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Paula Radcliffe is the first major client of a new PR firm that uses Nick Davies

Paula Radcliffe has made the curious decision to join a PR company that uses former IAAF communications chief Nick Davies. Last year Davies was fired after 24 years at the world governing body of athletics for lying to investigators about receiving secret payments totalling €30,000 ($40,000US) from the disgraced former IAAF marketing executive Papa Massata Diack. But Radcliffe, who serves as vice-chair of the IAAF athletes commission, has become the first major client of the new sports division at London-based Pagefield PR. Parker insisted that is not the case and that he heads the sports division, which also lists Dina Asher-Smith as a client. He said Davies does not work on Radcliffe's or any other account. He was also keen to stress that Davies was cleared of corruption, was not banned from working in athletics and insisted he 'deserves a second chance'. Davies was cleared of corruption after he was suspended by the IAAF in June 2016 following allegations that he was one of three officials who took money to delay naming Russian drug cheats ahead of the World Championships in Moscow in 2013. But he was fired. Having initially denied it to the IAAF ethics board, Davies eventually admitted receiving payments of €25,000 and then €5,000 in cash from Papa Diack, the son of similarly disgraced former IAAF president Lamine Diack, in envelopes. On Wednesday night Radcliffe said she was 'really happy' with Pagefield. 'I don't see what the issue is,' she said. 'Nick is a genuinely decent guy who made a mistake. He's admitted it, paid for it and I don't think he should have to pay for it for the rest of his life.'     (05/31/2018) ⚡AMP
by Matt Lawton/ Daily Mail
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It could be fascinating to watch Galen Rupp trying to break Mo Farah over the final miles in Chicago

In 2015, the Chicago Marathon abandoned the use of pacemakers to assist elite athletes, so it's unlikely to produce winning times that compare with those at the Berlin Marathon and London Marathon anymore, but when the weather cooperates, Chicago is still very fast for a record-quality course. (Obviously, there are some absurdly fast point-to-point courses, for those who are into that sort of thing.) But regardless of finishing times, the absence of pacemakers makes this race much more interesting, and probably makes Mo Farah much more of a threat in world-class competition. It could be fascinating to watch Galen Rupp trying to break Mo Farah over the final miles of an honest, unpaced race. (05/31/2018) ⚡AMP
by Walter H. Sargent
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Yuki Kawauchi is set to Run the Stockholm Marathon, weather forecast says Hot

This will be the 40th annual ASICS Stockholm Marathon and 7,000 runners from more than 100 countries have registered.  Racing this year will be Boston Marathon's winner Yuki Kawauchi who we know can handle extreme weather conditions.  Also, Fred Grönwall will be racing who is the Swedes' favorite.  It is predicted to be a warm day for marathoning and addressing this there will be 19 fluid and energy stations and at least 15 showers along the route.  The organizers have said they will keep the weather forecast in sight to be able to put in extra efforts if necessary.  The marathon will finish in the beautiful stadium built for the 1912 Olympic Games. The Olympic Stadium has been the site of numerous memorable athletic performances, with no less than 83 world records in track and field. There is no other arena anywhere in the world that comes close to that number. The 1912 Stockholm Olympic Stadium is truly a classic venue for athletics.   (05/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tokyo 2020 marathon will end with a grueling incline at the newly built Olympic stadium

The route will pass through many of the city’s historic and popular areas including Tokyo Tower and ‘Thunder Gate’ in Asakusa as well as the Imperial Palace, the primary residence of the Japanese Emperor. The final stretch promises to be grueling with a steady one percent incline over the last three kilometers of the course taking the athletes back to the Olympic stadium in the city’s west. Naoko Takahashi, marathon gold medalist at the Sydney 2000 Olympics, said she hoped the course would prove memorable in marathon-mad Japan. “It is really exciting to imagine just two years from now the side streets along the Tokyo 2020 marathon and race walk route filled with countless fans,” said Takahashi, whose gold-medal winning feat was matched by compatriot Mizuki Noguchi four years later in Athens. “I look forward to seeing some great performances from the runners, who will be encouraged by those fans lining the route. They will be memorable races.” Marathon running is one of the most popular sports in Japan, with over one million people cheering on the athletes at the annual Tokyo Marathon. The Olympic course largely resembles that of the Tokyo Marathon, one of the world’s most iconic running events which is held in winter to avoid the city’s punishing summer heat and humidity. The men’s marathon is traditionally held on the last day of the Games to close out the athletics calendar.  (05/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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Steve Prefontaine’s spirit lives on in all of us even after 43 years

43 years ago the world lost Steve Prefontaine. We aren't inspired so much as by the races that he won, but by the way that he ran them. There were no sit and kick affairs on his watch. He went straight to the front and dared everyone else to keep up. When that wasn't enough he slowly increased the pace and left his opponents gasping for air and swimming in lactic acid. At the time of his death Steve held every American record from 2,000 meters to 10,000 meters.  He was a beloved son, brother, and friend to many.  RIP Steve. You are missed but your spirit lives on in all of us. (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
by Dave Ross
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June 6th is Global Running Day, It doesn't matter how fast or how far you go, taking part is what is important

What is Global Running Day? Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you. Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk, or call your friends for a pick-up game in the park. The important thing is that you have fun being active—and you inspire others to join you.  WHAT is the Million Kid Run?  As part of Global Running Day, the Million Kid Run aims to get young people excited about fitness. By moving and having fun, kids discover that living an active lifestyle can be fun and easy. "It is so important to get our kids into sport and what better sport than running?" says Bob Anderson, MBR and RW founder.  "I think it is so special there is a day set aside for us who love running." Global Running Day was formerly known as National Running Day and began in the United States. The first event was in 2009. The inaugural Global Running Day was held on June 1, 2016. More than 2.5 million people from 177 countries pledged to run more than 9.2 million miles.  New York City Mayor, Bill de Blasio, declared June 1, 2016 to be Global Running Day in the City of New York. (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Peter Redwood-Smith was not going to let a knee issue get in the way of his epic Challenge

Peter Redwood-Smith, 23, is spreading awareness for a number of causes by running 52 races in 52 weeks, was just five miles into the gruelling course when disaster struck. But Peter was determined to keep going as he bid to raise cash for a number of good causes. Peter, who travelled to Edinburgh (UK) from Essex, said he was in terrible pain as he hobbled around the Edinburgh Marathon course. And it’s all part of his epic challenge to run 52 races in 52 weeks for charity. Despite being one of the last to finish, Peter is still hugely proud of his achievement. "I’m running fifty two races in fifty two weeks fundraising and spreading awareness for many great causes. “I travelled over 400 miles on Saturday from Rayleigh Essex to Edinburgh to take part in the marathon on Sunday. “The Edinburgh Marathon was the 28th race in my challenge, but I messed up my knee the week prior to the race. “While the sensible thing would’ve been pulling out of the race, I was determined to run it and support Glasgow Children’s Hospital in the process.” (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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18-year-old Chinese girl was the youngest to finish the North Pole Marathon

