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Long Distance Legends Michael Wardian and Dean Karnazes are set for the inaugural MCM50K

The MCM50K is the first of its kind, an urban ultra in Arlington, Virginia and the nation's capital with all the same on-course benefits of a marathon. Event registration sold out in under one hour, attracting enthusiastic runners from all over the US and big names in running. When the runners cross the MCM50K finish line, it will make the event the largest ultra in the United States by nearly double the current record.

“More and more people are looking for what’s next after they’ve run a marathon, and I think this is it,” shares Wardian.

Wardian is hoping to add the MCM50K top finish to his already impressive resume, which includes finishing over 400 marathons and ultras with dozens of top finishes, three 50K and one 100K titles from US Track and Field championships. Wardian is known for outlandish running feats and being a positive character in the running community, most recently running the entire 90-mile Capital Beltway.

“It's an opportunity to put myself out there, have a great experience, get a chance to see even more of beautiful Washington DC, but also to try to get on the podium.” With over a dozen MCM finishes, Wardian hopes this is his time to grasp the lead sharing, “I’m super excited. The Marine Corps Marathon was my first big city marathon I ever did in my life and it’s been a really important part of my career. This is my opportunity to have another chance to win the event, especially with inaugural 50K, a distance I’m quite comfortable with.”

As a northern Virginia native, Wardian hopes to pull from his hometown advantage. “I have a lot of friends and fans who are going to be taking part in the event with me and family that'll be out on the course supporting.”

Standing next to Wardian at the start line will be friend and competitor, Dean Karnazes. “Dean and I have worked and traveled together for nearly a decade. I’m looking forward to hanging out and experiencing this together,” offers Wardian. “I’m sure he’ll be inspiring people to get out there and put their best foot forward.”

Karnazes is known for being a New York Times bestselling author, named one of TIME magazine’s “Top 100 Most Influential People in the World,” one of the fittest men on the planet according to Men's Fitness, and for accruing a wild list of incredible running accomplishments including running 50 marathons in all 50 states in 50 consecutive days.

“The two of us have a really interesting and very close relationship. It’ll be great to see him on the start line,” shares Karnazes. “Mike and I gravitate towards the same type of events, and from a competitive standpoint it’s unbelievable what he’s accomplished.”

Runners will get to interact with Karnazes during the ultra event. He looks forward to enjoying the ultra at a comfortable pace, taking in the inaugural event and connecting with his fellow runners. On the eve of the MCM50K, runners will have a special opportunity to interact with Karnazes and hear motivation from him at the Carbo Dining In. 

Runners will get the chance to interact with Wardian and Karnazes at the MCM50K start line and during their 30+ mile journey. Running an inaugural event is special, and running alongside a few of running idols makes it unforgettable.

(07/20/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marine Corps Marathon

Marine Corps Marathon

Recognized for impeccable organization on a scenic course managed by the US Marines in Arlington, VA and the nation's capital, the Marine Corps Marathon is one of the largest marathons in the US and the world. Known as 'the best marathon for beginners,' the MCM is largest marathon in the world that doesn't offer prize money, earning its nickname, “The...

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Cigna returns as Presenting Sponsor of the Marine Corps Marathon

Global health service company Cigna (NYSE:CI) is returning for a second year as presenting sponsor of the Marine Corps Marathon® (MCM) to honor and thank U.S. military members, veterans, and their families and to support health and wellness in the community. Now in its 44th year, the MCM celebrates the commitment of the more than 30,000 runners and thousands of spectators who gather at this historic 26.2-mile journey through our nation’s capital.

"It’s a privilege to partner again with the Marine Corps Marathon to honor our brave military service men and women and their families," said Brian Evanko, president, U.S. government business, Cigna. "We are proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with the veterans and other athletes who are toeing the starting line this year, as we celebrate the power of the communities and support systems that got them to where they are today."

"Cigna has demonstrated a sincere appreciation for the military community and a genuine commitment to veterans. Combined with their dedication to improving health for all, MCM participants and their supporters were rewarded with a staggering array of meaningful interactions and engagements with Cigna," said Rick Nealis, Director, Marine Corps Marathon Organization.

