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Eliud Kipchoge and Caterine Ibarguen were named World Athletes of the Year at the IAAF Awards

Kipchoge underlined his status as the world’s most dominant distance runner. The 34-year-old Kenyan won the London Marathon in April in 2:04:17 to finish comfortably ahead of one of the deepest marathon fields in history. Five months later, he won the Berlin Marathon in 2:01:39 to smash the world record. His time in the German capital was 78 seconds faster than the previous world record, representing the biggest single improvement on a men’s marathon world record since 1967. Not content with being the best triple jumper in the world, Ibarguen also tested herself against the world’s best in the long jump this year – and consistently came out on top in that too. The 34-year-old Colombian won both horizontal jumps at the Central American and Caribbean Games, the IAAF Continental Cup and at the IAAF Diamond League finals – winning the latter two titles in two different cities within the space of 24 hours. She was unbeaten in all eight of her triple jump competitions, ending the year with a world-leading mark of 14.96m in her specialist event and a national record of 6.93m in the long jump. (Wed 5) ⚡AMP
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Leul Gebrselassie wins the Valencia Marathon clocking an outstanding 2:04:30

Leul Gebrselassie smashed the Spanish all-comers Record at the Maraton Valencia Trinidad Alfonso, an IAAF Gold Label road race, in the eastern Spanish city on Sunday December 2. Running for just the second time over the distance, the 25-year-old Ethiopian clocked 2:04:30 to finish almost a full minute inside the previous Spanish all-comers record set at this race last year. In a race of exceptionally strong depth, the top-three athletes dipped below 2:05 and no fewer than six men ran under 2:05:30, a figure only bettered in the Dubai marathon this season. In the women’s race Ethiopia’s Ashete Dido obliterated the course record and her previous best in 2:21:14 to take a commanding victory ahead of Kenya’s Lydia Cheromei, the leader for much of the race. Boosted by five pacemakers, the men’s opening splits were quite fast with the large heading group going through the five and 10-kilometer points in 14:48 and 29:47 respectively. By then, all the main favorites – Gebrselassie and the Kenyan pair of Mathew Kisorio and defending champion Sammy Kitwara – ran close together in ideal weather conditions of 55F (13C) and very slight wind.  Leul’s time is the fifth fastest winning time of marathons run over the last 12 months according to My Best Runs.  Only Berlin (2:01:39), Dubai (2:04:00), Amsterdam (2:04:06) and London (2:04:17) were faster.  2018 is clearly the best marathon year ever. (Sun 2) ⚡AMP
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Yemane Tsegay of Ethiopia returns to regain the title he won in 2016 at the 72nd Fukuoka Marathon

Two years ago, Tsegay stopped Patrick Makau from winning a third straight title at this race. Last year he finished a distant 26th in 2:18:05, slowed by a sudden back problem that hit him after five kilometres. In May he won the Ottawa Marathon with 2:08:52, has a personal best of 2:04:48 set in Rotterdam in 2012 and took silver at the 2015 World Championships in Beijing. He trains with this year’s Chicago Marathon runner-up Mosinet Geremew and Shanghai winner Seifu Tura, boding well. The man who beat Tsegay in Beijing, Ghirmay Ghebreslassie, is also in the race. Ghebreslassie was fourth at the 2016 Olympic Games and won the New York City Marathon later that year. He set his personal best of 2:07:46 earlier that year, at the London Marathon. However, he’s failed to finish the last three marathons he started: New York, Dubai and London. He said he was hampered by injury in 2017 and early 2018, but is back on track now. “My training after London is going well,” he said. Vincent Kipruto, the runner-up at the 2011 World Championships, is also in the field. His best of 2:05:13 dates back to the 2010 Rotterdam Marathon, but more recently clocked 2:06:14 at the 2017 Berlin Marathon. Amanuel Mesel of Eritrea has run well here in the past, finishing fifth at both the 2016 and 2017 editions of the race. Although not an invited runner, Brett Robinson of Australia, a pace maker last year, is said to be in strong shape and ready for a fast performance in his debut over the distance.  2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi is also running and posted this on FB.  "I will run Fukuoka international open marathon Sunday. I ran this race 8 times( include 3 times of sub 2:10). I love this race and this city and people of Fukuoka. I believe I can end my bad flow of marathon since this summer," Yuki posted a few hours ago.  (Fri 30) ⚡AMP
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Salpeter smashes the course record in Florence and sets a new national record for Israel

Lonah Chemtai Salpeter smashed the course record at the 35th ASICS Firenze Marathon, an IAAF Bronze Label road race, on Sunday (25). The reigning European 10,000m champion clocked 2:24:17 to clip nearly four minutes from the previous record of 2:28:15 set by Slovenia’s Helena Javornik in 2002. Her performance was also a national record for Israel, shattering the 2:35:59 standard set by Elena Dolinin in Berlin two years ago. Salpeter dominated the race, winning by more than six minutes over Kenyan Caroline Chepkwony.  Salpeter took the lead in the early stages, running with Gebiyanesh Gedamu from Ethiopia and Clementine Mukandanga from Rwanda, the trio passing 10 kilometres in 34:37 and 15 in 51:42. Salpeter and Gedamu reached the halfway mark in 1:12:38, but the Israeli started pushing the pace, building a gap of eight seconds over Gedamu (1:26:04 to 1:26:12) by 25 kilometres. Salpeter continued to pull away, extending her gap over Gedamu to one minute at 30 kilometres (1:43.16) and to more than four minutes five kilometres later, propelled by a 6:30 two-kilometre split between kilometres 33 and 35. She covered the challenging second half in 1:11:39 for a negative split to smash her previous personal best by 16 minutes. Her 2:24:17 performance was the sixth fastest time ever run on Italian soil and the fastest by a European this year. Salpeter set her previous best of 2:40:16 in Berlin in 2016, but recently showed good form with a half marathon PB of 1:07:55 in Lisbon in October. This year she made her breakthrough improving all her career best times on the track running the 3000m in 8:42.88, the 5000m in 15:17.81, the 10,000m in 31:33.03 at the European 10000m Cup in London last May. She won the 10000m European title in Berlin in 31:43.29. “The crowd gave me strong support along the course,” said Salpeter, who grew up in Eldoret, Kenya, and moved to Israel in 2008. “I did not fear the rain, because I was ready with any condition. Firenze is the springboard event of my marathon career.” Chepkwony clocked 2:30:46 for second ahead of Mukandanga who clocked 2:30:59 to knock nearly five minutes from her previous lifetime best. Croatia’s Nikolina Sustic improved her PB to 2:41:51, finishing fourth.  (Sun 25) ⚡AMP
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European 10,000m champion Lonah Chemtai Salpeter will be in the spotlight at the 35th edition of the Asics Firenze Marathon on Sunday

The 29-year-old has this year set Israeli records at various distances from the 1500m to the half marathon and she will be looking to add another to her collection this weekend. Before winning the continental 10,000m title in Berlin, she set a European-leading national record of 31:33.03 to win the European Cup in London in May. At the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships Valencia 2018 earlier in the year she set a national record of 1:08:58 and reduced that mark to 1:07:55 in Lisbon last month. Salpeter is yet to fully master the marathon, though. She has completed three marathons to date – her one failure to finish came at the 2016 Olympic Games – and her finishing times have all been between 2:40:16 and 2:40:22, a surprisingly consistent series of times for someone who appears capable of going much quicker for 26.2 miles. This weekend Salpeter is aiming at improving the course record of 2:28:15 set in 2002 by Helena Javornik. She could even challenge the European-leading time of 2:25:25 set by European champion Volha Mazuronak. Salpeter will take on Kenya’s Caroline Jepchirchir Chepkwony, who set her marathon PB of 2:27:37 in Lubljana in 2013, Ethiopia’s Ayele Gebaynesh, who has a career best of 2:26:54, and Kenya’s 2:27:07 performer Sarah Jebet. Croatia’s ultramarathon specialist Nikolina Sustic will run her fourth Italian race this autumn after Venice, Turin and Verona. The world 100km champion set a marathon PB of 2:42:44 at the European Championships in Berlin, improved to 2:42:10 in Turin at the start of November and last week clocked 2:42:26 in Verona. (Fri 23) ⚡AMP
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Joshua Cheptegei sets a new 15K world record clocking 41:05 in Nijmegen Netherlands

Joshua Cheptegei, 22, set a new world record for 15k.  The Ugandan distance athlete ran the 15K Sunday morning in 41:05 in Nijmegen, Netherlands at the Seven Hills Run. This is the third men’s world record to fall on the roads in 2018. Eliud Kipchoge clocked 2:01:39 for the marathon world record in Berlin, then Abraham Kiptum’s set the half-marathon world record of 58:18, and now Cheptegei’s 15K world record. Cheptegei took 8 seconds off of the previous mark. The Ugandan runner took the lead from the beginning, tiring his pacers out before the 5K mark, but managed to finish strong on his own. This was the runner’s fourth win at the Seven Hills Run. He closed his race in a solo 2:37 kilometre and averaged 2:44 for the entire run. (Tue 20) ⚡AMP
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Sub-2:20 runners Sarah Chepchirchir and Yebrgual Melese will face one another in the women’s race at Shanghai International Marathon