Xing Jiawen spent 11 hours and 55 minutes running the World's coolest Marathon in the North Pole with a temperature of minus 35 degrees centigrade (-31F).  According to the marathon's website, competitors are required to run ten laps of a specially created track, on top of a huge piece of floating ice with a thickness of 1.8 to 3.6 meters. “Although it sounds hard, I believe that I can make it,” Xing said before the race. She added that the only way she could fail was if she got injured during the race; otherwise, she would make every effort to complete it. Although Xing and her father had prepared themselves for the race, the harsh conditions of the North Pole were beyond their expectations. Shortly after the race began, Xing's whole foot got lodged in an ice cave. She was terrified, but quickly managed to move forward. Xing can now see how the North Pole Marathon has changed her, and understands what her teacher once said, “As for exploring new things, there may not be a correct answer even if you work hard enough, and sometimes, we do it not even for one.” (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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New York Marathon Race Director is retiring after this year’s marathon

Peter Ciaccia, the Race Director of the TCS New York City Marathon and President of Events at New York Road Runners (NYRR), has announced he will retire following the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon on November 4.   “Over the past 18 years, I have had the privilege of working with some of the most creative, innovative and dedicated individuals in the industry, and for that I will be forever grateful,” said Ciaccia. “Together we deliver first-class events and community initiatives that change lives, and I love every minute of it.  But, I am now at an age when the word retirement feels right.  After the marathon I’ll move into the next phase of my life, reconnect with family and friends and travel off to new adventures that I had put on hold. In the months ahead, I will spend each day the only way I know how, working with Michael, George Hirsch, and our fantastic team at New York Road Runners to deliver the world’s best events and a spectacular TCS New York City Marathon in November.” Ciaccia, who will celebrate his 65th birthday this summer, has been instrumental in the redesign and production of NYRR’s events, from logistics and entertainment to broadcasting and elite athletes, as well as guiding NYRR’s critical relationships with city officials to ensure a consistently safe and secure event experience.  During his tenure, he was responsible for introducing many NYRR innovations, from the marathon’s wave start plan and seeded corral program at weekly races, to the advancement of race day emergency management operations.   (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Potential showdown between Farah and Rupp at Chicago Marathon

Mo Farah has hinted at running the 2018 Chicago Marathon. On Monday, Farah reportedly said he is deciding between Chicago and New York for his fall marathon, but suggested that Chicago is typically a faster event.

If Farah does run Chicago, he would compete against former training partner and Nike Oregon Project member, Galen Rupp. The course record is 2:03:45 set in 2013 by Dennis Kimetto.  (Paula Radcliffe holds the women's record of 2:17:18 in 2002.) 

The course is fast but sometimes it can be hot.  A world record can be set on this course if everything is perfect on marathon day.

(05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Seven Ideas to consider before you start training for your first marathon

Marathon training should be fun. In fact, your training time should be more fun than running the actual marathon, so work hard at setting yourself up to have an amazing experience.  Here are seven ideas to consider before you start training for a marathon. 1. Prepare yourself physically – You should not start marathon training if you aren’t comfortable running 15 miles per week. Get in the habit of cross training to tone your entire body too.  The core supports everything while you run.  2.  Prepare yourself mentally – Marathon training takes a lot of time and energy. Will you be able to commit to running hours upon hours nights and weekends?  3. Make sure you have the support of family and friends.  Get family support so you know you have someone there to watch the kids for you.  4. Improve your diet – Eating healthy foods will fuel your body and enable it to work harder for you. Living on junk food and soda will not help you get through the final miles of a long run. If you start eating healthy before you are running 35 miles per week, you may be able to make better choices as you run more miles.  5. Pick a training plan – Look for a plan that works well with your schedule and lifestyle.  6. Dig up information – Read everything you can on training, eating, injury prevention, etc. It will not only provide you with valuable information, but it will help motivate you too.  7.  Start with a good mileage base – As mentioned in item 1, make sure you have a solid mileage base before you start week one of a marathon training plan. Work up to the mileage in week one for a few weeks. Otherwise, you may find yourself injured or burnt out.   (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Wietsie van der Westhuizen has participated in 40 consecutive Comrades Marathons

Wietsie van der Westhuizen's love for running started when he was a student at Potchefstroom University in Free State, and he has since participated in 40 consecutive Comrade Marathons. He was invited to run the Two Oceans Marathon by a friend, and this lead to his first Comrades. "At the end of the Two Oceans Marathon, they handed out pamphlets on the Comrades, and I decided to do the Comrades. So at the age of 19, I ran my first Comrades — and I have not stopped yet," the 60-year-old said. He says running is a great sport, because it unites people.   "Anybody can run; you don't have to be a built person, you can be overweight, you can be skinny. Running is for the average person, and I love the spirit of running. Runners do not see color; they're just comrades, like a family," he said. Van der Westhuizen will be running his 41st consecutive Comrades Marathon is a family affair. "My two daughters are running, my son-in-law is running, my brother are running..." (05/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah says it was nice running alongside club runners at London 10,000m

Great Britain’s Olympic legend Sir Mo Farah won the biggest ever Vitality London 10,000 today, while Steph Twell took her first victory in the women’s race. Farah treated the enthusiastic London crowds, who had turned out in the thousands to watch the race.  Mo outsprinted young British runners Richard Allen (29:48) and Matthew Sharp (29:50) in the final 500m to take his sixth Vitality London 10,000 victory, and the British road 10k title, on his first appearance at the race since 2013. Twell also dominated in the women’s race, finishing in 32:34, almost half a minute ahead of Gemma Steel (33:00), while 2017 champion Jo Pavey completed the podium with her third-place finish in a time of 33:12.  Vitality ambassadors Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill and Lord Sebastian Coe set the masses on their way as more than 14,000 runners crossed the starting line on The Mall to make this the biggest Vitality London 10,000 in 11 editions.  As they headed along The Mall and through Admiralty Arch in bright sunshine, Farah looked supremely comfortable as a group of six runners – which included Richard Allen, Jonathan Mellor, Mohamud Aadan, Matthew Sharp and Abdulle Abdishakur – ticked off the first few kilometers of the race. But once the group had passed the halfway point, just after the Bank of England, Farah started to increase the pace and dropping first one then two runners to reduce group to four, then to three, until Allen and Sharp were the only two men able to stay with the four-time Olympic gold medallist. With 800m to go, Farah moved up a gear to move into the lead, making the final turn into Spur Road and on to the Finish Line alone, to the delight of the crowds who had turned out in huge numbers to cheer their hero to victory in 29:44. “The pace was nice and comfortable and I really enjoyed the race,” Farah said afterwards. “I was happy with the win, which is the most important thing, but it was nice to be able to run alongside club runners who look up to you. “It’s good to forget about who you are – and what you have achieved – and just enjoy the moment, which is what I did out there. (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Course Record smashed at the 39th Annual Cotton Row Run