In addition to serving as a presenting sponsor, Team Cigna runners will participate in the MCM and the MCM10K on Oct. 27, 2019. This year, Cigna will sponsor more than 50 athletes to participate on Team Cigna from Achilles International, a non-profit organization that helps people with disabilities participate in mainstream athletic events.

(07/13/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marine Corps Marathon

Marine Corps Marathon

Recognized for impeccable organization on a scenic course managed by the US Marines in Arlington, VA and the nation's capital, the Marine Corps Marathon is one of the largest marathons in the US and the world. Known as 'the best marathon for beginners,' the MCM is largest marathon in the world that doesn't offer prize money, earning its nickname, “The...

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Renowned ultramarathoner and bestselling author, Dean Karnazes, is set to run the inaugural MCM50K on October 27

Renowned ultramarathoner and bestselling author, Dean Karnazes, is set to run the inaugural (Marine Corps Marathon) MCM50K on Oct. 27 in Arlington, VA. Karnazes, named by TIME magazine as one of the “100 Most Influential People in the World,” will also be the featured speaker at the MCM Carbo Dining In on Oct. 26, as part of MCM Weekend.

The MCM50K sold out in one hour and is set to be the largest ultra in the United States with nearly double the participants of the 2018 record. Karnazes will add running with the Marines to his impressive resume that includes running 50 marathons in all 50 states in 50 consecutive days; competing on all seven continents; winning the ESPN ESPY Award for Best Outdoor Athlete; and being a three-time winner of Competitor magazine’s Endurance Athlete of the Year.

The NY Times bestselling author has pushed his body and mind to inconceivable limits, such as running across the Sahara Desert and the South Pole; 350 continuous miles without sleep for three nights; and as a solo participant in ten different 200-mile relay races.

“I am thrilled and honored to be part of the inaugural MCM ultramarathon. Going beyond the marathon is the ultimate test of human endurance and I look forward to the challenge,” shares Karnazes.

(03/19/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marine Corps Marathon

Marine Corps Marathon

Recognized for impeccable organization on a scenic course managed by the US Marines in Arlington, VA and the nation's capital, the Marine Corps Marathon is one of the largest marathons in the US and the world. Known as 'the best marathon for beginners,' the MCM is largest marathon in the world that doesn't offer prize money, earning its nickname, “The...

more...
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Marine Corps Marathon introduces the MCM50K

The Marine Corps Marathon Organization (MCMO) introduces the MCM50K and enters into the realm of ultras for the first time in the event’s 44 year history. The 50-kilometer run will take place on the same day as the Marine Corps Marathon (MCM), Oct. 27.

This new event diversifies the MCM Weekend experience with more distance options to #RunWithTheMarines. This new distance joins the 10K and 26.2-miles for individuals to run with purpose and finish with pride.

The MCM50K is a fantastic urban ultra that showcases the nation’s capital and Arlington, VA with all of the same on-course amenities as the MCM. This new event appeals to first-time ultra runners with the draw of a paved course and offers seasoned ultra runners a new perspective and patriotic run.

Starting on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. and including portions of the MCM10K course, the MCM50K merges with the MCM course and follows the field of MCM participants. Runners must maintain an 11:30 minute pace-per-mile through mile 14 on Rock Creek Parkway. For the remaining 17 miles, MCM50K participants may run at a 14 minute pace-per-mile. Ultimately, the MCM50K will arrive at a joint finish at the iconic U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, VA.

