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Two time Boston Marathon winner Lelisa Desisa out sprinted everyone to win the New York City Marathon in 2:05:59

Lelisa Desisa from Ethiopia clocked 2:05:59 winning the New York City marathon this morning. He was third last year clocking 2:11:23. His PR is 2:04:45 set in Dubai in 2013. Lelisa was the Boston Marathon winner in 2013 and 2015. His win at the 2013 Dubai Marathon was his first marathon. Battling Lelisa to the end was 22-year-old Shura Kitata who clocked 2:06:01 for second place. The Ethiopian was second at the 2018 London marathon clocking his PR of 2:04:49. Last year's champion Geoffrey Kamworor just could not keep up the pace with these two as he finished third in 2:06:26. The 25-year-old Kenyan winning time last year was 2:10:53 but this year's weather was nearly perfect for marathoning.  Four Americans placed in the top ten.  In 6th place Jared Ward clocked 2:12:24 and Scott Fauble placed 7th clocking 2:12:28.   (11/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Mary Keitany pulled off her fourth New York City Marathon win crushing the field

Kenya's Mary Keitany opened up a lead after a 4:54 mile at the 20 mile mark.  The 36-year-old with a PR of 2:17:01 while winning the 2017 London Marathon was in control.  Mary won three consecutive TCS New York City Marathons from 2014 to 2016.  In 2016 her 3:34 margin of victory was the greatest in the women's race since 1980.  Last year she was runner-up to Shalane Flanagan clocking 2:27:54.  Today Shalane Flanagan was about a quarter mile back with six miles to go holding on to fifth place.  Molly Huddle (USA) was close behind.  At 35K Mary projected finish time was just 50 seconds off the course record.  The course record of 2:22:31 was set in 2003. Shalane Flanagan moved up to fourth at 35k with Molly in 5th.   Meanwhile Mary Keitany continued pulling further ahead clipping off 5:05 miles.  35-year-old Vivian Cheruiyot who won the 2018 London Marathon (2:18:31) upped her pace to 5:21/mile making a move on Ethiopian's Rahma Tusa who was second at 23 miles.  Mary crossed the finish line first clocking 2:22:48 crushing the field. Vivian Cheruityot was second in 2:26:02.  America’s Shalane Flanagan finished third in 2:26:22 and Molly Huddle was fourth in 2:26:44.  Rahma Tusa faded to fifth clocking 2:27:13.   2018 Boston marathon winner Desiree Linden placed 6th clocking 2:27:51.  Allie Kieffe (US) places 7th clocking 2:28:12.   (11/04/2018) ⚡AMP
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Can Geoffrey Kamworor become only the second male runner in 20 years to win consecutive New York Marathon titles

Geoffrey Kamworor, 25-year-old Kenyan, won last year’s New York City Marathon by three seconds, is back in New York aiming to become only the second male runner in the past two decades, and the seventh in the 48-year history of the race, to win consecutive titles. He knows the field, stacked with other Olympians and major marathon winners, will be gunning for him. Kamworor has a secret weapon though: his training partner. Six days a week for most of the year, he runs stride for stride in Kenya with Eliud Kipchoge, the world-record holder in the marathon and the greatest marathoner ever. In many ways, the runners have a mentor-protégé relationship. Kipchoge is older by eight years and has already made the progression from the track to road racing and marathons.    (11/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia’s Azmeraw Bekele will be looking to claim victory at Hangzou Marathon on Sunday

Ethiopia’s Azmeraw Bekele will be looking to claim back-to-back victories and challenge his own course record at the Hangzhou Marathon, an IAAF Silver Label road race. Last year, the 32-year-old emerged triumphant from a three-man battle in the final kilometer to take the top honors in 2:10:33 in what was his first appearance at the scenic city in southeastern China, beating the previous course record set by countryman Bejigan Regasa Mndaye in 2016 by 49 seconds. Although he has not run in any race at any distance since that victory, Bekele is still seen as one of the top favorites to continue the record-breaking streak in Hangzhou, thanks to his 2:07:12 personal best achieved at the 2014 Dubai Marathon, which made him the fastest man among the entrants. However, he will also be facing a strong challenge from a clutch of Kenyan sub-2:10 runners on Sunday with the biggest threat being the 31-year-old Edwin Kibet Koech. Since his marathon debut in 2014, Koech has remained consistent. He registering his career best time of 2:08:17 three years ago from his fifth place finish in Eindhoven and went on to won at the 2016 Linz Marathon in 2:09:06. His most recent performance was staged at the Dalian International Marathon six month ago, as he broke the course record with a winning mark of 2:09:44. Kenya’s Geoffrey Ronoh, who will turn 36 on Monday , will also toe the line with high spirits. The 2:09:29 performer has yet to run in any marathon in the current season but collected two half marathon titles in August and September respectively. Ronoh’s compatriot Evans Sambu is another man to watch. Following his victories in China’s Taiyuan and Shenzhen in 2016, the 25-year-old broke the 2:10 barrier for the first time last October when he clocked a career best mark of 2:09:05 to finished fifth in Gongju. However, Sambu has been struggling to find his best form in 2018, finishing seventh in Dongying and Taiyuan with a lackluster season best mark of 2:17:39. (11/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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A woman paralyzed escaping an attacker is running New York Marathon to inspire others

Hannah Gavios isn’t letting anything get in the way of her finishing the New York Marathon, not even an attack that left her partially paralyzed.  Gavios, 25, said she is going to complete the marathon on crutches after having survived being pushed off a cliff while on vacation in Thailand. In 2016, she was heading back to her hotel when she became lost. Gavios said someone approached her and started harassing her, so she ran. Eventually she found herself on a cliff trying to escape the person who would not leave her alone. She fell 150 feet and broke her back. After she was rescued, Gavios started her long recovery process. She said she believes she can fully recover but it will take a lot of hard work. She is adding 26.2 miles onto her extensive recovery. Gavios is partaking in the New York Marathon to help raise money for spinal cord injury research. “This year I am crutching the marathon, but soon you’ll see me running it,” she said. (11/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan-born American runner Paul Chelimo wins his first USA road title this morning in New York

The 2018 USATF 5K Championships for men and women was part of the Abbott Dash to the Finish 5K held this morning in New York City and produced by the New York Road Runners.  The race featured Team USA Olympians and national record-holders vying for $60,000 in prize money and the title of USA champion.  The first place man and woman won $12,000 and the title.  In addition to the elites, thousands of others took to the street the day before the NY City Marathon.  Paul Chelimo and Shadrack Kipchirchir battled to the end both clocking 13:45 with Paul breaking the tape first.  Stanley Kebenei was eight seconds back.  Emily Sisson pulled ahead in the women's race clocking 15:38.  Erike Kemp was second in 15:50 followed by Amy Cragg (15:54) and Kim Conley (16:01).  Paul is a Kenyan-born American runner.  He was the 2016 Olympic Silver medalist at 5000m.  He said after the race, "Wow, so excited to have won my first USA road title alongside my best friend, brother and training partner."   (11/03/2018) ⚡AMP
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America’s Tim Ritchie is hoping to run well in the New York City Marathon on Sunday

Tim Ritchie signed with Saucony and started his professional career on the track before moving into road racing in 2014. Ritchie raced 5Ks, 10Ks and half marathons. “That was my inroads into being a professional runner,” Ritchie said. “I didn’t quite have the credentials when I graduated to sign a contract or be competing in the elite field in New York. I had to earn my way in.” Ritchie spent a year as a volunteer assistant with the Yale cross country team, while working with McKirdy Trained coaching services. He won the USATF Marathon National Championship last December at the California International Marathon in Sacramento. Ritchie moved up from 18th at the halfway mark with a blistering finish to claim the title in 2 hours, 11 minutes, 56 seconds. “There’s much more of a need for patience and self control in the early miles. I try to break the race up into stages, and keep reminding myself that I have what it takes.” Tim was hired to be the head track coach at UMass which started in June. “It’s a new life and a new adjustment, trying to find that balance,” Ritchie said. “It takes some discipline, time management, patience both on my part and my athletes have been truly patient and supportive of me, as well.” UMass finished sixth in the men’s race at last weekend’s Atlantic 10 Championships and 13th in the women’s team competition. “I’ve found it impressive how quickly he was able to gain the trust of the team,” UMass senior Michael Famiglietti said. “He’s still an athlete himself out there competing.”  Ritchie’s buildup for the New York Marathon has not been perfect. He’s had to adjust his schedule to full-time coaching and contend with injuries and illness, too. “I’m in a good rhythm now. From a running standpoint, being out in western Mass has been awesome for me,” Ritchie said. “This training environment is phenomenal when it comes to trails, dirt roads, hills’ it’s a beautiful place to go for a run every day.” The men’s New York elite field is stacked with nine Olympians and three major marathon champions from 2017. Ritchie doesn’t harbor hopes of winning. He understands the landscape of elite distance running right now and is focused on his own best race. “I want to get the most I can out of myself and run with pride,” Tim said.   (11/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mark Sullivan is running the Philadelphia Marathon for the 25th consecutive year