Ethiopia’s Melese trimmed more than three minutes off her PB to finish third in Dubai in 2:19:36. She also clocked 2:27:47 to finish second at the Yellow River Estuary International Marathon in Dongying, China. Sunday’s race will be her third marathon of the year. The 34-year-old Chepchirchir of Kenya is the second-fastest woman in the field. Following a solid season in 2017 when she registered her big PB of 2:19:47 from her victory at the Tokyo Marathon and successfully defended her title in Lisbon, Chepchirchir will be keen to continue her winning streak in her first race in 2018. Kenya’s Flomena Cheyech, 36, is the other title contender whose PB is faster than the 2:21:52 course record in Shanghai set by Tigist Tufa of Ethiopia three years ago. Cheyech clocked a PB of 2:21:22 to finish third in Paris last April and finished fourth over the classic distance at the IAAF World Championships in London. Her most recent performance was a 2:33:01 clocking at the Nagoya Women's Marathon in March. Helen Tola Bekele, who will celebrate her 24th birthday next week, is another woman to watch. The rising Ethiopian has improved her PB each season since making her marathon debut in 2015, recently reducing it to 2:22:48 in Berlin. (Fri 16) ⚡AMP
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Mary Keitany has set her sights on breaking the world marathon record next year

Speaking on arrival in Kenya from the Big Apple yesterday, Mary Keitany said if she was to receive an invite to run in Berlin next year, she would attempt to break the record of 2:15:25 set by Britain’s Paula Radcliffe in 2003. “I’m confident with the right conditions and with my current form, I can break the world record or improve on my personal best time,” added Keitany. Keitany’s personal best in the marathon is 2:17:01, which is also all-women’s world record, set in London last year. Keitany, who clocked 2:22:48 to win her fourth crown in New York, missed the course record by 17 seconds and believes that if the Ethiopian rivals had kept pace, she would have smashed the course record. “I had no idea that I was 17 seconds outside the course record pace in New York. I think if the Ethiopian athletes had kept pace, we would have broken the course record,” she added. Keitany said she is delighted to have won the New York after under-performing in the last event due to illness. She said she will take a break to recover before resuming her training in the new year ahead of the 2019 season. “I will take a break to spend time with my family and start my preparations in the new year. I will work with my management team on where we will run next year,” added Keitany, who is also a three-time London marathon champion. (Fri 9) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono named AIMS Best Marathoners for 2018

The AIMS athletes’ nomination committee has decided that for this year (October 2017 to September 2018) Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono were the outstanding candidates for the awards based on their performances over the past 12 months. Kipchoge is undefeated in the marathon in 2018, winning in London and Berlin. His victory in Berlin was in a world record of 2:01:39, taking 78 seconds off the previous record – the biggest single improvement on the world record for more than 50 years. Cherono won the Berlin Marathon in a world-leading time of 2:18:11. She finished fourth at the London Marathon earlier in the year in 2:24:10. The achievements of the two Kenyan athletes will receive global recognition during the AIMS ‘Best Marathon Runner’ Awards Gala in Athens, Greece on November 9. (Thu 8) ⚡AMP
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National record holder Yuta Shitara and Yuki Kawauchi are running the Fukuoka Marathon

The best year in Japanese men’s marathon history is drawing to a close, and with it the chances for them to qualify for the new MGC Race 2020 Olympic trials are running out. The Dec. 2nd Fukuoka International Marathon features one of the best Japanese fields ever assembled, with ten Japanese men under 2:10 since 2016. Half marathon national record holder Yuta Shitara, 2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi, 2017 Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon winner Kentaro Nakamoto, Hayato Sonoda and Yoshiki Takenouchi, make up the list of those already qualified for the MGC Race, Shitara running a marathon for the first time since his now-former national record 2:06:11 in Tokyo in February and Kawauchi hoping to turn things back around after a string of bad races since Boston. Those with a realistic chance of qualifying off the two-race average include 2017 Gold Coast Marathon winner Takuya Noguchi, who missed it by seconds at this year’s Gold Coast, recent sub-2:10 men Kohei Ogino, Yuma Hattori and Jo Fukuda, and a trio who finished together just over the 2:10 mark in Tokyo this year, Asuka Tanaka, Hiroki Yamagishi and Daichi Kamino. There’s a good number of others on the list who ran well in 2015 and 2016 and will be hoping to get back on board in Fukuoka, including sub-2:10 teammates Takuya Fukatsu, Fumihiro Maruyama and Satoru Sasaki , and given the depth of Japanese men’s marathoning and the tendency for dark horses to post seemingly out-of-nowhere breakthroughs like Taku Fujimoto, earlier this month in Chicago there’s almost no limit to who else could have their day. Twins Hiroshi and Takashi Ichida would make a lot of people happy if they finally broke through in Fukuoka. Both 100 km world record holder Nao Kazami, and 100 km silver medalist Takehiko Gyoba, are also in the race. It being a nominally international marathon, Fukuoka also has its usual small contingent of overseas runners perfectly positioned to pace the Japanese men to times in the 2:07 to 2:08 range and to lend a little shine to the race with their medals. 2011 world championships silver medalist Vincent Kipruto tops the list with a 2:06:14 in Berlin last year, with 2015 world champion Ghirmay Ghebreslassie and past Fukuoka champ Yemane Tsegay. (Tue 30) ⚡AMP
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Asefa Bekele from Ethiopia won the 2018 men's Dublin Marathon

Ethiopia's Asefa Bekele won the 2018 men's Dublin Marathon while his fellow compatriot Mesera Dubiso won the women's race. Over 20,000 participants turned out for the annual race with Bekele coming home in a time 2:13:23 with Dubiso crossed over the finishing line in a time of 2:33:48 to take the women's title. Meanwhile, there was a strong Irish representation in the field with Mick Clohisey of the Raheny Shamrocks club claiming the Irish Athletics National Marathon, finishing in a time of 2:15:57. It was the fastest time to win the National title since 1991. The Dublin man placed sixth overall. Cork native Lizzie Lee took third place in the women's race and finished in an impressive time of 2:35:04 after winning the Vhi Women’s Mini Marathon earlier this year. She also claimed the Irish Athletics National Marathon title in the process. Lee said: "An Irish woman on the overall podium, I am thrilled with that. I am thrilled with the time, I am thrilled with the place and I know my little girl is out there somewhere I can’t wait to give her a hug. I needed redemption after Berlin. "I felt like the last few miles got away from me. I am absolutely over the moon. I am a Mum of two small girls and I work full time. "Running is my hobby and I am on a podium with two Ethiopian girls.  I am thrilled,"  said Lizzie Lee with a smile. (Mon 29) ⚡AMP
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Abraham Cheroben will battle it out with at least 14 other sub one hour runners at the Valencia Half Marathon

Defending champion Kenyan-born Abraham Cheroben of Bahrain will battle it out with 30 elite athletes, with at least 14 having run in less than an hour, at the upcoming Valencia Half Marathon.  Cheroben is aiming to retain the crown he won last year in 59:11. Among the elite field is a host of Kenyans led by two times Family Bank Half Marathon champion Jorum Okombo Lumbasi (58:48), Solomon Kirwa Yego (58:44), Mangata Ndiwa (59:09), Abraham Kiptum (59:09) and Josphat Boit (59:19) the pace maker, who guided Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge to break the world marathon record in Berlin. (Wed 24) ⚡AMP
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Lizzie Lee will lead the Irish charge at the Dublin Marathon on Sunday

Lizzie Lee, Mick Clohisey and Gary O’Hanlon are expected to lead the Irish charge at the Dublin Marathon on Sunday, October 28.  Lee finished 29th in the marathon at the European Championships in August, will face Remalda Kergyte of Lithuania, Caroline Jepchirchir of Kenya, and Ethiopian duo Motu Gedefa and Mesera Dubiso. Kergyte, has a personal best of 2.35.13, while Jepchirchir won this year’s Belfast Marathon. Lee has a personal best of 2:32.51 from Berlin in 2015 and last competed in the Dublin Marathon in 2006. The Olympic marathoner has shown good form this season, setting a new personal best of 1:13:19 at the World Half Marathon Championships in March.  The Irish national title will be a battle between Lee and fellow Olympian Caitriona Jennings who placed second in the 2017 National Championships. (Wed 24) ⚡AMP
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Dan Jones will go head-to-head with Russell Bentley at the Snowdonia Marathon

