RoadRunners." Although, she has never played soccer, she is a huge soccer fan.  "My uncle used to have a team when I was a kid and we would cheer for them every weekend."   Asked why she thinks she is such a good runner."When I was a kid I ran to get my parents attention and to make them proud. Then I ran for the awards. Later, ran because I enjoyed winning and the spotlight. Now I run because I love pushing myself and the way running makes me feel. I feel strong, beautiful, and brave! I think what makes me a good runner is the fact that I’m a hard worker! I don’t take any shortcuts. I’ve always been a front runner and I’m not afraid to take chances."  What does this think of this challenge?"This Run The World challenge sounds interesting and I want to be part of something great! Running bring people together world wide, language stops being a barrier."  Grace sums it up well. "Running has been my life and passion for over 35 years.  I believe running is my fountain of youth." (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Ethiopia's Teshome Mekonen set to defend title at 2018 Crazy 8s 8K

The 28th annual Ballad Health and Niswonger Children’s Hospital Crazy 8s 8K road race is slated to begin on the evening of July 14th as part of the Kingsport Fun Fest. The race is continually one of the fastest in not only the Southeast, but the entire world, boasting some of the leading times for 8K all-time. The race will also feature the top three finishers in last year’s race making a return trip to the Model City to chase the world record and the $10,008 world record bonus. A high bar was set earlier this year at the UAE Healthy Kidney 10K in New York, where a certified 8K split of 21 minutes, 45 seconds set the world standard. Last year’s champion Teshome Mekonen has run well this year with a third-place finish at the United Airlines NYC Half Marathon. He will be on the starting line along with Silas Kipruto, Wilson Kibogo and Simion Chirchir. (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Abbey had planned to run just one marathon to cross that off her bucket list

RUN THE WORLD: Abbey Cannon started running when she was 28 because she wanted to cross off "run a marathon" off her bucket list.  "While I succeeded, finishing in 4:24 with only 12 weeks of training, it was a painful experience but I was hooked on running," says Abbey.  She now runs because she enjoys it.   "Running keeps me healthy, happy, and sane, and I also like to run for charities."  She is currently training for the Chicago Marathon to raise money for a dog rescue.  After running her first marathon in almost four and half hours the Boston Marathon was not even a consideration. "I never thought that I could qualify for the Boston Marathon, but I did at age 36 and ran it in 2017. I am also proud to say that, even though it was a small crowd, I placed first female in my first ultra marathon at The San Francisco Marathon last year."  38-year-old Abbey is married, a mom of two and has five dogs.  Plus foster dogs.  She is a pediatric nurse living in the San Francisco Bay area.  Asked about this challenge she wrote,  "I think the Run The World Global Run Challenge is great because it shows that even though we are all at different levels and may run for different reasons, we in the running community from all over the globe can all come together to work for the same goal."  (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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What happend to Yuki Kawauchi? He did run his 80th sub 2:20 marathon at the Gold Coast!

It was hot and humid at the Gold Coast Marathon (Australia) July 1.  It was 65 degrees with 100% humidity.  Not the best conditions for running a marathon.  Yuki Kawauchi said,  "I could not run well." 

He finished 9th clocking 2:14:50.  (Kenneth Mungara won clocking 2:09:49, Kenta Murayama second 2:09:50 and Jo Fukuda third 2:09:52.)  

Yuki posted on Facebook, "But, I achieved my 80th time of sub 2:20 at this race."    "The Australian people were kind to me," Yuki says.

(Photo: Yuki with fan/marathoner Dion Finocchiaro.  Dion ran 2:24:36 a PR for him.  Maybe meeting Yuki gave him that extra push?) 

Yuki's next marathon is going to be the New Caledonia International Marathon August 26.  Their site says, "This is an Olympic-level world-class marathon as runners battle for victory along a spectacularly scenic route winding around Noumea's bays." 

Yuki posted on Facebook, "This race is my important memorial marathon.Because this race was my first oversea race. If I didn't run this race 10 years ago, I might not run oversea races like now.   

I want to build a course record."  Where is this marathon?  Their site says, "Surrounded by the vast expanse of the South Pacific, New Caledonia, with a surface area of 18,564 km², lies to the east of Australia and south of the thousands of islands and archipelagos making up Melanesia and Micronesia."       