Mark Sullivan is one of only two runners who has participated in every Philadelphia Marathon since 1994. He’ll be competing for the 25th consecutive year. The 56-year-old graphic designer and running coach has completed 176 marathons — more than 4,600 miles — since 1986, including 32 consecutive Boston Marathons, but never set out to make it a goal. “If races ceased to exist, I’d still be a runner,” said Sullivan. “It’s not about the challenge. I just like it.” He did ran track in high school but he didn’t take up running seriously until after college. Working as a technical illustrator early in his career, Sullivan found himself sitting at a desk all day and felt he wasn’t getting enough exercise on the occasional hikes and tennis matches he played with his wife, Robin. “I needed to get out and the cheapest thing to do was run,” he said. Sullivan discovered the outdoor exercise was useful in his work by helping him tap into his technical and creative side. “If I was out running, I could come back (to the home office) and be more productive,” he said. It began with a three-mile loop around his Freeburg neighborhood until “one day I just went and ran six miles,” Sullivan recalled. The outings kept getting longer and by 1985 Sullivan began entering local 5K and 10K races. In addition to running marathons, he’s participated in several ultras too.  (11/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Organizers are expecting a record number of runners at this year's Istanbul Marathon

The 40th Vodafone Istanbul Marathon, the world's only transcontinental race, will be held on Nov. 11. "We are seeing a lot more interest compared to last year. The registration for the 10-kilometer and the 15-kilometer events are already closed. We are expecting a record number of runners this year," Vodafone Turkey Deputy CEO Hasan Suel told Anadolu Agency on Wednesday. "The Istanbul Marathon attracts a great deal of attention from foreign and Turkish runners," he said. "This is the only marathon in the world where the runners cross two continents. The runners also run to see the world. This marathon also gives the participants a chance to see the city." The marathon will start on the Asian side of Istanbul's July 15 Martyrs Bridge, formerly known as the Bosporus Bridge. The finish line will be at the historic Sultanahmet Square on the city's European side. Recalling this year's motto "Run Istanbul for a Healthy Future," Suel said, "Running has become much more popular in Turkey." Around 30,000 runners including 3,500 foreigners from more than 100 countries will take part in the marathon. The event features the marathon, 15K, 10K and 8K.  (11/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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Only two American woman have won the New York City Marathon, Miki Gorman was the first in 1977.

Miki Gorman was the first woman to finish the New York City Marathon in 1977, and it took 40 years until another American woman took the title. Miki Gorman was sitting alone at a corner table of a Magic Pan restaurant in Manhattan on Oct. 23, 1976, when her food arrived: not one, but two large crepes stuffed with mushroom and spinach souffle. A couple sitting nearby gawked at her. Gorman, at 5 feet tall or so, weighed only 90 pounds, and the plates of food covered her table. “I’m running the New York City Marathon tomorrow!” she told them. “And I’m going to win.” And so she did, the first woman to cross the finish line the next day. Even more, she won again the following year. No other American woman would take the title for the next four decades. “We’ve gone so long without winning, I can’t believe it,” Gorman told The Washington Post in 2004, long after her retirement in 1982. “My win was a lifetime ago.” Gorman was not around to see Shalane Flanagan’s 2017 victory; she died on Sept. 19, 2015, at 80, in Bellingham, Wash. The cause was metastasized lung cancer, her daughter, Danielle Nagel, said. Despite Gorman’s accomplishments, news of her death was not widely reported at the time. No word of it reached The New York Times. If it had, readers would have learned of record-breaking achievements that landed her in several halls of fame. One feat, in 1978, was a world best for a woman in the half marathon, at 1:15:58. She also won the Boston Marathon in the women’s category in 1974 and 1977, the latter victory coming, remarkably, the same year that she won in New York. She is the only woman known to have won both races twice. “She ran everything, from track races and really quick stuff all the way to these 100-mile races,” said George Hirsch, chairman of New York Road Runners. “There’s no one that I know of to this day who has that kind of a range and excelled in them all.” (11/02/2018) ⚡AMP
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America’s Molly Huddle just might be the one to beat at this year’s New York City Marathon

Last year Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Desiree Linden followed with a victory in April at the Boston Marathon, the first American woman to win in 33 years. Those achievements motivate Molly Huddle, who finished third at the 2016 NYC Marathon in her debut after a successful middle-distance career. "We have a very talented group of women marathoners," Huddle said. The 34-year-old from upstate New York is among that group. At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Huddle broke Flanagan's 10,000-meter American record from the 2008 Beijing Games. In January, Huddle broke Deena Kastor's 2006 American record at the Houston Half Marathon. Kastor, who won bronze in the marathon at the 2004 Athens Olympics, watched Huddle surpass her record in Texas. "Some of the other American women already have the accolades under their belt," Kastor said. "Molly is coming in a little more hungry. So I think we'll see something special out of her on Sunday." Huddle recently trained for two months in Arizona in the high altitude of Flagstaff and Scottsdale. She lives and trains in Providence, Rhode Island, where her longtime coach Ray Treacy is the track coach at Providence College.  The 5-foot-4 Huddle called it a "confidence boost" to finish on the podium in her first marathon. Defending champion Flanagan and Linden are in the field Sunday, along with Kenyans Mary Keitany and Vivian Cheruiyot. Last year, Flanagan brought it home to a cheering crowd against a fading Keitany. "She really captivated everybody watching, the two million people on the streets, those of us glued to our televisions or here at the finish line to welcome her at Central Park," Kastor said. "It was an extraordinary performance." Kastor thinks Huddle has a good chance on Sunday. Huddle aims to make the U.S. team for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. "Molly has such a great range and she's pushing it into the marathon," said Kastor.  "She could really make the team in whatever event she chooses — 5K, 10K and marathon." Huddle attributes the surge of American women in the marathon to watching the likes of Kastor, Flanagan and others perform at international levels.  She says "once you see it is possible" it helps "shift your subconscious." "It's raised the bar," Huddle said. "It's more encouraging than anything."  (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Can Shalane Flanagan do it again two years in a row at the New York Marathon

Last year at the New York Marathon, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman to win in 40 years, clocking 2:26:53. On Sunday, the 37 year-old will once again face three-time champion Mary Keitany who she dethroned from the top podium spot, along with London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot and Boston Marathon champion Des Linden.  Flanagan has a personal best of 2:21:14, while Kenya’s Keitany clocked a women’s only world record of 2:17:01 to win the 2017 edition of the London Marathon.  A couple of days ago Shalane posted this on FB. "Who is your biggest fan? I say, be your own biggest fan.  Self belief is powerful."  (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Battalion Chief Joe Downey is running the New York Marathon in honor of his father

FDNY Battalion Chief Joe Downey is usually the first one to suit up when the alarm sounds and sirens wail, but at the TCS New York City Marathon approaches, his off-the-clock time is spent focusing on training and preparation. Downey said it's a way for him to stay active, competitive, and challenge himself. This year, for his sixth marathon, Downey will be joined by his two nieces, Nicolette and Gina Tortorici. They call themselves "Team Moved Me" to honor his father, Deputy Chief Ray Downey, Sr., who died at the World Trade Center on 9/11. Downey said he looks forward to running in his father's memory, along with his nieces. "For the run or life in general, in the fire house, I'm always thinking about his values, his character," Downey said. "I'm looking forward to running in his memory, in a way, with my nieces." The chief ran his first marathon with his father in 1981, and that being athletic and competitive was in his father's nature. The elder Downey even led the department's hockey team when he was alive, and his active lifestyle was an example to his son. "We watched him skate, we watched him run marathons," he said. "So he instilled that in us, to follow his way." Though Downey hopes that his own daughter, Carlee, will join him in running a marathon one day, it's his own running that speaks to him the loudest. (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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President Cyril Ramaphosa will take part in the soweto Marathon in South Africa