The Cotton Row Run has a new record time. Kenyan Linus Kiplagat, 23, ran the 39th edition of the 10K course in Huntsville in 28 minutes, 39 seconds on Monday, shattering the mark of 29:10 that John Wellerding set in 1983. In addition to the $1,200 that comes with finishing first, Kiplagat received a $5,000 bonus for breaking the course record. Kiplagat is the fifth consecutive Kenyan to win the Cotton Row Run. Kenyan Margaret Wamahiga, 27, was the top female finisher with a time of 34:20.  (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia's Getaneh Tamire wins the men's pro race by wide margin at the 40th annual Bolder Boulder 10K

Sam Chelanga embodies the American dream. And even if he didn't finish the men's pro race quite like he wanted to Monday at the 40th annual Bolder Boulder, Chelanga nonetheless was inescapably moved during his stretch run to the finish line at Folsom Field. A Kenya-born runner who came to the United States to compete at the college level while gaining an education, Chelanga made his second consecutive appearance with the U.S. men's elite team in the International Team Challenge at the 40th annual Bolder Boulder on Monday. Though it wasn't as successful a race as last year, when Chelanga placed third overall and helped the U.S. to a rare victory in the team standings, Chelanga nonetheless couldn't help but feel a little overwhelmed coming down the stretch of the Bolder Boulder with a miniature American flag in hand.  "This is probably my favorite race ever," Chelanga said. "To come in this stadium and here them cheering for you, it's Memorial Day and I love America. I got my flag and was waving it down the home stretch. I think it embodies the spirit of remembering those who sacrificed for us. My heart was melting coming down there." It was a historic effort at the front of the pack among the men's professionals, with Ethiopia's Getaneh Tamire taking first in 28:18. In favorable weather conditions, Tamire's winning time was the fourth-best time ever recorded in the 40-year history of the Bolder Boulder. Tamire finished 21 seconds ahead of runner-up Gabriel Geay, a runner from Tanzania who ran on a unified Pan African team this year. (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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There’s a reason why runners seem so happy

People who run regularly are probably already well aware of this, but now there’s concrete data to prove that running actually makes you happier. Researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University carried out the study by interviewing 8157 regular joggers across the UK registered with parkrun, the nationwide weekly free 5K run and fitness app Strava. The survey found that over 89 percent of runners said it has made them happier and has had a positive impact on their mental health, body image and motivation, with women benefiting the most. Those surveyed scored 4.4 on the Oxford Happiness Scale, above the average score of 4 on the method used by scientists to measure well-being, according to Press Association. Dr Emmanuelle Tulle, reader in Sociology at the university, said: “Running gives you a feeling you have achieved something and a sense of tremendous satisfaction. It adds to a general sense of well-being, you feel good and it helps boosts your self-confidence.” (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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How to improve your running, by jumping a rope

It doesn't take state-of-the-art equipment or a highly paid trainer to help you improve your running. All you need is rope and space to jump. All the abilities for running better, coordination, speed and endurance, are ones that are enhanced when you engage in a serious jump rope workout. Jumping rope will improve your stride rate and stamina and can help strengthen your ankles to keep you stable and injury-free when running. Use the jump rope to warm up before a run or as a workout alternative when the weather keeps you off the trail. (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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South African's Johannes Kekana, says I am afraid this will be my final race in Comrades

It's gold or bust for Johannes Kekana at this year's Comrades Marathon, the veteran runner saying he is taking a final tilt at golden glory in The Ultimate Human Race. “I am afraid this will be my final race in Comrades if I fail to make it into the top ten this year,” the Boxer Athletics Club runner said yesterday. While he is one of the country's best in the standard marathon, Kekana has not made great shakes in the ultra-distances. His best run in Comrades came way back in 2013 when he finished 5th in a time of 5:46:27. Before and thereafter, Kekana never broke six hours. Why then is he putting his cards out on the table as he has this time around? “I am feeling like I did back in 2012 and 2013. One of the main reasons I've not had good Comrades runs is the lack of proper camp because of not having sponsors. In 2012 (he completed Comrades in 6hrs and three seconds) and 2013, I was running for Bonitas who organised camps for us. I also did very well in both the Two Oceans and City to City.” He has had a good camp in Mpumalanga and is looking forward to next Sunday. (05/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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New Zealand’s Dick Quax has died at age 70. In 1977 he set a world record at 5000m

Dick Quax had been battling cancer. In January, he told the Herald: "I'm not dying from cancer, I'm living with cancer." A former world record holder, Quax won silver in the 5000m at the 1976 Montreal Games. He won silver in the 1500m at the 1970 British Commonwealth Games. In 1977 he had set a world record for the 5000m. Olympic gold medalist’s  Sir John Walker was close with Quax not just on the track, but off it as well; with both heading into local politics as councilor at the then Manukau City Council and then Auckland Council in their later years. Walker paid tribute to a man he called a good friend, colleague and running mate. "Dick was one of the fiercest and hardest working competitors on and off the track,'' he wrote online. "He helped me a lot as a young athlete and I will always be grateful for our time shared during and after our running careers and above all else, getting to know a great man and friend." Dick Quax  was a great runner and a great man.  “We are sorry to hear of his passing,” says My Best Runs Bob Anderson who knew him.   (05/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Willie Mtolo is adamant that South African athletes will again emerge victorious at the Comrades Marathon

Running legend Mtolo is optimistic that the domination of South Africa’s black male athletes will continue in this year’s Comrades Marathon. The showdown for this much anticipated, world famous KwaZulu/Natal ultra-marathon will take place on June 10. This year’s edition is the Down Run and will see the race starting in Pietermaritzburg with the finish now moved to the iconic Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban. The supremacy of black local athletes has been evident in the past six years since Ludwick Mamabolo ended Zimbabwean Stephen Muzhingi’s three-year (2009 to 2011) stranglehold on the event. Claude Moshiywa, Bongmusa Mthembu (twice), Gift Kelehe and David Gatebe have ensured the title of The Ultimate Human Race remains on local shores. Mtolo is adamant that South African athletes will again emerge victorious in a fortnight’s time. “My money is on either Bongmusa Mthembu or David Gatebe. You can’t also rule out Gift Kelehe. I have no doubt that Comrades will be won by another South African athlete this year.”  “Between Mthembu and Gatebe, one of them will win Comrades. Mthembu possesses a very impressive record (5.28.34) in the Down Run,” explained Mtolo who finished Comrades runner-up in 1989 and 2002. (05/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian Gelete Burka breaks course record at Ottawa Marathon