(07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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America's Lopez Lomong 10,000m track champion says it would be amazing to win Peachtree 10K too

Fresh off his national title in the 10,000m on the track one week ago, Lopez Lomong (Portland, OR) will compete for a 10 km title on the road for the first time as the AJC Peachtree Road Race will be Lomong’s 10K road debut. At the USATF Outdoor Track and Field Championships last month, Lomong unleashed a furious kick on the final lap to become the only man in history to win U.S. titles in the 1,500m and the 10,000m on the track. “The Peachtree is one of America’s most amazing events,” said Lomong. “It is my honor to come and run the streets of Atlanta. It’s a U.S. championship so it would be amazing to win it, but even to be a participant is massive.” Lomong, the torch-bearer for the United States at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, will join previously announced contenders like U.S. Half Marathon Champion Chris Derrick (Portland, OR), his teammate in the Portland-based Bowerman Track Club and Bernard Lagat (Tucson, AZ), a five-time Olympian who smashed the AJC Peachtree Road Race masters course record (28:42) in 2017. Also in the men’s field are the top two American men from the rain-soaked and raw 2018 Boston Marathon: Shadrack Biwott (Folsom, CA), and Tyler Pennel (Blowing Rock, NC). Reigning USATF 25 km champion Sam Chelanga (Colorado Springs, CO) and 2016 Olympic marathoner Jared Ward (Kaysville, UT) will also compete. Last year’s Peachtree runner-up Shadrack Kipchirchir has withdrawn from the race, as has Abdi Abdirahman. “We are excited to welcome athletes who have won American titles, set American records and represented the United States around the world to Atlanta’s celebration of running and country on July 4,” said Rich Kenah, Executive Director of Atlanta Track Club and Race Director of the AJC Peachtree Road Race. “The AJC Peachtree Road Race has a rich history of crowning the legends of road racing and that history will continue in the race’s 49th running.” (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Boilermaker winners plan to return, Mary Wacera going after a fifth win

“This is my race.” That’s what Mary Wacera was saying here last July, after winning the women’s open title at the Boilermaker Road Race for the third time in four years. Now, according to the 2018 Elite Runner Field released by the Boilermaker, the 29-year-old Kenyan is planning to return to Utica for this year’s July 8 race. And if Wacera wins yet again, she will join Catherine Ndereba as the only four-time Women’s Open champion. The Elite Runner Field is subject to change, but both of last year’s Boilermaker winners — Wacera and Silas Kipruto of Kenya — are expected to return with hopes of defending their 15K titles. Wacera, the Boilermaker women’s champion in 2014 and 2015 and the third-place finisher in 2016, won last year’s race in 49 minutes, 18 seconds. Ruti Aga Sora was the runner-up, just two seconds back, and the 24-year-old from Ethiopia is also coming back this year. (07/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Mike Fanelli (62) has been running nearly every day since he was 14

RUN THE WORLD: Mike Fanelli caught the running bug after watching the 1968 Olympic Games on TV.  "I began competing as a high school cross country runner at age 14. I have run/trained practically every single day since and have a lifetime tally of 109,339 miles," Mike says. 

Over his nearly five decade career there have been many highlights.  A 2:25 marathon PR, a 16:40 100 miler (on the track) and one mile in 4:57 at age 50.  He is originally from Philadelphia and currently lives in the Sonoma Country Wine Country. 

The 62-year-old is a real estate broker representing luxury residential and vineyard properties.  As far as his running these days?  "These days my running tallies 35 to 40 miles a week...at least one of which is done on the track." he says.  He plans on logging in an average of 37 miles per week for the challenge.   

"I found out about the Run The World Global Run Challenge from my pal and 'streak mate' Geoff Smith and figured it'd be fun to be part of a mileage counting team effort," Mike says.

If you follow Mike on FB you know he has an amazing collection of running related material.  "My running archives began with one meet program which I got on March 1st, 1969 at the AAU Indoor National Track & Field Championships...as a 12 year old track nerd at that time, I chased down every single name athlete at that meet and got them to autograph my program...including George Young who only minutes before had set a new world indoors record that night for 3 miles," says Mike proudly. 

The library is now over 4000 pieces in all.  "I hope to donate my collection to an entity that will use it to educate people on the history of running and track & field." 

(07/01/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Australian’s Jack Rayner Took six minutes off his PR to win the Gold Coast Half Marathon

In the Gold Coast Half Marathon men’s race, Jack Rayner added his name to an illustrious list of Australian winners of the ASICS Half Marathon. In another breakthrough performance for the Victorian 22-year-old, Rayner took more than six minutes off his personal best to stop the clock at 1:03:12.