President Cyril Ramaphosa will take part in the 2018 Old Mutual Soweto Marathon that starts and finish at the iconic FNB Stadium on Sunday. The president will line up alongside the strong field of some 30,000 athletes‚ who will be pounding through the streets of the historic township. “Yes I can confirm that President Cyril Ramaphosa will be running," said race director Danny Blumberg at a media briefing at FNB Stadium on Thursday. Blumberg said Ramaphosa will join the runners as a normal South African but withheld the race that the head of state will be running. “I think we are going to leave it as a surprise as to what distance he will be running‚” said Blumberg. The main race will start at 6am‚ followed by the 21‚1km at 6.30am while the casual runners resume at 7am. The 30,000 strong field is expected to crisscross the streets of the historic township in the energy-sapping route‚ more than half of which is hilly. It is forecast to be hot and humid on Sunday but race director Blumberg said there will be water points and more than one million water sachets that will be provided to the runners. (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Seoul marathon champion Sylvester Teimet of Kenya hopes for victory at Hangzhou marathon

Former Seoul marathon champion Sylvester Teimet of Kenya on Wednesday vowed to beat defending champion Azmeraw Molalign Bekele of Ethiopia in this Sunday's Hangzhou Marathon in China. Teimet, 34, who settled for fourth spot in last year's race, clocking 2:10:59, holds one of the fastest personal best times among the elites who will be racing in Hangzhou, an IAAF bronze level road race. The Kenyan holds a personal best time of 2:06:49, which he set when winning the Seoul Marathon in 2010. During his 11-year-long career, the experienced Kenyan has also collected titles in Shanghai and Gyeongju. He set the course record in Shanghai International Marathon of 2:09:01 in 2012 before compatriot Paul Lonyangata improved it to 2:07:14 in 2015. Sunday's race in Hangzhou will be his third in China this year, after he placed seventh at the Yellow River Estuary International Marathon in Dongying in May and second at the Taiyuan Marathon in early September. "I love running in China. I have rested enough and believe I have the strength to go for the win in my third marathon this year. There are several top names to expect, but I always focus on my own strength and strategy to win the race," Teimet said in Nairobi. (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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When Tsepo Mathibelle won the Soweto Marathon last year it changed his life, he wants to repeat

2017 Soweto Marathon winner Tsepo Mathibelle is back in the country and ready to defend his Old Mutual Soweto Marathon title. His win last year was one of the highlights of his career clocking 2:19.50. On Sunday, the target is on his back with numerous rivals gunning for the title. "So far things are going the way I want them to in terms of my physical and mental readiness," Mathibelle said. "I have made a few changes in my training program.  This marathon requires a bit of speed to be able to break away at the 20km mark." He said his victory in 2017 and the R220000 ($15,190US) prize money changed his life in a number of ways and did enhance his training. "I was able to buy a car and am now able to travel to faraway places to train at high altitude. So, I am better prepared this year... before I used to struggle," he said. The 27-year-old will dedicate this year's race to his father, Molefi, who passed away earlier this month. (11/01/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Lydia Cheromei is ready to return and win the women's title at the Shanghai Marathon

Kenya's veteran road racer Lydia Cheromei is hopeful her return to the Shanghai International Marathon on November 18 might see her strike gold. The 41-year-old had to settle for silver last year, but started 2018 on a high note, winning in Rabat in a time of 2:28:48. Two weeks ago, she was seventh in the Lisbon half marathon. Now she has returned home to Eldoret to continue her training before heading to China. "I loved the fans and the challenge I received in Shanghai last year," said Cheromei. "On returning to China I want to win like I did at the 2017 Lanzhou Marathon. I know the caliber of opposition in Shanghai will be tough, but that is what inspires me." Cheromei will be up against former Commonwealth Games marathon champion Flomena Cheyech, who has shaken off a foot injury and is back in contention. "I have been out of competition for a long time because of the injury I picked up in Japan. But it has since healed and I am back in competition. Shanghai is the next stop for me in November, and hopefully I will be able to run well and win gold," said Cheyech. (10/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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Bjørn Tore Taranger broke the 24-hour treadmill world record averaging 8:49/mile pace

Norwegian ultrarunner Bjørn Tore Taranger, 39, has broken the 24-hour treadmill record. Earlier this month Taranger ran 264.5K (164.3 miles), more than three kilometers better than the previous record, which was set by Luca Turrini of Australia last year. It translates to an average pace of 5:26 per kilometer (or 6.8 miles per hour which is 8:49/mile pace), maintained over 24 hours. Before going for Turrini’s record, Taranger first surpassed the Norwegian treadmill-running record of 240K. The heavily tattooed ultra runner plays the drums in a punk band when not setting extreme running records. Taranger’s record-breaking run took place in Bergen, Norway (Taranger’s home town) on October 11-12.  Taranger's achievement was more impressive since he was only 10th place in the 24th World Championships in Belfast in 2017, where he ran 257.6 km. “I knew I had it in me, I was not in doubt,” Taranger said after he recorded the new world record, "I knew that as long as I managed to get in my nutrition, follow the plan with the wonderful people here who have supported me throughout the night. That was awesome!,” dagdag pa niya. That was awesome !, "he added.   (10/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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A group of Japanese doctors warm that heat could be deadly at 2020 Olympic Marathon

The warning is the latest in a chorus of concern about how extreme heat could affect several sporting events at the Olympic games, particularly after Tokyo sweltered through a record heatwave this year. A group of Japanese doctors on Wednesday (Oct 31) urged Olympic organisers to start the Tokyo 2020 marathon as early as 5.30am, saying failure to do so could "lead to deaths" from heatstroke. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) and Tokyo 2020 organisers have acknowledged the concerns and already moved the marathon start time up 30 minutes to 7.00am, with competitive walking starting even earlier. But the Japan Medical Association and the Tokyo Medical Association said that was insufficient because most of the course would still be run in heat levels that were dangerous, and under which physical activity should be halted. "We are seriously concerned about it," Kimiyuki Nagashima, a senior official with the Japan Medical Association told reporters Wednesday. "If the risk of heatstroke is high for not only athletes but also staff members and the audience, there will be a rising demand for emergency services, which will have serious impact on medical institutions and regular patients." (10/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Daniel Wanjiru will face defending champion Geoffrey Kamworor at the New York City Marathon

Daniel Wanjiru and defending champion Geoffrey Kamworor are ready to battle it out at the 48th Annual New York Marathon on Sunday. Former London Marathon champion Daniel Wanjiru will face Kamworor and Festus Talam in what is expected to be a competitive race from the Ethiopian athletes. Ethiopia’s Tamirat Tola (2:04:06) leads his compatriots Lelisa Desisa (2:04:45) and Shura Kitata (2:04:49) in a bid to wrestle victory from the Kenyan contingent. Kamworor, who has been training in Kaptagat, clinched the title last year after clocking 2:10:53 three seconds ahead of Wilson Kipsang while Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa came in third with a time of 2:11:32. Wanjiru, who has been training in Kerugoya, will be making his debut in the race and is optimistic that he will run well and win. (10/31/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Run Internacional - The U.S. - México 10K, canceled due to the caravan's expected arrival

The Run Internacional - The U.S. - México 10K, has been canceled due to the caravan's expected arrival. The popular race begins in El Paso and ends in Ciudad Juárez and is showcased as a symbol of binational unity. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) always has been very supportive of this binational event and is a critical stakeholder in making this happen. You may have heard that a caravan of Central American people is on its way to the U.S.-Mexico border. Based on the need of resources, CBP has requested we postpone this year’s race to a later date in the next few weeks. A new date will be announced soon.  (10/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Callum Hawkins will make his return to marathon racing at the Fukuoka Marathon