This year returning champion Dan Jones will go head-to-head with 2016 winner Russell Bentley in what promises to be a great battle on the roads of Snowdonia, as both will want to make it to the top of the podium once again. Bentley has been rounding into some great form after completing the Berlin Marathon in September, finishing second at the Chester Marathon in early October and running a season’s best half marathon time of 1:08:26 in Manchester last weekend. Jones will be equally tuned-up for Snowdonia. The Team Bath man has had some solid autumn performances and after finishing second to Bentley in 2016 he returned to take the title in emphatic style last year. Gary Priestley will make Snowdonia his debut marathon and with a personal best half marathon of 1:08:23 the Salford Harrier will also look to challenge for honors next weekend. An interesting entrant in the men’s race is Julius Mwangi. The Kenyan runner was a 2:15 marathoner back in 2004, but has not raced much the last couple of years. (Tue 23) ⚡AMP
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Lawrence Cherono shattered the course record at Amsterdam Marathon

Kenyan’s Lawrence Cherono shattered the course record at the TCS Amsterdam Marathon, clocking 2:04:06 at the 43rd edition of this IAAF Gold Label Road Race on Sunday October 21. Running in nearly ideal conditions with cloudy skies and very light winds - Cherono clipped more than a minute from the 2:05:09 course record and lifetime best he set last year. The 30-year-old also broke the Netherlands' all-comers record of 2:04:27 set by Duncan Kibet in Rotterdam in 2009. A lead group of 14, including Cherono and Kenenisa Bekele, sped through the opening five in 14:33 and 29:08 through ten, in range similar to the 14:29 and 29:01 splits that propelled Eliud Kipchoge to his world record run in Berlin last month. The leaders reached 15 in 44:03 and 20k in 59:00, well inside the 59:52 course record pace that guided Cherono last year. When the half was reached in 1:02:11, 11 men still remained in contention.  But after 25 kilometers (1:13:48) the lead group slowly began to unravel. The last remaining pacesetter, Edwin Kiptoo, completed his chores just before the 30 -mark, with Bekele, Özbilen and Alamirew falling back soon thereafter. Cherono switched gears near the city's Filmmuseum before pulling away for the decisive victory. "I am happy with my race," said Cherono, whose performance squalled the fourth fastest run of 2018. "Today the weather that was very good: little wind and an ideal temperature. That made it possible to run harder this year. My goal was to run 2:04 and that worked." Wasihun and Deksisa were next, clocking 2:04:37 and 2:04:40 respectively, also under the previous course record. There was good depth behind them. Kipketer was fourth in 2:06:15, Özbilen fifth in 2:06:24 and Laban Korir sixth in 2:06:33. Abate (2:06:47) and Jonathan Korir (2:06:51) also broke 2:07. Bekele meanwhile didn't finish, dropping out near his hotel at about 40 from where he chose to walk back to his room. (Sun 21) ⚡AMP
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Jerome Drayton's Canadian marathon record of 2:10:09 has stood for nearly 43 years

 Jerome Drayton's mark of 2:10:28 from the 1975 Fukuoka Marathon is the current national Canadian record. Drayton, who lives in Toronto, is 73 years-old now. "Two-ten is obviously a good time," remarked two-time Canadian Olympic marathoner Reid Coolsaet, who came close to Drayton's record at the 2015 BMW Berlin Marathon where he ran 2:10:28. Speaking at a press conference here this morning in advance of Sunday's Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon he added, "[But], especially after Eliud Kipchoge's record (2:01:39) we need a faster national record. With guys like Cam stepping up to the marathon, it's just a matter of time before it goes." "Cam," of course, is Cameron Levins, the 29 year-old Canadian Olympian who holds the national record of 27:07.51 for 10,000m. A former Nike Oregon Project athlete who now represents Hoka One One, Levins will be making his long-awaited marathon debut here this Sunday. He'll be running primarily for the Athletics Canada national title, but with a CAD 43,000 bonus (USD 32,800) on the line for taking down Drayton's mark, the record is definitely on Levins's mind. His 10,000m best is equivalent to a 2:06:38 marathon by using one popular conversion formula. "I'm in great shape," Levins told the media here today, looking relaxed in a hooded sweatshirt, his hands folded in his lap. "I'm ready to attack the Canadian record." Levins, who was notorious for running exceptionally high mileage during his NCAA career at Southern Utah University, stuck with a high-mileage diet for this race, too. He estimated that he averaged 168 miles (270 kilometers) per week, splitting his time between his sea level home in Portland, Ore., and the high altitude of Cedar City, Utah, where he lived and trained in college. He said he adapted well to marathon training after an uncertain start. "I was a little nervous about getting into the new kind of training," Levins told Race Results Weekly. "I mean, I'm into it now. I know I'm going to do more beyond this. I can see it becoming, just, what I do." But first, he had to get through Sunday's race. Long-time race director Alan Brookes has assembled one of his best elite fields led by two-time race winner Philemon Rono of Kenya (2:06:52 PB), 2012 Olympic Marathon champion Stephen Kiprotich of Uganda (2:06:33), 2017 Seoul Marathon runner-up Felix Kandie of Kenya (2:06:03), and New Zealand record holder Jake Robertson (2:08:26). Levins, who said he will run with the second group, made sure he put enough long runs which included very specific goals. As a track runner, his long runs were mostly just for adding miles, he said, at an easy pace. (Sat 20) ⚡AMP
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Marathon champion Lawrence Cherono of Kenya, wants to retain his title and improve the course record in the Dutch city on Oct. 21

Defending champion Lawrence Cherono will come up against stiff competition on Sunday when he lines up in Amsterdam Marathon. Cherono, who has been training in Kaptagat in Eldoret County, will be in a men’s field that features, among others, Ethiopia’s distance running legend Kenenisa Bekele. Bekele, considered the greatest distance runner of all time with a Personal Best of two hours, three minutes and three seconds in the marathon which he recorded in the 2016 Berlin Marathon. “I love training in Kaptagat because it has always given me good environment for training, which has often translated to positive results in all the races I have participated in. The place is cool and training in the forest gives me perfect conditions to prepare for marathon races,” Cherono told Nation Sport in Kaptagat. The athlete said he was happy to have finished his training programme injury-free and is looking forward to a good race on Sunday. “My training has gone well and I want to thank God because I have not suffered an injury during training in the last three months I have been here. I’m looking forward to running a good race as I seek to lower my Personal Best,” said Cherono. Cherono also said he has paid little attention to Bekele’s presence in men’s field, saying the Ethiopian can only help competitors run a quick race. (Fri 19) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Eliud kipchoge wins the Sjak Startimes sports personality award for the month of September

World marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is the Sports Personality of the Month for September 2018. Kipchoge becomes the 15th recipient of the award sponsored by Pay TV provider, StarTimes. Kipchoge got the accolade after setting a new marathon world record of 2 hours 01 minute 39 seconds on September 16 in the Berlin Marathon. Kipchoge sliced one minute 18 seconds from the previous record of 2 hours 02 minutes 57 seconds set by Dennis Kimetto in 2014. In that breath taking feat, Kipchoge also bettered the world’s best marks for 35km and 40km previously held by Kimetto. The 33-year-old blipped one hour 41 minutes, one second at 35km and one hour 55 minutes 32 seconds at 40km. In an interview, Kipchoge said the award came as a surprise to him though it will act a morale booster as he focuses on future assignments. "It is exactly one month since I broke the record on September 16 and this being October 16, I think it is a good timing on your part," Kip told the journalists. Kipchoge was awarded a 43 inch StarTimes Digital TV Set, Sh100,000 shillings and the winner’s trophy. (Thu 18) ⚡AMP
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The Run The World Challenge 2 team has finished and here are the awards