Last month Rayner won the Launceston 10km breaking an 11-year race record. In an exciting duel on the Gold Coast, Rayner broke away from Kenyan William Chebor, the 2009 Gold Coast Marathon winner, with about one kilometre to go and kept increasing the margin. Chebor crossed the line 16 seconds behind in second in 1:03:28 with Victorian 20-year-old Edward Goddard putting in a huge performance to land third place in a massive 5-minute PB of 1:04:07. Collis Birmingham (AUS/VIC) finished fourth in 1:04:28.

(06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sara Hall wins the Gold Coast Half Marathon in Australia today and then will be racing Peachtree on July 4th

Sara Hall (USA) made it back-to-back wins at this morning’s ASICS Half Marathon on the Gold Coast. In an enthralling women’s race, Hall achieved a 10-second personal best (PB) to win a consecutive ASICS Half Marathon in 1:09:27 after also finishing runner-up in 2015. It was also the second fastest performance ever recorded in the ASICS Half Marathon, only behind the race record of Lisa Jane Weightman (1:09:00). Hall, 35, pulled away in the second half of the race from Australia’s Sinead Diver (VIC) who finished second in 1:09:53, a close to two-minute improvement on her previous best. Today’s result was the 40-year-old runner’s third podium finish in the ASICS Half Marathon, having also placed second in 2014 and third in 2016. The Lee Troop-coached Laura Thweatt (USA) filled this year’s podium in third in a PB of 1:10:17.   Sara Hall is running Peachtree 10k on Wednesday.   (06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Philemon Mbaaru wins the Safaricom Lewa Marathon for the sixth time once Rhinos were cleared off the course

Lewa master Mbaaru does it again! Winning sixth Safaricom marathon, Pre-race favorite Philemon Mbaaru lived up to his expectations as he battled tough conditions to clinch the title at the Safaricom Marathon as the 19th edition graced by the First Lady Margaret Kenyatta went down at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy on Saturday. The women’s category saw Jane Ngima take the title in 2:51:36 after flooring Esther Macharia who clocked second in a time of 2:53:41.  Being one of the toughest marathons in the world since its being run in the wilderness, the race delayed for almost five minutes to allow the organisers to clear the Rhinos and elephants on the course. However, that did not affect experienced Mbaaru who cruised to his sixth Safaricom Lewa Marathon men’s title, recording 2:22:21, dropping three seconds from the time he won with last year. The 36-year old beat his close contender Peter Wahome who was second in 2:22:33 while Silas Gichovi settled for third in 2:23:23. Running under scorching sun in the event where wild animals are privileged to be among the spectators, Mbaaru had dismissed claims that he won the race because he clearly knows the course well but attributed stiff competition imposed by Wahome. “The competition was very tough because you never know what to expect from every athlete. The first loop was not bad because I was leading with a big gap but in the second loop the second placed kept me in check, running behind my shoulder but I put more effort to beat him,” Mbaaru, who trains in Nyeri, Nanyuki Highway said. (06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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ASICS have unveiled the world’s first running track to train the mind, the blackout Track in London

The blackout track was developed in collaboration with sports scientists and top coaches to remove all distractions and encourage runners to focus on synchronising the mind and body, and runners have been trialling the first race track.  It is a custom-built course in London and the circuit – one lap is 150m – is dark apart from one spotlight trailing the athlete. The track’s absence of sound, technology, scenery and even a finish line means runners can focus their mind on each step. The “ASICS Blackout Track” was developed in collaboration with sports scientists and top coaches.  Researchers included Professor Samuele Marcora, the director of research at the University of Kent’s School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, and Dr Jo Corbett, leader of the Human Performance and Health Research Group at the University of Portsmouth. In addition, ASICS ambassadors Chevy Rough, a mind coach who works with leading athletes, and Jan Erik Kruse, a lead ASICS frontrunner, also helped to shape the various experiences on the track. Three runners, with a range of athletic abilities, completed 66 laps in near darkness as part of a 10km “mental marathon” – pacing the track without any of their usual running comforts. Olympic medallist and marathon record holder Deena Kastor (USA) ran the fastest time in just 37 minutes and 16 seconds. (06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Phil Camp is a lifetime runner with plenty of cool stories to tell