Hawkins has been named in the elite men’s field that includes Ethiopia’s Yemane Tsegay, who has a 2:04:48 personal best, Kenya’s Vincent Kipruto (2:05:13 PB), and Eritrean duo Ghirmay Ghebreslassie (2:07:46 PB) and Amanuel Mesel (2:08:17 PB). In April, the Scottish athlete was on course for victory at the Commonwealth Games marathon on the Gold Coast, Australia, when, overcome by the heat, he lost control of his body and fell over in the closing stages. The 26 year-old has bounced back as expected and most recently clocked a 61:00 half marathon in Valencia, where he finished first European. “Things are on the up. 61:00 today in the Valencia half,” said Hawkins post-race on Instagram. “Not exactly what I wanted from the race but the legs are almost back.” At the 2017 edition of the Fukuoka Marathon, Norway’s Sondre Nordstad Moen took victory in a European record time of 2:05:48. (10/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mexico's Juan Luis Barrios is training with Bernard Lagat as they get ready for the New York Marathon

Mexico's Juan Luis Barrios and American Bernard Lagat have competed against each other at the highest level, but that doesn't keep them from training together for the New York Marathon. Bernard Lagat is a five-time Olympian, an American record holder and five-time world champion in distances from 1,500 to 5,000 meters. He's also a fine foodie. Come dinner time, that means a lot to Juan Luis Barrios. "Lagat is the chef," Barrios says. "He's really good in the kitchen." Since August, Lagat, Barrios, a two-time Olympian for Mexico, and Abdi Abdirahman, a four-time U.S. Olympian, have been training partners and housemates in Flagstaff, Arizona, as they get ready for Sunday's New York City Marathon. There the trio will find a strong field including Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor, who is the defending champ. The three have found they have similar easygoing personalities and taste in food. Lagat and Barrios often yield to Abdirahman when they go out to eat, though, because when he finds a restaurant he likes, he sticks with it. Lagat jokes he's "a snob" and playfully suggests his friend won't even go anywhere for coffee but the one little spot he has visited for years. For Lagat, Barrios and Abdirahman, Flagstaff stays also mean time spent talking, eating, going out for coffee and watching TV before and after long days of training. Lagat, who will make his marathon debut at New York at the age of 43, calls Barrios and Abdirahman his brothers. He and Abdirahman, 41, first met when they competed against one another in the Pac-12 in the late 1990s and have been training together in Flagstaff since 2002. All three became friends in 2012 when Barrios made Flagstaff his base before the London Games. "I have the same conditions for training, altitude," says Barrios, 35, of his home in Mexico City. "But I don't have these kind of training partners." (10/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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National record holder Yuta Shitara and Yuki Kawauchi are running the Fukuoka Marathon

The best year in Japanese men’s marathon history is drawing to a close, and with it the chances for them to qualify for the new MGC Race 2020 Olympic trials are running out. The Dec. 2nd Fukuoka International Marathon features one of the best Japanese fields ever assembled, with ten Japanese men under 2:10 since 2016. Half marathon national record holder Yuta Shitara, 2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi, 2017 Beppu-Oita Mainichi Marathon winner Kentaro Nakamoto, Hayato Sonoda and Yoshiki Takenouchi, make up the list of those already qualified for the MGC Race, Shitara running a marathon for the first time since his now-former national record 2:06:11 in Tokyo in February and Kawauchi hoping to turn things back around after a string of bad races since Boston. Those with a realistic chance of qualifying off the two-race average include 2017 Gold Coast Marathon winner Takuya Noguchi, who missed it by seconds at this year’s Gold Coast, recent sub-2:10 men Kohei Ogino, Yuma Hattori and Jo Fukuda, and a trio who finished together just over the 2:10 mark in Tokyo this year, Asuka Tanaka, Hiroki Yamagishi and Daichi Kamino. There’s a good number of others on the list who ran well in 2015 and 2016 and will be hoping to get back on board in Fukuoka, including sub-2:10 teammates Takuya Fukatsu, Fumihiro Maruyama and Satoru Sasaki , and given the depth of Japanese men’s marathoning and the tendency for dark horses to post seemingly out-of-nowhere breakthroughs like Taku Fujimoto, earlier this month in Chicago there’s almost no limit to who else could have their day. Twins Hiroshi and Takashi Ichida would make a lot of people happy if they finally broke through in Fukuoka. Both 100 km world record holder Nao Kazami, and 100 km silver medalist Takehiko Gyoba, are also in the race. It being a nominally international marathon, Fukuoka also has its usual small contingent of overseas runners perfectly positioned to pace the Japanese men to times in the 2:07 to 2:08 range and to lend a little shine to the race with their medals. 2011 world championships silver medalist Vincent Kipruto tops the list with a 2:06:14 in Berlin last year, with 2015 world champion Ghirmay Ghebreslassie and past Fukuoka champ Yemane Tsegay. (10/30/2018) ⚡AMP
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Gene Dykes is getting faster every year - My Best Runs Exclusive Profile Part Two

My Best Runs Exclusive Profile Part Two.  Gene Dkyes is only the second man in history over the age of 70 to run a marathon under three hours. He has done it twice.  He ran 2:58:28 at the Rotterdam Marathon and then he clocked 2:55:18 in Toronto Oct 21. 

Only Ed Whitlock have run faster.  Gene Dykes was born in 1948 in Canton, Ohio. 

All of his PR's from 200 miles to 1500m (accept for the 5k) have been set in the last year. He has a B.A. in chemistry and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Cornell University in 1978.  

He has been married since 1982 and they both moved to Philadelphia from Ithaca, New York in 1993.  After his Toronto Marathon we asked Gene about his race strategy. 

"I’m a slave to my GPS watch while running a race," says Gene.  "I nearly always run negative splits on any race shorter than a marathon, and I’m rarely more than a minute or two slower in the second half a marathon. 

I consume far fewer calories before and during a race than most runners seem to."  How about your weight?  He thinks the  "Two seconds per pound per mile is a rule that is awfully important.  Keeping weight down for a major race is the hardest part of training. 

It’s especially hard when I use the “See Food” diet.  I’ll eat just about anything, especially when I see it." 

In 2017 he was only one of 13 to complete the Triple Crown of 200's and he was the oldest finisher in each of them.  

In August he ran the 206.5 mile Bigfoot 200, September was the 205.5 mile Tahoe 200 and October was the 238 mile Moab 240.  In 2018 he won ten USATF National Championships from 1500m on the track to 100 mile on the trail.  So what is ahead for Gene?  

 "Having turned 70 this year, I decided that I would spend the year chasing records and national championships and forego many of the big ultra races that I really love. 

I still have one national age group record to topple which I expect to happen at the Philadelphia Half Marathon in November.  Having come up just 34 seconds short of beating Ed Whitlock’s venerable M70 age group record in the marathon, you can be sure that I’m making plans on another attempt within a year. 

I’m keeping those plans secret, though," Gene told My Best Runs.  In the meantime Gene has signed on to the Run The World Challenge 3 team.  

Gene is at the top of the 70 plus world and don't you get the feeling he is going to be setting a lot more records? (Photo taken at the USATF National Outdoor Championships in Spokane)

(10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Meet the new Half Marathon World Record Holder Abraham Kiptum, My Best Runs Profile