32-year-old Ethiopian’s Gelete Burka set a Canadian All Comers’ marathon record of 2:22:17 to win the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon by almost four minutes on Sunday May 27.  Her superb victory on an overcast breezy day was earned despite suffering stomach cramps in the final 12 kilometers which at one point provided incentive to her compatriot, Hiwot Gebrekidan to attempt a break. But the highly experienced Burka brushed off the pain to earn her first marathon victory. Though she finished 6th in Dubai in 2:20:45 earlier this year, winning this IAAF Gold Label road race on a less than flat course is certainly a far greater achievement. Along with the $40,000 (Canada) first place prize Burka will receive an additional $10,000 (Canada) for the new course record. (05/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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The hot and humid weather did not stop Geoffrey Kamworor from winning the TCS World 10K

Geoffrey Kamworor fulfilled all expectations and consolidated his reputation as arguably the best road racer in the world below the marathon distance by winning his third title at the TCS World 10K in Bengaluru, India, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on Sunday May 27.  The Kenyan, the winner of the last two world half marathon titles and first man across the line in Bengaluru in 2012 and 2014, couldn’t challenge his course record of 27:44 on a hot and humid morning but crossed the line in 28:18 after impressively imposing his authority on the race just after the halfway point. Kamworor led during the early stages of the race almost from the gun as the rest of the leading pack ran in single or double file behind him through the first five kilometres, with only his compatriot and defending champion Alex Korio helping with the pace.  A few strides after the halfway point was passed in 14:28 – making it almost certain that the course record would not fall this year – Kamworor suddenly went through the gears. Only Ethiopia’s 2018 Birhanu Legese opted to go with Kamworor as he strode away from the rest of the elite field, throwing in two back-to-back kilometres of 2:42 to reach 6km in 17:10 and 7km in 19:52. However, in the eighth kilometre Legese had to toss in the towel and by the 8km mark was 50 metres adrift with another 100 metres back to a four-man group consisting of Korio, his fellow Kenyan Edwin Kiptoo, Ethiopia’s 2018 Dubai Marathon winner Mosinet Geremew and Bahrain’s IAAF World Half Marathon Championships Valencia 2018 silver medallist Abraham Cheroben.  Kamworor kept up his relentless pace and deservedly took the plaudits in front of a packed and raucous audience in the Kanteerava Stadium to continue his unbeaten streak which started with his win at the New York City Marathon last November and has continued through his four outings in 2018. “I think we were all cautious about the weather in the first half of the race. It was very hot, and I think that’s what cost me the course record. I came here thinking about the course record and tried the best I could, but I could feel the temperature rising as I was warming up. I was jogging for just three minutes before starting to sweat,” reflected a smiling Kamworor. (05/27/2018) ⚡AMP
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Avoid these Seven mistakes when starting to get into running

Starting a running program is the best thing you can do for your health both mentally and pysically, when starting out avoid these mistakes  1. Overtraining: Start out easy and build up, don’t tackle all at once, no junk miles, quality miles. 2. Using improper form: follow your stride and focus on how you strike the ground, easy not aggresive 3. Not warming up: warm up the engine, unless in a race, on training run start easy and esatblish rythm 4.  Sticking to the same workout: plan routes and get into a habit of training, like brushing your teeth get the run in 5. Skipping strength training: work the core to avoid injuries 6. Not stretching out: Stretch before and after run 7. Not taking time to rest and recover: if feeling anything back off and rest it, a day off can avoid an injury and weeks to months off.  Enjoy your runs.   (05/27/2018) ⚡AMP
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How will training in Iten Kenya for six weeks help this Canadian Runner?

Trevor Hofbauer, who is among the hometown favorites in Sunday’s Canadian Half Marathon Championships on Scotiabank Calgary Marathon weekend, spent nearly six weeks this winter in Iten, Kenya, a high-altitude training base for some of the fastest folks on the planet. “You’d wake up at 6 o’clock, get out for a run at 6:30 a.m. and that’s when the sun comes up. So instead of hearing birds in the trees, you’d hear monkeys,” said Hofbauer, describing an average day at a famed camp that was founded by several-time world champion Lornah Kiplaget and sits nearly 8,000 feet above sea level. “So you’d go for a run for about an hour or an hour-and-a-half in the morning, come back and have breakfast, go for a two-hour nap, have lunch, read a book in the afternoon and then go for another run in the evening, which would be about 45 minutes. Then go to the gym, have dinner and call it a day.“ We will soon find out how this helped Trevor.   (05/27/2018) ⚡AMP
by Wes Gilbertson/ Calgary Sun
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Former champion Caroline Wostmann has withdrawn from the Comrades Marathon.

Former champion Caroline Wostmann withdraws from Comrades. Wostmann made the announcement through her running club KPMG. "We all understand that her withdrawal is a loss for the 2018 Comrades Marathon and Caroline’s large number of loyal supporters. This was a very tough and emotional decision, but we all believe it was the right one for the athlete at this point in time," the club said. "As a previous winner of both the Comrades and Two Oceans marathons, Caroline was doing everything in her power to properly prepare for this race she so dearly loves. The KPMG Running Club will continue to support Caroline on her journey back to full fitness." Wostmann, 2015 Comrades Marathon and two-time Two Oceans champion, was in the middle of her journey back to full fitness after struggling most of 2017 with a torn quadratus femoris muscle (muscle under the glute) in her left leg. (05/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Maxwell Curtiss, 26, recovers from coma to run in marathon

After an application process, four lucky runners were selected to join an Olympic Silver medalist's relay team that will run at Sunday's Vermont City Marathon. One of those four is a Milton man who overcame a brain injury and broken bones, using the marathon as motivation. Maxwell Curtiss, 26, laces up his sneakers, ready to run, after a hard day working for the family business. "Just with all the work, and all the stresses with work, you can just just put that behind me," Curtiss said. Routines may be boring for some, but Curtiss doesn't take his for granted. Especially after what happened to Maxwell last Summer while biking home from work. "The last thing I remember, I was in Fairfax, saw my friend's dad, said hey, chatted for a little bit, then I took off and don't remember anything after that," Curitss said. It was July 19th of last year, around 8:30 p.m. Maxwell was on his bike at the corner of Lake Road and Route 7 in Milton when he was hit by a car. Maxwell suffered a fractured skull and a broken hand he was in a coma for ten days.   (05/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Did you know that in France and Italy all Runners need a medical release signed by a doctor to run a race?