RUN THE WORLD: Phil Camp (70) was a former aviator at the United States Navy.  He now lives in Chula Vista, CA with his wife Judy who is a top master tennis player.  This photo of Phil running a mile in a track meet on the ship the Coral Sea was taken in 1974.  During his running career he has qualified for Olympic Marathon Trials three times starting in 1972.  He has won five marathons including Nike OTC (73) and Marine (79).  He says, "I didn’t get into masters running Stateside until age 45 because I was living in Sicily, then the Philippines my last two tours in the Navy."  As a master runner in 1993 Phil was second overall at the Carlsbad Marathon.  At the Carlsbad 5k he placed first 45-49 in 1993 and 1st 50-55 in 2000.  Phil continued to push as the years went by.  However, just after he turned 60 his ankle started hurting.  "It turned out to be a fallen arch," he says.  "A foot surgeon told me I was done running, but my podiatrist said he could keep me going at fewer miles with newer orthotics."  Another "age challenge" was dealing with his heart health.  "I had experienced coronary artery disease at 58 and got two stents," he says.  "The heart rhythm issue was a complete mystery to me."  He started taking long bike rides and he started wearing a heart rate monitor.  "A cycling friend told me that everyone he knew with similar symptoms had a pacemaker. That night I wore my HR monitor to bed and watched my HR drop to 33-35 bpm.  I drove myself to the ER around midnight and they told me I wouldn’t be leaving without a pacemaker."  It was February 2016, he was 68-years-old, and he got a PM.  "Running has never quite been the same since just before and after the PM. I get very fatigued if I run faster than 8:30 per mile," Phil says.  But he is still gets in his runs but just slower these days.  "I’m excited to be in the Run the World Challenge! I will slow down to whatever pace I have to to contribute my 15-20 mi each week, I’m just so happy to be included with such a large diverse group of runners."  Phil has many running stories to tell and this one is about Bill Rodgers.   "I knew Bill Rodgers was going to be at the Azalea Trail Run and being a local runner at the time I was too.  I took the race out fast for me, 9:36 at the 2 mi. Somewhere before 3 mi, Bill finally caught up. He said he left the line with the pack and wondered who was in the lead. One of the guys said, “that’s Phil Camp!” He said he had read an article in Runner's World several years before and figured he’d better not let me get too far ahead.  We shared the pace for awhile and then he slowly pulled away! Three years later when I was stationed in the Philippines I got a free military flight to Korea and managed to talk my way into the Seoul Marathon. They doubted that I had run a 2:13 but allowed me to enter. The next morning I showed up among maybe 10,000 runners with no idea how to stash my warm ups. Then a bus pulled up near the start line and all the elite runners including Bill stepped out to mingle with the crowd.  I waved at Bill and he told me to jump on the bus. They took us to a locker room with a track nearby for warm up and then back to the start ahead of the masses. Bill said he wasn’t running fast.  He was just there to run with his fiancée and attend the after party. I ended up 10th in a 2:19, my 3rd marathon in two months! Never forgot Bill’s kindness, one of the nicest guys I’ve ever met!" Phil has a lot of good running stories. (06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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New Belfast City Marathon route in 2019 will touch every part of the city

Next year will see a new look Belfast City Marathon after councillors agreed to changes to the iconic race’s route and usual race day at City Hall on Wednesday. The council’s City Growth and Regeneration Committee approved the plans with broad, cross-party support for the new look event, which for decades has seen thousands descend upon Northern Ireland’s capital city each May. Typically costing around £600k annually, the Belfast City Marathon normally takes place on a Bank Holiday Monday, however next year the starter’s pistol will go off on a Sunday morning. Chair of the City Growth committee, SDLP representative Donal Lyons, said the marathon is a great family day out and the 2019 routes should benefit local traders. "The change of day will go down well, because it will allow Sunday marathon runners the day to recovery on Monday and hopefully give Belfast a potential boost for the our tourism trade," he added. Sinn Fein's new council group leader Ciaran Beattie spoke following the meeting and said his party hope "route number one" of the two proposed routes will now go through a successful public consultation with few, if any, speed bumps. "We're really happy, this will be the most balanced marathon yet in terms of geography and it will touch every part of our city," he said. (06/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Running 31 Marathons in 31 days while working full time? impossible? Not for Harold Allen

When most people decide to run seven marathons in seven days or 30 marathons in a month, they usually take time off from work. Not 36-year-old Harold Allen, a Georgia man who works a minimum wage job as a surgical orderly. The hardworking father of four daughters skimped on sleep in order to run 31 marathons (26.2 miles, not actual races) in 31 days to raise money and awareness for mental health. He came up with the month-long challenge because he wanted to raise money for Samaritan Counseling Center of Southwest Georgia, which provides extensive therapy options for adults, teens, children and families. He set up a GoFundMe page, with a goal of raising $2,000. In the end, he raised nearly $3,800 for the organization. So, why run 812.2 miles in 31 days and sleep for just three hours a night on top of working full-time and raising a family (his youngest daughter was born two weeks into this challenge, by the way)? For him, the answer was easy: May was Mental Health Awareness month, and his struggle with depression in the past made him realize how important good mental health care is. (06/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Lamar Perlis, 93 is not the fastest but will be the oldest male running the Peachtree 10K July 4th

