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Sudan Hassan sets European record at the Copenhagen Half Marathon

European 5000m champion Sifan Hassan took more than a minute off the European record at the Copenhagen Half Marathon on Sunday (16), winning the IAAF Gold Label road race in a course record of 1:05:15. The Dutch runner showed that she is not only a world-class runner on the track but also on the road, improving on the European mark of 1:06:25 set 11 years ago by her compatriot Lornah Kiplagat in Udine. In near perfect weather conditions, the 25-year-old was ultimately just 24 seconds shy of the world record in her first attempt at the distance.   Hassan started out fast and stuck to pre-race favourite Joan Chelimo Melly, who had announced beforehand that she would be targeting the world record. The Kenyan appeared to be on course for her goal after passing through five kilometres in 15:06 and 10 kilometres in 30:36. Two-time world bronze medallist Hassan was the only woman who could match that pace, but even she lost grip on the Kenyan at several points throughout the race. She finally settled into a rhythm, though, and passed 15 kilometres in 46:09, still with Melly for company. Hassan, who last week won the 3000m at the IAAF Continental Cup Ostrava 2018 in a world-leading 8:27.50, broke free from Melly in the closing stages and went on to win in 1:05:15. Ababel Yeshaneh came through for second place in 1:05:46 with Melly finishing third in 1:06:15. “I often thought I was going to die!” said Hassan, whose only previous attempt at the distance was as a teenager back in 2011 when she ran 1:17:10. “The pace was so hard, but I just kept coming back.” With four women finishing inside 67 minutes and another four finishing within 68, it was the deepest half marathon ever held on European soil. (09/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge smashed the World Marathon Record clocking 2:01:39 in Berlin

33-year-old Eliud Kipchoge from Kenya smashed the world marathon record in Berlin today (September 16, 2018) clocking 2:01:39, breaking the record by over a minute. 

According to MBR's Willie Korir reporting from Kenya, "the pace was so high.  Eliud started well and maintained 2:52-2:55/k pace.  Two of the pacers dropped at 14k.  Sammy Sitwara, Kipkemboe and Boit remained up to 25k.  Eliud was alone from 25k to the end. 

It is a big celebration all over Kenya especially in Eliud's home town of Kapsabet and in Eldoret, home of Champions." 

Amos Kipruto (2:06:23) passed Wilson Kipsang to place second and Wilson placed third (2:06:48).    

Kipchoge maintained his form well in the closing stages and crossed the finish line in 2:01:39, taking one minute and 18 seconds off the previous world record set four years ago by Dennis Kimetto.

This is the largest single improvement on the marathon world record since Derek Clayton improved the mark by two minutes and 23 seconds in 1967.

"I lack the words to describe how I feel," said Kipchoge. "It was really hard [during the last 17 kilometers] but I was truly prepared to run my own race.

I had to focus on the work I had put in in Kenya and that is what helped push me. I’m really grateful to my coaching team, my management, the organisation."

For the women, Gladys Cherono set a course record clocking 2:18:11.  Second woman was Ruti Aga 2:18:34 and Trunesh Dibaba 2:18:55.

(09/16/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Paul Kios Kangogo wants to win and break the course record at Beijing Marathon

Kangogo who has a best time of 2:09:20, said he has overcome his injury concerns and is ready to return to the winner's podium in the Chinese capital. However, it will not only be the win he is targeting but to improve on his best time and attack the course record of 2:07:16, which was set five years ago by Ethiopia's Tadese Tola. My training has gone well and everything is fine. I have pushed my body to the limit and am happy, I have come through without any problems. I can say am in-form. I know there will be a strong Ethiopian challenge including the past champions, but running a marathon is down to your own strength and strategy and past record count for less," Kangogo told Xinhua, Thursday in Nairobi. The Kenyan has blown hot and cold in the last two years, mainly due to injury and hopeful, after returning to fitness in April, he will be consistent to string together another podium finish. He however, will be up against the 2014 Beijing marathon champion Fatuma Sado, Tola Dibaba (2:06:17) and Abayneh Ayele (2:06:45) who will be running his third race in China this year. He finished second in 2:14:13 at the Chongqing marathon in March and went on to take third place in Dongying in 2:13:47. There is also Ethiopia's Seboka Negusse (2:09:44) winner at the Hannover marathon in April and Xiamen marathon champion Dejene Debela (2:07:10). (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenyan´s Joan Chelimo Kelly is looking forward to running her personal best at Copenhagen Half Marathon

