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Articles tagged #Badwater
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What is the longest someone has run without stopping?

In 1992, after taking a 15-year break from running, it wasn’t enough for Dean Karnazes’ first run to be 30 miles. Winning the infamous, 135-mile Badwater Ultramarathon across Death Valley in 120-degree heat didn’t cut it. Nor did pushing the opposite end of spectrum of human suffering by running a marathon to the South Pole, at -13-degrees F.

From October 12-15, 2005, Karnazes ran 350 miles across Northern California without stopping. He didn’t stop to sleep or to eat, or – in the most stupefying accomplishment of all – he did not even slow down to sample a Sonoma Valley chilled chardonnay. All told, he ran for 80 hours, 44 minutes without a break. He covered ground – from San Francisco to Bodega Bay to Stanford University, in Palo Alto – that many of us would plan for a weeklong road trip in a car.

The outing, which cost him a few toenails, included 40,000 calories of intake over the 3.3(ish) days, required shoe changes every 50 miles or so to accommodate his ever-swelling feet, and wasn’t originally supposed to be quite so long. After winning the Badwater in 2004, Karnazes set the goal to be the first runner to go 300 miles without stopping. Because, why not?

(08/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Ashprihanal Aalto Wins the 23rd Sri Chinmoy 3100 Mile Race

Ashprihanal Aalto is ready to go to sleep.

The 48-year-old Finn just won this year’s Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race. He crossed a duct-tape ribbon Friday after running more than 60 miles on each of 48 consecutive days around the same half-mile course in the Jamaica Hills neighborhood of Queens, N.Y.

This is Mr. Aalto’s 15th time completing one of the hardest footraces in the world, which requires runners to cover 3,100 miles over 52 days. It is often compared with ultra-endeavors like the 6633 Arctic Ultra that crosses the Arctic Circle and the Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley. The concrete sidewalk course wraps around one block that is home to Thomas A. Edison Career and Technical High School and its baseball field, with a view of Grand Central Parkway.

Guru Sri Chinmoy, an Indian athlete and philosopher who died in New York City in 2007, started the run in its current form in 1997.

His goal: to achieve the seemingly impossible—and in the process, transcend the limitations of the mind through meditation and persistence.

Not to mention, New York City’s summer heat, exhaust from nearby traffic and crowds of children walking to school.

Mr. Aalto isn’t the only one ready for a nap. The race relies on dozens of helpers and volunteers who work around the clock.

Hometown friends, co-workers and fellow disciples of Mr. Chinmoy, sleep very little for the month and a half. They spend all day on chores, including fixing the runners’ shoes and making tea and food for the eight runners participating this year who consume up to 110,000 calories a day total.

“You don’t want to have to come through here wondering what to eat,” said race director Rupantar LaRusso.

“I’m very happy,” Mr. Aalto said, who has won the race eight times now. “I can go do other things, rather than run, run, run.”

(08/06/2019) ⚡AMP
by Acacia Coronado
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3100 Mile Race

3100 Mile Race

The Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race. Called 'The Mount Everest of ultramarathons' by The New York Times, is the longest certified footrace in the world. Athletes are able to test themselves in a format unlike any other ultra-marathon event. In order to meet their goal of 3100 miles in 52 days, they must log an average of 59.6 miles per day....

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An ultramarathoner won the Badwater 135 race through Death Valley, then proposed. (She said yes.)

Moments after he finished the 135-mile run from Death Valley to Mount Whitney, setting a record in the Badwater 135 race, Japanese ultra runner Yoshihiko Ishikawa dropped to one knee. The reason wasn’t fatigue or relief over the accomplishment. He was asking his girlfriend to marry him.

Ishikawa finished the race Tuesday in 21 hours 33 minutes 1 second, breaking Pete Kostelnick’s 21:56:32 mark, set in 2016.

The Badwater race, one of the most prestigious and grueling ultras, started Monday at Badwater Basin in Death Valley, the lowest elevation in North America, and ended at Whitney Portal, the trailhead to the summit of Mount Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous United States.

The race covers three mountain ranges, with 14,600 feet of cumulative vertical ascent and 6,100 of cumulative descent, according to its website. An ultra is anything longer than the traditional 26.2-mile marathon.

After Ishikawa’s memorable finish and proposal (she said yes), there were plenty of tears.