"We have finished," says Lize Dumon (photo) a RTW Challenge 2 team member from South Africa, "Great achievement! But this morning, going out for my run just felt that little bit harder. I haven't realized how precious this RTW community has become to me. It is like an extended running family, a safe place to share everything running without rolling eyes and sighs from non-runners. It has become a place where I learn so much about running from reading everybody's posts and a place of immense encouragement! I don't want to leave this place... bring it on Challenge 3!" Run The World Global Run Challenge is a global event celebrating running, motivating the team, inspiring others and completing the goal.  The 131 member RTW Challenge 2 team ran and logged miles in 24 countries reaching a total of 24,901 miles in 44 days 18 hours 29 minutes.  "This event is a real motivator. Many of our members (including me) ran many more miles than usual," says Run The World Challenge Team Caption, Bob Anderson. 34-year-old team member Carmen Gair from South Africa posted, "Thank you...for this amazing challenge...thank you...for motivating me to run more than double my usual mileage in this amount of time." She ran and logged 151 miles in 44 days.  Team members added this challenge to their existing goals and used the Challenge to further motivate them.  "Here are the special awards for our RTW Challenge 2 team," says Bob Anderson who reached 260.66 miles himself. For Outstanding achievement: Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 801 miles...Most Inspiring: Lize Dumon set her goal to reach 200 miles and she did that. She also motivated other team members in South Africa that she recruited to reach their goal as well...Most Motivating: Aaron L. Salvador from the little country of Palau logged 377.99 miles, recruited others and posted a note and photo everyday...For Best Performance: Willie Korir from Kenya logged the most miles (993.88) which is an average of 22.5 miles per day. This is being shared with Joel Maina Mwangi also from Kenya who not only logged in 610.44 miles but he raced four half marathons during the Challenge period clocking 1:02:52, 1:03:19, 1:02:50 and 1:02:54...Five Most Inspiring stories: based on their story posted on My Best Runs: (this award goes to the five who received the most views on My Best Runs) Joyce Lee (1178 views), Michael Wardian (851 views), Gloria Nasr (616 views), Joel Maina Mqangi (492 views), Pete Magill (400 views)...Best Youngest performance: Zander Brister age 11 logged 16.32 miles. He ran one mile in Hollister clocking 6:19 and he also averaged 7:42/mile pace at the Pacific Grove Double Road Race 15k...Best Oldest performance: Frank Bozanich age 74 logged 801 miles. Shared with 71-year-old Paul Shimon who logged 655.37 miles...Top Fifteen Spirit awards: (Based on posts on the RTW Feed) Aaron L Salvador, Michael Anderson, Brent Weigner, Danilo Purlia, Larry Allen, Asya Cabral, Lize Dumon, Roger Wright, Geoffrey Smith, Carmen Gair, Annie Conneau, Joseph Brazil, Vince Martignetti, Marnie Margolis, Willie Korir... Best Single Run: Michael Wardian when he ran 184.5 miles in 36 hours 48 minutes 14 seconds on the C&O Canal Trail...Notable Mentions: Boaz Kipyego logged 788.61 miles and came to the United States and placed fourth at the Twin City Marathon. Rosaline Nyawira was first female logging 454.37 miles. Brent Weigner (69) has been running races every weekend including running a marathon in another country Sri Lanka. He logged 258 miles. James Kalani has gotten back into running (this challenge motivating him) and has already run 4 miles at 5:33 pace. He logged 252 miles. Ultra marathon star Gloria Nasr from France logged 237 miles. Rosaura Tennant ran both the Berlin and Chicago marathon during this Challenge. Becca Pizzi was first woman in the marathon run inside a NFL stadium in Boston..."Everyone is a winner on our team," says Bob Anderson.  "I can't wait to do this again."  RTW Challenge 3 start Oct 29.  (Sat 13) ⚡AMP
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France's Morhad Amdouni is going after his second title at the 40th edition of 20km de Paris

Amdouni, the winner in 2016, was forced to withdraw from last year’s edition due to injury which in his absence was won by Kenyan Collins Chebii. Amdouni looks to be the favorite following his successful 10,000m title-winning run at the European Championships in Berlin in August. He clocked in 28:11.22 on that occasion and holds a PB of 27:36.80 set in May. Four days later the 30-year-old Frenchman won bronze in the 5000m and hasn’t raced since. Stephen Ogari should be one of his main rivals. The Kenyan won here in 2015, one year prior to Amdouni and eight seconds faster, 59:11 to 59:19. Gauging Ogari’s form, however, is difficult as he has only run two 3000m races this year, both with modest times. Alfred Cherop of Kenya holds the fastest PB of the field over the distance with 58:20, but that dates back to 2012. Cherop, who has a 27:59 10km lifetime best, was third in 2016 in 59:25. More recently, he clocked 1:01:58 over 20km in May. Rwanda’s Felicien Muhitira and Nicholas Mulinge Makau could be also be in contention for the podium. The former was fourth at last year’s edition in 58:43 and the latter recorded a 15km PB of 44:19 this year. Elvis Tabarach, 21, will also have a say. He finished fifth last year but was credited with the same time as Muhitira. The men’s course record of 57:19 set in 2005 shouldn’t be in jeopardy. (Fri 12) ⚡AMP
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Defending champion Mathew Kimeli is aiming to win for the second time at the Great 10k

With Alina Reh and Mathew Kimeli on Sunday at the "The Bridgestone Great 10k" in Berlin both defending champion in the race, also other German top runners are at the start. In the German Junior Runner Cup 2018 the decision is made. Once again, the favorites from Kenya are aiming for world-class times on Sunday, at the highest-ranking German 10-kilometer race. Even the top-class track record of the Great 10k of Leonard Komon could be in danger. The Kenyan ran 27:12 minutes ago in Berlin eight years ago. No other German 10-kilometer race has such a fast track record. With Mathew Kimeli the defending champion comes back to Berlin. The only 20-year-old Kenyan won a year ago at Schloss Charlottenburg in 27:32 minutes. But his best time is even one second faster than the course record of Komon with 27:11 minutes. His compatriots Emmanuel Kiprono 27:26, and Vidic Kipkoech 27:57, are expected to be the toughest rivals for Kimeli. There will not be a hunt for the world-class course record of 30:37 minutes for the women, but once again Alina Reh, could provide a highlight. One year ago, the 21-year-old surprisingly won the race and with 31:38 minutes became the second-fastest German runner of all time. Having won the Cologne Half Marathon in a strong 69:31 minutes over 10,000 meters last Sunday, she can also be expected to perform first-class in Berlin. Alina Reh's rivals include Kenyan Gladys Kimaina, who has a best time of 31:15, and Fabienne Schlumpf from Switzerland, 32:08 min and Karolina Nadolska from Poland, 32:09 min. Also starting is Katharina Heinig, 33:04 min, for whom the race as well as for Arne Gabius will be a test for the Frankfurt Marathon. (Thu 11) ⚡AMP
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Why are the best times run on Kenya soil so slow? Part 2: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

The best times run on Kenyan soil are not nearly as good as times run by Kenyan runners outside the country. The best marathon time run on Kenya soil is 2:10:12 clocked by Moses Kigen in 2009. The best time for women is 2:28:04 clocked by Alice Chelangat.  Even world record holders like Eliud Kipchoge who recently clocked 2:01:39 at the Berlin Marathon don't attempt to race on Kenya soil due to stiff competition from juniors or seniors who haven’t gotten the opportunity to run abroad.  Most of the major races recognized by IAAF are run at very high altitude (2600m-8500 feet) above sea level.  In cities like Eldoret, Iten, Nairobi, Nyahururu, Nakuru, and Ngong there is less oxygen making it hard to run world record times.  In cities at low altitude like Garrisa in Northern part and Mombasa where the marathon and world cross-country have been held, the humidity is very high and temperatures are so hot that a lot of runners faint due to dehydration.  For example at the 2007 world cross-country championship in Mombasa, Kennenisa Bekele dropped out of the 10km cross country race due to high humidity and hot temperatures. Kenya has thousands of athletes, but no race has ever been controlled at world record pace.  This is because most of athletes have no managers or even links to run abroad take out the pace of 2:40/K (13:20 5K pace) or even below in long distsance races like the marathon making it hard to break a world record due to fatigue.  Other national records run on Kenyan soil include: 1:01:21 half marathon clocked by Philemon Baaru and 1:08:12 for women clocked by Paskalia Chepkorir.  In the 10km for example Kamworor ran 29:11 in the 2018 cross-country while world leader in 3000m Beatrice Chepkoech ran 34:04 which is totally different when abroad. Many races are long.  Like many 10k's are actually 10.2 or 10.3.  Sometimes the clock does not start until the 200m to 300m out due to large number of athletes in a race. This has to be done to avoid athletes injuring themselves due to each athlete running very fast at the start. Most athletes do not have good training facilities or managers.  Pacing is a big problem in many races held in Kenya.  This is very noticeable in many major races (like the Nairobi Standard Charter Marathon) because Kenyans are used to being front runners and they run too fast at the beginning.  Another factor is race terrain.  Most of Kenyan courses are very hilly and hard to run good times.  Many half marathons winning times in Kenya are like 65 minutes making race organizers avoid putting on marthons.  All of these factors are why there is a big difference in best times run in Kenya and abroad.  This is why all Kenyans dream is to race outside Kenya.    (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
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Stacy Ndiwa will challenge the Ethiopians at the Delhi Half Marathon

The 2018 African Championships 10,000m winner and Commonwealth Games runner-up Stacy Ndiwa will challenge the Ethiopians. Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba is among star attractions.  Three Kenyans must be at their best to stop Ethiopia’s Belihu and Gebresilase. Eric Kiptanui, the 2018 Berlin Half Marathon champion, will be up against his training mate Daniel Kipchumba at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon on October 21. Kipchumba paced Kiptanui during the Berlin race to the 15 kilometer mark and the contest in the Indian capital will no doubt give them an opportunity to size up each other. The two, who are guided by Italian coach Renato Canova, will carry their under 60 minutes best times they posted last year. Yangzhou and Istanbul Half marathons champion Ababel Yeshaneh hope to outclass Dibaba. Yeshaneh had earlier this year set a personal best over the half marathon distance in Turkey where she ran 69:36. She weathered a strong competition to come in second in the 2017 Delhi Half Marathon. (Wed 10) ⚡AMP
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Thousands of Kenyan runners have the same dream Part 1: The Real Running Scene in the country of Kenya

