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Sarah Flourentzou-Lucas doesn't let aggressive cancer stop her from living and dreams of running the London Marathon

An inspirational mum who ran a half marathon one month after having a breast removed is encouraging others to keep fighting. Sarah Flourentzou-Lucas' doctor told her 'not to worry' about a small lump she had found, as it looked like a cyst.

But she was given the devastating news she had a rare form of cancer after waiting for weeks for a follow-up appointment, but medics were unsure what type.

The 39-year-old Worle runner said: "They told me it was a really rare one as they would normally know straight away. "That was the worst part because I was left wondering if I was going to die in a month."

Sarah said a 'weight lifted off her shoulders' when she finally found out what form of breast cancer she had. She had seven rounds of chemotherapy before undergoing surgery to remove her breast.

She said: "This cancer might kill me but it's not going to stop me living. I get bouts of anxiety about it but I can't stay in that position because there is no point in me being here and that isn't a life.

"My motto during my treatment was to take a good day and make it great because the next day I could be on my butt doing nothing."

James Lucas described his wife as an 'inspiration' to other people battling cancer. He said: "We have a running group called #NoExcuses which really encompasses Sarah.

"She is still running and training and doing everything she does despite what she is going through." Sarah carried on her with her exercise regime, completing 17 park runs during her chemotherapy treatment.

Sarah had her breast removed on April 23 and, within four-and-a-half weeks, she completed a half marathon in Edinburgh. She started radiotherapy, but has been told by her doctors she will not go into remission as the odds of her cancer returning will increase at a rate of 2.5 per cent every 10 years.

Sarah has called on men and women to 'check their lumps and bumps', as early detection 'could have saved her life'.

Sarah is now hoping to continue her running aspirations by earning a place in the London Marathon for Breast Cancer Now.

(07/15/2019) ⚡AMP
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London Marathon runners who claimed they were called fat and slow during this year’s race will receive free entry to next year’s race, according to organizers

Runners who competed in the marathon in April said at the time they were taunted by contractors and volunteers as they race to the finish line of the 26.2-mile race.

“I had runners that were crying — ones saying they were going to go home and quit,” Liz Ayres, an official race pacer, previously told the BBC.

Some runners were allegedly told, “If you weren’t so fat, you could run,” and “This is a race, not a walk.”

Organizers for the London Marathon investigated the situation, apologized and recently announced that those who were taunted will receive free entry to next year’s event, the BBC reported on Saturday.

Ayres claimed that as early as 3 miles into the race, the water stations along the course had been packed away and that one runner was injured by a cleaning solution used by crews who allegedly told the group to “hurry up” so that they could clear the streets quicker.

Race organizers said that, in response, they’ll start cleaning up at a later time, will look into when water was provided throughout the race and will have a senior staff member monitor the event from the back of the race.

More than 42,000 people participated in the 39th running of the London Marathon earlier this year.

(07/10/2019) ⚡AMP
by Nicole Darrah
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Obviously these people just wanted to wrap up the race after a long day. No excuse for this but it appears the London Marathon are addressing this with style. 7/10 9:52 pm


Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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More than 450,000 runners want to run the next London Marathon, the most ever

More than 450,000 runners have entered the ballot for next year's London Marathon, breaking the event's own world record for registrations, organisers said on Tuesday.

The final total of 457,861 applicants from Britain and overseas represents a 10.5% increase on last year's 414,168 bidding for a place in the world's most popular marathon.

More than 56% of British entries were from people who have never run a marathon, and the majority of those are women.

"One of our goals is to inspire people to take up sport and it's fantastic that more than 210,000 people from the UK have been inspired to apply to run a marathon for the first time in 2020," event director Hugh Brasher said in a statement.

"At the first London Marathon back in 1981, fewer than 300 of the 6,300 finishers were women.

"More than 179,000 women from the UK have applied to run in 2020 and, for the third successive year, there are more female than male first-time marathon runners from the UK."

The 40th London marathon will take place on April 26, 2020.

(05/22/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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London Marathon winner Brigid Kosgei says she does not know what is next for her at the moment

London marathon champion Brigid Kosgei says she will relish the challenge to defend her title in the English capital in 2020.

Speaking in Nairobi upon her arrival from London, Kosgei, who is also the Chicago marathon winner, says she has no fear of any athlete and will be ready to take on any challenge in future race.

"I say thank you for Kenyans for cheering me. I have done to London and done something good. I hope next year I will go there and do something better," said Kosgei on Tuesday.

For now, Kosgei will take a deserved rest to shake off the fatigue as she discusses with her coach Erick Kimaiyo and management over her next race in 2019.

"I want to prepare well for the next race. I hope to be a winner again wherever I will go. I must thank my coach Kimaiyo for having believed and trained me," she said.

Kosgei, who in 2018 was second to Vivian Cheruiyot, returned to the English capital and proved her worth as she obliterated her mentor to win the race with Cheruiyot settling for silver.

She however says due to the high number of elite runners in the race, it is always hard to hit fast time as each will sit back to wait for a sacrificial lamp to step forward and lead.

"But for me, I knew I had trained well and after 21km I decided it was time to go. We were watching each other, me, Vivian and Mary Keitany. I believed in my strides and it was good that I won. Even the few times that Cheruiyot pulled away, I was not worried. I don't fear anyone because as long as my legs are strong, I always focus on winning," she said

Kosgei had prepared for a fast time but not a personal best. "I don't know what is next for me at the moment. After recovering, my body will show where next I will go," said Kosgei.

It is now three wins in a row for Kenya women in London after Keitany won in 2017, Cheruiyot in 2018 and now Kosgei in 2019.

(05/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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London Marathon offered edible seaweed drinks instead of plastic bottles

Over 30,000 edible drinks capsules made from seaweed were handed out to runners at the London Marathon, in a bid to reduce plastic waste.

The marathon was the largest ever trial of Ooho capsules – biodegradable pods that can be filled with water or other beverages.

You can either consume the pods whole, or bite into them to release the liquid. Made from a seaweed-based substance, the discarded wrapping will naturally decompose in four to six weeks – roughly the same time as a piece of fruit.

Ooho pods are made by Skipping Rocks Lab, a London-based startup led by Royal College of Art graduates Rodrigo Garcia Gonzalez and Pierre Paslier.

During the marathon, the capsules were filled with energy drink Lucozade Sport Orange and handed out to runners from a station 23 miles into the 26.2-mile course.

Introduction of the capsules formed part of a push from London Marathon organisers to make this year's event the most sustainable marathon ever.

Last year an estimated 760,000 plastic bottles were thrown onto the city's streets by runners and spectators. The target for 2019 was to bring this number down by 215,000.

The total number of drinks stations was reduced from 26 to 19, including the one distributing edible Ooho pods. Plus two of the stations were handing out drinks in compostable cups.

To further reduce the marathon's carbon footprint, plastic bottles dropped in the London were taken to a recycling plant.

"It's really simple because it’s a membrane, and membranes are the technology that nature uses to encapsulate things using the minimum amount of material," explained Gonzalez.

(05/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Sir Mo Farah is disappointed on his performance at London Marathon

Mo Farah finished fifth in Sunday’s London Marathon in 2:05:39, three minutes behind winner Eliud Kipchoge. Farah went into the race hoping for a big result, but came away shy of his goals.

Farah fell off of the leaders at roughly halfway but maintained a strong position throughout the race. The runner told the London Marathon post-race, “I didn’t feel great at the start but I followed the pace maker.

I felt good halfway and by 20 miles a gap was there. My aim was to reel them back once the pacemaker dropped out but wasn’t able to. I am disappointed as training went well.”

When asked about the Haile Gebrselassie controversy, Farah said, “I didn’t think the fuss affected my run and I wasn’t distracted by the build up, it was all about London today and so I put my head down, did my best.”

While a 2:05:39 wasn’t exactly what he was looking for, it’s still less than 30 seconds off his personal best and European record of 2:05:11, and a fifth-place finish among one of the best marathon fields ever assembled is no joke.

In Sunday’s race, only seven months after his world record run, Kipchoge ran the second-fastest time in history over the marathon distance and became the first man to win four London Marathon titles.

(04/30/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Kipchoge wins London Marathon for record 4th time while Brigid Kosgei wins the women’s race as American women finish 6th and 12th

Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya ran the second-fastest time ever to win the London Marathon for a record fourth time Sunday, and compatriot Brigid Kosgei swept to victory by almost two minutes in the women's race.