Last year, Ishikawa, a 31-year-old engineer, won the Spartathlon, tracing the 153-mile route that Pheidippides ran before the battle of Marathon, in 22:54:40.

Patrycja Bereznowska of Poland was the women’s Badwater winner (and second to Ishikawa overall) with a time of 24:13:24 that was more than 90 minutes faster than the record set by Alyson Venti three years ago. Bereznowska also won the Spartathlon, in 2017.

(07/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Badwater 135

Badwater 135

Recognized globally as "the world’s toughest foot race," this legendary event pits up to 90 of the world’s toughest athletes runners, triathletes, adventure racers, and mountaineers against one another and the elements. Badwater 135 is the most demanding and extreme running race offered anywhere on the planet. Covering 135 miles (217km) non-stop from Death Valley to Mt. Whitney, CA, the...

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The mission of Dean Karnazes is to help all of us get off the couch and on our feet

Dean Karnazes is one of the most famous runners in the world.He's known for running 50 marathons in all 50 states over 50 consecutive days and was named one of Time Magazines "100 Most Influential People in the World." Karnazes also won the world's toughest footrace, the Badwater Ultramarathon. He ran 135 miles nonstop across Death Valley during the middle of the summer.

What is his secret to success? Good genes. Karnazes says he has his parents to thank for his runners body and ability to run without injuries.

That's right, after years of running Karnazes has never had to take time off because of an injury.One of Dean's missions is to help all of us get off the couch and on our feet.

Dean's tips:1. All you need is a pair of sneakers to get started

2. Start small - try running to the end of your street for the first couple of days. Slowly extend the run to a couple of blocks. Before you know it you will have your fist mile under your belt. Then sign up for a 5K

3. You can do it alone-just you and your music or audiobooks-- or you can do it with family or friends. Start a walking club in your community. Make new friends, or new bonds with family members.

4. A great path to physical and mental fitness

5. It doesn't matter if you're running or walking. Either way you're out there enjoying the same benefits.

(06/05/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marshall Ulrich, 67, had to drop out of “world’s toughest foot race” he’s previously won four times

Marshall Ulrich has run 129 ultra marathons and adventure races averaging 125 miles apiece. He started running in 1978, when he was 27, and tackled ultra marathons in his mid-30s. He once ran across the United States, from San Francisco to New York City, averaging almost 60 miles a day. He completed the Badwater 135-miler from Death Valley to the foot of California’s Mount Whitney a record 20 times, winning it four times, also a record. Each time, he continued another 11 miles with an ascent of 6,000 feet to the summit of Whitney, the highest peak in the contiguous United States, at 14,500 feet. But this year, Badwater went badly for Ulrich, three weeks after his 67th birthday in July. On a day when the temperature reached 127 degrees in what is widely considered “the world’s toughest foot race,” the man Outside magazine once dubbed the “Endurance King” missed the mandatory cutoff time at a checkpoint 50 miles into the race and had to drop out. Now, he’s having a hard time facing the realization that his career as one of America’s most iconic endurance athletes may be over because he’s not as fast as he used to be. (09/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Running has become an essential part of my life says Joyce Lee

For the first half of Joyce Lee's life, the only sports she did was swimming and gymnastics. "I never would have thought in a million years I would come to enjoy running," says 37-year-old Joyce.  In college she spent her summers teaching private swim lessons. 

"I needed another form of exercise, so I turned to running since it seemed like a simple way of getting in some cardio. I didn't own any running sneakers so I just wore my gym shoes and set out to run for an hour in my hilly neighborhood. I had no idea how far I went, or what my pace was; the goal was to just keep moving," she remembers.  

At first she was only using running to stay fit but that changed.  "Running has been a multi-faceted way to maintaining my overall physical, mental and emotional health. Getting the heart pumping has an amazing way to bringing issues to the front of mind for me, and allowing for some creativity to work its magic.

I am able to sort out problems, formulate new ideas and work through painful patches of my life.  Running has become an essential part of my life," Joyce says. 

On Juanurary 1, 2013 she decided she would run at least a mile every day for a year. "I often like to fly by the seat of my pants and live with little planning, so this presented a very interesting challenge for me. Any sensible person would carve out time in their morning, wake up early and fit their daily run then, but that wasn't me.