Kenya is famous for producing many of the best runners in the world.  Just recently Kenyan’s Eliud Kipchoge smashed the world record for the marathon clocking 2:01:38 in Berlin. What makes Kenyan runners so fast? There are many theories.  One of them suggests that since many runners originate from the mountainous districts of the Rift Valley, they get an edge due to living at high altitude.  However, the same advantage would be for athletes living at high altitudes in central Asia and Mexico.  So maybe this is not the reason?  Kenya is a nation blessed with thousands of athletes of approximately 85,000.  A majority of them are distance runners. More than 12,000 can run below 75 minutes for 21km (half marathon) and about 25,000 can run a sub 35 minutes 10km.  Thousands can run a marathon in under 3 hours 20 minutes. Very impressive for elite performances. Most runners in Kenya are between the ages of 12-45.  There are very few master runners (40 plus) compared to other countries.  This is because most runners in Kenya make running as their primary source of livelihood to feed the family and even help their relatives or friends and the community.  There are very few runners 45-60 years or older because of health conditions like diabetes or heart conditions.  It is rare to find a runner 70 plus in Kenya unlike countries like the USA.  They are like endangered species and there are less than 20 athletes in the whole country that are 70 plus.  The current life expectancy for all people in the US is 78.74 years while in Kenya it is 62.13 years.  The total population in Kenya is 45 million compared to 325 million in the US.  Kenya is the size of Texas. The median age in Kenya is 18, half that of the United States and 41 percent of the population is 14 or younger.  For many Kenyan's their whole life is centered around running.  Many train three times per day logging in over 100 miles per week.  They live modestly making ends meet on $100US per month or less.  They dream of being a super star and they train very hard.  This started when Kipchoge Keino came on the scene in 1962 at the Commonwealth Games in Perth.  Kip Keino in 1968 won the gold medal in the 1500m in Mexico City and after that many have followed in his footsteps.  But it wasn't until later when millions of dollars of prize money came available did things really change.  Now the best runners in Kenya can earn millions of dollars (US) in prize money and sponsorship money.  There is the possibility that through hard work, dedication and connections that any talented Kenyan can make their dream become a reality.  Thousands of Kenyans have the same dream. This is no different than the dream kids have in America of being a famous baseball, basketball or football player.... There is one thing, however that seem to be missing in Kenya.  The times run on Kenya soil are not that good compared to the times run by Kenyans outside the country.  Why is this?  In Part two we will address this situation.   (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Three-time Olympic champion Tirunesh Dibaba has been added as the latest star to the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

The Ethiopian legend, Tirunesh has won three Olympic Games gold medals and five world titles on the track to add to the four world cross country championships victories as a senior. She is also the current 5000-metre world record holder. Tirunesh will now run the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2018 on Sunday, October 21. The ace is an obvious favorite to add the Delhi Half Marathon trophy to her packed cabinet of precious metal ware. In the wake of her third place at last month’s Berlin Marathon, her third run under 2:19 over the classic distance in the last 18 months, she will be chasing two half marathon marks in Delhi, win which comes with a check for $27,000. The Airtel Delhi Half Marathon course record stands at 66:54 since 2009 in the name of Kenya’s Mary Keitany. The presence of Tiruensh this year is posing a threat to the 9-year-old record. “After Berlin, I felt good about myself and felt I could still run fast over the half marathon despite the short recovery time. I didn’t achieve my aims completely in Berlin, although I certainly have to be pleased with my performance, because I went there to win and run faster than my time of 2:18:55 so there is no better race than the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon to make my return to racing. I am excited about coming to India and I look forward to make my presence felt,” said the 33-year-old Tirunesh. (Tue 9) ⚡AMP
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Abdi Nageeye, Michel Butter and Kenenisa Bekele will compete for the national title at the TCS Amsterdam Marathon on October 21

Especially the arrival of Nageeye (Photo) is striking. He started this year in two marathons (Boston and European Championships in Berlin), but says he has recovered well. Last year Nageeye ran to the title in a Dutch record of 2.08.16. Butter said due to pains for the European Championships in Berlin and therefore wanted to run an autumn marathon. He does not aim at a sharp time, but wants to enter into the fight with favorite Nageeye. Nageeye and Butter have been the best marathon runners in the country for years. Racedirector Cees Pronk is therefore pleased that the two opt for the capital. ,, I am proud that both gentlemen have chosen Amsterdam again, they feel at home here. "Earlier, the arrival of the Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele was already announced. The world record holder on the 5000 and 10,000 meters and man with the impressive personal record on the 2.03.03 marathon will get competition from Lawrence Cherono, who won the Amsterdam last year. (Wed 3) ⚡AMP
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Strong elite women´s field is set to run the Chicago Marathon this weekend

American elite’s Gwen Jorgensen and Alexis Pappas will both run this year’s Chicago Marathon.  While Jorgensen has run a marathon before (after deciding to retire as a triathlete), this will be her first marathon since committing to professional running full-time. Jorgensen is the 2016 Olympic triathlon gold medallist. Pappas is a former track runner who competed at the 2016 Olympics in the 10,000m, running for Greece. She’s a Dartmouth and Oregon alumna with a creative side. The runner directed the film Tracktown with her husband Jeremy Teicher, and helped cover the 2018 winter Olympics with comedian Nick Kroll. Pappas is reportedly hoping to run the marathon at the 2020 Olympics for Greece. Roza Dereje of Ethiopia has the fastest incoming women’s seed time, having run a 2:19:17 in Dubai this January. At only 21 years old, Dereje has already made a strong mark on the road running scene. The second-fastest entry is Florence Kiplagat of Kenya. Kiplagat’s personal best is from the 2011 Berlin marathon, and she hasn’t come close to it since the 2014 London marathon. The veteran’s most recent time in the event is a 2:26:25 from the 2017 London marathon. Birhane Dibaba, who comes in third, broke the 2:20 barrier at the 2018 Tokyo marathon, running 2:19:51 to take the win. Dibaba will surely challenge Dejere this weekend. Dayna Pidhoresky and Melanie Myrand are the only two Canadians on the Chicago elite women’s list. Pidhoresky, the Vancouver native has run several half-marathons this summer, along with a 10K. She broke the tape at the Scotiabank Vancouver half-marathon in June, running 1:13:04. Her marathon personal best is 2:36:08. Myrand of Lachine, Que. is a nurse practitioner in primary care who decided to give this running thing a chance after a breakthrough in 2016. Her personal best is 2:39:07 from the 2017 Scotiabank Waterfront marathon in Toronto. (Tue 2) ⚡AMP
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Vienna Marathon champion Nancy Kiprop will face a big challenge at the Frankfurt Marathon

Vienna Marathon champion Nancy Kiprop of Kenya, former Xiamen Marathon winner Mare Dibaba face a big challenge to run in less than two hours and 20 minutes at the Frankfurt Marathon women's race on Oct. 28. It means that Kiprop must improve her own best time past the current mark of 2:24:18, which she set in April to retain her title in Austria's capital. "To shake off four minutes is a big challenge. But after seeing what Eliud Kipchoge did in Berlin, I believe anything can go and I want to see how fast I can run in Frankfurt against some of the strongest challengers. Of course the first priority is to dictate the pace and win the race, then the time will fall in," said Kiprop on Monday in Eldoret. Kiprop and Dibaba lead a carefully selected elite list for the race with organizers offering 30,000 US dollars as bonus for whoever beats the course record alongside the 24,000-dollar prize for winning the race. The men's race is led by 2017 Berlin marathon silver medalist Guye Adola of Ethiopia. Adola will face two other notable runners-up in Frankfurt Marathon when he lines up against fellow Ethiopian Kelkile Gezahegn and Kenya's Martin Kosgey, the second-place finishers at the past two editions. Last year Olympic 5,000m champion Vivian Cheruiyot won her maiden marathon race in 2 hours 23 minutes and 35 seconds. The organizers have thrown down the gauntlet challenging the elite runners to push for faster time and Kiprop will take it upon herself secure this feat and improve her personal best time. The organizers have assembled an elite women's field with impressive strength in depth. The course record stands at 2:21:01 set by the Ethiopian Meselech Melkamu six years ago and, given good weather conditions, this should come under threat on Oct. 28. (Tue 25) ⚡AMP
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Amos Kipruto is considering either running the Xiamen or Tokyo marathon

The Xiamen marathon, the third biggest race in China after Beijing and Shanghai, will be staged on January 6 while Tokyo marathon is scheduled for February. However, Kipruto has already competed in Tokyo last year where he claimed the bronze medal. "I want to rest and hopefully return stronger and focus on my next race. Tokyo or Xiamen are very good races. I have not raced in China and this may be my time," said Kiruto on Thursday in Eldoret. In Berlin, Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge was the star focus after he clinched the gold in world record time of 2:01.39, which was almost five minutes faster than what Kipruto posted 2:06:20 in second place. But Kipruto believes he has what it takes to stage his own conquest and Xiamen marathon in China will be an attractive destination should his management team 2 Running Club get an incentive offer. "I have run the last two races without a win. I was third in Tokyo and second in Berlin. It is an improvement but I have a chance to ascend to the winner's podium in my next race," he said. Kipruto made his marathon debut back in 2016 and defied the odds to win the Rome Marathon. However, he was given a rude shock four months later when he finished in position 12 at the Amsterdam Marathon clocking 2:09:06. Last year, he returned stronger mentally and triumphed at the Seoul Marathon timed at 2:05:54. He returned to the Netherlands and was fifth at the Amsterdam Marathon in 2:05:43. "Next year I would love to go back to Berlin. I went there hoping to finish third, because we had tough runners in Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang. But I was happy to finish second. My management team are already working on a deal and we will see what happens," he said. (Mon 24) ⚡AMP
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Eric Kiptanui, Leonard Korir and Zane Robertson headline the Delhi Half Marathon