(02/08/2019) ⚡AMP
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Marine Corps Marathon

Marine Corps Marathon

Recognized for impeccable organization on a scenic course managed by the US Marines in Arlington, VA and the nation's capital, the Marine Corps Marathon is one of the largest marathons in the US and the world. Known as 'the best marathon for beginners,' the MCM is largest marathon in the world that doesn't offer prize money, earning its nickname, “The...

more...
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Jeffrey Stein won the 43rd Marine Corps Marathon, a first marathon win for this public defender

Two months ago, Jeffrey Stein had no idea that he’d be participating in — let alone winning — the 43rd Marine Corps Marathon. Mired in a trial that required his full attention, the 32-year-old Washington DC resident and public defender was only able to carve out time to run during his daily commute to and from the Archives building. “When you’re in trial, you usually can’t train, and you can’t run because you’re in trial 24/7,” Stein said after Sunday’s race, which brought almost 21,000 runners to its course. “I bought a run commute backpack, which let me run to and from work. No marathon-specific training, but it allowed me to keep a baseline fitness.” Those five-mile runs were all Stein needed to come out on top, as he notched his first career marathon victory with an official time of 2 hours 22 minutes 49 seconds. California resident and Navy Lieutenant Patrick Hearn crossed the finish line 37 seconds later to claim second place, while Navy Lieutenant Commander Will Christian of Chesapeake, Va., came in third in 2:24:23. (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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BethAnn Telford has not let Brain Cancer get in the way of her running the Marine corps Marathon

BethAnn Telford has 15 medals from previous Marine Corps Marathons.  The 2005 medal is very special to her. “It wasn’t great bling at the time, but to me, that’s my gold medal,” said Telford. That’s because the year before, Telford fought for her life. While running the Marine Corps Marathon in 2004, Telford first noticed something wasn’t right at mile 19.  “I felt a pop in my head, almost like I was in an airplane and I had to clear my nose or my head,” said Telford. “I started to act like I was drunk and my gait was off. I did finish the race however,” she remembers.  Things didn’t improve when she went to work the following day. Telford found herself walking into furniture that had been there for years and taking the wrong train home. “There was something wrong,” said Telford. Telford’s doctors told her she had brain cancer. The lifelong athlete full of fight was put to the ultimate test: a battle for her life. Soon after, Telford underwent surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. “I had to learn to run, walk and talk again, and deal with skills that were taken away,” Telford said. “But I was determined.” Telford returned to her hometown in Pennsylvania to recover. A few months later, she decided to participate in a 5K in her community. Her father followed her along the course and toward the finish line, cheering her on. “I started to hear him yell like when I was in high school or the hockey field, ‘Beth run! Run Beth!’ and then I knew I was going to be okay,” Telford said. “I ran and finished that 5K.” She hasn’t looked back since. “I thought if I can finish this 5K, I know that I can lace up in October right after my brain surgery and make sure that I get into the Marine Corps Marathon where this all started,” said Telford. “It wasn’t going to be fast, but I was determined that course wasn’t going to get me.” She ran in the Marine Corps Marathon again in 2005, and has run it every year since then. (10/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sam Smith who has autism loves the feeling of playing ice hockey and running the Marine Corp Marathon

There is nothing quite like hitting the ice says Sam Smith. He is number 99 on the Washington Ice Doges hockey team. “You can’t walk away from it,” he said, as he put on his helmet. “Once you step on the ice with skates and you’re a hockey player, hockey is your life.” He’s played for the Washington Ice Dogs, a special needs ice hockey team, for 20 years. “It feels good to be on the ice. It feels good to score goals,” he said, smiling.  Another awesome feeling, he says, is crossing the finish line at the Marine Corps Marathon. “This will be Marine Corps Marathon number six for me!” This year, he’s running alongside teammate Elias Tsakiris and two of their coaches.  Smith and Tsakiris, who both have autism, are running to raise money for their team. “I think it shows their leadership abilities,” said Stacie Manger, Communications Director. “I think it shows how much this team means to them. And I think it shows how much they want the community to believe in them, too.”  (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jimmy Magee is running the Marine Corps Marathon to honor father's legacy