Some runners are motivated by a desire to record personal-best times in every race they complete. Others are inspired by the idea that their favorite snacks are waiting just beyond the finish line. Lamar Perlis is unfazed by either of these things. He keeps moving to avoid an imaginary street sweeper. “I picture this enormous street sweeper at the end of the race,” he said. “I just keep thinking to myself, ‘Lamar, just stay well ahead of that street sweeper.’ That’s going to be constantly on my mind. I don’t care how fast I run as long as it’s faster than that street sweeper.” At 93, Perlis may not be the fastest participant, but he is the oldest male competitor running  in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race July 4.  He won the 90 plus division in 2016, finished second last year and will try to reclaim his title this Fourth of July. (06/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Becca Pizzi has run 7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents twice and never gets injured

RUN THE WORLD: Becca Pizzi ran her first race when she was six years old.  Now 38 she has run over 70 marathons in 33 states.  "I love running, sharing my passion, and inspiring others," Becca says. She has run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days, twice.  “I ran the World Marathon Challenge in 2016, to make history," she says. She was the  first US woman to complete this challenge.  She went back in 2018 to hopefully lower her time.  "I love to run and I love to travel; this is my favorite race."  She beat her 2016 time setting a new world best performance clocking 6 Days 7 Hours and 58 minutes this year.  "My daughter was at the finish line and ran the last 100 yards with me. She was my biggest inspiration to get me to the finish as fast as I could. I will never forget that moment."  Becca has many things going and she loves every minute of it.  "My life is like a puzzle. I own a Day Care, I manager an ice cream shop, my daughter is 10-years-old, I am a motivational speaker,  I coach my daughters soccer team, a kids Tri team,  I started the Belmont Track Club and a kids track club."  What she is most proud of is the Becca Pizzi 5k (now in the third year) in her hometown.  The proceeds go to graduating seniors.  "It is my chance to give back to the community. I love all that I do and don't ever feel overwhelmed."  Asked about this challenge.  "I am excited to log my miles with RUN THE WORLD. I whole heartedly believe in Bob's mission."  She runs a lot of miles and has never been injured.  What is your secret?  "I listen to my body. When I feel good I go for it, when something is tweaking I back off."  We know you love deserts? "I have my own ice cream flavor named after me, Becca7. I try to eat healthy and hydrate especially leading up to a marathon. I have a weak spot for Swedish Fish." she says.  Becca lives in Belmont, Mass with her husband Joe and her daughter Taylor.  "Lets circle the world," Becca says. (06/29/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Yuki Kawauchi may face rain at the Gold Coast Marathon but nothing like Boston

This Sunday, Yuki Kawauchi is likely to face the rain again as he competes in the 40th edition of Australian’s Gold Coast marathon, an IAAF Gold Label event. But nothing like what runners experienced in Boston with the biting winds and slippery roads. Mild and relatively still weather is forecast for race morning. It will be warm – with the temperature tipped to rise to just over 68F (20C) but nothing like as hot as the Commonwealth marathoners experienced. Kawauchi will be competing in his seventh straight Gold Coast marathon and chasing his second victory. His only win came in 2013, but he has three more podium finishes and has never finished outside the top eight. Kawauchi will need to be on his A-game, however, as two other recent winners are in this year’s line-up – last year’s victor, Takuya Noguchi and race record holder and two-time winner Kenneth Mungara. Actually, there are at least five former winners starting in this 40th edition of the race – Eric Sigmont, winner of the inaugural race in 1979, and 1990 Commonwealth Games 5000 metres champion Andrew Lloyd, who won in 1980, are also in the field. (06/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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New Zealand's Mike Stewart has run 565 marathons and isn't planning on quitting any time soon