I decided that I wanted to run a 20K Race in Paris while on a business and pleasure trip there.  The race is tomorrow May 27.  I tired to register on line but since everything was in French I decided weeks ago I would just sign up at Endurance Sports on Saturday.  I had noticed that it did say Runners needed a medical release signed by a doctor.  Being an American I thought that only applied to Runners living in France.  I had met Julie who worked at the front desk of our hotel in Paris.  Luckily she was a runner.  She called and was told that yes I needed to get a full exam from a doctor because I am over 50.  I would need to go to a hospital since it would have to be a complete physical.  In France and Italy you have to present a signed medical statement to run a Race.  It did not matter that I have run nearly 1000 races and regularly run 20 or more miles weekly.  Julie at the front desk made a few calls and because she does run races she came up with a solution.  I am racing 20K through Paris Sunday.  I really don’t feel this is a good requirement.  I think signing a waiver should be good enough.  If Julie was not a runner this would not have happen.  This is a heads up to those wishing to race in either France and Italy.  But also I think this requirement should be changed.     (05/26/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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78-year-old EIna Roxström is running her 40th Stockholm marathon

Every weekday Elna Roxstrom wakes up just after 3AM.  She makes coffee and reads the morning newspaper. Then she goes out and runs for an hour and a quarter. “The mornings are absolutely amazing. It's cool and it is just me and the moon,” Elna says. A big goal for her is to complete 40 Stockholm Marathons. She ran 3 hours and 48 minutes on her 20th race and her best time came four years later: 3:24:06. This year, her goal is to get under six hours. "It's a big goal to complete 40.  Sometimes I wonder how I did it with four children and several grandchildren.  The Stockholm Marathon Jubilee is not my final goal.”  She will continue to run the race as long as she can stay under the time limit. (05/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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The third man to break four minutes for the mile, Laszlo Tabori has died at 86

Hungary’s Laszlo Tabori, who held the 1500m world record in the 1950s, died on Wednesday, May 23 at the age of 86. Born in Kosice in 1931, Tabori was part of the all-conquering Honved Budapest club. Under the guidance of legendary coach Mihaly Igloi, Tabori enjoyed a rapid rise to international success. One of Tabori’s first big achievements came when he and training partners Istvan Rozsavolgyi, Ferenc Mikes and Sandor Iharos broke the 4x1500m world record in Budapest in 1954. He improved significantly in 1955 and became the third man in history to run a sub-four-minute mile, clocking 3:59.0 in London on May 28.  In Oslo later that year, Tabori clocked 3:40.8 to equal the world 1500m record that had been set two months earlier by his training partner, Iharos. Denmark’s Gunnar Nielsen finished a close second to Tabori and was given the same time, meaning three men shared the world record. Tabori set his third world record at the end of 1955 when he once again teamed up with his same three training partners, this time running in a slightly different order, to take 6.4 seconds off their own world 4x1500m record. (05/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Fast times are expected at the Ottawa 10K

Ottawa is unique in that it has two IAAF Gold Label races on the same weekend and the sight of the elite marathon runners huddled together near the start of the Ottawa 10k on Saturday evening has become a familiar one. The assembled 10k field is incredibly well balanced with no clear favorite. Mohamed Ziani, the 2016 winner, sports a personal best of 27:28 set in Casablanca two years ago. This year he resigned his post with Morocco’s Royal Guard to focus on training. He will face a pair of young Kenyans, Benard Kipkorir Ngeno and Japan-based Benard Kimeli. The latter won the 2017 Prague 10k in a brilliant 27:10 the equal the seventh best performance ever. More recently he ran 59:47 to win the Prague Half Marathon. Having arrived from Japan on Wednesday, a day earlier than his competitors, he might have an advantage. Ngeno, 22, has been on a winning streak of late taking the Azalea Trail 10km (27:45) and setting course records in both the Fresh 15km (43:37) in Texas and Dismal Swamp Half Marathon in Virginia, clocking 1:02:28. Not to be discounted is 19-year-old Andamlak Belihu Berta who represented Ethiopia at the 2017 World Championships where he ran a personal best 27:08.94 in the 10,000m. For the women’s race Edith Chelimo of Kenya personal best is just 31:07 but she can run much faster. Last November she won the Cardiff Half Marathon in a stunning 1:05:52 passing the 10k mark in 30:56. This is not her first visit to Ottawa. Shortly after arriving in the Canadian capital a year ago she was diagnosed with a serious kidney infection and confined to a hospital bed for a couple of days. Now she is eager to get the job done. (05/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Rob Davies biggest challenge is the 58 mile Comrades ultra marathon coming up June 10

Rob Davies will fly to South Africa in preparation for a gruelling challenge that starts on June 10. Rob, 59, will be competing in the Comrades Ultra Marathon, also known as the Ultimate Human Race, a road race with a distance of 58 miles (90.1km). The race starts at Pietermaritzburg and ends in Durban in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province. The race has to be completed in 12 hours, starting at 5.30am where the temperatures can be close to freezing and rising to a possible 80F as the day progresses. The terrain is very hilly, meaning an already extremely challenging race is made even tougher. Mr Davies said: “Family, friends and colleagues know that I 'run a bit', or should I say 'a lot'. I have been fortunate enough, privileged even, to be able to complete 48 marathons, across Wales, England, Ireland, France and Germany but this is by far my biggest challenge to date.” He started his training in December which typically involves 8 to 10 hours running weekly alongside strength and conditioning in the gym. (05/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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British marathon champion will return to the streets of London

Lily Partridge, who ran a personal best 2:29:44 to finish eighth overall and first British woman at the Virgin Money London Marathon in April, is set to get back to racing at the Vitality London 10000 on May 28. The 27-year-old will not be the only British marathon champion competing, with Mo Farah already confirmed for the last Monday of May bank holiday race. Partridge’s, who clocked her 10k PB of 33:27 at the 2016 event, will face Aldershot, Farnham and District club-mate Steph Twell before looking ahead to the Berlin hosted European Championships in August. “The Vitality London 10000 is great because it does bring together a range of athletes,” said Partridge. “Some people like Steph come into it in track shape and it can be fast and then there are us girls who come into it off the back of a marathon and we have to ease ourselves into it a bit more. (05/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kellyn Taylor, one of the top female marathoners, will compete in the 42nd annual Grandma's Marathon

Kellyn Taylor, one of the top female marathoners in the United States, is coming to Duluth. The 31-year-old Taylor will compete in the 42nd annual Grandma's Marathon on June 16, two months after historically miserable weather kept her from finishing the Boston Marathon. "After a tough race at Boston I have the unique opportunity to utilize the fitness I gained but didn't use during that segment," Taylor said in a Wednesday news release from her team, Hoka Northern Arizona Elite. "The city of Duluth is beautiful and I cannot wait to take the 26.2-mile scenic tour." Taylor should know a thing or two about the region. Her hometown is Sussex, Wis., about 20 miles northwest of Milwaukee. Her personal best in the marathon is 2 hours, 28 minutes and 40 seconds, which she produced in her debut at the distance, a sixth-place showing at the 2015 Houston Marathon. (05/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Shrewsbury Half Marathon will be the first running race in the UK to use cartons of water