In my first year, I flew over 75,000 miles across the Pacific and around the country for business, weddings and of course a handful of road races. The time zone changes, fatigue from travel, unpredictable weather, lack of facilities required me to get very creative with how I would fit my mileage in.

I have run on a cruise ship track, airport terminals, stairs, and even a hotel hallway on my birthday at midnight. I am now into my sixth year of running every single day," she says with pride.  

She likes the idea of the Run The World Challenge and this is why she signed up.  "It is a wonderful way for runners near and far to work together as a team, joined by their passion, to work towards a common goal.  This is an awesome way for runners to socialize online and cheer each other on," says Joyce. 

Recently she placed first in the 50 mile Run De Vous Ultra. "I was adequately heat trained from having served as crew and pacer at the Badwater 135 Ultramarathon in Death Valley, I was able to successfully run the entire 50 mile distance.

The heat reached as high as 101 degrees in Morgan Hill (California), but I was able to outrun the second place runner by over two hours. It felt incredible to cross the finish as first overall winner rather than first female, something I never imagined I'd ever experience. I'll never forget it," she says. 

Some of her PR's include 20:02 for 5K, 1:34:20 for the half, 3:27:20 for the marathon and 29:41:23 for 100 miles. 

(08/29/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Not only does running keep me sober, it helps me feel balanced says Henry Ward

RUN THE WORLD:  Henry Ward has been sober since November 17, 2008 and after his son was born in March of 2012 he noticed he was becoming squirrelly.

"Even though I wasn't drinking or using," Henry says.  "I became restless. Sort of like a dry drunk. I knew I needed to do something." 

He was going to visit a friend and Henry asked what they were going to do.  "My friend was thinking about running a 8k race.  He said he would run if I did. I said sign me up! I didn't even know how far an 8k was," Henry remembers. 

"I hated every step of that race, and vowed never to run again. Every time a runner past me, I was angry. I honestly wanted to trip or elbow all runners I saw.  But when I finished, I received a glass medallion.  I also had a feeling that I will never forget.  A feeling of accomplishment, and happiness, that prompted me to seek out another race as we drove back to my friend's house." Henry signed up for another 5k the following weekend and then a 4 miler.  He was hooked. Henry is from Boston and currently lives in Tempe, Arizona.  He is married and has a 6-year-old son.

"Family is always first, running comes second," he says.  He is a chef by trade.  "I get to sweat, lift things and log 30,000 steps at work alone!  Plus eat!  I love to eat.  I eat 4000 calories a day," Henry says. 

"I run to survive, to help me deal with life on life's terms.  When I run and exercise I feel alive and it helps my day flow. If I didn't find running I would be a neurotic mess."  He loves how he feels during and after running. 

"The Runner's high, and endorphin kick was like no other. I am thankful that I found running, and it has changed my life for the better. Not only does it keep me sober and it helps me feel balanced," he says. 

He believes that anyone can change, if they want to.  "If I can change, anyone can!  I have come along way, but know that I still have a lot of work to do on my personal character defects."  

He moved up from the 5K to doing ultras.  In 2017 he completed the 250K six day stage race, 4deserts Patagonia.  In 2018 he did the Boston Quad which is running the Boston Marathon four consecutive times. 

"The official marathon was number four. We had snow, freezing rain, 50 mile an hour winds and torrential downpours," Henry says.  He wants to help inspire others and motivate many along the way.  That is one of the reasons he joined the Run The World Challenge. 

"I think the challenge is really cool because I get to connect with people who are doing the same thing for different reasons, and people from around the world." 

He has two 100 mile races coming up and he hopes to qualify for the 2019 Badwater 135 race in death valley.  

(08/01/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Michele ‘Mickey’ Graglia, wins the world's toughest foot race in extreme heat at the Badwater 135

Michele ‘Mickey’ Graglia ran an ultra in sub-40-degree weather less six months ago in the Yukon. Yesterday, he experienced the fire of Death Valley and thrived to capture the overall title of the world’s toughest foot race. The 34-year-old coach/athlete from Los Angeles was chased the final 50 miles by three runners -- Texan Jared Fetteroff, Colorado race director Don Reichelt, and, 2011 champion Oswaldo López of Madera. They finished in that order. Graglia, who was born in Italy clocked 24 hours, 51 minutes, 47 seconds. “I pretty much nailed it,” said Graglia, who ran the 2016 Badwater edition in 34 hours, 10 seconds. Fetteroff was about a dozen minutes behind; Reichelt about 75 minutes back; and López a little more than 2 hours behind. “Oh my God! I just want to hug everyone right now,” said Graglia at Mt. Whitney portal, the end of a 135-mile race that began the night before at Badwater Basin.  Micah Morgan finished in 30 hours and nine minutes to land her on the national podium finishing third in the female division and ninth overall. Badwater starts at 279 feet below sea level in the Badwater Basin, in California's Death Valley, and ends at an elevation of 8,360 feet at Mount Whitney. Temperatures reached as high as 121 degrees.  (07/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Harvey Lewis On Track To Set Record For the 2,189 mile Appalachian Trail