When most people run a marathon, the ending is the hardest part. But 58-year-old Jimmy Magee, of Conway, Arkansas, is hoping to be the exception to this. The pediatrician is running the race to honor his father, a World War II veteran who died 20 years ago. “He fought on Iwo Jima, so I was particularly intrigued by the Marine Corps Marathon not because I was in the Marines but because my dad was,” Magee said. “I think it’s unique and especially meaningful to me that this marathon actually ends at the Iwo Jima Memorial. That has a special meaning to me.” Corporal Kenneth Magee served in the 5th Marine Division, which was part of the invasion of Iwo Jima in 1945. The statue, overlooking the Potomac River, of those soldiers struggling to mount a waving flag atop a hill is an iconic memorial to those who suffered through an especially bloody, and deadly, battle. Corporal Magee survived it, but just barely. Training for the race is hard enough, but the summer and early fall in Arkansas has been hot and humid this year, he said. He admits grueling is the word that applies, but “thinking about the number of hours I’m putting in doing it, it doesn’t even hold a candle to what the soldiers went through and what our dad went through,” he said. (10/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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A young couple tried to stay focused on training for the Marine Corps Marathon

The 43rd Marine Corps Marathon will be 30-year-old Kevin Rodriguez, an active duty Marine, first marathon. It’ll also be the Corpus Christi, Texas, native’s first trip to the nation’s capital. But amid all that excitement, one could probably forgive him if he doesn’t run quite as well as he had originally hoped, since training for the race has fallen somewhat on his list of priorities. Rodriguez is stationed at Camp Lejeune, in North Carolina, and Hurricane Florence made landfall only about 50 miles south of his home in the nearby city of Jacksonville. “We’re trying to stay with it,” he admitted. “Right now his wife Susanna is a lot more committed than I am.” Susanna Rodriguez used to be an active duty Marine, too. In fact, that’s how the two met; and it’s why they chose to run this race together. (10/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Joe Sinclair is preparing for his sixth Marine Corps Marathon

72-year-old Joe Sinclair is readying for his sixth Marine Corps Marathon in Washington.  He now has run more than 200 marathons and shows no signs of stopping any time soon. Despite the miles he’s put in other races, the Marine Corps Marathon, which will be run on Oct. 28 this year, is his favorite. “It’s spectacular, mind-blowing,” he said. “It and Boston are the top marathons. You’ve got 30,000 runners from all over the world.” The MCM also has time limits that must be met at several stages or the runner is pulled from the race. That, Sinclair said, gives him incentives to reach all along the 26-mile route. He said the entire race is inspiring, from the support staff along the way to the members of the military branches who are running or taking part in the race. (10/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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After 22 years, Cathi Remington, now a 56-year-old grandmother is running the Marine Corps Marathon

Cathi Remington, a 56-year-old grandmother who ran the marathon four times in the 1990s and finished under the 3 1/2-hour mark each time, is returning to the race. "There’s just something about the Marine Corps Marathon," Remington said. If you made a list of the things that 56-year-old Cathi Remington really, really loved, high up on it would be her country, the Marines and grueling races. And so it only makes sense that this grandmother from New Hampshire would look to satisfy that itch for competition by returning to the Marine Corps Marathon for the fifth time. Remington served in the Marines in the early and mid-1980s, and ran the race four times before — every year between 1993 and 1996. Her best finish came in 1995 when she ran the race in 3:14:40, a nearly 14-minute improvement from the year before. In fact, all four times she finished under the 3 1/2-hour mark. “I decided that at age 56 I wanted to get back into racing,” said Remington, who runs a bead shop in Hampton, New Hampshire. “So (22) years later, I’m coming back.” And coming back to this race as opposed to the famed Boston Marathon is a much bigger deal where she’s from. She notes with her heavy New England accent, “everyone loves Boston, and I do too, but for some reason there’s just something about the Marine Corps Marathon.” (10/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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MCMO Wants to Encourage More Younger Runners

The Marine Corps Marathon Organization (MCMO) has set sights on bringing the next generation of runners to the starting line. This year, the MCMO will engage in the Next Generation Inspiration Initiative, promoting a love of running among youth age 17 and under. “This effort is intended to grow the next generation of runners,” says MCM Director Rick Nealis. “This year's events will offer runners age 17-and-under a 40 percent discount off registration.” (01/18/2018) ⚡AMP
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