The organisers of Shrewsbury Half Marathon, UK Run Events, have announced that the 2018 event on Sunday 17th June will be the first running race in the UK to use cartons of water at the finish line. In a huge step towards reducing the amount of plastic used at events, Shrewsbury Half Marathon will be giving everyone a 500ml carton of One Less Bottle as they enter the finish funnel at the end of the race. The still mountain water is packaged in Tetra Pak® cartons, which are made from sustainable paperboard from FSC approved forests and fully recyclable, as well as refillable and reusable. By supporting One Water, Shrewsbury Half Marathon will be making a positive contribution towards improving lives on the other side of the world whilst actively helping the environment and acting as leader of the pack when it comes to environmental responsibility. UK Run Events will be funding the provision of One Less Bottle at the finish line of Shrewsbury Half Marathon as a trial. The organisers will be encouraging feedback from runners post-race, with a view to increasing the use of cartons at future events if they are well received. The Running Festival at Goodwood on 14th October, also organised by UK Run Events, has already committed to providing One Less Bottle at the finish line. (05/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Molly Huddle will head one of the best professional athlete fields at the New York Mini 10K

Three-time United Airlines NYC Half winner Molly Huddle of the United States will headline one of the best professional athlete fields ever assembled for the NYRR New York Mini 10K on Saturday, June 9. Keitany, who won the race in 2015 and 2017, and Huddle, who won the race in 2014 in the fastest time ever by an American at the event, will join previously announced Boston Marathon podium finishers Des Linden, Sarah Sellers, and Krista DuChene at the start line of the world’s original women’s only road race. The women’s open division, representing nine different countries, will include 10 Olympians in total racing the historic event that was established in 1972 as the world’s first road race exclusively for women. “We are excited to have one of the best professional athlete fields ever assembled for the NYRR New York Mini 10K – the most prestigious all-women’s road race in the world – and one which includes past champions, Olympians, and Abbott World Marathon Majors race winners,” said Peter Ciaccia, president of events for NYRR and race director of the TCS New York City Marathon. “Led by Mary, Molly and Des, this phenomenal group of women lining up will certainly thrill the spectators along the course on June 9, as well as those fans around the globe watching the race on USATF.TV.” (05/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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74-year-old Gu Dawo is the the oldest official pacemaker in Chinese marathon history

When many friends of his age are suffering from senile diseases, some of whom cannot even walk without external support, Gu Dawo, 74, is running the marathon. For the second time, Gu shows up as a pacer on Sunday's International Marathon in Yinchuan, the capital city of northwest China's Ningxia Hui Autonomous Reigon. "I'm leading the pace and I also want to lead more to participate in this activity," Gu said. He has been quite experienced in marathon running. The past 2017 was a fruitful year for the 74-year old. Gu went to the United States to run a half marathon in Georgia, and a triathlon in the Ironman 70.3, Chattanooga of Tennessee. "I was the oldest to complete the triathlon, many jumped cheering when I was introduced to be from China in the award ceremony," He said, showing a video clip recording the big moment he was breasting the tape in Chattanooga. "A Chinese grandpa of 73 was recorded to be the oldest to complete the Ironman 70.3," A local American website said while many American audience nicknamed him as Chinese Grandpa to set a record. In the same year, he also competed in marathons in Lanzhou and Xiamen, becoming a running idol for people both old and young. "Everytime I compete in a marathon, many will come to me and say 'if only I could run like you at your age'," Gu said, adding that young people wish to be as strong as him when they are aged, but always excuse themselves that they are much too busy to exercise. "One should exercise young. Some of my age envying me of my physique have lost the best time to run for exercises," Gu said. "I always ran to work when I was young," he added. Since the 1990s, Gu has kept this habit of running and the first time he competed in a race, he won 20 yuan ($3.13US) which encouraged him a lot.  (05/23/2018) ⚡AMP
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Callum Hawkins will face Mo Farah and Chris Thompson at Vitality London 10000 first race since the Commonwealth Games

Callum Hawkins will make his first return to racing , since collapsing while leading the Commonwealth Games marathon, at the Vitality London 0,000 on Monday, May 28. The Scottish star will once again compete against Mo Farah in the men’s race, while Chris Thompson also joins them on the start-line. Hawkins, 25, was on course for victory at the Commonwealth Games marathon on the Gold Coast, Australia, last month when, overcome by the heat, he lost control of his body and fell over just two kilometres from the finish. The Australian Michael Shelley came through to win the race and Hawkins was taken away to receive medical treatment. The Kilbarchan AC athlete continues to recover and has returned to training in his home city of Glasgow ahead of his competitive return to action at the Vitality London 10,000 on Bank Holiday Monday. “I feel a lot better now I have had some rest since returning from Australia and I’m looking forward to getting out there and competing again,” said Hawkins. “It has been a few years since I ran a 10k on British roads and it will be a good race to see where I am at in order to kick-start my summer. (05/23/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mysuru King Yaduveer Krishnadatta Chamaraja Wadiyar has confirmed that he will run for charity at the TCS World 10K

The young king has confirmed that he's running for the Kalisu Foundation in the Open 10K category. The CEO of the foundation, Nikhilesh MM, said: "We are extremely privileged to have his highness YKC Wadiyar running for us. Though he has never participated in a distance running event before, he is a good runner and is training to finish within 60 minutes." Over the course of 11 years, the Tata Consultancy Services World 10K (TCS World 10K) has carved a niche for itself among other sporting events in the country. Not solely for the fact that it is one of the country's biggest sporting extravaganza, but also because it is an event with a social conscience. TCSW10K philanthropy pillar driven by India Cares Foundation has seen phenomenal growth and the event now stands unsurpassed and unchallenged as the single largest charity raising platform in South India. The 2018 edition of the event has till date raised Rs 4 crore ($585,000US,  benefitting 70 Civil Society Organisations (CSOs).  (05/23/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dan Conway, national and world champion in masters running, died Sunday after a battle with pancreatic cancer

Jess Koski had heard 'em all. Whenever his friend, Dan Conway, started in on another tale, Koski would hold up his fingers — as in, here's how many times I've heard this one, Dan. Often, Conway proceeded, undeterred. Which jibes with his recently published book, "Carry on Regardless." "Storytellers, they just have to tell stories," Koski said. Conway's frequently were laced with humor. He liked to see people smile. "It was almost impossible to not be happy around him," said Evan Walpole, a 2013 graduate of Superior High School, where he ran for Conway's cross-country team. That held true even after Conway, diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in early February, entered Solvay Hospice House in Duluth on April 20, when he was given less than a week to live. Surrounded by friends, family and music, he made it a month. The Superior resident finally succumbed to the disease on Sunday afternoon. He was 79. Through many titles, Conway is perhaps best known as a world-class runner, a pursuit he didn't take all that seriously until he was in his late 30s. He made up for lost time, morphing into a national and world masters champion, which earned him a 15-year Nike sponsorship. This former football player — he competed in the sport at Wisconsin-Superior after graduating from Superior Cathedral in 1957 — could cruise. Conway claimed four national masters titles in the 10K and 15K, won the world masters 10K championship and set a then-world indoor mile record for the 50-54 age group (4:41.31). He added seven national masters indoor crowns in the mile and 2-mile, plus four outdoor titles over 1,500 and 5,000 meters. Conway also is a four-time Grandma's Marathon masters champ and still holds two age-group records for the Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon, 1:18:04 for 55-59 and 1:25:00 for 65-69. (05/22/2018) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Mary Keitany of Kenya will return to action at New York Mini 10km race