The 34-year-old Kipchoge pulled clear of Ethiopian runners Mosinet Geremew and Mule Wasihun in the final 10 minutes to complete the course in 2 hours, 2 minutes, 37 seconds on a blustery day in the British capital.

Only Kipchoge has run a marathon quicker than that, when breaking the world record in Berlin in September in a time of 2:01:39. With more twists and turns, London is typically a slower course than Berlin - making Kipchoge's display even more exceptional.

"I'm happy to win on the streets of London for the fourth time and to make history on a day that the event has raised 1 billion pounds ($1.3 billion)," said Kipchoge, who won in London in 2015, '16 and '18.

Geremew finished 18 seconds behind, and Wasihun a further 21 seconds back. Nobody has run quicker to finish a marathon in second or third place.

Home favorite Mo Farah - a four-time Olympic champion on the track - could not live with the pace, dropping away at the 14-mile mark and finishing a distant fifth at the end of a week when he was involved in an extraordinary public feud with retired distance-running great Haile Gebrselassie.

Kosgei bettered her second-place finish in last year's race by winning in 2:18:20 for her second victory in the World Marathon Majors, after Chicago last year. She ran the quickest-ever second half of a women's marathon.

Compatriot and defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot finished in a time of 2:20:14 and Roza Dereje of Ethiopia was third, 37 seconds further back.

Dan Romanchuk, a 20-year-old American, won the men's wheelchair race ahead of Switzerland's Marcel Hug. The women's wheelchair race was won comfortably by Switzerland's Manuela Schar, the 2017 champion.

In her debut at the distance, American Emily Sisson (photo) ran 2:23:08 to finish sixth at the London Marathon this morning. This is the fastest American woman time in a woman only race.  Her training partner, (photo) Molly Huddle, finished 12th in a personal best of 2:26:33.

Sisson’s time makes her the sixth-fastest American in history on a record-eligible course.

(04/28/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Eliud Kipchoge clocked the second fastest time in history to wins the London Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge win the men's London Marathon posting a negative split.  He lead a group of several at the half marathon mark clocking 1:01:35 there.  The pace quicken right away as mile 14 was clocked in 4:31.  

World record holder Eliud waves to the crowd as he takes the win with a time of 2hrs 2 mins and 37sec. That’s the second fastest time in history.  He said he was coming here to win but he certainly did more than this.  

Second place was also under 2:03.  Mosinet Gerewen from Ethiopia clocked 2:02:55 followed by Mule Wasihun also from Ethiopia, in 2:03:16.  These are the three fastest times of the year.

Brigid Kosgei from Kenya won the woman’s race in 2:18:20.  She smashed the field.  Vivian Cheruiyot also from Kenya was second clocking 2:20:14.  

(04/28/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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The battle at the London Marathon is going to be starting in just a few hours

Sir Mo Farah has twice competed in the London Marathon, finishing in eighth place in 2014 and in third spot in 2018.

The four-time Olympic champion will face stiff competition to win race, which will come in the form of defending champion and world record holder Eliud Kipchoge.  On top of this Eliud has only been beaten once in the marathon.  Wilson Kipsang beat him in Berlin as he set a world record.  

Farah is well aware of the momentous task on his hands and is hoping his fellow Brits can help guide him to victory.

”All I can ask from the crowd is to give me as much information as possible, as I go through the last 10 miles in particular," he told Sky News. "If I'm leading, if I'm behind, the more information I have the easier it is.

“This race means a lot to me. I finished third last year and this year I believe I can give it a little bit more."

Kenya’s Kipchoge is the favourite to win the marathon this year having set a new world record in Berlin last September.

"Eliud is a great athlete and the world record holder," Farahsaid of Kipchoge. "I'm going to go out there and give it my best."

"Racing against Eliud in London was learning the hard way - but I believe I learned a lot," Farah added when asked about last year's race.

Mo Farah and Eliud Kipchoge are two of the favourites to win the London Marathon.

"After each race, you get a bit better, that bit more experienced. I believe I could have gone a little bit faster in Chicago - 2:04-something, but I don't know.

"It's nice to be back in my home city; it's really exciting. I feel more nervous and hungry again. I'm not used to winning in the marathon, so I feel like I've got my mojo back."

The battle in the women’s race could even be more exciting and in fact a world record could be in the makings.  

It looks like the weather could be good for marathoning.  Rain maybe early but the temperature should be in the mid forties.  The wind might be as strong as 10mph.  

In total over 40,000 participants have entered and over one billion pounds have been raised for charity since the Marathon was first run.  

(04/27/2019) ⚡AMP
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Defending London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot, says a women-only world record could be broken Sunday

Vivian Cheruiyot appears in a confident mood ahead of Sunday’s Virgin Money London Marathon, and with good reason.

The defending champion returns to the UK capital as a 66:34 half-marathoner, having improved her PB to claim victory in Lisbon last month. That run, she says, paired with her performances in training, proves she’s in even better shape than last year, when she defeated a field including her fellow Kenyan Mary Keitany after a superbly-judged race which resulted in a 2:18:31 PB.

“I am in better shape because last year I changed things and the programme of last year and this year has been the same,” says the 2016 Olympic 5000m champion, who made her marathon debut in London in 2017.

“We normally compare (the training of) last year and this year and I did better than last year which means I am in better shape than last year so I am happy about that.

“I also did a personal best at the half-marathon in Lisbon so I think I am going to run good on Sunday.”

Twelve months ago, in challenging hot conditions, Keitany and Tirunesh Dibaba had been accompanied by male pacemakers as they set their sights on Paula Radcliffe’s world record of 2:15:25. Keitany stormed through half way in 67:16 before fading in the final miles, with Cheruiyot coming through for victory after having sat back off the lead pack initially.

This time the race will feature female pacemakers, as it did in 2017 when Keitany ran her women-only world record of 2:17:01 to secure her third London Marathon title.

World half-marathon record-holder Joyciline Jepkosgei heads the lead group of pacemakers and will be joined by Dorcas Tuitoek and Edith ChelimoEunice Chumba will pace a second group.

While Dibaba won’t be racing on Sunday as she is expecting her second child, Keitany does return and the pair will also be joined by two other sub-2:19 runners – Chicago champion Brigid Kosgei and Berlin winner Gladys Cherono.

Cheruiyot believes a women-only world record could be on the cards.

“The male pacemakers, they were quicker (last year) because the ladies wanted to run 2:15. I think now people are trying to run 2:17,” she says. “It’s possible (for the women-only world record to be broken) on Sunday if the weather is good because I know the athletes are very strong.

“I’m going to try my best (to break the record herself). It will depend on how my body responds. If it is going to respond very well, I am in good shape and I’ll try to do my best.

“If it’s going to be 68 (minutes) at half way, that is okay for me, I can stay with them all the way through. Last year 67 was too fast.

“Running a PB in Lisbon really gives me confidence because mostly I did it alone. We have people pacing us here so my chances of running 2:17 are very high.”

Since making her debut two years ago, Cheruiyot has raced three more marathons – in Frankfurt (first in 2:23:35), London and New York (second behind Keitany in 2:26:02) – and, despite missing the track, she insists she won’t be returning to in-stadium action.

“I miss it a lot because I really liked running on the track, especially the 5000m – it was really enjoyable for me,” says the 35-year-old four-time world track gold medallist.

“We used to go for 40 minutes, one hour training (for the track), but now you have to do 40km for training – it’s very hard.

“When I started training for the marathon I was like ‘I’m going to finish the training, I’m going to be tired forever!’ But now I am catching up, I am used to it and I love it now.”

(04/27/2019) ⚡AMP
by Jessica Whittington
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Half marathon world-record holder Kenyan Abraham Kiptum, suspended before London Marathon

Kenyan Abraham Kiptum, the half-marathon world-record holder, was provisionally suspended for a biological passport violation, the sport’s anti-doping watchdog announced two days before Kiptum was to run the London Marathon.

Kiptum, 29, made no mention of the case at Wednesday’s pre-race press conference in an interview with LetsRun.com. Kiptum said his goal for Sunday’s 26.2-miler was to lower his personal best of 2:05:26.

On Oct. 28, Kiptum surprisingly broke the half-marathon world record by five seconds, bringing it down to 58:18 in Valencia, Spain. He has raced marathons since 2015 and was to make his major marathon debut Sunday.