The road race, which is a IAAF Gold Label race, has attracted the finest half marathon distance runners in the world as they look forward to running their personal bests. Joan Chelimo, who is the fourth-fastest half marathon runner and was second in last year's edition, will be eyeing the top prize after vigorous training for the last two months. Chelimo, who is fresh from winning the Kisii Half Marathon, told Nation Sport that she will be expecting a competitive race. “My training has been good and my participation in Kisii Half Marathon was just to taste waters and I was able to do some fine tuning before the race,” said Chelimo. The athlete admitted that her competitors are good and she will be giving her best in Sunday's race. “The line up has very good athletes including the World Half Marathon champion Netsanet Guneta, but I believe in my training and my goal is to be on the podium,” said the athlete, who is coached by Erick Kogo. Chelimo will be competing against compatriots Edith Chelimo (65:52), Ruth Chepngetich (66:19), former World Half Marathon bronze medallist Mary Wacera Ngugi (66:29), Ethiopia's Meskerem Assefa (67:42), Ababel Yeshaneh Brihane (66:22 among others. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Tata Mumbai Marathon gets IAAF gold label

The Tata Mumbai Marathon, to be held on January 20, 2019, was accorded the gold label by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). The 16th edition of the race became the only gold label marathon in the country and joined the elite list of marathons in Asia, race organisers Procam International announced on Saturday. The USD 405,000 event is set to witness over 46,000 participants running across six race categories, according to the organisers. The IAAF gold label is granted to races based on stringent criteria, including organisational excellence, world-class elite field representation, prize money for male and female runners, exhaustive medical support system, live television coverage for an enhanced reach of the race, media facilities, timing and qualified personnel to ensure smooth conduct of the event across departments,among others, the release added. Vivek Singh, Joint MD, Procam International, said it was a result of solid teamwork. “We are honoured to receive the IAAF Gold Label for the Tata Mumbai Marathon. This achievement is symbolic of the collective efforts of a team that works tirelessly for months to ensure a Race Day that we all look forward to,” Mr. Singh said. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang are set to battle and maybe set a world record in just a few hours in Berlin