Abraham Kiptum was born September 15, 1989 and is from Nandi county (Kenya) the same county as marathon world record holder Eliud Kipcoge.  He also comes from the same village as former world marathon champion Martin Lel.  The 29-year-old, Abraham Kiptum ran the fastest half marathon ever on Sunday October 28 clocking 58:18 taking five seconds off Eritrean's Zersenay Tadese world record 58:23 set in 2010 in Lisbon. Abraham trains in Kaptagat and Kapsabet and started training for elite running about five years ago after getting inspired by former elite marathon star Martin Lel. Kiptum ran in primary and high school but wasn’t that serious.  It was just part of the culture.  The world record holder, with long and fast legs, journey to greatness started April 24, 2016 in Madrid when he clocked 61:52 in the half marathon, then he ran 61:26 in Casablanca placing first. His next break through was on September 16, 2018 in Copenhagen when he finished second clocking 59:06 and finally yesterday the world record in the Valencia ahalf marathon.  He had been running incredible well on Kenya soil.  In 2017 he ran two fast 10000m clocking 27:19 and 27:44 at high altitude in Eldoret. On October 15, 2017 he ran 2:05:26 at the Amsterdam Marathon.  Kiptum gain further confidence and knew he would give the world record a try when he ran and won on July 2018 the second edition of the Kabarak University half marathon clocking 62:02 on Kenya soil.  For the Half Marathon in Valencia on Sunday Kiptum was on his toes leading the pack at 5km clocking 13:56 and then 28:02 at 10km.  But after a short distance the tall champion with long and fast strides upped the pace to 2:44km/min and he went on to win and set a new world record.  The cheers and excitement from the crowd helped him bolt fast because he was aware the record was in his reach.  He moved easily to the finish line crossing with unbelievable joy. He said “I cant believe it, I am over the moon.  Obviously I knew I was in a good shape because I set a pb last month in Copenhagen but I was eager to run in Valencia. I was confident of improving on my best."  When asked when he started to move fast, he said, ”I realized the race slowed down between the 9th and 10th km, so I decided to step up the pace and go for everything.”  (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
by Willie Korir reporting from Kenya
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Bernard Lagat, the second fastest 1500m runner of all time, will debut at New York City Marathon

Bernard Lagat, at the age of 43, with two Olympic medals and five world titles to his name would have every reason to walk away from his beloved sport feeling proud. Instead, he wants to achieve more.  The 2018 New York City Marathon will be Lagat’s debut at the distance.  The Kenyan American has the second best record in history at 1,500 meters. Today, this nationalized Kenyan American athlete in 2004 is best known for all the achievements he has achieved at an age when many others have long since retired from the world of athletics. But the truth is that Bernard Lagat has earned the respect of all fans of athletics for their brands in recent years and for still running at an elite level at age 43. Lagat is the American record holder in the 1500m and mile indoors, as well as the 1500m, 3000m, and 5000m outdoors, and is the Kenyan record holder at 1500m outdoors. Lagat is the second fastest 1500m runner of all time, behind Hicham El Guerrouj. Lagat is a five-time Olympian, having competed in the 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016 games, and is a thirteen-time medalist in World Championships and Olympics including five gold medals. Going into the Rio Olympics with the age of 41, in the 5000m, he finished 5th among 16 starters (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Runners were forced to wade through ankle-deep water at the Venice marathon, Yuki Kawauchi finished seventh, in 2:27:40

Venice Marathon runners were left wading through ankles-deep water after high tides flooded the course.   Competitors were undeterred by the tricky conditions for the marathon on Sunday with water inches deep in some places. Witnesses described the conditions as “insane” and some suggested it had turned the marathon into a swim.   One runner Andrew Chessell joked that he "should have hired a gondola". The flooding was caused by acqua alta, which is the high tide from the Northern Adriatic Sea.    Despite the difficult conditions, Mekuant Ayenew Gebre of Ethiopia managed to pull off the win today, finishing in 2:13:22. The Ethiopian runner entered the race with a 2:09:00 personal best from the Prague Marathon in 2017. Second place went to Kenyan plumber Gilbert Kipleting Chumba in 2:13:49, and third place to Stephen Kiplimo in 2:13:56. Yuki Kawauchi of Japan finished seventh, in 2:27:40 in the diffult conditions.  This was Kawauchi’s 87th marathon of his career, and 10th marathon race this year but not a sub 2:20 he had wanted.    (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia’s Meskerem Assefa breaks course record at Frankfurt Marathon

Having finished on the lower steps of the podium at last year’s Mainova Frankfurt Marathon, Ethiopia’s Meskerem Assefa and Kelkile Gezahegn topped the podium at this year’s edition of the Frankfurt Marathon on Sunday. In a high-quality women’s race in which the first seven athletes finished inside 2:23, 33-year-old Assefa triumphed in 2:20:36 to take 25 seconds off the course record set by compatriot Meselech Melkamu in 2012. Ethiopian athletes swept the women’s podium as Haftamnesh Tesfay finished second in 2:20:47, also inside the previous course record, and Bedatu Hirpa placed third in 2:21:32. After a thrilling duel, Gezahegn won the men’s race by just four seconds from Kenya’s Martin Kosgey, clocking 2:06:37. Marathon debutant Alex Kibet was third in 2:07:09, while Mark Kiptoo took 48 seconds off the world M40 masters best with 2:07:50 for sixth place. Assefa wins battle of the Ethiopians, leading a group of 12 women reached the half-way point in 1:09:55, it was obvious that something special was possible. The group was on course for a sub-2:20 finish and although weather conditions were far from ideal, the leading women maintained the swift pace until late in the race. Their 30-kilometer split of 1:39:30 suggested a sub-2:20 time was still possible, but the group later faced a stiff headwind for several kilometers and their pace suffered slightly. At 35 kilometers there were still five women in the lead group: Ethiopians Assefa, Tesfay, Hirpa and Dera Dida as well as Kenya’s Betsy Saina, the Paris Marathon champion. Saina struggled in the closing stages and eventually finished eighth. Hirpa and Dida also dropped back, leaving Tesfay and Assefa to battle for victory. It was only in the final kilometer when Assefa, who finished third in Frankfurt last year, moved ahead and build a decisive lead before going on to win by 11 seconds in 2:20:36. “I did not really feel the wind,” said Assefa, a former 1500m specialist. “I prepared for Frankfurt for five months because I wanted to run 2:22 and win the race. Now I had to run a little bit quicker for first place.” (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Asefa Bekele from Ethiopia won the 2018 men's Dublin Marathon

Ethiopia's Asefa Bekele won the 2018 men's Dublin Marathon while his fellow compatriot Mesera Dubiso won the women's race. Over 20,000 participants turned out for the annual race with Bekele coming home in a time 2:13:23 with Dubiso crossed over the finishing line in a time of 2:33:48 to take the women's title. Meanwhile, there was a strong Irish representation in the field with Mick Clohisey of the Raheny Shamrocks club claiming the Irish Athletics National Marathon, finishing in a time of 2:15:57. It was the fastest time to win the National title since 1991. The Dublin man placed sixth overall. Cork native Lizzie Lee took third place in the women's race and finished in an impressive time of 2:35:04 after winning the Vhi Women’s Mini Marathon earlier this year. She also claimed the Irish Athletics National Marathon title in the process. Lee said: "An Irish woman on the overall podium, I am thrilled with that. I am thrilled with the time, I am thrilled with the place and I know my little girl is out there somewhere I can’t wait to give her a hug. I needed redemption after Berlin. "I felt like the last few miles got away from me. I am absolutely over the moon. I am a Mum of two small girls and I work full time. "Running is my hobby and I am on a podium with two Ethiopian girls.  I am thrilled,"  said Lizzie Lee with a smile. (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jeffrey Stein won the 43rd Marine Corps Marathon, a first marathon win for this public defender

Two months ago, Jeffrey Stein had no idea that he’d be participating in — let alone winning — the 43rd Marine Corps Marathon. Mired in a trial that required his full attention, the 32-year-old Washington DC resident and public defender was only able to carve out time to run during his daily commute to and from the Archives building. “When you’re in trial, you usually can’t train, and you can’t run because you’re in trial 24/7,” Stein said after Sunday’s race, which brought almost 21,000 runners to its course. “I bought a run commute backpack, which let me run to and from work. No marathon-specific training, but it allowed me to keep a baseline fitness.” Those five-mile runs were all Stein needed to come out on top, as he notched his first career marathon victory with an official time of 2 hours 22 minutes 49 seconds. California resident and Navy Lieutenant Patrick Hearn crossed the finish line 37 seconds later to claim second place, while Navy Lieutenant Commander Will Christian of Chesapeake, Va., came in third in 2:24:23. (10/29/2018) ⚡AMP
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I can’t believe it. I am over the moon says Abraham Kiptum after clocking 58:18 a new world record