He brings color to every event he attends, but the man they call "Mad Mike" has a black and white outlook for his running future. Joining 300 participants from as far afield as Hawaii, 66-year-old Mike Stewart completed his 565th marathon at the Monaco Mid-Winter event on Sunday. His first marathon was as an 18-year-old in Wellington's Olympic Handicap event on January 28, 1970, back when distances were still measured in miles and women were still limited to spectator roles. In 1988, he clocked his best time, 2:59:07.   In 2012, he completed his 500th marathon.  On Sunday, he entered the finishing chute in 5h 50m 48s. "Most are just marathons but I remember the first one and the 100th and when I broke the three hour – the others you have to look at the certificate to see if you'd done it." All but two of his marathons since that day have been run in New Zealand. Stewart said he only attended two events on the Gold Coast in Australia because his brother lived there. Over the last 48 years, the Naenae, New Zealand resident has run a total of 23,843km. That's equivalent to running the length of New Zealand 15 times, more than the total length of the Great Wall of China or, in Forrest Gump terms, five and a half times across the width of the United States. Stewart is believed to hold the Southern Hemisphere record for most marathons completed, not that such achievements drove him to pound the pavement. (06/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Harvey Lewis On Track To Set Record For the 2,189 mile Appalachian Trail

Harvey Sweetland Lewis has covered over 1,370 miles and 60% of the iconic Appalachian Trail since May 30th, and is nearing record setting pace to arrive in Mount Katahdin, Maine on July 14th. This Fastest Known Time (FKT) has become one of the most contested, coveted accolades in ultra running and has been broken in recent years by Scott Jurek and Carl Metzler. Joe “Stringbean” McConaughy set the current record last summer in 45 days, 12 hours and 15 minutes. Harvey’s support team has been led by his 78-year-old dad and includes countless friends, family, fellow ultra runners and strangers who have been encouraging him along the trail and on social media. Road iD has joined Harvey to document his journey. “The man who has no imagination has no wings,” are the words that drive high school teacher Harvey Lewis as he searches within himself to complete the most challenging test of his life. His accomplishments include winning Badwater, the 135-mile ultra marathon in Death Valley, considering by many as The World’s Toughest Race. His latest pilgrimage began in the early morning on May 30th, 2018, with his dad and a small film crew, set out from Springer Mountain in Georgia on waterlogged trails through torrential downpour while navigating several mudslides. For Harvey Lewis these obstacles are opportunities, as he speaks prior to the start, “Pushing yourself to extreme limits, this is when the greatest growth happens.” “When I was dealing my injuries last week, the Achilles pain, the tendinitis, the foot soreness. I was beginning to think these injuries would sideline me,” shared Harvey Lewis as he had just completed one of the most grueling sections of the Appalachian Trail on June 24th. “This has been my toughest ultra and I didn’t quit because I knew there were people counting on me, these amazing friends and strangers have made all the difference. Now, I’m feeling 90% and ready for whatever’s in store.”  Harvey posted on FB before the start.  "The opportunity to have the experience of a lifetime with my father on a journey we never would have imagined. The love of the wilderness and need to push myself to new places has inspired the seed."  Photo: Assistance on the trail comes in many forms.  Here 30 days in with Alann Lopes. (06/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Rosaura Tennant says running is like a vitamin or medicine done daily

RUN THE WORLD: Rasaura Tennant was born in Costa Rica in a little town she calls the jungle.  "It was a very remote town without electricity, potable (piped) water, hospital, or roads," she says.  "That meant no cars or even bicycles.  We had to walk a lot, and if we were going far with heavy things, then we had to ride a horse or go the distance by boat."  She is number thirteen of fifteen kids and even though the conditions were hard it was a very happy family.  "My mother didn’t have help, so we all had to do chores at home, she was also a tailor and a midwife," Rosaura says.  "My father was a farmer and a carpenter. He built our house and many other houses in our little town."  When she was 20 they finally got electricity followed by potable water.  More recently the town caught up with the rest of the world.   "Now in my ‘little jungle’ almost everybody has a cellphone and some of the finer things of life."  She did start running while still living in Costa Rica but nothing longer than the half marathon.  "I was very intimidated by the marathon. It wasn’t until I was living in the USA when I ran my first marathon at the age of 47. I ran the Portland marathon with a time of 3:37," she says.  She has run a lot of races.  "I have lost track of the number of half marathons, 10Ks and 5Ks I have run during my running career… but I know it’s a pretty big number.  I have run a total of 24 marathons including five Bostons and one 50K."   She decided to join the Forward Motion Race Club (FMRC) in Danville.  "This is where I had the opportunity to run with more experienced runners and was able to learn from these athletes.  My times definitely improved, a lot."  She has a very supportive husband and a flexible work schedule that allows her to do what she loves.  "Running is part of my daily life. Running is like a vitamin or medicine.  If I don’t take it (run)… I start feeling not myself. Running makes me feel free and fulfilled."  She thinks our Run The World is a great idea.  "The fact that people around the world can join and commit to log their runs just to accomplish our goal means a lot throughout the running community; this tells us how supportive we can be without knowing each other," says 58-year-old Rosaura.  The Run The World Challenge starts July 4th and the goal is to reach 24,901 miles in 30 days.  Rosaura is looking at logging an average of 37 miles weekly. (06/28/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Olympic Triathon gold medalist, Gwen Jorgensen is set to race the AJC Peachtree Road Race