The Berlin Marathon will start Sunday September 16 at 9:15am local time or 12:15am California time (3:15am in New York).  The weather forecast looks good.  Only 10% chance of rain, mostly cloudy and the temperatures in the 60’s (17-21c). The stage is set for two of the best marathoners in the world to battle each other in the 45th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON on Sunday when Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang meet for the third round of their rivalry in the fastest marathon in the world. Kipchoge’s best of 2:03:05 is only eight seconds slower than the current world record and Kipsang has done his share of record breaking, since he ran his best of 2:03:13 to break the then world record and win Berlin in 2013.  Eliud Kipchoge’s aim on Sunday is to break his personal best and attack the world record while Wilson Kipsang is equally primed to set a world record.  This year’s Marathon is the biggest ever, 133 countries will be represented among the 44,389 participants. The BMW BERLIN-MARATHON is also part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series (AWMM) which also comprises Tokyo, Boston, London, Chicago and New York. The new series, the 12th edition, of the AWMM begins in Berlin on Sunday and will also conclude with the 46th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON next September. Then men’s marathon in Berlin has become a yardstick for performances at the distance worldwide. Over the past 15 years in September its flat course has been the stage for half a dozen world records. Since 2003 no other marathon has produced a men’s world record. For good measure, the world’s fastest time for the year by a man has been run at every BMW BERLIN-MARATHON since 2011. The current world best time for the year is the 2:04:00 by the Ethiopian Mosinet Geremew, set in Dubai in January. The world record stands at 2:02:57 by Kenya’s Dennis Kimetto to win Berlin four years ago. Eliud Kipchoge said this at Friday’s press conference and talk of a world record attempt: “After winning in London in April I concentrated on preparations for Berlin and can assure you that I shall run well on Sunday. I want to improve my personal best,” said the man who has won all but one of his eleven marathons and is regarded by many as the best ever at the distance.  He did hold back a little and perhaps the reason for his reluctance to commit fully in public is caused by two previous world record attempts in Berlin where the 33-year-old had bad luck. In 2015 his shoe insoles came lose and, despite being in pain, he still won in 2:04:00. A year ago bad weather foiled the world record attempt as Kipchoge set a “Rain World Record” to win in 2:03:32. No athlete had ever run a marathon so fast in such conditions.  The only man to have beaten Eliud Kipchoge in the marathon is Wilson Kipsang and that was in 2013. Kipsang broke the world record in that Berlin race with 2:03:13. The 36-year-old has plenty of experience and achieved consistently world class performances over many years, breaking 2:04 on four occasions – a total Kipchoge has not yet matched. Wilson Kipsang plans to run more cautiously than Kipchoge on Sunday: “I want to run similarly to my world record in 2013. I ran the second half faster than the first then. This Sunday I want to reach halfway in 61:30,” said Kipsang, who dropped out of Berlin last year at 30km. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Meselech Beyene of Ethiopia aiming to capture another title at the Beijing Marathon

The 24-year-old Beyene enjoyed a comfortable solo lead in the final 10 kilometers en route to her 2:27:44 victory last year, one minute shy of her personal best set six months earlier in Barcelona. It will be the third race of the year for Beyene following a third place finish in Houston with a season’s best of 2:27:21 in January and a second place showing at the Vienna City Marathon in 2:29:51 three months later. Beyene will once again face a deep field in Beijing, as she did here last year, which includes several sub-2:25 runners including the 26-year-old Sado. The Ethiopian achieved her career best of 2:24:16 at the 2015 Toronto Waterfront Marathon, one year after her 2:30:03 victory in Beijing, where she ended a 22-year winning streak by local runners in the women’s race. Although she failed to dip under the 2:30 the past two years, Sado proved her competitiveness in Xiamen this January as she shrugged off the heavy rain and overcame a stomach problem in the latter stages to win her second title there in 2:26:41. Beyene and Sado are more familiar with the course that stretches from the landmark Tian’anmen Square and ends outside the National Stadium, better known as the “Birds Nest”, but the top favorite should be Kenya’s Valary Jemeli Aiyabei. The 27-year-old is the fastest woman on paper with a career best of 2:20:53 from her third finish at the 2017 Berlin Marathon. Prior to that performance in the German capital, the rising Kenyan emerged triumphant in four straight marathons in Eldoret, Barcelona, Valencia and Prague, improving her PB on each occasion. Her winning marks in Valencia and Prague remains as the course records and she also proved her worth in 2018 with a 2:22:48 clocking in Nagoya where she finish second. The field also includes two sub-2:22 runners, Mulu Seboka and Amane Gobena, who are both from Ethiopia. Gobena recorded her PB of 2:21:51 in Tokyo two years ago while Seboka set her lifetime best of 2:21:56 in Dubai in 2015. The duo will both arrive in Beijing with high spirits following their newly claimed titles this year in Mumbai and Dalian respectively. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Zimbabwean’s Canisious Nyamutsita is set to race the Copenhagen Half Marathon