Countryman Eliud Kipchoge is the overwhelming favorite in London. Brit Mo Farah and Ethiopian Shura Kitata are the top challengers in the world’s strongest spring marathon.

(04/26/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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A grandfather pensioner with dementia is set to take on his 131st marathon in London Sunday

Malcolm Brookes, 78, is preparing to tackle his 131st race when he takes part in this Sunday’s London Marathon. He completed his first marathon in 1986, finishing the course in Jersey in four hours 41 minutes. It took him 22 years to enter his second marathon, but since then the retired minister has clocked up thousands of miles.

Malcolm follows a gruelling training regime of running six miles every other day to keep fit. What a legend. Four years ago he was diagnosed with vascular dementia just weeks after he became the oldest Brit to complete his 100th marathon.

Despite his condition, which affects around 150,000 people in the UK, Malcolm continued running and has completed another 30 races.

He is now hoping to raise more than £2,000 for charity Dementia Revolution when he runs on Sunday. ‘I was 45 when I ran my first marathon and 22 years later I ran my second one,’ says Malcolm.

Malcolm, who has three grown-up children and seven grandchildren, now relies on his wife Mary, 77, to help him plan his races.

‘Eventually, I will disappear down the plughole and I will be quite a different person from what I was,’ he says. ‘I find it very difficult at times to find words. I make up words. I can only focus on one thing at a time. I can’t multi-task at all. ‘I sometimes get very angry. I don’t know why I am being angry. It’s frustration that I can’t live a life that I used to live.

‘I might shout at my wife and I don’t want to be shouting at her. Malcolm’s marathon career started while working as a minister in Jersey when he spotted an advert for the island’s marathon. He even signed up for the 7x7x7 Challenge – seven marathons in seven locations in seven months, saying simply that it was, ‘really tough.’ ‘I am going to carry on for as long as I can,’ he says. ‘I just enjoy running and I will do it as long as I am able to do it.

(04/25/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Callum Hawkins is running the London Marathon and Andy Vernon will be making his marathon debut in London

Callum Hawkins is to run the Virgin Money London Marathon this weekend, returning to marathon action for the first time since his collapse when leading the Commonwealth Games race last year.

In terms of British elite men’s entries, the world fourth-placer will be joined in the UK capital by the already-announced Mo Farah, Dewi Griffiths, Jonny Mellor, Tsegai Tewelde, Andy Davies, Josh Griffiths, Robbie Simpson, Matt Sharp and Andy Vernon, who will be making his marathon debut.

Hawkins clocked 2:10:52 when running the London event for the first time in 2016 and improved to his current PB of 2:10:17 when finishing fourth as the city staged the IAAF World Championships the following year.

Racing on the Gold Coast last April, the Scot had looked set to claim a dominant Commonwealth victory but collapsed with just two kilometres of the race remaining. He was entered to compete in the Fukuoka Marathon in December but withdrew due to a hamstring niggle.

His latest performance saw him impress over 10km as he ran 28:55 in Valencia last weekend – a time which is an official PB, though the 26-year-old has clocked faster 10km splits as part of a half-marathon.

Fans will also be interested to see what Vernon might be able to achieve as he steps up to race over 26.2 miles for the first time.

The 2014 European 10,000m silver and 5000m bronze medallist, who also claimed individual European Cross Country Championships bronze in 2013, missed last year’s edition of the Euro Cross through injury but returned to race at the Simplyhealth Great Stirling XCountry last weekend.

“It felt like the right time in my career to move up to the marathon,” said the 33-year-old.

“I feel like I am getting a little bit slower on the track. It’s tough to make teams, it’s tough to do well at championships, especially over 10,000m. For that reason, I thought if I don’t do it now, I won’t ever do it.”

The London Marathon doubles up as the GB team selection event for the IAAF World Championships in Doha, with the British women’s field also looking competitive.

After a year hampered by injury and illness, Charlotte Purdue will return to race in London, as will her Aldershot, Farnham and District club-mate Lily Partridge, the current British champion, who was also forced to drop out of last year’s European Championships marathon with stomach cramps.

Just one second separates Purdue’s marathon PB of 2:29:23, set in London in 2017, and Partridge’s best time of 2:29:24, which she ran to finish eighth in her first London Marathon last year.

“I want to make the world championship team for Doha and I want to run a PB at the Virgin Money London Marathon because I think I can go a lot faster than I did in 2017 and I think my world championship performance proved that,” said world 13th-placer Purdue.

“I just haven’t had the right race yet so I’m hoping the London Marathon will be the right race for me.”

(04/25/2019) ⚡AMP
by Athletics Weekly
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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This year London Marathon will have the deepest women’s field in marathon history

This Sunday is the Virgin Money London Marathon, and the women’s field is so strong it feels too good to be true. It feels like winning an all-inclusive trip for two by calling into a radio show–things this good just don’t happen.

But this field is real, and very much happening. Getting underway on Sunday morning at 4:25 a.m. EDT is a women’s event that could make history.

The only piece of bad news is that one of the fastest marathoners in history, Tirunesh Dibaba, has announced that she and her husband are expecting their second child and that she won’t be racing for the remainder of the year.

The top women coming in are defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot and women’s-only world record-holder Mary Keitany. These are just two of the six women with incoming personal bests under 2:20:00.

The others are Birhane Dibaba, who was the winner of the 2018 Tokyo Marathon in 2:19:51, Gladys Cherono (a three-time Berlin champion with a personal best of 2:18:11), Brigid Kosgei (the 2018 Chicago champion in 2:18:35) and Roza Dereje at 2:19:17 (from the Dubai Marathon in 2018).

The wild thing about this group of women is that each of them (except for Dereje) have a world major title and a recent personal best. Keitany has the oldest PB (which is the women’s-only world record) and it’s only from 2017. In terms of who will take the title, it’s a genuinely tight race between these women.

Depending on the day, the order could change, but Kosgei’s Chicago performance was truly dominant, as was Cherono’s in Berlin in 2018. But Keitany has had luck in London before, setting the world record there, so she knows how to run the course well.

The other women’s story to watch is the American battle. The Molly Huddle and Emily Sisson battle could make history for American women. Both women have had impressive 2019 seasons. Sisson ran within seconds of Huddle’s American half-marathon record in Houston.

Then the two women competed against each other three weeks ago at the Stanford Invitational 10,000m, where Sisson came out on top in 30:49 and the third-fastest American woman of all time.

Huddle is going in with an extremely impressive personal best of 2:26:44, and London will be Sisson’s debut. Both women are clearly in incredible shape, and the women’s field is top-notch, so they are sure to push each other to some of the fastest American women’s times in history. Deena Kastor’s American record of 2:19:36 may not be within reach just yet, but it likely will be one day soon for these women.

(04/24/2019) ⚡AMP
by Madeleine Kelly
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Molly Huddle is set for her London Marathon debut

With her sights set on a return to London in a month, Elmira native Molly Huddle opened the outdoor track season with a runner-up finish in the 10,000 meters Friday night at the Stanford Invitational in Palo Alto, California.

Huddle, 34, posted a time of 30 minutes, 58.46 seconds at Stanford's Cobb Track and Angell Field. Emily Sisson won in 30:49.59. Sisson's time was the sixth-fastest ever for an American woman, with only Huddle and Shalane Flanagan having run quicker times.

Huddle's time was good enough to top the standard of 31:25 for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, though she would still need to qualify for Tokyo at next year's U.S. Trials. Huddle set the still-standing American record in the 10,000 at the 2016 Rio Olympics with a sixth-place time of 30:13.17.

After the meet, Huddle credited Sisson with helping to push her to a sub 31-minute race.

The meet included both professional and college runners. Allie Ostrander of Boise State took third in 32:06 in the 10K invitational race behind Sisson and Huddle.

Huddle is tuning up to compete in the London Marathon on April 28. It will be the fourth career marathon for Huddle, who finished fourth at the New York City Marathon in November after placing third in her marathon debut there in 2016. She ran the Boston Marathon last year. Sisson, who is Huddle's training parter, will make her marathon debut at London

(04/23/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Reigning London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot is focusing on defending her title at 2019 London Marathon

Reigning London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot is not focusing on breaking the world record when she returns to the 2019 London course on April 28.