2016 Olympic triathlon gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen will chase a national title at the AJC Peachtree Road Race on July 4 in Atlanta, which for the second consecutive year will serve as the USATF 10 km Championship for men and women. Jorgensen, the reigning Olympic triathlon champion as well as the 2014 and 2015 World Champion has retired from triathlon to pursue professional running. “I am thrilled to be racing in the AJC Peachtree Road Race,” said Jorgensen. “I am really excited to race the 10K on a hot and hilly course.”  The 49th AJC Peachtree Road Race is one of the nation's most recognizable Independence Day traditions. Jorgensen, whose 10K road personal best is 32:12, will face defending AJC Peachtree Road Race champion Aliphine Tuliamuk (Flagstaff, AZ), who has won U.S. titles this year in the 25K and the half marathon. They will compete against previously announced athletes such as Sarah Pagano (Boston, MA), last year’s runner up; Stephanie Bruce (Flagstaff, AZ), who placed third in the 10,000m in Des Moines and Sara Hall (Flagstaff, AZ) whose 2:26:20 at the 2018 Ottawa Marathon made her the 10th fastest American woman of all time in the marathon. (06/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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A cancer survivor is running 380 miles, from the Boston Harbor to Lake Ontario

Cancer survivor is running 380 miles, from the Boston Harbor to Lake Ontario and Wednesday was day six of 12. When she reached the steps of the state capitol in Albany Wednesday afternoon, she officially hit her halfway mark. Davina McNaney has been running long distance for years. In 2012 she ran her first ever ultra-marathon, 40 miles to celebrate her 40th birthday. One month later she had her first ever mammogram and that came with a cancer diagnosis. "It was very, very frustrating and this is what I can do to overcome all of that,” Davina said. Without a second thought, she had a double mastectomy and within four months she was officially cancer free. Since then she's been determined to take action and fight against breast cancer. "Running is my strength and so I want to use it to highlight the research that the foundation funds is really key. So if I can come out here and sacrifice myself and encourage people to donate, I'm helping people and that's how I can give back,” Davina said. "One morning, I woke up and I said I want to run home." So she did exactly that, traveling 480 miles across four states from Michigan to her hometown of Sodus Point, New York. After their move to Medway, Massachusetts, she was up for another challenge. This journey is 380 miles, but much steeper with some 18,000 feet of elevation. (06/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Bertrand Newson aka Coach B gets immense pleasure encouraging others to get active

RUN THE WORLD:  Bertrand Newson (Coach B) has always enjoyed sports and outdoor activities.  "After turning 40," he says, "I found myself looking to expand my fitness interest. There were several close friends that enjoyed running, but I had always been reluctant to join them due to lack of confidence in my running ability. 

"It wasn’t until the beginning of 2011 that I decided to give running a try. I recall attempting to run a mile without stopping before my birthday in March and I was very disappointed with my effort." Bretrand says.  

It was clear to him in order to become a better runner he would need to commit to a regular training schedule.  "March of 2011 was my first "timed" running event as a member of a four person marathon relay team.  From that point on running became a passion for me."  

It was later that year the idea to start a team came to mind.  Team Too Legit To Quit (2L2Q) was founded with fellow original members: Jim Cordoba, Chis Smith, Bernardo Newson, Demetrius Coats and Jabari Sims.  

"Our team has grown immensely over the last six years as we have over 700 members," he says.  Becky Hernandez joined 2LTQ in 2011.  "Becky played a vital role in the overall growth, leadership and being a true visionary inspiring so many along the way," Bertrand says. 

Asked why he joined the Run The World team.  "I love the spirit behind the “Run the World Challenge” as the running community is incredible supportive.  The teamwork aspect of this challenge is very compelling and I cannot wait to share the journey with my fellow RTWC teammates."  

Bertrand loves the Bay Area and works in San Francisco as a General Manager of two hotels in the Union Square area.  Promoting his passion is what is very important to him.  "I will continue to encourage others to embrace a healthier active lifestyle and having a social impact on the local community for those less fortunate.  I’ve experienced many satisfying moments and accomplishments involving sports, however, there’s nothing like completing a race/event when family and friends are participating. One of my biggest sources of inspiration and motivation is my younger brother Bernardo who underwent a successful kidney transplant in 2007.