Promising Zimbabwean long distance runner Canisious Nyamutsita (left), will be hoping to carry his fine run of form on the local circuit on to the international stage when he takes part in the biggest race of his career at the Copenhagen Half Marathon in Denmark on Sunday. The 27-year-old Nyanga-born athlete has been in brilliant form on the local circuit, winning almost all the country’s major road races over the last two years, including the recent Old Mutual Westgate Half Marathon. Nyamutsita is set to rub shoulders with some of the world’s finest runners over the distance including Kenyan born Bahraini Abraham Cheroben, who will be seeking to defend his title, having won last year in a world-leading 58:40. Other top runners in the field include Berlin Half Marathon champion Kenyan Erick Kiptanui, who has announced that he will be attacking the world record in Copenhagen. Nyamutsita will be joined by his teammate at the Chitungwiza-based Mr Pace Athletics Club Bertha Chikanga, who will line up in the women’s race of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Gold Label. (09/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Val Zajac became one of only seven women in the US this year to complete the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning, a set of 100-mile trail races over some tough terrian

On Sunday afternoon, Val Zajac, a Poland native, finished her fourth ultrarunning race of the summer, 100 miles through the Wasatch Mountains. Her boyfriend greeted her with a hug. "This is trail -- dirt roads with a little bit of road in between, like checkpoints -- but mostly trail and dirt road," Zajac said. But, it's 100 miles worth of trail and dirt roads. To complete the Grand Slam, participants must finish three of the four 100-mile races -- one in Virginia, California, Vermont and Colorado -- plus the race through the Wasatch Mountains in Utah, all in the same year. Along with finishing the Wasatch Mountains race this summer, Zajac also ran through the Sierra Nevadas of California, the Rockies of Colorado and the Green Mountains of Vermont to complete the Grand Slam. It was up and down mountains and through rivers. "There are people actually in the water with wetsuits with glow sticks telling you where to put your feet cause you're doing it in the middle of the night," Zajac said. She had to complete the races in under 30 hours -- one under 36 hours -- to actually say she finished. That meant running at night with headlamps and not resting. (09/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Strengthening your feet and toes will improve your marathon experience

While training for a marathon, your feet take a major pounding. Many runners forget about their feet in their strengthening and stretching programs, but as every runner knows, those feet will make some noise when there is a problem. And when they’re being stuffed into sneakers and forced to hit the pavement over and over again, problems are likely. Since your feet are the only contact point between your body and the ground, that connection needs to feel good and strong or you, your feet, and your running performance will suffer.   Here are five things to do regularly.  1. Do some simple toe stretches when your feet feel tight. The flexor hallucis longus is a muscle that extends from the lower part of your leg all the way to the tip of your big toe. You need your big toe to balance and to help propel you forward when you run. Weakness or repetitive straining of this muscle, can cause it to feel tight or painful. Stretching it out can help ease discomfort. 2. Incorporate toe-strengthening exercises into your daily routine. Strengthening is a necessary and critical part of marathon training. The feet should be no exception. By strengthening the feet and toes, you can create a more sturdy foundation for your running and improve the propulsion capabilities of your feet while you run.  3. Make the “legs up the wall” stretch part of your post-run ritual. When you run, your heart rate goes up, increasing blood flow to the muscles. When you stop running, blood, lymph fluid, and extracellular fluid can pool in your legs and feet, causing swelling and pain. While the gastrocnemius (what’s known as the calf muscle) acts as a muscle pump to return fluid from your feet back up to your heart, it can’t always keep up. Compression garments may help minimize swelling (though evidence on their effectiveness remains mixed). 4. Roll it out with a lacrosse ball. If you don’t have the time to get regular foot massages, try self-massaging your feet with a lacrosse ball. By stretching and releasing restrictions in the soft tissue of the arch of your foot, you can help ease soreness and prevent inflammation and pain caused by repetitive straining of this fascia. 5. Give your feet a stability challenge. Imagine your hands are in mittens every day, and then you decide you want to go rock climbing. This isn’t too different from having your feet in cushy, supportive sneakers every day. When you surround the feet with tons of support, they may become weaker because they don’t have to work as hard to do their job. As advanced as running footwear technology has become, our feet are begging to be naked and free so they can adapt to different surfaces and grip onto uneven terrain. (09/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Uganda’s Thomas Ayeko will be chasing the race course record at Sydney Marathon