World marathon record holder Mary Keitany of Kenya will return to action on June 9 in New York just two months after failing to improve on her mark at the London Marathon. Keitany is the reigning champion for the New York Mini 10K and hopes she has returned to her best after suffering fatigue for pushing too fast her quest for the world marathon record in London on April 22. The Kenyan won the New York Mini 10km race on two occasions in 2015 and 2017. "The New York Mini 10km is a very special race for me, not only because I have been able to win it twice, but because it is so special to see so many women of all ages and abilities running together," Keitany said. "I hope that I am able to inspire them as much as they inspire me," she added. Runners in New York will vie for a first-place prize of 10,000 U.S. dollars in the open division. But Keitany is only keen to gauge her body after suffering exhaustion in London Marathon. "I have gotten over my frustrations from London Marathon. I still feel I can run faster, but after the experience in my last race, it will be important to take each day at a time and focus on the task ahead that is to win the New York Mini 10km race," she said on Tuesday from her training base, In Iten Kenya.   (05/22/2018) ⚡AMP
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An ultra-marathon runner is set to make a 63-mile heart-shaped route around Manchester as a unique tribute to victims of the Manchester Arena attack.

Thousands are expected to travel to the city to mark the first anniversary of the bombing, when alone suicide attacker killed 22 and injured hundreds during an Ariana Grande concert. It was the worst terror attack in the UK since the London bombings in 2005. Nathan Rae, a filmmaker from Manchester, will be paying tribute to the victims by running 63-miles in the shape of a heart around the city. He set off from Sale at about 8.30am on Tuesday and estimates it will take about 16 hours to complete the route. The circuit will take him through the centre of Manchester and its suburbs, as well Trafford, Salford and Stockport. He plans to stop outside A&E departments at Manchester Royal Infirmary and Wythenshawe and Salford Royal hospitals, where some of the wounded were treated.  (05/22/2018) ⚡AMP
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Catching Up with Sarah Sellers, her life has changed since placing Second in Boston

The last time we checked on Sarah Sellers, she was being deluged with worldwide media requests and coping with overnight fame in the wake of her stunning second-place finish in the Boston Marathon. More than a month later, the nurse who came out of nowhere to defeat world and Olympic medalists in the world’s most famous road race is still riding the wave she created in Boston. She now has her own Wikipedia page, an agent, a weekly podcast and a shoe deal. She has an invitation to ride the lead float in a Phoenix parade this fall. She has received calls from Oakley and Timex, among other companies, about endorsing their products. And the interviews continue. During the broadcast of the London Marathon, she got up in the middle of the night to do live interviews for BBC radio and TV (after performing jumping jacks to wake herself).  Sellers has been invited to run road races on the pro circuit, and this time she won’t have to pay her entry fee or expenses, as she famously did at Boston. Her first post-Boston race will be the New York Mini 10K (all women) on June 9; her second will be Salt Lake’s Deseret News 10K in July. She hasn’t chosen her next marathon, but she has an offer from the Gold Coast Marathon in Australia, among others. Sellers is a hot commodity in running circles and her anonymity is long gone. Hey, aren’t you that marathoner? According to her agent, Bob Wood, Sellers had 6.9 million Google searches for her name the first two days after the Boston race. “It’s been a life-changing thing,” says Wood. “She’s got so many people who want a piece of her, and she’s been very accommodating.” Sellers, an Ogden native, has returned to work as a nurse anesthetist at Banner-University Hospital in Tucson, while also training at an elite level for professional road races. She still does her training runs at 4 a.m. before she goes to work, and, if she is doubling that day, she’ll run again in the evening after work. When she isn’t running or working, she’s trying to respond to the demands of fame. “I’m just trying to respond to all the messages,” she says. “Sometimes I feel like I’m making progress, but I’m not. It’s been good and exciting, but this is added on top of trying to work full time and train. It’s not sustainable.” (05/22/2018) ⚡AMP
by Doug Robinson/ Deseret News
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Running makes me a better mom, a better partner, a better human says Melissa Chamberlain

Melissa Chamberlain always thought marathon runners were nuts. She certainly never thought she'd become one. "I was not born to run," said Chamberlain. "I didn't like running. I didn't like sweating. I didn't like being outside." But she also was looking for a way to stay in shape. Despite the time crunch that comes with being a working mom, she started small and realized she kind of liked it. "I did the Shamrock 5K in 2010 and that was my first 5K and then I got bit by the bug," said Chamberlain. "I just do it for fun. I do it to stay healthy. I like to run to show the kids that it's important to train for something and stick with it." She ran the Cleveland half Marathon on Sunday May 20th for the seventh time since 2010. "I have always aspired to be one of those runners that has a training plan and sticks to it every single day, but life happens and kids get sick and extracurricular things happen and you just can't always get out when you want to, so you just do the best you can," said Chamberlain.  Whether it's getting a run in on her lunch break or logging some miles on the weekend at Stevens Park in Niles, she says one of the most important parts behind all of this is simply getting some "me" time. "You just have to kind of make that time for yourself. And I honestly think it makes me a better mom. It makes me a better partner. It makes me a better human because I get that time to do something that I really love and then I can get back to life," said Chamberlain. She fully admits that she's not the fastest person out there; she walks when she has to and isn't worried about competing for a win. For her, it's about the experience on race day. (05/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Will Kocken sets a world record for running a marathon with a 100 pound pack on his back

This is a follow up on the story we ran a few weeks back about a runner going after the world record for running a marathon carrying a 100 pounds on his back. Will Kocken did it at the 2018 Cellcom Green Bay Marathon. Kocken's mission was to raise awareness for the 4th H.O.O.A.H. Wisconsin, a non-profit organization supporting veterans and their families. His other mission was to break the Guinness World Record for fastest time running a marathon with a 100-pound bag. Kocken, an Army National Guard solder, crushed it. He finished the marathon in a time of 6:27:59. That easily beats the previous record of 6:47:03. The results still need to be certified. Kocken had a team of witnesses recording his journey, and he weighed his pack at the beginning and end of the marathon. The evidence will be sent to the Guinness team. "Over the last four months I told myself I needed to run 600 miles before race day," Kocken said. "And so I hit over the 600 mile marker and I know I had done the training and now it's time to go out and show what hard work does. Hard work produces results." (05/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mary Etta Boitano's Mother smashed the world 5K record for 94-year-olds