Eric Kiptanui will be the star attraction at the 14th edition of the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon (ADHM) to be held on October 21. Kiptanui, from Kenya, has already notched up two impressive half marathon victories this year — winning the high-quality Lisbon and Berlin races. He will be accompanied on his first trip to India by his training partner Daniel Kipchumba. Two-time Tata Consultancy Services World 10K winner Alex Korio — whose best of 58:51 was set in the 2017 Copenhagen Half Marathon — has been a regular participant in Procam International events in recent years and has run the ADHM twice in the past, last in 2015. Representing Ethiopia will be two men, Leul Gebresilase and Feyisa Lilesa, who are better known as marathon runners but who can still boast of outstanding half-marathon credentials. Adding to the considerable global interest in the race, USA’s Leonard Korir and New Zealand’s Zane Robertson are also in the men’s elite field. (Sat 22) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge is a simple man who helps others - Part three of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Three: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge.  When Eliud Kipchoge passed the first 10k mark in 29:01 on September 16 in Berlin everyone was excited because he was nine seconds ahead of world record pace. Actually this was his slower 10k split of the day.  He picked up the pace and his second 10k split was 28:55, third 28:49 and fourth 28:47 clocking 2:01:39 to smash the world marathon record.  So how did he do this?  It is not drugs! He has never failed a drug test.  Besides doing some unbelievable workouts (as detailed in part 2) he pays close attention to his diet. His favorite meal is ugali, kalenjin traditional milk called mursik which nutritious and energetic, traditional veggies (such as; socha, saga, mborochet, chepkerta and mitiat).  These are herbal and they build the immune system and adds to the blood.  He eats roasted maize for carbohydrates. How does he relax? During leisure time he likes reading at least two or three inspirational books every month. This is where a man full of wisdom and maturity adds to his knowledge.  One quote he likes, "The impossible is possible and imitation is limitation. " by John Manson. Eliud is a dairy and tea farmer and when he is at home he looks after cattle.  His last born kid son started running so he can follow in his father's foot steps.  After smashing the World Marathon Record in Berlin, Eliud is expected to get $50,000 for winning and $69,000 for breaking the world record. This is 12 million Kenyan Shillings.  In additon, truck manufactures, Isuzu East Africa, which Kipchoge is a Brand Ambassador, will give him a D-max luxury double cabin vehicle. There are also gaming companies which will reward him. Eliud has involved himself in charity work too. He helps raise funds for dispensaries, pay school fees for unable kids, he helps upcoming athletes with housing and hospitals bills.  He pays for airline tickets for students going abroad on scholarship.  He helps to motivate young Kenyans on the importance of hardwork.  Kenya has been very proud of Eliud Kipchoge and since he smashed the world record the whole country is behind him.  Part one and two of these series were published the last two days on My Best Runs.   (Sat 22) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Eliud Kipchoge says he handles pain by smiling - Part two of a three part series on the King of the Marathon

The King of The Marathon Part Two: an inside look into the life of Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge. He began his move into road running in 2012 when he clocked 59:25 for the half marathon.  In 2013 Eliud ran his first marathon when he won the Hamburg Marathon clocking 2:05:30, setting a new course record.  In 2016 he won the gold medal in the marathon at the Rio Olympics.  He has won 10 out of the 11 marathons he has run.  Wilson Kipsang beat him in 2013 in Berlin when setting the world record.  Eliud trains in Eldoret, the home of Champions.  His humbleness is seen when training with athletes.  Eliud keeps a low-profile and even does house chores in camp like washing toilets, utensils, cutting grass and cleaning the dining hall.  He uses public buses or bodaboda to travel despite having good cars.  He has earned a lot of prize, bonus and sponsorship money from running especially since he moved to the road.  However, money hasn't changed his character. He says, "An athlete with 50 million Kenyan shillings ($500,000US) in his bank account can brag, but a farmer who uses the same amount to plant wheat is not even noticed as he walks around town."  Eliud loves the simple life and when he travels he arrives without many people realizing it. He loves his Nike shoes and is comfortable with NN running and with his mentor and neighbor Patrick Sang. During the Nike project, he almost broke the two hour mark clocking 2:00:23 for the full Marathon.  Yes, the conditions were perfect and he was paced like in a time trial but his body ran the distance.  He puts in a lot of hardwork, discipline and good training.  He also eats a healthy diet.  Before he lined up to run the Berlin Marathon this was the kind of workouts he was doing. 8x1600 (recovery 1:30) + 10x400m (recovery 45 seconds) in Eldoret altitude 2200m (7200 feet) above sea level.  His 1600m times were:  4:35, 4:33, 4:32, 4:34, 4:33, 4:32, 4:33, 4:33. His 400m times were: 62, 63, 63, 62, 62, 62, 61, 62, 61, 60. He always does speedwork on the track wearing racing shoes with other fast athletes like Kamworor, Brimin kipruto and Conselsius.  "You can't train alone because you need others to push you higher to reach your best limit,"  Kipchoge told me last month at Kabarak university.  No marathoner has been more dominant in the marathon than Kipchoge. The 5'6" 115 pound Eliud has never sustained a serious injury because he listens to his body and eats a healthy diet.  Even the greatest runners have days when they have a strained muscle or an upset stomach kept them from winning but not Kipchoge.  He actually has a winning formula:  Motivation plus disipline equals consistency.  Pain, he says, is nothing more than a mind set so he distracts himself with other thoughts such as the joy of running and the finish line ahead, then the pain fades with a smile on his face. He has a habit of smiling whenever pain sets in. Tomorrow in part three of this series we look closer at Eliud’s healthy diet and at the day he broke the world Marathon record.  We talk about  the prize money and how Eliud wants to help others.   (Fri 21) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Two-time Chicago Marathon champ Florence Kiplagat is ready to reclaim her title after recovering from an injury

Kiplagat announced her recovery from a muscular cramp, which ruled her out of competition for nine months. The 31-year-old sustained the injury in Chicago last year in October, failing to complete the race. Kiplagat has not raced since. "The injury is over. I am back to my normal training schedule. I have been in rehabilitation to get the muscular cramp better and it has kept me away from competing in many events. Last year, my body didn't respond well in Chicago and I have had enough time to rest," she said. Kiplagat will be among the elite women, who will be lining up at the start of the race. However, last year's bronze medalist Jordan Hasay has pulled out. Kiplagat, who has a personal best time of 2:19:44, won the Chicago marathon in 2015 and 2016, with times of 2:23:33 and 2:21:32, respectively and will be eyeing her third title in four attempts. Mexico's Madai Perez has also pulled out. The men's race defending champion Galen Rupp of the USA will return to seek a second win, but Abel Kirui, who was second last year, is keen to return to winning, especially after seeing his training partner Eliud Kipchoge obliterate the opposition to win the Berlin marathon in 2:01.39 and set a new world record. "I have since moved in with the Global Sports Communications management team and we train together with Kipchoge. I have improved a lot and ran my personal best time during the London Marathon in April," said Kirui, who trains under Richard Metto and Patrick Sang. (Wed 19) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge is not sure when will be his next race before Tokyo

Kenyan world marathon record holder Eliud Kipchoge will not confirm his next race, but says he remains focused on defending his title at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Kipchoge, 33, will consider competing at the Doha World Championships in October 2019, but that will depend on his management. However the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo is already at the back of his mind. "It's about the gold medal but the preparation is the same - you should be comfortable with pacemakers and without pacemakers. Tokyo seems far away but it's at the back of my mind that I will really assemble myself in Tokyo," said Kipchoge on Tuesday. On what it will take for his record to go down, Kipchoge was hesitant. "It's too early to do that because it's only a few hours since I ran the fastest time ever," he said. "I don't think it's good to think about it - the core thing now is to make sure I recover fully," he said. Three more races in Boston, Tokyo and New York remain of interest to Kipchoge in his quest to become the greatest marathon runner. Already Kipchoge has won in London, Chicago and Berlin. In fact his win in Berlin was the third in four attempts. After smashing the world marathon record with a time of 2:01:39 in the Berlin Marathon on Sunday - the biggest improvement since 1967 - only the world marathon championships remain on his wish list. "In sport you need to have a good team. That's why, in terms of where I'm going to run next, I'm going to have a full discussion with the management, with the sponsors, technical team and the coaching team," he said. (Tue 18) ⚡AMP
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Let’s not forget Gladys Cherono’s performance at the Berlin Marathon 2:18:11