Uganda’s Thomas Ayeko best marathon is only 2:12:04, but he has a 1:00:26 half-marathon and a 27:40.96 10,000m (11th in the 2013 World Championships) to his name and was fourth in the 5000m at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. The elite men at the upcoming Syndey marathon will be chasing the race record of 2:11:18 set by Ethiopia’s Gebo Gameda Burka in winning the 2014 race. The race records are modest by the highest international standards, but any road course in Australia’s biggest city is a compromise between aesthetics and degree of difficulty. If you want pancake-flat, better look somewhere else. There are faster runners, but recent history of the men’s race suggests Japanese duo Norikazu Kato and Takumi Honda should be in the lead pack. Since Burka’s record winning performance, there have been three successive Japanese winners. Hisanori Kitajima won in 2015, followed by Tomohiro Tanigawa a year later and then Shota Hattori last year. Sydney will be just the second marathon for Honda. He made his debut in Nobeoka earlier this year, finishing second in 2:12:18. Several others in the field have faster personal bests, but he looks competitive on 2018 performances. Likewise, Kato’s personal best of 2:12:48 came in this year’s Beppu-Oita race in Japan. Sydney will be his first significant race outside Japan. Kenya’s Elija Kemboi is entitled to race favouritism, however. Kemboi has run 2:11:15 or faster each year from 2011 to 2017 and was second in Linz this year in 2:11:30. He has run three sub-2:08 marathons, with a best of 2:07:34, among his seven sub-2:10 performances. If he is in that sort of form again now, he will be very hard to beat and might be the most likely to try an early breakaway. The other sub-2:10 men in the field are Ethiopia’s Birhanu Addisie, who ran 2:09:27 in finishing second in Rome in 2016, and Kenya’s Cosmas Kimutai, who ran 2:09:25 on debut back in 2010, but nothing of similar quality since. (09/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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BMW Berlin Marathon, fast times and intense battles, maybe a world record

Eliud Kipchoge is just like the rest of us runners. All he wants from his next race is to beat his personal best. The only difference is that his next event is the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16 and a Kipchoge PR could mean a new world record!, Eliud Kipchoge is the marquee signing for the 45th edition of BMW Berlin Marathon as the current Olympic champion and undisputed number one for consistency and quality in recent years. His PR, set in London 2016 (2:03:05), prefaced his Olympic marathon gold in Rio the same year. Meanwhile, Denis Kimetto's world record (2:02:57) remains tantalisingly just out of reach for the three-time London champion and double Berlin winner. Kipchoge surely has pace to burn as his brilliant 2:00:25 in 'laboratory' conditions at Monza motor racing circuit in May last year demonstrates. This was never going to be ratified as a record but serves to indicate there is much more to come from the 33-year-old Kenyan, who said: “My preparation is entirely concentrated on the BMW Berlin Marathon on September 16. I am confident I can beat my personal best on this fast course if conditions are good.” The women's field in Berlin is the best for many years and is headlined by the third fastest in history, Tirunesh Dibaba, from Ethiopia (2:17:56) who set her PB in London last year chasing Paula Radcliffe's legendary 2:15:25 from 2003. Dibaba will face the defending champion Gladys Cherono (Kenya) and former double Berlin winner Edna Kiplagat (Kenya), who is the oldest of the leading trio at 38 years old. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Canada's second fastest marathoner Reid Coolsaet is eyeing Jerome Drayton's record