"We’ve shared some of our proudest moments as siblings participating side by side in fitness events and crossing finish lines in 5K’s, 10K’s, half marathons and challenging obstacle courses.  "I get an immense amount of joy and satisfaction by organizing group fitness events and encouraging people to get active and see them appreciate the health benefits by doing so (weight loss, reduced stress, improved level of confidence and more energy)."

(06/27/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Good hard training is more important than diet says Ultra legend Frank Bozanich

RUN THE WORLD: "I discovered running as a very young child as play and way to get places. I ran track in HS and College," says 74-year-old Frank Bozanich who currently lives in Reno, Nevada.  His last overall ultra marathon win was when he was 69.  In 1976 he won the AAU National 50 Mile Championship clocking 5 hours 36 minutes.  In all he won three National 50 mile titles, two at 100k.  In 1979 he set the American 100K record clocking six hours 51 minutes.  I asked him about injuries.  "I have been injury free all these years other than a couple hamstring situations when I was sprinting.," Frank says.  "I attribute this to having a strong physical body.  When I was a young lad I was working on crab fishing and salmon fishing boats.  I helped my dad pull in crab pots (traps) by hand. I continue with physical work in wrestling and has a Marine. I have always maintained a strong overall body."  I knew we had found another good Run The World team member.  "I love the idea of the Run The World Challenge. It is fantastic way to join the world together in a different way. It is something we can all do..." Frank enjoys running as much as he did when he was young.  "I understand that age takes a toll on speed and endurance. but I still love running.  I have enjoyed working with and helping new runners and think we should impart what knowledge we have to help others improve and enjoy the sport so they can have a better quality of life in their elder years." How about diet?  "I love eating good fresh Dungeness Crab when I can get it and also fresh wild caught salmon (no farm raised). I also eat whatever I want, no special diet. I eat good and well balanced foods, my wife of 51 years is a great cook."  What is your secret for success?  "The good hard training is more important than the diet," he says.           (06/27/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Boston Marathon Champ Des Linden will Run 2018 TCS New York City Marathon

The New York Road Runners announced 2018 Boston Marathon champion and two-time U.S. Olympian Des Linden will run the 2018 New York City Marathon on Sunday, Nov. 4.

In April, Linden, 34, became the first American woman in 33 years to win the Boston Marathon despite battling rainy and cold conditions. Last year's New York City Marathon was won by Shalane Flanagan, who became the first female American champion in the race in 40 years.

Flanagan, 36, contemplated retirement after her win but decided to run the 2018 Boston Marathon, where she finished sixth. Flanagan has yet to commit to a fall marathon.

Linden is looking to become the first woman to win the Boston Marathon and New York City Marathon in the same year since Norway's Ingrid Kristainsen in 1989.

(06/27/2018) ⚡AMP
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Volunteer of the Year Joe Wilczynski has also run all 40 Boilermaker 15k's

This year’s Boilermaker Volunteer of the Year is Joe Wilczynski, who has been the coach of WKTV’s Go The Distance for all 22 years of the training program. “He’s very deserving of this and we were honored to give it to him,” said Boilermaker Race Director Jim Stasaitis. Joe has run every single Boilermaker 15K since the race’s inception, making him one of the ten Perennials who have run all 40 Boilermakers, for a total of 372 official Boilermaker miles logged. “If you added up all the mileage with the running he does, with the Go the Distance group starting out with the 10-week, 12-week course, he's probably run it more than a hundred times,” Stasaitis said. Joe is the heart of the Go The Distance program, inspiring a new generation of runners each year. Many of them go on to join the Mohawk Valley Hill Striders running club, which was created by Joe and other former Go The Distance runners. Joe serves as president of the club. “He gives the proper instructions to all these beginners, and actually, there are some veteran runners who could probably learn from him," Stasaitis said. “Joe was there every step of the way with me,” said Rose Butler, a Go The Distance volunteer who was a member of the 2006 GTD class. “He helped me complete the Boilermaker. I couldn't have done it without him.” More than 200 people have crossed the Boilermaker finish line thanks to Joe’s guidance. But he would never take the credit, because that’s the kind of guy he is. “He is a huge supporter of the running community, huge supporter of all the runners. All the people with Go The Distance and the Mohawk Valley Hill Striders,” Stasaitis said. (06/27/2018) ⚡AMP
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