Kenya’s Gladys Cherono smashed her personal best and course record when she claimed her third Berlin Marathon victory on Sunday. Cherono, who broke away from the pack at the 25km mark, swept the course to victory in 2 hours, 18 minutes and 11 seconds, becoming the fourth fastest woman in the history of women’s marathon. She broke Japanese Mizuki Noguchi’s 13-year-old course record by 61 seconds besides improving her personal best of 2:19:25 set with victory in 2015 in Berlin. Noguchi won the 2005 Berlin in a course record time of 2:19:12. “My target was to break the course record and improve on my personal best and I am happy I did it,” said Cherono, who retained her title for her third success in Berlin. She won in Berlin in 2015 in personal best 2:19:25 before reclaiming the title last year in 2:20:23. (Tue 18) ⚡AMP
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Valary Jemeli Aiyabei from Kenya becomes the first ever Kenyan winner of the women’s race at Beijing Marathon

The women’s race was first introduced to the Beijing Marathon in 1989, but Kenyan runners had never previously managed to reach the top step of the women’s podium. Aiyabei, the fastest entrant and the only Kenyan in the elite women’s field, broke clear after 20 kilometres and kept pushing ahead until hitting the line in 2:21:38, ending a four-year winning run by Ethiopian runners. Her winning mark is the fourth fastest in the history of the race and the quickest mark since 2005, but is two minutes shy of the 2:19:39 course record set by Sun Yingjie in 2003. “This is my first time running the Beijing Marathon,” said the 27-year-old, who set her PB of 2:20:53 when finishing third at last year’s Berlin Marathon. “The race today was good and the weather was good. Everything was good. I want to say thanks to my pacemaker and my husband, he did the best job. I am very happy.” The race was staged under cool ad breezing conditions and the in-form Aiyabei tried to break away soon after the gun. After passing the water station at five kilometres, only Bahrain’s Eunice Chebichi Chumba, with a PB of 2:24:27 set last year in Rotterdam, managed to keep up with Aiyabei’s pace. The duo remained together for another 15 kilometres before Aiyabei finally broke free from Chumba. Paced by her husband Kenneth Kiplagat Tarus, Aiyabei kept widening the gap between her and Chumba. When Tarus stepped out of the course at 40 kilometres, Aiyabei had already built a lead of more than four minutes. (Mon 17) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge smashed the World Marathon Record clocking 2:01:39 in Berlin

33-year-old Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya smashed the world marathon record in Berlin today (September 16) clocking 2:01:39, breaking the record by over a minute.  According to Willie Korir reporting from Kenya, "the pace was so high.  Eliud started well and maintained 2:52-2:55/k pace.  Two of the pacers dropped at 14k.  Sammy Sitwara, Kipkemboe and Boit remained up to 25k.  Eliud was alone from 25k to the end.  It is a big celebration all over Kenya especially in Eliud's home town of Kapsabet and in Eldoret, home of Champions."  Amos Kipruto (2:06:23) passed Wilson Kipsang to place second and Wilson placed third (2:06:48).  Gladys Cherono set a course record clocking 2:18:11.  Second woman was Ruti Aga 2:18:34 and Trunesh Dibaba 2:18:55.  Kipchoge maintained his form well in the closing stages and crossed the finish line in 2:01:39, taking one minute and 18 seconds off the previous world record set four years ago by Dennis Kimetto. It is the largest single improvement on the marathon world record since Derek Clayton improved the mark by two minutes and 23 seconds in 1967. "I lack the words to describe how I feel," said Kipchoge. "It was really hard [during the last 17 kilometers] but I was truly prepared to run my own race. I had to focus on the work I had put in in Kenya and that is what helped push me. I’m really grateful to my coaching team, my management, the organisation." (Sun 16) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world. Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September. Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record. For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January. The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday. I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck. In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions.  The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13. The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched. Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km. (Sat 15) ⚡AMP
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Meselech Beyene of Ethiopia aiming to capture another title at the Beijing Marathon

The 24-year-old Beyene enjoyed a comfortable solo lead in the final 10 kilometers en route to her 2:27:44 victory last year, one minute shy of her personal best set six months earlier in Barcelona. It will be the third race of the year for Beyene following a third place finish in Houston with a season’s best of 2:27:21 in January and a second place showing at the Vienna City Marathon in 2:29:51 three months later. Beyene will once again face a deep field in Beijing, as she did here last year, which includes several sub-2:25 runners including the 26-year-old Sado. The Ethiopian achieved her career best of 2:24:16 at the 2015 Toronto Waterfront Marathon, one year after her 2:30:03 victory in Beijing, where she ended a 22-year winning streak by local runners in the women’s race. Although she failed to dip under the 2:30 the past two years, Sado proved her competitiveness in Xiamen this January as she shrugged off the heavy rain and overcame a stomach problem in the latter stages to win her second title there in 2:26:41. Beyene and Sado are more familiar with the course that stretches from the landmark Tian’anmen Square and ends outside the National Stadium, better known as the “Birds Nest”, but the top favorite should be Kenya’s Valary Jemeli Aiyabei. The 27-year-old is the fastest woman on paper with a career best of 2:20:53 from her third finish at the 2017 Berlin Marathon. Prior to that performance in the German capital, the rising Kenyan emerged triumphant in four straight marathons in Eldoret, Barcelona, Valencia and Prague, improving her PB on each occasion. Her winning marks in Valencia and Prague remains as the course records and she also proved her worth in 2018 with a 2:22:48 clocking in Nagoya where she finish second. The field also includes two sub-2:22 runners, Mulu Seboka and Amane Gobena, who are both from Ethiopia. Gobena recorded her PB of 2:21:51 in Tokyo two years ago while Seboka set her lifetime best of 2:21:56 in Dubai in 2015. The duo will both arrive in Beijing with high spirits following their newly claimed titles this year in Mumbai and Dalian respectively. (Sat 15) ⚡AMP
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Zimbabwean’s Canisious Nyamutsita is set to race the Copenhagen Half Marathon

Promising Zimbabwean long distance runner Canisious Nyamutsita (left), will be hoping to carry his fine run of form on the local circuit on to the international stage when he takes part in the biggest race of his career at the Copenhagen Half Marathon in Denmark on Sunday. The 27-year-old Nyanga-born athlete has been in brilliant form on the local circuit, winning almost all the country’s major road races over the last two years, including the recent Old Mutual Westgate Half Marathon. Nyamutsita is set to rub shoulders with some of the world’s finest runners over the distance including Kenyan born Bahraini Abraham Cheroben, who will be seeking to defend his title, having won last year in a world-leading 58:40. Other top runners in the field include Berlin Half Marathon champion Kenyan Erick Kiptanui, who has announced that he will be attacking the world record in Copenhagen. Nyamutsita will be joined by his teammate at the Chitungwiza-based Mr Pace Athletics Club Bertha Chikanga, who will line up in the women’s race of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Gold Label. (Sat 15) ⚡AMP
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BMW Berlin Marathon, fast times and intense battles, maybe a world record

Eliud Kipchoge is just like the rest of us runners. All he wants from his next race is to beat his personal best. The only difference is that his next event is the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16 and a Kipchoge PR could mean a new world record!, Eliud Kipchoge is the marquee signing for the 45th edition of BMW Berlin Marathon as the current Olympic champion and undisputed number one for consistency and quality in recent years. His PR, set in London 2016 (2:03:05), prefaced his Olympic marathon gold in Rio the same year. Meanwhile, Denis Kimetto's world record (2:02:57) remains tantalisingly just out of reach for the three-time London champion and double Berlin winner. Kipchoge surely has pace to burn as his brilliant 2:00:25 in 'laboratory' conditions at Monza motor racing circuit in May last year demonstrates. This was never going to be ratified as a record but serves to indicate there is much more to come from the 33-year-old Kenyan, who said: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.” The women's field in Berlin is the best for many years and is headlined by the third fastest in history, Tirunesh Dibaba, from Ethiopia (2:17:56) who set her PB in London last year chasing Paula Radcliffe's legendary 2:15:25 from 2003. Dibaba will face the defending champion Gladys Cherono (Kenya) and former double Berlin winner Edna Kiplagat (Kenya), who is the oldest of the leading trio at 38 years old. (Thu 13) ⚡AMP
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Canada's second fastest marathoner Reid Coolsaet is eyeing Jerome Drayton's record