Cheruiyot, popularly known as ‘Pocket Rocket’, will be lining up in the streets of London for a third consecutive year but this time round she will be defending the title she clinched in 2018.

The Olympic Champion clocked 2:18:31 beating the three-time London Marathon champion and her close ally Mary Keitany en route to clinching the title and the duo are set to face off again in this year’s event.

The 35-year-old however says that focus is on retaining the crown but not setting a record and would not be focussing on her competitors.

“I will be running against anybody. I will be competing as Vivian and so I don’t know what my competitors are planning, maybe they want to break the world record but for me I hope to run good race,” Cheruiyot, known for her trade mark infectious smile told Citizen Digital.

Having beaten Keitany to the title last year, Cheruiyot said they might be rivals on the road but enjoys a warm relationship with the New York Marathon champion.

“In athletics we are also friends, only that if I win then that is my time and if Mary wins it’s her time because this is sports,” explained Cheruiyot.

This year’s race is set to be as competitive as ever with the winners of the last four Abbott World Marathon Majors set to line up in London on Sunday.

The duo is set to face off against Chicago Marathon champion Brigid Kosgei and the Berlin Marathon champion Gladys Cherono.

Also, in the mix is another Kenyan, Linet Masai, who will be making her debut.

Cherono, Kosgei and Keitany top the current Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York.

Meanwhile, three-time Olympic champion who finished second in London and won Chicago in 2017, Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba, has pulled out of the Sunday’s race as she is expecting her second- born child thus leaving her compatriots Tadelech Bekele, who finished third in London last year and the 21-year- old Roza Dereje, second in Chicago, and winner of the Dubai Marathon in 2018 to lead the assault for Ethiopia.

(04/22/2019) ⚡AMP
by Gilbert Kiprotich
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Prince Harry’s touching message for London Marathon runners for hitting the one billion pounds fundraising mark

The Duke of Sussex has thanked runners preparing to take part in the London Marathon, as total fundraising over the years hit £1 billion (1.3 billion US dollars). 

Prince Harry, who is awaiting the birth of his first child, branded the race, which takes place April 28, “an extraordinary force for good.”

The duke said in a video message tweeted by Virgin Money London Marathon that the funds had supported hundreds of charities around the world, helping those most in need.

“It is the biggest one-day fundraising event on the planet and helps hundreds of charities at home and abroad provide vital services to those that need them most,” he said. 

(04/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Marathon world record holder, Eliud Kipchoge, says he is relishing the prospect of facing Mo Farah again at london marathon

Kipchoge, who won his third London title in last year’s race, with Farah finishing third, then went on to set a stunning world record of two hours, one minute and 39 seconds at the Berlin Marathon in September – beating the previous best by over a minute.

Farah, meanwhile, went on to claim the Chicago Marathon in October in a European record time of 2hr 5min 11sec – and afterwards promised that he was “not afraid to keep turning up in the same field and testing Kipchoge”.

That wish has now been granted with the Kenyan, who was named the 2018 IAAF Athlete of the Year in December, having agreed to make his fourth appearance in London.

“I had a memorable 2018, winning the Virgin Money London Marathon and then setting a new world record at the Berlin marathon and I’m hoping that 2019 is just as good to me,”said Kipchoge.

“I am looking forward to racing Sir Mo Farah again. He is a great champion and proved in Chicago that he can win a major marathon so I relish the battle with him and also the many other great athletes that I’m sure will once again be on the start line in London.”

The top three from the 2018 podium will all be in London again this year with organisers confirming Ethiopia’s 22-year-old marathon star Shura Kitata, who was second to Kipchoge last year before finishing runner-up in the New York marathon in November, will race.

Hugh Brasher, event director of the race, said he was delighted to have set up a mouthwatering showdown between Kipchoge, who is unbeaten in London and also holds the course record of 2:03.05, and Britain’s greatest distance runner.

“There is no doubt that Eliud Kipchoge is the greatest marathon runner of all time,” he said “Since Sir Mo Farah won the Chicago Marathon in October, everyone has been talking about another head-to-head between Mo and Eliud and we are absolutely thrilled that this showdown will happen.

“We will see two absolute legends of distance running competing over 26.2 miles of roads in the greatest marathon in the world. I cannot wait until Sunday 28 April to see who comes out on top.”

(04/18/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba has withdrawn from the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon for personal reasons

The three-time Olympic champion and current 5,000m world record holder was second in the 2017 Virgin Money London Marathon when she set a personal best (PB) of 2:17:56, making her the fifth fastest female marathon runner in history.

Dibaba, 33, is one of a handful of notable changes to the fields for the elite men and elite women races since they were first released at the end of January.

USA’s Allie Kiefer, who was seventh at last November’s TCS New York City Marathon, has withdrawn as has Denmark’s Anna Holm Jorgensen – the daughter of Henrik Jorgensen, the 1988 London Marathon champion who died earlier this year.

Swiss pair Maude Mathys and Martina Strahl have both also pulled out, as has Ireland’s Emma Mitchell and the British duo Eleanor Davis and Laura Graham.

In the elite men’s race, North American pair Chris Derrick (USA) and Cam Levins (CAN) are the biggest name withdrawals while Mikael Ekvall (SWE) and Matt Sharp (GBR) are both also no longer running.

(04/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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A cancer survivor Pete Alsop will be showing that age is no obstacle by taking on the London Marathon in his eighties for Cancer Research UK

Pete Alsop will be 83 when he puts on his trainers for his first marathon attempt later this month. The 82-year-old, who had prostate cancer, is taking on the challenge in memory of his wife, Val, who died from bowel cancer.

The octogenarian is a familiar sight pounding the pavements in St Neots, power walking three times a week. Residents in his retirement complex have pledged support, but Pete is paying the first £3,000 himself to say 'thank you' to the charity.

On April 28 he will tackle the Virgin Money London Marathon. And he's urging other runners, with a confirmed place, to raise money for Cancer Research UK too.

Pete said: “On my 80th birthday I decided I wanted to do something special and I walked 25 miles – but the London Marathon will be my first full marathon. I really wanted to walk it for my Val and in memory of my mother and nan. But I also wanted to do it as a 'thank you' to Cancer Research UK.”

It's something he could not have imagined doing more than 22 years ago, when he sat watching a news item on TV about prostate cancer. His wife suggested he went for a check.

Pete said: “I knew a normal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was anything below four, but my reading was six, so the doctor decided to keep a close eye on it.”

He received his cancer diagnosis later that year in 1997.

Around that time, the couple moved to a retirement home in St Neots. Twelve years later, Val began to get stomach pains and was diagnosed with bowel cancer, which had spread to her liver. Despite deciding against surgery and chemotherapy, Val lived for a further two years.

Pete said: “Val died on March 18, 2008, and it still gets me to talk about it. Not many people were as fortunate as we were to have such a happy marriage; we were married for 47 years.”

He continued to get his PSA level checked. When the levels kept going up, Pete had injections into his stomach every three months for five years, followed by radiotherapy seven years ago. His reading went down to zero and he is now in remission.

Pete then joined a local cancer support group – Acorn – and started fundraising by doing walks for charity.

Pete said: “Since then I've done eight or nine sponsored walks of up to 10 miles – but I started to add another 10 miles on top.

“I would like to help other people who have had cancer and share my view with them that you need a positive attitude, a determination to get fit – and to decide you are going to get over it.

“I have known a lot of men who have had cancer and just decided to die, whereas my belief is that with all the research going on, you have a chance – and you have got to take it.”

Danielle Glavin, Cancer Research UK's spokesperson for the East of England, said: “We are so grateful to Pete for taking on this challenge for us at the age of 82. We wish him all the best with his training and also on the day of the marathon.

“It's thanks to the support of amazing people like Pete that we're able to continue our research into kinder and more effective treatments for cancer. A great deal of progress has been made, but there's still so much work to do.

“Anyone who already has a place in the Virgin Money London Marathon can still join our team of runners. Or if a marathon is one step too far, why not try one of our other runs or sporting events instead and get involved to help support vital cancer research.”

(04/15/2019) ⚡AMP
by Daniel Mansfield
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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An army veteran who is suffering from sight loss is planning on running the London marathon with a white cane

Steven Waterson says running was a 'coping mechanism' after he suffered a brain hemorrhage.

Steven Waterson began to lose his vision after operations following two brain hemorrhages and other health problems.