My 94 year old mother just grabbed the women’s world age group record in the 5k for 94 year olds. She smashed the world record held by Betty Ashley from Tampa, Florida set in February of 2016. In this picture, she is nearly half way to the finish line and going strong. I am so proud to call her my momma. She will turn 95 in July and there are more distance records she can now chase. Check out the web site at ARRS.net. We are just now hoping the course was certified and from what we heard, it was.  Her time was 1:13:24.9 at the 2018 Marin Greek Festival Walk and Run held Saturday May 19th.  (Editor's note: Mary Etta has run over 150,000 miles and has been running races since she was four.  She ran 50 marthons before she was 12.  In 1973 she was the overall winner at the Dipsea.  She was 10.  She won the Bay To Breakers and many other races.  Her mother has always been so proud of her daughter and now they can celebrate this world record together.)  (05/21/2018) ⚡AMP
by Mary Etta Boitano Blanchard
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Strong elite women's field set for World 10K Bengaluru 2018 on Sunday

A strong women's field with elite runners from across the globe has been assembled to challenge Ethiopias IAAF World Half Marathon Valencia 2018 winner Netsanet Gudeta at the TCS World 10K Bengaluru 2018 Sunday. Gudeta's rivals this weekend will include the Kenyan pair of Agnes Tirop and Pauline Kamulu. Tirop, still only 22, won the 2015 world cross country title and has proven herself to be a formidable competitor on the track as well. She won the IAAF World Championships 10,000 metre bronze medal in London last summer and showed she is in excellent form earlier this month when she finished second over 3000m at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Doha with a personal best of 8:29.09. Kamulu, 23, has spent several years based in Japan but this will be her first trip to India. She surprised many when she took the bronze medal at the IAAF World Half Marathon Valencia 2018. A third Kenyan, Caroline Kipkirui, doesn't have the international championships credentials of her two compatriots but has shown stunning form recently while winning the Doha 3000m in a personal best of 8:29.05 and also running a 10km best of 30:28 when finishing second in Prague last month, which makes her the fastest woman in Bengaluru and the equal-seventh fastest ever. (05/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Is Yuki Kawauchi's secret weapon doing long distance runs at a slow pace? He ran 44 mile race Sunday

2018 Boston Marathon winner, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi, won the Yatsugatake Nobeyama 71K ultramarathon in Nagano, Japan Sunday May 20, taking more than six minutes off the course record in the process.

His winning time was 4:41:55 (6:23/mile for 44.1 miles).  He won by more than half an hour.  According to Japan Running News, Kawauchi is training for the Stockholm marathon, which is June 2. 

Yuki finished sixth place there last year. This was the longest race of Kawauchi’s career so far. Kawauchi is famously unusual in his incorporation of over-distance training at a slow pace into his training, something few world-major elites do.

Some believe it’s his secret weapon, though others are skeptical of its value in marathon training.  

(05/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Both the men's and women's course records were broken at the Lattelecom Riga Marathon

Ayana Tsedat of Ethiopia broke away from Kenyan's Silas Kiprono Too over the final two kilometers en route to his 2:11:00 victory.  The previous men's record of 2:11:45 was set in 2016.  The men's race was a three-man battle between Tsedat, Too and Joseph Kyengo Munyoki, who were all well within race record pace at the halfway point, reached in 1:05:09. They ran together for nearly 14 more kilometers when Munyoki began to drift back as they approached kilometer 35. At that point the leaders forged on nearly stride-for-stride until the 22-year-old Tsedat made his move. Too couldn't respond but held on for second, clocking 2:11:13. Rono, the pre-race favorite on the women's side, had just her pacesetter for company for most of the race, eventually winning in 2:28:22. The previous women's mark, 2:31:22, was set last year by Bekelech Bedada Daba of Ethiopia.Rono, 34, was the clear class of the women's field, building a two-second lead by five kilometers, and extending it to 11 at 10, reached in 33:47. She clocked 1:11:31 at the midway point, nearly a minute-and-a-half clear of her nearest competitor. When she reached the line, she was more than four minutes ahead of runner-up Ethiopian Tigist Teshome. It was Rono's fastest performance since 2014 and the fourth fastest of her career. Teshome clocked 2:32:46 with Pauline Nujeri Kahenya of Kenya third in 2:34:41. (05/21/2018) ⚡AMP
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Bay To Breakers saw Kenya’s Cheboi win again while Jane Kibii wins the women’s race

Kenya's Philemon Cheboi repeated as the winner of the men's race at San Francisco's Bay to Breakers on Sunday morning, while Jane Kibii took home the top spot for the women.  Cheboi came in with a time of 35:41 while Tanzania's Gabriel Geay came in second (36:04) and United States runner Aaron Braun finished third (36:45). Kibii came in with a time of 40:27 and had a bit fun posing for the cameras after her run. Times were slower this year because of the headwind most of the way.  (05/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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Morris Gachaga wins Cape Town 12 OneRun 15 seconds off his world best time for 12k

Morris Gachaga and Jackline Chepngeno made it a Kenyan double, taking line honours at the FNB CApe Town 12 ONERUN in dramatic fashion on Sunday May 20.   Almost 13 000 runners of all shapes and sizes finished the traditional harbourside 12km dash from Milnerton into the city centre in perfect running conditions, the colourful mass transforming the usual silent Sunday city centre into a bustling party-town.  Gachaga crossed the finish line in Bree Street in 33:42, some 15 seconds off of his world best time from 2017. “Racing for the win was more important than chasing my time from last year,” Gachaga said after the race. “We did start out fast, for the first three kilometres we were on record pace, but then we started watching each other and the pace dropped a bit.” Those first 3km were passed in 8:15, 5km going by in 14:02 with all the main contenders in the lead pack of twelve athletes.  Gachaga, after driving the pace to the 3km mark, then slipped back into the pack with Kenya’s Victor Chumo taking up the front running. The South African challenge fell away just after 8km which was covered in 22:47, with only Stephen Mokoka, the 2016 Champion, still in the mix. 10km came and went in 28:25 and it was at this point that Gachaga and Chumo kicked again, dragging Mande Bushendich with them.  On the climb up Wale Street, Chumo surged again and as they entered the final 800m in Bree Street, Chumo and Gachaga had broken away from John Langat (Kenya), Abdallah Mande and Mande Bushendich, with Mokoka dropping off further. Chumo and Gachaga raced down Bree Street where Gachaga’s knowledge of the route giving him the advantage as he timed his sprint to the line perfectly, passing Chumbo in the final 300m to defend his title. The female race saw Kenya’s Jackline Chepngeno take control after 2km. Uganda’s Stella Chesang, who was widely tipped to win the race after winning the 10 000m title at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, hung on till 9km, before she had to give way to the relentless surging of Chepngeno. For Chepngeno the victory was the perfect start to 2018 after having taken 2017 off from racing, having given birth to her son. “The last kilometre I was worried about Stella (Chesang) after her win in Brisbane (Commonwealth Games), so I ran really hard. I did not know where she was, so I needed to race to the line,” said Chepngeno. “Winning was really good for me. This was my first race back after my pregnancy and it is a big confidence booster for me.” (05/20/2018) ⚡AMP
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