Zersenay Tadese's eight-year-old half marathon world record of 58:23 has been broken. 29-year-old Abraham Kiptum from Kenya, who ran 59:09 in Copenhagen last month, clocked 58:18 in Valencia this morning, October 28.  The Medio Maratón de Valencia Trinidad Alfonso is a IAAF Gold Label road race.   On a perfect day (a slight wind and 52F, 11C), the race opened according to the plan with the main pack passing the opening five kilometers in 13:56. By 10K, the pace had dropped slightly as the 15-man lead pack went through that checkpoint in 28:02. But shortly afterwards the long-legged Kiptum broke away from the rest of the pack with incredible ease and began to cover each kilometer in a stunning 2:44. The 15K split of 41:40 was just seven seconds slower than Tadese’s equivalent split from his world record run – suggested that Kiptum was on course to break his PB of 59:09.  Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer was still just two seconds behind Kiptum.  Boosted by the crowd and fully aware that he was close to world record, Kiptum kept on pushing hard to open a margin over the Ethiopians in second and third. The Kenyan reached 20K in 55:18 to take three seconds off Tadese’s previous world best of 55:21 set on his way to his world half marathon best of 58:23 in Lisbon eight years ago. Having covered the second 10K in 27:16, Kiptum strode home in 58:18 to bring the world record back to Kenya.   “I can’t believe it, I’m over the moon,” said 29-year-old Kiptum. “Obviously I knew I was in good shape because I set a PB last month in Copenhagen but I was eager to run in Valencia because it’s one of the flattest circuits I’ve ever run and I was confident of improving on my best. “In the race I slowed down between the ninth and 10th so I decided to step up the pace and go for everything.” (10/28/2018) ⚡AMP
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Gene Dykes is currently the world's top 70 Plus runner - My Best Runs Exclusive Profile Part One

Gene Dykes is the world's best runner in the world currently seventy plus. "One of my 'secret' training methods for marathons is to run a lot of ultras," Gene told My Best Runs in this exclusive profile. "I’ll begin training for Boston in January, and to kick it off I’ll run a 50-miler in January and both a 100-miler and a 200-miler in February. During March I’ll convert that training base into marathon speed." Sounds wild and unconventional but it has been working for 70-year-old Gene Dykes from Philadelphia..."It was thought by many of us that Canada's Ed Whitlock's records were way beyond reach," says lifelong runner and Runner's World and My Best Runs founder Bob Anderson.  "At age 73 Ed became the first 70 plus runner in the world to run the marathon under three hours."  In 2004 73-year-old Ed Whitlock clocked an amazing 2:54:48 at the Scotiabank Tornonto Waterfront Marathon.  No one ever had run a marathon that fast 70 plus. The late Ed Whitlock was in a league of his own until now.  At the same marathon this year on October 21, 70-year-old Gene Dykes clocked 2:55:18.  My Best Runs wanted to find out more about this new super star, a runner who has set PR's at all distances (other than the 5k) over the last year from 1500m to 200 miles. How did Gene discover running?  "It’s probably more accurate to say that I discovered running twice," said Gene. "The first time, when I was about fourteen, it just kind of popped into my head to run three miles to the house of a girl I was interested in.  After about a mile and a half, I had to walk for a bit.  I was really disgusted with myself, and I swore I would never again resort to walking on a run.  I actually kept this promise, until I started doing trail races, of course, where there are lots of good reasons to walk now and then."  After this he ran track in high school for a couple of years. "In my senior year I thought I was pretty good when I dominated the 2-mile run in my county.  That notion was quickly dispelled when I ran track in college and I was totally blown away by the competition.  For the next four decades, I would stay in jogging shape much of the time, but it never occurred to me to race because it had been firmly impressed upon me that I wasn’t a very good runner," Gene remembers.  He rediscovered running in 2004 at the age of 56 after a six year layoff because of a torn hamstring... "A golfing acquaintance told me he had a running group and that I should join him sometime.  A classic case of falling in with a bad crowd.  They encouraged me to run some races with them, and discovering that I wasn’t half bad, my running career was born," Gene told us.  So how important is running to Gene?  "It started out as an activity I looked forward to on weekends, and it slowly took over as my main hobby.  Probably starting around 2011 when I ran my first adventure race and started training for Comrades (56-mile race in South Africa) it became way more than just a hobby.  While it will never quite reach the point of being 'all-consuming.' I suppose you would be forgiven for thinking that, considering that I’ll have done 38 races in 34 weekends this year."  The obvious next question was, tell us about your training.  "For about nine years I just stumbled my way through training.  I did lots of long, slow runs with occasional track workouts.  I gradually improved, and I was having a lot of fun, but I was worried that my best days were behind me when I fell miserably short of a new marathon PR at the 2013 Toronto Marathon.  Swallowing my pride and opening my wallet, I hired a coach.  What a life changing decision that was!  In just five months I went from a half decent runner with modest goals to a runner capable of competing at the highest levels. Training now consists of fewer miles, but harder workouts and fewer rest days," says Gene.  He has set PR's in the last 12 months from 200 miles down to the 1500m.  He clocked 98 hours, 10 minutes 22 seconds for 200 miles, 23:41:22 for 100 miles, 1:26:34 for the half marathon and 5:17 for 1500m.  In 2018 he won ten USATF national championships. His 2:57:43 clocked at this year's Rotterdam Marathon was a world single age record until he bettered it in Toronto.  Gene says, "I’m particularly fond of having won championships at both track 1500 meters and trail 100 mile this year.”  In part two Gene talks about his diet, going after more records, dealing with injuries and a lot more.  Coming tomorrow October 29 on My Best Runs.           (10/28/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Kangogo and Tanui are set to take on the Venice Marathon

Kenyans Philip Kangogo and Angela Tanui are gearing up for another conquest at the Huawei-sponsored Venice Marathon on Sunday in Italy. Kangogo will be up against Venice course record holder John Komen (2:08.13) as he targets to hit two birds with one stone. "Records are there to be broken. I feel I have run faster and if the weather and competition is right, I will be the new champion and set a new course record. I can run two hours and seven minutes," said Kangogo. The 27-year-old Kangogo clocked his 2:08:16 career best at the 2015 Barcelona Marathon and believes he has gone over his worst time as he nursed an ankle injury and is ready to return to winning form. "Venice will provide the platform to announce my return to high level competitions. I want to win here and go on to impress in other cities to be able to make the cut in the Kenyan team," Kangogo said. "We have the World Championships and Tokyo Olympics coming up and the road to the Olympics starts in Venice," he added. Racing too will be Japan’s Yuki Kawasaki, the 2018 Boston Marathon winner. The title favorite in the women's race is Kenyan Angela Tanui, who clocked 2:26:31 in Vienna last year and has a half marathon best of 1:07:16. The leading European runner is Croatia's Nikolina Sustic. (10/27/2018) ⚡AMP
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Doctors told Anais Maniere she’d never walk again is running the Dublin marathon

A woman who was warned by doctors that her incurable disease would confine her to a wheelchair for the rest of her days is aiming to prove her medical team wrong by running this weekend's Dublin Marathon. Anais Maniere, a Dublin-based nurse, was diagnosed last year with Ankylosing Spondylitis, a little-known rheumatological condition that leaves sufferers with constant pain and stiffness from the neck down to the lower back. In the case of Maniere, the symptoms were at one stage so severe that everyday actions like walking, dressing, driving, and sleeping became extremely challenging. And doctors warned the 28-year-old to expect things to go from bad to worse, telling her she would be in a wheelchair in her thirties. However, determined Anais, whose courage has earned her a prestigious Lord Mayor's medal nomination, has vowed to push herself through the pain barrier this weekend and not only complete the Dublin Marathon, but run the entire, grueling course. She said, "I've suffered from pains since when I was a child, but it wasn't until January of last year when I was diagnosed, and at the beginning of this year things got really bad, and it was hard for me to walk, stand up or even be static. "I was also told by a doctor at the time that I'd be in a wheelchair in my thirties, and that was horrible to hear. It upset me, but I'm determined to prove that doctor wrong. "In February I started a new treatment and things have improved. Although this condition can't be cured, it's about controlling the pain and learning to live as normal a life as possible." (10/27/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Edith Chelimo wants to fly Kenya’s flag high at this year’s Valencia Half Marathon

In the absence of defending champion and world record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei and compatriot Fancy Chemutai, Kenya’s Edith Chelimo will look to fly Kenya’s flag high at this year’s Media Maratón de Valencia Trinidad Alfonso on Sunday.  