However the 46-year-old is still a keen runner and his next challenge will be the London marathon.  The former army chef has received support from the charity Scottish War Blinded after losing his left field of vision following surgery, and reduced vision on his right.

In 2014, Steven ran part of the Queen's Baton relay in Midlothian for the Commonwealth Games.  Steven says, "There’s always something positive you can take out of a race.

“I was intrigued by marathons – every year I’d watch London and I knew one day I’d get to one.”  After a brain haemorrhage in 2003, Steven was found to have arteriovenous malformation – where high pressure arteries are connected to low pressure veins, risking rupture.

As well as sight loss,  Steven also suffered paralysis on his left side.  Steven said running was “a coping mechanism” after his first bleed.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Egyptian woman Manal Rostom, and first Nike Hijab model and coach is set for London Marathon

As the countdown for the 2019 London Marathon gets underway, international charity Penny Appeal has announced that the Egyptian mountaineer and marathon runner, Manal Rostom, will be running this year’s London Marathon for the charity.

Rostom is widely recognised as Nike’s first Hijab model and coach, but is also the first Egyptian woman to summit two out of the seven highest summits in the world.

On the running side of things, Rostom has completed five sprint triathlons, run over 13 half marathons, various full marathons and even one 50K solo run.

She is the first Egyptian woman to run the length of the Great Wall of China Marathon, and her mission is to be the first Egyptian to run all the World’s Six Major Marathons.

The Penny Appeal is an international humanitarian charity, which provides a range of life-saving solutions in over 30 crisis hit countries. Manal said, “So very proud to be running for Penny Appeal this year, for a good cause.

This is my first London marathon, I hope that we can make a big difference by raising funds to support the Dig Deep campaign, I also want young Muslim women in Britain to realise they can do anything they want in life as long as they believe in themselves.”

Haroon Mota, who is Head of Challenges at Penny Appeal said, “We are proud to have such an inspirational woman running with us.

(04/11/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Emily Sisson became the third-fastest American in history with her 30:49 10,000m performance at Stanford on Friday

With her 30:49 10,000m on Friday night at Stanford, 27-year-old Emily Sisson is behind only Molly Huddle and Shalane Flanagan in American history. Sisson will next tackle her marathon debut on Apr. 28 in London.

Marathon training is already showing a lot of promise for 26.2 newcomer Emily Sisson. With just under a month remaining until her debut.

The race was executed with teamwork from Sisson, 27, and her training partner Huddle, 34, who are both coached by Ray Treacy. The runners switched off leading every few laps for the majority of the race in Stanford, California, which set the tone for a pace aimed to break the 2020 Olympic qualifying standard.

Both runners competed at the 2017 IAAF World Track and Field Championships together and are currently in the middle of training to compete at the London Marathon in April, which made the return to the track all the more exciting.

(04/01/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Two-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray has been named as the official starter of the London Marathon

He follows in the footsteps of the Queen, who started it in 2018, while the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry did the honours in 2017.

Scot Murray - currently rehabilitating following hip surgery - said it was an "honour" to be asked.

"It's such an amazing race that means so much to so many people," the 31-year-old added.

"It raises millions each year for charity and helps inspire people to get active. I have nothing but admiration for everyone who runs - I may even run it myself one day."

Murray - also a double Olympic champion - was in attendance at the 2014 London Marathon when his wife, Kim, took part.

Event director Hugh Brasher said: "Sir Andy Murray is one of Britain's greatest sporting superstars and it is so fitting that he will be the official starter for one of the country's greatest sporting events and the world's greatest marathon.

"Andy is renowned as one of the toughest and most competitive sportsmen on the planet and someone who does not recognise barriers in sport."

(03/28/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Molly Huddle and Emily Sisson are using the Stanford 10,000m as a tune-up before the London Marathon

This Friday is the Stanford Invitational, and the start lists are stacked. American half-marathon studs Molly Huddle and Emily Sisson are using a 10,000m to prepare for the upcoming London Marathon, and many NCAA athletes will open their outdoor seasons at the race.

In addition to top American runners, droves of Canadians are heading down to the warm California weather to get their spring seasons underway.

Sisson announced after a blazing 1:07:30 Houston half-marathon that she would be making her marathon debut this spring in London.

Some predict that Sisson’s marathon debut could be one of the fastest in American history, and if her half is any indication, she has a bright future at 42.2K.

Huddle, who ran her marathon debut at New York in 2018 in 2:26:44, will also be in London and hoping to run faster. 

(03/27/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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The Canadian record-holder Cam Levins has withdrawn from the London Marathon due to an injury

Canadian marathon record-holder Cam Levins announced on Tuesday evening that he is out for the 2019 London Marathon, due to an injury. 

Levins told Athletics Illustrated that he’s dealing with what he believes to be patellar tendinitis, which has prevented him from training properly since the New York Half-Marathon on March 17. 

Levins was heading into London hoping to break his own Canadian record of 2:09:25 set in October 2018 at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. There he became the first Canadian to ever go under 2:10 for the marathon.

The London men’s and women’s fields are historically deep. The men’s race will feature world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge, half-marathon world record-holder Abraham Kiptum, Olympic gold medallist (in the 5,000m and 10,000m) Sir Mo Farah, and 2018 London Marathon second-place finisher Shura Kitata. 

(03/27/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Sophie Morgan is running this year’s Virgin Money London Marathon for her cousin Tony who died from cardiomyopathy

Sophie Morgan, 25, will be running for the Cardiomyopathy UK charity in April after her cousin’s heart suddenly stopped working 21 years ago.

“We lost my cousin 21 years ago to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a genetic heart muscle disease," she said.  "He was in his 30s with young children so it was a huge shock for us all.

“When we later found out that his heart had just stopped, it was the first time we became aware that this hereditary disease ran in the family.

“A number of my family have since been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. I feel incredibly lucky that I’m able to run, while so many of my family members cannot because of this disease.

“I’m running the London Marathon for Cardiomyopathy UK because it’s played a huge part in helping my family through many diagnoses, so it’s a charity that’s close to my heart.”

Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases have many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments.

In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. In rare cases, the muscle tissue in the heart is replaced with scar tissue.

As cardiomyopathy worsens, the heart becomes weaker. It's less able to pump blood through the body and maintain a normal electrical rhythm. This can lead to heart failure or irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias. In turn, heart failure can cause fluid to build up in the lungs, ankles, feet, legs, or abdomen.

The weakening of the heart also can cause other complications, such as heart valve problems.

Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. "Acquired" means you aren't born with the disease, but you develop it due to another disease, condition, or factor. "Inherited" means your parents passed the gene for the disease on to you. Many times, the cause of cardiomyopathy isn't known.

Cardiomyopathy can affect people of all ages. However, people in certain age groups are more likely to have certain types of cardiomyopathy. This article focuses on cardiomyopathy in adults.

 

(03/22/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Mo Farah says he does miss the track and is seriously thinking about returning but now his focus is on the half this weekend and the London Marathon in April

Mo Farah has admitted watching his British team-mates compete at the European Indoor Championships last weekend made him long to race on the track again, as he seriously considers returning to defend his triple world 10,000m crown later this year.

Farah announced his retirement from track athletics after winning his sixth world title in London in 2017. He has since focused on road running, finishing third at last year’s London Marathon, before breaking the European record when winning the Chicago Marathon.

Unbearably high temperatures in Doha mean the men’s marathon at the World Championships this October will be run at night, starting at 11.59pm. That strange timing, coupled with the relative lack of strength in global 10,000m running since Farah’s retirement, means he is mulling whether to return to the track in a bid for a sixth straight gold medal in global competition over the distance.

He will make his decision after taking on the greatest marathon runner in history, Eliud Kipchoge, at next month’s London Marathon.

“Having seen my fellow athletes I’ve competed against in the past in the 10,000m and watching the European Indoors on TV, I was thinking ‘Oh man, I want to get back out there,’” said Farah.

“That’s just me. If things are going well and I’ve got a chance to win a medal then I’d love to come back and run for my country, but my aim now is to concentrate on the marathon and don’t get excited.

“Part of me when I watch track races I’m like, ‘can I still do it? I want to do it’. I do miss the track.”

(03/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Mary Keitany, Vivian Cheruiyot And Tirunesh Dibaba will battle at the London Marathon

The defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot and the current TCS New York City Marathon champion Mary Keitany return to the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2019.