Reid Coolsaet is the fastest Canadian in the field at this year’s Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. It’s a race Reid knows well having run it several times before. In 2011 he qualified for the 2012 Summer Olympics by running 2:10:55. He has since lowered his PB to 2:10:26 making him Canada’s second fastest ever marathoner. The two-time Olympian, Coolsaet has had his eye on Jerome Drayton’s 2:10:09 Canadian record for some time. And no Canadian has run Scotiabank–or any other marathon on Canadian soil–faster. Coolsaet set that record (2:10:55) here in 2011. An interesting coincidence: Drayton’s record was set in 1975 at Fukuoka, Japan, a race Coolsaet has run twice, achieving an excellent time here in 2016 (2:10:55–the same time he ran at Scotia in 2011). With a PB of 2:10:28, set at the Berlin Marathon in 2015, Coolsaet has been tantalizingly close to this goal for a while. He’s had to be patient through a series of setbacks, most significantly a painful foot condition in early 2017 that took him out of competition for almost a year. He came back in time for the Canadian National Cross-Country Championships in November, placing ninth.   Jerome Drayton has held the Canadain record since 1969.  Jerome won the Fukuoka Marathon in 1969, 1975, and 1976, as well as the Boston Marathon in 1977. He  has held the Canadian record since 1969, after breaking the then record of 2:18:55 set by Robert Moore a month earlier. (Thu 13) ⚡AMP
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Former marathon world record holder Patrick Makau of Kenya has announced his retirement from professional running

Patrick Makau, 33, has lost his fight to gain fitness after persistent patella-tendon injury, forced him off training and competition since 2017. With doctors warning against him running, Makau has opted to throw in the towel. "With the age catching up, with persistent patella-tendon injury due to which I was forced to cancel competition in 2017 for both Boston and Berlin marathons, I know this is the right time to say it is enough," Makau said Thursday in Nairobi. The two time Berlin marathon champion is credited for reclaiming the world marathon record from the grip of Ethiopian Haile Gebreselassie in 2011 when he clocked 2:03:38 eclipsing the Ethiopian's time of 2:03:59. Gebreselassie had beaten Paul Tergat's record of 2:04:54 set in 2004. Wilson Kipsang improved Makau's record after two years to 2:03:23, but that has also been shuttered to 2:02:57 by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto, which is the current record. "I have had a wonderful career as an athlete. My life is defined by athletics, what I have today is because of the sport I love. Athletics has literally changed me, allowing me to grow and to make positive impact on lives of my family and our community," said Makau, the 2007 World Half Marathon champion. "For this I am truly grateful." However, Makau will not be taking a long walk away from athletics completely. To remain busy, he intends to help guide a new generation of young distance runners realize their dreams and develop their careers, especially from the southern part of Kenya where he comes from. "I want to coach some athletes who have no guides. I want to continue giving back to the community," he said. (Thu 13) ⚡AMP
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Commonwealth champion Joshua Cheptegei will be the runner to beat at the Dam tot Damloop 10 Miler

Joshua Cheptegei from Ugandan won silver last year at the 10,000 meters at the World Championships in London and this year was the fastest in the 5000 and 10,000 meters at the Commonwealth Games in Australia.  He will be going for gold at the up coming Dam tot Damloop ten mile race. Belgian's Bashir Abdi (silver 10,000 meters EK Berlin) and Ethiopian's Ayele Abshero are also candidates for the victory for the race that runs from Amsterdam to Zaandam.  The Dutch toppers Khalid Choukoud and Michel Butter are also running. In total, 46,000 runners will participate at the Dam tot Damloop race. (Tue 11) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge is focused on only one thing as he gets ready for the Berlin Marathon Sunday

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya says he has a crazy dream to be the fastest man in history. He hopes will inspire his quest to shutter the world marathon record in Berlin on Sunday. Kipchoge, 33, will be racing in his 10th marathon since he graduated from the track back in 2012. The London champion has only one loss in his career back in 2013 against compatriot Wilson Kipsang. He has won in Hamburg, Chicago, London, Rio (Olympics) and Berlin. "It's only a crazy dream until you do it. Don't be the fastest runner in the world, but strive to be the fastest runner in history," said Kipchoge on Monday in Nairobi. Kipchoge will be running his fourth Berlin marathon on Sunday and has sounded out world marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto (2:02.57) saying he will be focused on lowering his personal best time, which is only eight seconds off the mark. "Don't ask if your dreams are crazy. Ask if they are crazy enough," he added. "In Berlin the focus will be to improve on my personal best time of 2:03.05. Last year the weather was not good but I managed strongly to finish the race," he said. (Mon 10) ⚡AMP
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The world record will be under attack at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon on September 16

Kenya’s Jorum Okombo and Alex Korio will be hoping to improve on their respective second and third finishes at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon on September 16. Organizers have assembled one of the deepest half marathon fields in history of the road race. “An elite field boasting 17 sub-60-minute men, including three of the four fastest half marathon runners over the past six years, is proof of an extremely high level,” says Jakob Larsen, director of the Danish Athletics Federation. Abraham Cheroben will be back to defend his title, having won last year in a world-leading 58:40. His main opposition looks set to come from Berlin Half Marathon champion Erick Kiptanui, Okombo and Korio. Kiptanui has announced that he will be attacking the world record in Copenhagen. The women’s race also boasts superb depth as it contains seven runners with PBs faster than 68:00. (Mon 10) ⚡AMP
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Martina Strähl wins the Jungfrau Marathon with almost a quarter of an hour advantage securing her victory for the second time

At the 26th Jungfrau Marathon from Interlaken to the Kleine Scheidegg, Martina Strähl celebrated her 2nd victory after the success of 2016. The Marathon European Championship seventh in Berlin missed the course record in just 3:14:36 ​​hours by just 100 seconds. The second-placed German Michelle Maier lost almost 15 minutes on Strähl. Third was with Michela Segalada another Swiss. Among the men, the Scot Robbie Simpson prevailed. The Swiss Volley-Nati of the women gambled their first victory in an annoying manner at the end of the Masters in Montreux. After a 2: 1 sentence lead and match balls in the 4th set, they were forced by the Cameroon women in the decision set. There the local girls went down with 1:15. Thus the Swiss selection ends the tournament on the 7th final rank. (Sat 8) ⚡AMP
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Dennis Kimetto says Kenyan athletes have the strength and skills to run the fast Berlin Marathon course in under 2 hours and 50 seconds

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03.05) and New York marathon silver medalist Wilson Kipsang (2:03.13) will be the top Runners at the Berlin marathon on Sept 16 and Kimetto believes either athlete can run away with the world record. Kimetto's world record stands at 2:02:57. "First there is a race to be won and then the record. Kipchoge is the best so far but Kipsang has the ability to sprint and win if he has his tactics right. Both athletes are under pressure since they will all want to prove a point," said Makau on Thursday in Nairobi. Kipsang was forced to pull out of Berlin marathon last year under rainy and windy conditions after just 31km, citing stomach cramps. He recovered and a month later, and proved his critics wrong to secure silver in New York. "My training has gone on very well and I'm looking forward to a good run in Berlin. It has been an injury-free period for me since running in Tokyo although there has been lots of rain but that didn't stop me from achieving my dream," said Kipsang. Like Kipchoge, Kipsang will be running his fourth marathon in Berlin, having made his debut in 2013 running a world record time of 2:03:23 and has since followed it up with 2:03:13 for a second-place behind Kenenisa Bekele (2:03.03) in 2016. (Fri 7) ⚡AMP
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Abera Kuma of Ethiopia wants to break the world record at BMW berlin marathon

Abera Kuma (27) of Ethiopia, the Rotterdam marathon silver medalist has a personal best of 2:05:50.  Former World marathon record holder Patrick Makau has warned that it will require more than skill, strength and pacesetters to break the world record. "Breaking a world record in my experience requires more hard work, experience, mental and physical strength as well as a favorable course and weather conditions," he warned. But that has not dampened Kipsang's resolution to go for the top mark and win the 50,000 U.S. dollar prize. "My target is to be on the podium as the winner. I will not be looking at who's in the race, but I will be able to use my training skills to be on the podium". (Fri 7) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto says he has overcome his injury worries and hopes to make another comeback, this time running at the Shanghai Marathon in China in November

Kimetto wants to set a new all-time best mark in China as he seeks his first win in marathon since 2016. Speaking in Iten, Kimetto, 35, warned his rivals that it will take more than their skills to improve on his world mark. "I am in right frame and shape to return to marathon running. Shanghai in my next stop in Nov," Kimetto told Xinhua on Thursday in Iten. Compatriots Wilson Kipsang (2:03:13) and Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03:05) like patient vultures have been circling the carcass that has been his world record for the last three years. The two will be in Berlin next week eyeing shutter the record but Kimetto is sitting pretty saying the record is safe. "It depends on their strategy. They are the fastest in the last two years and it depends on their pace makers. If they go past the 30km mark in under one hour and 27 minutes, then they will be able to break the record. But it is fast running and needs a lot of endurance," he warned. Kimetto, who has not finished a marathon since London in 2016, suffered another unhappy day in Vienna, Austria in April when he aggravated his calf muscle injury. He has been in and out of hospital in Germany and hopes when he returns to Hamburg next week for review, he will be given the all clear signal. "I am going for a review in Germany next week. I have just cleared my long run now and am resting. There has not been any pain my leg and I believe it is clear sign I am getting back to my best form," he said. "I will be running in Shanghai in November and I want to check with the doctors to be certain I am ready for the race. If Kipchoge and Kipsang fail to break the record, I want to tell them I will be back next year and will run even faster. But for now, winning Shanghai Marathon is my main concern," said Kimetto. (Fri 7) ⚡AMP
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