Jepkosgei set a world record at last year’s race and in her absence, organizers were looking to lure Chemutai to step up, but the latter was forced to withdraw due to injury earlier this week.

Chelimo however will be looked at as a huge contender having run a 1:05:52 career best set last year in Cardiff, and a season’s best of 1:07:13 from Houston earlier this year. Ethiopia’s Buze Diriba should also be a factor.

The 24-year-old clocked 1:06:50 in Houston where she beat Chelimo. Her compatriots Gudeta Bekelech, who was eighth at last year’s World Championships, set a PB of 1:07:03 last month in Copenhagen. Gelete Burka, who claimed the 2008 world indoor 3000m title in Valencia, is also in the field. The 32-year-old has enjoyed a successful transition to road events, with solid 2:20:45 and 1:08:18 personal bests in the marathon and half marathon.

Other Kenyans on show include Diana Kipyogei (1:07:55), Caroline Rotich (1:08:52) and Risper Chebet (1:09:24) with Eritrea’s Yeshi Chekole (1:09:13) also aiming for a top-five spot.  

(10/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tirunesh Dibaba wants to win the Rock ‘n’ Roll San Antonio Half Marathon

Ethiopian champion, Tirunesh Dibaba, is all set to try her hand on the half marathon course at the Humana Rock ‘n’ Roll® San Antonio Marathon & ½ Marathon on December 2. In addition, 2018 Boston Marathon Champion, Des linden, and 2014 Boston Marathon Champion, Meb Keflezighi, are set to participate in race weekend festivities. Keflezighi will pace the 1:40 half marathon group while Linden will run alongside the winners of the Brooks Run Together contest. All three will make appearances throughout the weekend’s festivities including the press conference on Friday, November 30 and Saturday’s 5K and 10K on December 1, as well as meet & greets with runners and spectators. Widely regarded as one of the best female distance runners of all time, Dibaba is a three-time Olympic Gold Medalist representing Ethiopia. Dibaba won gold in 2008 games in Beijing, China in the 5000m and 10,000m distances as well as in 2012 games in London in the 10,000m race. She is a nine-time World Champion and holds the World Record in the 5000m with a time of 14:11.15. Dibaba was the 2017 Chicago Marathon Champion winning the 40th edition of the race. She has a personal best in the marathon of 2:17:56 which is the fifth fastest of all time and boasts a 1:06:50 personal best in the half marathon. (10/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sarah Sellers has changed her training schedule getting ready for the New York City Marathon

Sellers narrowed her focus on the fall marathon season. After debating between a few large races, she decided to run the New York City Marathon. “I think New York will be the most competitive field I’ve ever been around,” she said. Her buildup for the November 4 race has been a bit different than Boston, chiefly because of a change in her work schedule. Instead of working 10-hour shifts at the hospital five weekdays in a row, she now takes off either Thursday or Friday, which allows her to do a weekly hard workout during the day rather than squeezing it in before or after work. To log her weekly mileage—which peaked at around 105 miles—Sellers still has to double up most days, which means running at 4 a.m. and after 7 p.m. on the days she works. On her dark morning and evening runs, Sellers said she brings lights to make herself visible to cars. Sometimes she runs with another local marathoner, Katie James, but she’s most often alone on the streets and trails of Tucson. On her easy days, she runs with music, wanting to drown out the haunted howls of coyotes. “I’d rather hear my music and not know what’s going on around me,” she said. (10/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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BethAnn Telford has not let Brain Cancer get in the way of her running the Marine corps Marathon

BethAnn Telford has 15 medals from previous Marine Corps Marathons.  The 2005 medal is very special to her. “It wasn’t great bling at the time, but to me, that’s my gold medal,” said Telford. That’s because the year before, Telford fought for her life. While running the Marine Corps Marathon in 2004, Telford first noticed something wasn’t right at mile 19.  “I felt a pop in my head, almost like I was in an airplane and I had to clear my nose or my head,” said Telford. “I started to act like I was drunk and my gait was off. I did finish the race however,” she remembers.  Things didn’t improve when she went to work the following day. Telford found herself walking into furniture that had been there for years and taking the wrong train home. “There was something wrong,” said Telford. Telford’s doctors told her she had brain cancer. The lifelong athlete full of fight was put to the ultimate test: a battle for her life. Soon after, Telford underwent surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. “I had to learn to run, walk and talk again, and deal with skills that were taken away,” Telford said. “But I was determined.” Telford returned to her hometown in Pennsylvania to recover. A few months later, she decided to participate in a 5K in her community. Her father followed her along the course and toward the finish line, cheering her on. “I started to hear him yell like when I was in high school or the hockey field, ‘Beth run! Run Beth!’ and then I knew I was going to be okay,” Telford said. “I ran and finished that 5K.” She hasn’t looked back since. “I thought if I can finish this 5K, I know that I can lace up in October right after my brain surgery and make sure that I get into the Marine Corps Marathon where this all started,” said Telford. “It wasn’t going to be fast, but I was determined that course wasn’t going to get me.” She ran in the Marine Corps Marathon again in 2005, and has run it every year since then. (10/26/2018) ⚡AMP
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Yuki Kawauchi felt ashamed of his performance in Chicago but has arrived in Venice with one thing in mind

2018 Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi arrived in Venice, Italy today.  He wrote on Facebook, " I arrived in Venice today.This city is so beautiful. I will run Venice Marathon on Sunday. This will be first race in Italy for me. I heard venetian tiramisu is very delicious.I am looking forward to eat tiramisu after race since it is my most favorite cake. I want to run good race."  On October 20 he ran a 20k race clocking 1:00:48, good enough for second place.  Yuki was very disappointed in his performance at the Chicago Marathon.  Afterwards he called his 2:16:26 19th place finish an embarrassment.  He said he was ashamed and hung his head.  This was his 82nd sub-2:20 marathon. He has run more sub-2:10 marathons since 2011 than the entire running population of the United States put together.  He averages about 11 marathons per year while most of his rivals run two.  He said before the Chicago Marathon that his goal was to destroy the status quo, to show people a different way to approach running and life.  Earlier this month he posted, "I come to win (the Venice Marathon) and I can not wait to do it because, in addition to running, I would like to taste Italian cuisine... Food and marathon will make this weekend unforgettable," says Yuki.    (10/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan runners are looking at running well again at the Valencia Half Marathon this weekend

Kenya's Pauline Korikwiang, 30, is returning to Spain hoping to win the Valencia Half Marathon in her second attempt on Sunday. She won the Bucharest Half Marathon clocking 1:10:07 in May and she hopes she has the energy to win in Spain. She leads five other Kenyans in the race including Edith Chelimo, Risper Chebet, Diana Chemutai, Mary Wacera (the world half marathon bronze medalist) Caroline Rotich and Ines Chenonge. "I have done well in training and am certain to do well in Valencia. This is part of my preparations for the World Championships, where I hope to do well in the 10,000m race," Korikwiang said on Thursday. The Kenyans will have to face stiff challenges from the Ethiopian delegation led by Kajela Diriba, Helen Tola and Gelete Burka. In the men's race, defending champion Abraham Cheroben of Bahrain will strive to defend his title against an elite team of 30 athletes with 14 of them having run under 60 minutes. Cheroben won last year's race clocking 59:11. The Kenyan challenge will be led by Jorum Okombo Lumbasi (58:48), Solomon Yego (58:44), Mangata Ndiwa (59:09), Abraham Kiptum (59:09) and Josphat Boit (59:19) with the Ethiopian brigade led by Yemal Yimer (59:00), Belihu Berta (59:51) and Getaneh Molla (60:18).   (10/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Adriele Silva hopes to be the first double amputee to finish the New York City Marathon