They join their compatriots Gladys Cherono (2018 BMW Berlin Marathon champion) and Brigid Kosgei (2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon champion) meaning the winners of the last four Abbott World Marathon Majors will be on the Start Line in London on Sunday 28 April.

Cheruiyot, who is also the reigning Olympic 5000m champion and the runner-up behind Keitany at last November’s TCS New York City Marathon, said: “It was a great moment for me winning last year’s Virgin Money London Marathon and I am very much looking forward to returning in April.

“The line-up for this year’s race is, once again, incredibly strong so I know I will need to be at my very best to repeat last year’s victory but it is a challenge that I’m really looking forward to. I will be ready.”

Also confirmed to run are the Ethiopian trio of Tirunesh Dibaba,  the three-time Olympic champion on the track and third fastest woman of all time, who finished second in London and won Chicago in 2017, Tadelech Bekele, who finished third in London last year, and 21-year-old Roza Dereje, second in Chicago and winner of the Dubai Marathon in 2018.

Cherono, Kosgei and Keitany top the current Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York. Dereje and Cheruiyot are on 16 points apiece following their second places in Chicago and New York respectively. The Series XII title could be decided in London.

The Abbott World Marathon Majors series adds up points for the best finishes in the world’s six best marathons. Series XII started at the 2018 BMW Berlin Marathon and will finish at the same race in 2019, taking in the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, 2018 TCS New York City Marathon, 2019 Tokyo Marathon, 2019 Boston Marathon and the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

Hugh Brasher, Event Director, said: “This is a truly amazing women’s field which features the five best women marathon runners in the world last year. The stage is set for a fascinating race on Sunday 28 April.

(02/06/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Dialysis nurse Rachel Cox is training for the London Marathon after donating a kidney to a stranger

A mother of two is training for the London Marathon and raising money for kidney disease research after she went under the knife two years ago and donated her organ to a complete stranger.

Rachel Cox, 48, a nurse on the renal unit at Crosshouse Hospital in Scotland, said she was moved to help after watching her patients suffer the harsh side effects of dialysis.

“A life on hemodialysis is not easy and it’s not really a choice,” she said. “It’s something is every day and I wanted to do something to make at least one person’s life better. You can only give your kidney once."

Cox said her family thought she was “crazy,” but that it was a “personal choice and not something anyone should feel pressure to do.”

Cox had to undergo a psychological evaluation to ensure that she was donating for the right reasons, and said she wasn’t public about her decision at the time because she didn’t want to pressure any other nurses in her field.

(01/31/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Virgin Money has extended its sponsorship of the London Marathon for another year

Virgin became the main sponsor in 2010 and has already extended its sponsorship once. In 2015 it announced it would support the event for five years.

The Virgin Money London Marathon is the UK’s biggest fundraising event, raising a record £63.7m ($83,306, 860US) for charities in 2018. This year the charity of the year is Dementia Revolution, a campaign specially created for the 2019 Marathon by Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer’s Research UK to support the UK Dementia Research Institute.

Next year’s partner will be Mencap. David Duffy, chief executive of CYBG Plc, the owner of Virgin Money, said: “Each year Virgin Money partners with a ‘Charity of the Year’, and we are now ready to receive applications for the year leading to the 2021 Marathon.

We hope to hear from charities working on ambitious projects or initiatives that will make a sustainable difference in the areas where help is needed most.”

Hugh Brasher, event director of the Virgin Money London Marathon, said: “Our partnership with Virgin Money has helped London to become the world’s greatest marathon and the race that everyone wants to run, with a world record 414,168 people applying through the ballot for the 2019 event.”

(01/29/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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The total amount raised through the London Marathon will top 1 billion pounds this year ($1,319,000US)

Thousands of charities sign up runners to collect donations at the race. Last year they raised 63.70 million pounds, taking the cumulative total to 955 million pounds since the first event in 1981.

"This is a phenomenal achievement and part of what makes the London Marathon unique. No other mass participation event comes anywhere near this kind of fundraising," Hugh Brasher, the race's event director, said.

Alzheimer's Society and Alzheimer's Research UK are the race's official charities in 2019.

The men's event pits world record holder and three-time London marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya against four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah.

In the women's field, defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya is set to take on her compatriot and New York City marathon champion Mary Keitany.

(01/25/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Beijing Olympics 10,000m bronze medalist Linet Masai will make her debut in London marathon on April 28

Former world 10,000m champion and Beijing Olympic bronze medalist, Linet Masai on Tuesday warned her rivals not to rule her out when she makes her debut in London marathon on April 28.

The 29-year-old, who has battled with poor form, injuries and maternity leave, will be seeking to make a statement when she runs in London with her eyes firmly on representing Kenya at the World Championships in Qatar later in the year.

It is by no chance that she chose to return to top flight marathon in London where she will be up against her nemesis including defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot, New York City marathon winner Mary Keitany, Berlin Marathon champion Gladys Cherono, Chicago Marathon gold medalist Brigid Kosgei and Berlin marathon bronze medalist Tirunesh Dibaba.

All the five have run under two hours and 20 minutes in marathon, not once but on several occasions.

"Getting an invite to compete in London is not easy. I am happy to have been considered because it is one of the biggest marathons in the world with a very fast course. Furthermore, it is special to me since I will be participating for the first time," said Masai in Nairobi.

It will be Masai's second marathon after she made her debut last year in Amsterdam where she clocked an impressive 2:23:46.

But the fast time will count for less when she faces her rivals, who have superior records and fast time over the distance.

"I lost two years of no competition between 2016 and 2018. But I have returned strong and will be out to reclaim my spot in the global ranking," said Masai.

To prepare well, Masai said that she will compete in a half marathon in March to gauge her speed and endurance. But for the time being she is happy to immerse herself in training in Kaptagat, Eldoret.

(01/23/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot will defend her London Marathon title in April

Vivian Cheruiyot believes she will need to produce her "very best" to defend her London Marathon title in April as she heads a star-studded lineup, which includes winners of the last four majors.

Cheruiyot will be joined by fellow Kenyans Gladys Cherono, Brigid Kosgei and Mary Keitany, who top the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series XII rankings with 25 points apiece from their wins in Berlin, Chicago and New York respectively.

Cheruiyot clocked two hours, 18 minutes and 31 seconds to seal her London triumph last year ahead of three-time winner and race favourite Keitany, who finished fifth.

"It was a great moment for me winning last year's Virgin Money London Marathon and I am very much looking forward to returning in April," Cheruiyot said in a statement.

"The line-up for this year's race is, once again, incredibly strong so I know I will need to be at my very best to repeat last year's victory but it is a challenge that I'm really looking forward to. I will be ready."

(01/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Cam Levins will run the 2019 London Marathon in one of the deepest fields in the race's history

The complete elite lists were announced on Friday for the 2019 London Marathon and Canadian marathon record holder Cam Levins was included. London is shaping up to have one of the strongest marathon fields in the race’s history.

Levins smashed the Canadian record this October at the 2018 Toronto Waterfront Marathon and Canadian Marathon Championships, running a 2:09:25. London will only be his second marathon, but the field is very strong and could pull him to a fast finish and maybe even another Canadian record.

Levins will face world record holder Eliud Kipchoge, 2018 Chicago champion Mo Farah and 2018 London runner-up Shura Kitata. The men’s marathon will be extremely competitive. With eight men who’ve run under 2:05:00, if Levins has a good day, he could do something very special at this race.

(01/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Callum Hawkins, Lily Partridge and Dewi Griffiths are among the latest wave of British athletes named for the Virgin Money London Marathon on April 28

Callum Hawkins and Dewi Griffiths will also be running the London Marathon in April. 

Great Britain international marathoner Hawkins has fond memories in the UK capital after running 2:10:52 in 2016 before clocking 2:10:17 to finish fourth at the 2017 World Championships, while Griffiths memorably ran 2:09:49 at the Frankfurt Marathon in 2017.

British marathon champion Lily Partridge will join the women’s field along with previously announced Charlotte Purdue, Tracy Barlow, Sonia Samuels, Hayley Carruthers, Tish Jones and Natasha Cockram.

Just one second separates Purdue’s marathon personal best of 2:29:23, set at the 2017 London Marathon, and Partridge’s best time of 2:29:24 which she ran to finish eighth in her first London Marathon last year.