Harvey Sweetland Lewis has covered over 1,370 miles and 60% of the iconic Appalachian Trail since May 30th, and is nearing record setting pace to arrive in Mount Katahdin, Maine on July 14th. This Fastest Known Time (FKT) has become one of the most contested, coveted accolades in ultra running and has been broken in recent years by Scott Jurek and Carl Metzler. Joe “Stringbean” McConaughy set the current record last summer in 45 days, 12 hours and 15 minutes. Harvey’s support team has been led by his 78-year-old dad and includes countless friends, family, fellow ultra runners and strangers who have been encouraging him along the trail and on social media. Road iD has joined Harvey to document his journey. “The man who has no imagination has no wings,” are the words that drive high school teacher Harvey Lewis as he searches within himself to complete the most challenging test of his life. His accomplishments include winning Badwater, the 135-mile ultra marathon in Death Valley, considering by many as The World’s Toughest Race. His latest pilgrimage began in the early morning on May 30th, 2018, with his dad and a small film crew, set out from Springer Mountain in Georgia on waterlogged trails through torrential downpour while navigating several mudslides. For Harvey Lewis these obstacles are opportunities, as he speaks prior to the start, “Pushing yourself to extreme limits, this is when the greatest growth happens.” “When I was dealing my injuries last week, the Achilles pain, the tendinitis, the foot soreness. I was beginning to think these injuries would sideline me,” shared Harvey Lewis as he had just completed one of the most grueling sections of the Appalachian Trail on June 24th. “This has been my toughest ultra and I didn’t quit because I knew there were people counting on me, these amazing friends and strangers have made all the difference. Now, I’m feeling 90% and ready for whatever’s in store.”  Harvey posted on FB before the start.  "The opportunity to have the experience of a lifetime with my father on a journey we never would have imagined. The love of the wilderness and need to push myself to new places has inspired the seed."  Photo: Assistance on the trail comes in many forms.  Here 30 days in with Alann Lopes. (06/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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I drew inspiration from the rough weather conditions at Badwater Cape Fear 50K

The Badwater Cape Fear 50k was my first Ultra for the year and my first Badwater. I ran 5:10:17, a 50K PR and was first female (fifth overall). The course itself didn't have any challenging elevation. Instead, it had sand. Lots of sand. And to my disappointment, not much road and even less trail. I laughed about this as I ran along the beach, slipping & sinking into the sand; dodging the incoming tide...Through the difficulty, I was forced to notice the remarkable changes the shoreline goes through every day. The sand was definitely more packed down on my way back, and the shells that were there on my way out were washed away. It was so beautiful... I felt a little sad these breathtaking transformations are going unnoticed day in & day out while the rest of the world spins and many of us are busy living the office life...When things got tough, I drew inspiration from the rough weather conditions, I wanted to cross the finish line with my fastest 50k ever and to make my Badwater family proud! (03/20/2018) ⚡AMP
by Joyce Lee
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Run It Fast is about pushing yourself and limits beyond anything you have ever done before

RunItFast post cool running photos regularly on Twitter. So cool that we just needed to learn more about them. RunItFast.com is a compilation of some of the most elite and experienced runners in the world. Run It Fast is a way of life and is subjective according to every runner. Run It Fast is about pushing yourself and limits beyond anything you’ve ever done before. For some that will mean running a single mile while for others it will be finishing their first marathon or ultra marathon. The inspiration and creator of this club is Joshua Holmes. He has run 205 marathons/ultras including forty 100 milers. On Friday Joshua posted on FB: The prestigious Badwater 135 mile ultra marathon invites were announced late this morning and it includes 13 Run It Fast club members of the 100 person field from around the world. (02/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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