Adriele Silva, 31, from Brazil looks forward to crossing the finish line of the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon on Sunday, November 4, 2018. A spokesperson for the New York Road Runners believes she will be the first female double amputee to complete the full New York City Marathon. “I hope to inspire people when they see me run and challenge them to go after things that seem unachievable,” said Silva, who will be running her first full marathon. “Where I come from, people often look down on you for having a disability, but I don’t think about that. When I face a challenge, I look for ways to overcome it. I see the possibilities, and that keeps me going.”  Silva’s road to the New York City Marathon began in 2012, when she went to a hospital in her hometown of Jundiai, outside of São Paulo, Brazil, after feeling severe pain. Having received pain medications, she was sent home. Overnight, her situation worsened. She returned to the hospital the next day to find out that her problem was serious — a kidney stone had clogged her urinary tract and caused an infection. Within hours, Silva was in an induced coma. For 20 days she remained comatose, her body fighting a losing battle against the bacteria. During that time, the infection led to a lack of blood circulation in her legs. To save her life, doctors had only one choice: to amputate her legs. They brought her out of the coma to get her consent to proceed with the amputation. When she was finally cleared of the infection after 64 days, the now bilateral amputee left the hospital to go and learn to live again. “Before the amputation, I had no desire to run,” she says. “After it happened, I started getting more interested. I wanted to become normal again.” Since then, Silva has taken up running, cycling, swimming, and other sports. She has participated in 20 running races in Brazil and in China, where she completed the Great Wall Half Marathon in 2018. (10/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Galen Rupp will miss the spring marathon season following left foot surgery after his fifth-place finish in the Chicago Marathon

Galen Rupp is the only US man to break 2:11 in the marathon over the last three years.  He has been the top U.S. marathoner since debuting at 26.2 miles at the February 2016 Olympic Trials. He won that race in Los Angeles, then took bronze in Rio (adding to his 2012 Olympic 10,000m silver medal). Rupp then finished second at his first city marathon in Boston in 2017 and won Chicago later that year. He was one of many dropouts at this year’s Boston Marathon, with the worst weather in the oldest annual marathon’s recent history. Rupp’s surgery last Friday was related to an Achilles injury that forced him to withdraw before the Sept. 16 Copenhagen Half Marathon and flared up near the end of the Chicago Marathon — Haglund’s Deformity, a bony bump on his heel that caused the tendon to fray, according to the Oregonian.  (10/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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70-year-old Gene Dykes has been named USATF Athlete of the Week

Gene Dykes from Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania set an American masters 70-74 record in the marathon to earn USATF Athlete of the Week. Dykes, 70, won the 70-74 age group in the WMA Marathon Championships at the Scotiabank Toronto Marathon, running 2:55:18 to take more than two minutes off his own American record. He was also only 30 seconds off the world 70-74 best, set by Canadian legend Ed Whitlock. Dykes and Whitlock are the only two men over 70 to have broken three hours in the marathon.  Gene wrote this on FB before the race, "On Sunday I will be running the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, and the big goal is to beat one of the most revered marathon records on the books - Ed Whitlock's M70-74 age group record of 2:54:48, which he ran in 2004 at the ripe old age of 73.  If all goes well, it will probably be a nail-biter. I've been training hard for about eight weeks and training has gone well." (10/25/2018) ⚡AMP
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Thousands took to the streets at night in the Greek coastal town of Thessaloniki

Thousands of runners took to the streets of Thessaloniki, Greece’s last week to test their limits in the 7th International Thessaloniki Night Half Marathon. More than 18,000 participants, including long distance athletes, Olympic and Paralympic champions, people with disabilities, running enthusiasts and youngsters from 56 countries tried their luck in the 21.1km half marathon, the 5km Health Running Race and the 5km Power Walking Race.  Kenya’s Sammy Kipngetich was the winner of the 7th International Thessaloniki Night Half Marathon, crossing the finish line at the city’s famous White Tower in 1:06:09, followed by compatriot Hosea Kimeli Kisorio in 1:07:10 and in third place, Greece’s Giorgos Menis, with a time of 1:07:55. Rania Rembouli came in first in the women’s category with a new record at  1:14:30, followed by Vivian Jerope Kemboi from Kenya clocking 1:17:39, and Foteini Dagkli-Pagkoto in third place with a time of 1:20:47. (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya's Brimin Kipkorir will compete at the more lucrative Athens Marathon instead of Nairobi

Kenya's champion Brimin Kipkorir has withdrawn from Sunday's Nairobi International Marathon and will instead compete at the more lucrative Athens Marathon on November 11. Kipkorir, who clocked a time of 2:12.39 in winning last year's event, said he has been forced to choose between the two races and believes he has more to prove in Greece. "I have great respect for the Nairobi Marathon; it opened the way for me. Now that I have another chance to run in Athens, it is better I take the chance. There are many Kenyans who can run in Nairobi and even beat my time," he said in Eldoret on Monday. However, Kipkorir disclosed that he has been battling an ankle injury, which he picked up in training back in April. But he believes it has gone past its worst stage and will be ready to show the world that he is among the contenders for the title. "I had an ankle injury, but it has healed and I am targeting a podium finish in Athens. I have battled with the ankle injury since April, but am now at my normal fitness and back in training," he said. (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Abraham Cheroben will battle it out with at least 14 other sub one hour runners at the Valencia Half Marathon

Defending champion Kenyan-born Abraham Cheroben of Bahrain will battle it out with 30 elite athletes, with at least 14 having run in less than an hour, at the upcoming Valencia Half Marathon.  Cheroben is aiming to retain the crown he won last year in 59:11. Among the elite field is a host of Kenyans led by two times Family Bank Half Marathon champion Jorum Okombo Lumbasi (58:48), Solomon Kirwa Yego (58:44), Mangata Ndiwa (59:09), Abraham Kiptum (59:09) and Josphat Boit (59:19) the pace maker, who guided Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge to break the world marathon record in Berlin. (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Sam Smith who has autism loves the feeling of playing ice hockey and running the Marine Corp Marathon

There is nothing quite like hitting the ice says Sam Smith. He is number 99 on the Washington Ice Doges hockey team. “You can’t walk away from it,” he said, as he put on his helmet. “Once you step on the ice with skates and you’re a hockey player, hockey is your life.” He’s played for the Washington Ice Dogs, a special needs ice hockey team, for 20 years. “It feels good to be on the ice. It feels good to score goals,” he said, smiling.  Another awesome feeling, he says, is crossing the finish line at the Marine Corps Marathon. “This will be Marine Corps Marathon number six for me!” This year, he’s running alongside teammate Elias Tsakiris and two of their coaches.  Smith and Tsakiris, who both have autism, are running to raise money for their team. “I think it shows their leadership abilities,” said Stacie Manger, Communications Director. “I think it shows how much this team means to them. And I think it shows how much they want the community to believe in them, too.”  (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Lizzie Lee will lead the Irish charge at the Dublin Marathon on Sunday

Lizzie Lee, Mick Clohisey and Gary O’Hanlon are expected to lead the Irish charge at the Dublin Marathon on Sunday, October 28.  Lee finished 29th in the marathon at the European Championships in August, will face Remalda Kergyte of Lithuania, Caroline Jepchirchir of Kenya, and Ethiopian duo Motu Gedefa and Mesera Dubiso. Kergyte, has a personal best of 2.35.13, while Jepchirchir won this year’s Belfast Marathon. Lee has a personal best of 2:32.51 from Berlin in 2015 and last competed in the Dublin Marathon in 2006. The Olympic marathoner has shown good form this season, setting a new personal best of 1:13:19 at the World Half Marathon Championships in March.  The Irish national title will be a battle between Lee and fellow Olympian Caitriona Jennings who placed second in the 2017 National Championships. (10/24/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dan Jones will go head-to-head with Russell Bentley at the Snowdonia Marathon

This year returning champion Dan Jones will go head-to-head with 2016 winner Russell Bentley in what promises to be a great battle on the roads of Snowdonia, as both will want to make it to the top of the podium once again. Bentley has been rounding into some great form after completing the Berlin Marathon in September, finishing second at the Chester Marathon in early October and running a season’s best half marathon time of 1:08:26 in Manchester last weekend. Jones will be equally tuned-up for Snowdonia. The Team Bath man has had some solid autumn performances and after finishing second to Bentley in 2016 he returned to take the title in emphatic style last year. Gary Priestley will make Snowdonia his debut marathon and with a personal best half marathon of 1:08:23 the Salford Harrier will also look to challenge for honors next weekend. An interesting entrant in the men’s race is Julius Mwangi. The Kenyan runner was a 2:15 marathoner back in 2004, but has not raced much the last couple of years. (10/23/2018) ⚡AMP
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