The British field in both the men’s and women’s races at the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon which will be used as the selection race for the World Championships in Doha. 

(01/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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World half marathon record holder Abraham Kiptum will also be running the London marathon

Kiptum is among a host of elite athletes set to battle it out on the streets of the English capital in what will be his maiden appearance in the lucrative race that counts as part of the World Marathon Majors.

The 29-year-old set a new world record of 58 minutes and 18 seconds at the 2018 Valencia half marathon in October 28 just a few months after setting a personal best of 59:09 at the Copenhagen Half Marathon.

Kiptum enjoyed a successful 2018 season whereby, two months after smashing the world record, he competed at the inaugural Abu Dhabi marathon in December where he finished second clocking 2:04:16 behind compatriot Marius Kipserem (2:04:04) a feat he is hoping to maintain in 2019.

“Abu Dhabi was my last race last year. I have started my build ups and I hope to pick on where I left last season. I also pray that I maintain the fitness that I had last year,” Kiptum told Citizen Digital.

(01/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Could Mo Farah beat Eliud Kipchoge in London Marathon!

Eliud Kipchoge versus Mo Farah in the Virgin Money London Marathon on April 28 is one of the tastiest head-to-heads of the year – and it is a race the Briton can win.

Kipchoge has won 10 of his 11 marathons, including three times in London and at the Olympics in Rio. His most recent victory – in Berlin last September – saw him set a world record of 2:01:39. At the Breaking2 time trial in Monza in 2017, he ran even faster, too, with 2:00:25 – a performance just one second per mile short of a hallowed sub-two-hour clocking.

The Kenyan has been described, with good reason, as the greatest marathoner in history. So how can Farah hope to beat him?

For starters, not only did Farah smash the European record with 2:05:11 in Chicago in October, but he looked supremely smooth and strong the entire way. In the world of marathoning, he is on the upward curve whereas Kipchoge’s bubble will inevitably burst sometime.

Farah’s career has also got stronger over time. In 2003, while Kipchoge was out-kicking Hicham El Guerrouj and Kenenisa Bekele to win the world 5000m title in Paris, Farah won a mere silver at the European Under-23 Championships behind fellow Brit Chris Thompson.

Then there is home support. Farah is a Londoner and has a long history with the London Marathon. The first time his name appeared in Athletics Weekly, after all, was in 1995 when he came 10th in the Mini London Marathon aged 12.

Farah will also not be fazed by Kipchoge. He has beaten him too many times over the years to be totally intimidated by him.

Farah freely admitted in 2018 that Kipchoge is a stronger marathon runner, but the Briton knows he’s come out on plenty of occasions in the past.

In fact, the duo have a long history of clashes. Back in 2007, Farah beat Kipchoge over 3km on the roads at the Great North Run weekend. On the track, in the world 5000m final in 2009, Kipchoge and Farah were separated by less than a second in fifth and seventh in a race won by Bekele. When Farah set a British 5000m record of 12:53.11 in Monaco in 2011, Kipchoge was back in sixth.

(01/17/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Former world record-holder Wilson Kipsang and Chicago Marathon champion Brigid Kosgei are among the latest runners confirmed for the Virgin Money London Marathon

Wilson Kipsang won the London Marathon in 2012 and 2014, setting a course record of 2:04:29 on his second triumph. In between those victories, he earned the Olympic bronze medal in 2012 and set a world record of 2:03:23 in Berlin in 2013.

Owner of four sub-2:04 marathon performances, Kipsang will be making his sixth appearance at the London Marathon and will line up against the man who now owns the course record and world record, Eliud Kipchoge.

“This will be a comeback race for me,” said Kipsang, who will also face Olympic champion Mo Farah and last year’s runner-up Shura Kitata. “I’m focused on winning,” says Wilson Kipsang.

Fellow Kenyan Brigid Kosgei will also return to the British capital. The 24-year-old finished second last year in 2:20:13 before going on to smash her PR with 2:18:35 when winning at the Chicago Marathon six months later.

(01/16/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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World record holder Eliud Kipchoge will defend his title at the Virgin Money London Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge has confirmed he will be running this year's London Marathon.  The 2018 World Athlete of the Year, broke the world record in the marathon in Berlin last September, clocking 2:01:39. The 34-year-old Kenyan won his third London marathon title last year, clocking 2:04:17. He is unbeaten in three appearances in London, having notched victories in 2015 and 2016 as well. He also set the course record of 2:03:05 in that 2016 race.

Kipchoge will face Mo Farah of Great Britain, who was previously announced. Farah set the European record over the distance in Chicago last October when he clocked 2:05:11 to collect his first major marathon victory. Earlier in the year, Farah finished third in London in 2:06:21, at the time a national record.

“I had a memorable 2018, winning the Virgin Money London Marathon and then setting a new world record at the BMW Berlin Marathon," Kipchoge said. "I’m hoping that 2019 is just as good to me."

Kipchoge also said he's looking forward to another match-up against Farah.

“He is a great champion and proved in Chicago that he can win a major marathon so I relish the battle with him and also the many other great athletes that I’m sure will once again be on the start line in London.”

Those include Ethiopia’s 22-year-old rising marathon star Shura Kitata also returns after finishing runner-up to Kipchoge last year and placing second in the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon.

"There is no doubt that Eliud Kipchoge is the greatest marathon runner of all time," said Hugh Brasher, Event Director of the London race. "His world record at the BMW Berlin Marathon was a legendary sporting moment and one more win at the Virgin Money London Marathon would make him the most successful athlete in the history of the elite men’s race in our event’s illustrious history.

“Since Sir Mo Farah won the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in October, everyone has been talking about another head-to-head between Mo and Eliud and we are absolutely thrilled that this showdown will happen at the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon."

(01/14/2019) ⚡AMP
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Virgin London Marathon

Virgin London Marathon

The London Marathon was first run on March 29, 1981 and has been held in the spring of every year since 2010. It is sponsored by Virgin Money and was founded by the former Olympic champion and journalist Chris Brasher and Welsh athlete John Disley. It is organized by Hugh Brasher (son of Chris) as Race Director and Nick Bitel...

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Mo Farah confirmed that he will run in next April’s London marathon

Mo Farah made his martahon debut in London in 2014 and he is set to compete at the London Marathon next year. The four-time Olympic gold medalist over 5,000m and 10,000m is coming to the end of his first full year as a dedicated marathon runner, which saw him set a European record of 2:05:11 at the Chicago Marathon in October. That result was an improvement on the 2:06:21 he had run in London six months previously, at the time a British record. (11/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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A London Man is facing jail for only running 1000 feet of the London Marathon and taking a finishers medal

A London marathon impostor who picked up a lost race number to see “a dream come true” has been jailed for 16 weeks. The homeless 38-year-old Stanislaw Skupian crossed the finish line with legitimate runner Jake Halliday’s number after spotting it 300 meters from the end of the London Marathon.  He picked it up, ran the remaining 1,000 feet of the course and strode across the line, victorious. Now, a month after being pictured kissing his finisher's medal Skupian is being jailed for fraud.  Halliday, who was running for the charity Bloodwise, dropped his number after stopping short of the finish line to take off his T-shirt during the hottest London Marathon on record. Friends later told him someone had been pictured celebrating with his number, with Halliday saying he was “shocked”, the court heard. The London marathon chief executive, Nick Bitel, said the episode could be seen to damage the reputation and integrity of the race, regarded as one of the best organized in the world, the court heard. The homeless father of one had been training for a race ahead of the London Marathon his lawyer said.  He wanted to watch the race and in his excitement picked up the number and crossed the line.  The reaction in England has not been good.  Many are criticizing the organizers for what they see as a lack of compassion for Skupian's circumstances.  But he only ran 1000 feet of a 26.2 mile race! Once the press published the photo and showed the world what had happen, how could this event be overlooked?  Medals are only met for finishers, period. (06/22/2018) ⚡AMP
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I want to win the Olympic Marathon says London winner Kenya’s Vivian Cheruiyot

London marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya will only think of retirement after competing at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. Speaking from Eldoret, Kenya on Thursday, Cheruiyot believes good planning and performance will be enough to secure her a slot in the Kenyan team and at the Olympics. The 34-year-old remains confident. "I still view myself as novice in marathon. I have only run three races and the target is always to run in big cities and in the Olympics. I want to win the Olympic marathon," said Cheruiyot. Competitors at the Tokyo 2020 marathon will face a tough uphill finish as organizers said Thursday when they outlined the route, an additional challenge to heat that has already sparked concern. Kenya has over 40 women who have run under two hours and 30 minutes, the cut off mark for qualification to the Olympics and Cheruiyot will be among the many athletes who will have their names in the pot for the coaches to draw from. Cheruiyot's victory in London confirmed her pedigree as one of the top female marathon runners, ready to take over from veteran Edna Kiplagat and Mary Keitany. Cheruiyot, with a personal best of 2:18:31, now becomes the fourth fastest woman in marathon history after Radcliffe (2:15:25), Keitany (2:17:01) and Tirunesh Dibaba (2:17:56). But she has to toughen up if she is to win in Tokyo in 2020 as organizers believe the change in course, especially the final climb would likely be decisive factor in deciding the winner of the race. (05/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge says what makes a runner dope is easy money, he wants to empower our youth

Kenya marathon star Eliud Kipchoge plans to establish lucrative road race, Speaking at a business forum organised by Rich Management in Nairobi on Saturday, Kipchoge, the Olympic champion and three-time London Marathon winner, urged aspiring athletes to be empowered to resist the urge to dope in the sport. "When I retire, I will have a 10K, 21K or a marathon race where all youth can take part and earn good money. What makes a sportsman dope is easy money. They know when they perform, they will get money. They are those who want to get a high lifestyle without working for it," said Kipchoge who bagged his third Marathon crown on April 23. In slamming dope cheats as 'greedy' the Rio 2016 marathon gold winner stressed the vice that has cast a dark shadow over the rich legacy of Kenya's distance running excellence can only be fought by sensitisation. "When you dope, you will be guilty even in your deathbed. You cannot stand and say you have done this or that in the sport. We should empower our youth to leave a legacy by training hard to win," he said.  (05/19/2018) ⚡AMP
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Over 400,000 people want to run the 2019 London Marathon, the most ever for any race!

More than 400,000 runners have entered the ballot for next year’s London Marathon, breaking the event’s own world record for registrations. A total of 414,168 runners from the UK and overseas have applied to take part in the race around the capital.  Last year’s total of 386,050 applicants first established London as the world’s most popular marathon, with this year’s total 7.5 per cent higher.   Of the applicants for the 2019 event, 347,876 are from the UK and 66,292 are from overseas.  More than 50 per cent of those who entered the ballot have never run a marathon before, while 44 per cent of the UK applicants are women.  Hugh Brasher, Event Director for London Marathon Events, said the world record reflects the “extraordinary inspiration” of this year’s event. He said: “One of our goals is to inspire people to take up sport and it's fantastic that more than 190,000 people from the UK have been inspired to apply to run a marathon for the first time in 2019. (05/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Routine, discipline and consistency are all so important when training for any distance says James Westlake

James Westlake completed this year's London Marathon in 2:24:19 and finished 8th overall not including the elite runners.  His first experience of marathon running was at the London Marathon in 2012.  His mum was also running and through her training it inspired James to give it a go.  Much to his amazement, he ran 3 hours 14 minutes and the bug grew from there. He has now run nine marathons and offers this advice as I am getting ready to run my first half marathon. James told me, "Get to know your body and try to understand what it can and can’t cope with training wise.  Routine, discipline and consistency are all so important when training for any distance. Get yourself into a routine that works for you around your work and social life. Be disciplined and stick to what you know but be clever if you are struggling with an injury, cross train (swim or cycle) and take the pressure off your body. Consistent training is going to improve your body and prepare it for what is ahead on the day." I asked him what is his motivation?  James said, "I’m naturally a competitive person. Whether it be in training or racing, I always want to win or improve my personal best. I also enjoy that feeling when you cross that finish line, all the training and the sacrifices that are made to achieve that goal all just builds into one moment."    (05/05/2018) ⚡AMP
by Mark Dunford/ On Your Marks
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Dave Bedford Who helped build the London marathon into one of the best in the world is stepping down

Dave Bedford has announced his decision to leave his role as a consultant with London Marathon Events, which includes recruiting the elite fields. He will step down in November. Bedford, a legendary runner on the track and the former 10,000m world record holder, has played a pivotal role with the London Marathon for more than three decades. He famously ran the first edition of the race in 1981 following a bet in his night club. Over the years, he served on the Board of Directors from 1986 – 1988, representing British Athletics and in 1989 was appointed to recruit the London Marathon elite field. He became London Marathon Race Director in 2000, a role he held until 2012 when he became a part-time consultant. He also played a leading role in the formation of the World Marathon Majors. Nick Bitel, CEO of London Marathon Events Ltd, said: “The London Marathon is deeply indebted to Dave for all that he has done for the event over the years. During his tenure as Marketing and Sponsorship Director and then as Race Director, he was instrumental in developing the London Marathon into the world’s greatest marathon. He will be greatly missed and we wish him well.” Bedford said: “I have been fulfilled working with the London Marathon for many years. London Marathon’s growth and success was only possible because of the great team I worked with. We should not forget, however, that the success of the London Marathon was only possible because of the hard work done by Chris Brasher and John Disley in founding the event.” (05/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Time is already running out to get entered into the 2019 London Marathon

The ballot to enter the 2019 London Marathon is underway.   But you'll have to be quick, since the process will close at 5pm (London Time) on Friday, May 4, 2018. During that time anyone wanting to run has to visit the London Marathon 2019 ballot website and fill in their details. It costs £39 to enter, or £35 if you are a member of an athletics club. All those who enter the ballot will find out whether or not they have been successful in early October. Other ways to get a place include running for a charity or via the 'Good For Age' category, which is open to those who have already run a full marathon in a particularly fast time. The Queen started the 2018 race from Windsor Castle, which saw Eliud Kipchoge and Vivian Cheruiyot, both from Kenya, in the fastest combined winners time for a marathon.  It was hot for this year’s marathon but that is not the norm.  However, there still were many fast times in this bucket-list event.   (05/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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The First paralyzed man on foot has completed the London Marathon

The first paralyzed man completed the London Marathon on foot crossed the finish line, but a day late to get a medal. Simon Kindleysides set off at 10am on Sunday alongside thousands of other racers and finished at 10:46pm on Monday - the last person to cross the line. The 34-year-old, a father of three was diagnosed with functional neurological disorder and a brain tumor in 2013, which left him paralyzed from the waist down. He walked the 26.2-mile marathon course using a ReWalk exoskeleton suit. He has been awarded the Spirit of London award, which the London Marathon gives to participants who "encapsulated the unique spirit" of the race. He is the first finisher from this year's race to be given the award. Simon was raising money for The Brain Tumor Charity and at the time of writing has raised £8,630.04 ($12,032US) just short of his goal of £10,000. (04/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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How the Abbott World Marathon Majors $820,00 was dished out

Series XI of the Abbott World Marathon Majors concluded in dramatic fashion Sunday (April 22) at the London Marathon with a double win for Kenya. In the elite men’s series, Eliud Kipchoge destroyed the best men’s field ever assembled to take his third consecutive AWMM title, while his compatriot Mary Keitany destroyed herself in her bid to break the mixed-race women’s world record, failing in that quest but picking up the AWMM win as a consolation. Series XI kicked off at last year’s London Marathon with a new one-year format featuring a rotating start and finish for each of the six annual series races. A new prize structure was also introduced for Series XI, with prize money awarded to the top three men and women in both the open and wheelchair series, rather than just individual winner. The Series XI champions receive US$250,00 each with US$50,000 going to second and $25,000 to third, while the top wheelchair racers will get $50,000 each, with $25,000 and $10,000 going to second and third respectively. Kipchoge claimed his Series XI crown in stunning style, taking 25 points for his London win yesterday to add to the 25 he earned for his Berlin Marathon victory last year. After the disappointment of coming fifth in yesterday’s London Marathon, Keitany also took her third Abbott World Marathon Majors title thanks to the 25 points she earned in London last year and her second place in New York last November. Geoffrey Kirui with 41 points placed second. Yuki Kawauchi with his Boston win placed third with 25 points. For women Tirunesh Dibaba placed second with 41 points and Brigid Kosgei placed third with 32 points. Wheelchair winners were Marcel Hug and Manuela Schar with 100 points each. (04/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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