Reid Coolsaet is the fastest Canadian in the field at this year’s Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. It’s a race Reid knows well having run it several times before. In 2011 he qualified for the 2012 Summer Olympics by running 2:10:55. He has since lowered his PB to 2:10:26 making him Canada’s second fastest ever marathoner. The two-time Olympian, Coolsaet has had his eye on Jerome Drayton’s 2:10:09 Canadian record for some time. And no Canadian has run Scotiabank–or any other marathon on Canadian soil–faster. Coolsaet set that record (2:10:55) here in 2011. An interesting coincidence: Drayton’s record was set in 1975 at Fukuoka, Japan, a race Coolsaet has run twice, achieving an excellent time here in 2016 (2:10:55–the same time he ran at Scotia in 2011). With a PB of 2:10:28, set at the Berlin Marathon in 2015, Coolsaet has been tantalizingly close to this goal for a while. He’s had to be patient through a series of setbacks, most significantly a painful foot condition in early 2017 that took him out of competition for almost a year. He came back in time for the Canadian National Cross-Country Championships in November, placing ninth.   Jerome Drayton has held the Canadain record since 1969.  Jerome won the Fukuoka Marathon in 1969, 1975, and 1976, as well as the Boston Marathon in 1977. He  has held the Canadian record since 1969, after breaking the then record of 2:18:55 set by Robert Moore a month earlier. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Former marathon world record holder Patrick Makau of Kenya has announced his retirement from professional running

Patrick Makau, 33, has lost his fight to gain fitness after persistent patella-tendon injury, forced him off training and competition since 2017. With doctors warning against him running, Makau has opted to throw in the towel. "With the age catching up, with persistent patella-tendon injury due to which I was forced to cancel competition in 2017 for both Boston and Berlin marathons, I know this is the right time to say it is enough," Makau said Thursday in Nairobi. The two time Berlin marathon champion is credited for reclaiming the world marathon record from the grip of Ethiopian Haile Gebreselassie in 2011 when he clocked 2:03:38 eclipsing the Ethiopian's time of 2:03:59. Gebreselassie had beaten Paul Tergat's record of 2:04:54 set in 2004. Wilson Kipsang improved Makau's record after two years to 2:03:23, but that has also been shuttered to 2:02:57 by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto, which is the current record. "I have had a wonderful career as an athlete. My life is defined by athletics, what I have today is because of the sport I love. Athletics has literally changed me, allowing me to grow and to make positive impact on lives of my family and our community," said Makau, the 2007 World Half Marathon champion. "For this I am truly grateful." However, Makau will not be taking a long walk away from athletics completely. To remain busy, he intends to help guide a new generation of young distance runners realize their dreams and develop their careers, especially from the southern part of Kenya where he comes from. "I want to coach some athletes who have no guides. I want to continue giving back to the community," he said. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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2012 Olympic champion Uganda’s Stephen Kiprotich will target fast time in Toronto

Over its decades-long history, the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon has been graced by some of the world’s greatest marathoners, but never an Olympic champion. That will all change on October 21, when Uganda’s Stephen Kiprotich will race in this IAAF Gold Label event. The 2012 Olympic marathon champion will accompany two-time Toronto champion Philemon Rono from their mutual training base in Iten, Kenya in what should be an intense battle between the two accomplished marathon runners. The pair are both friends and training partners, but each will want to take home the CAD$30,000 first-place prize money. “I am really happy and training hard and looking forward to competing in this big race in Toronto,” says Kiprotich, who also won the marathon title at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, joining Ethiopia’s Gezehegne Abera as the only men to ever win both major competitions. “I was speaking with Rono and I asked him what is the course like,” he says of the man who set a Canadian all-comers’ record of 2:06:52 in Toronto a year ago. “He said the course is good and nice. I was telling him if we go fast and run the first half in 63 minutes, we can push at the end to 2:05. He told me it is possible.” Kiprotich’s major championship success is outstanding and all the more remarkable since he chose to make Iten his training base. There he lives in the camp built by Dutch based management company Global Sport Communications with a group which includes not only Rono but the world’s No.1 marathon runner, Eliud Kipchoge. They are coached by 1992 Olympic steeplechase silver medallist Patrick Sang. (09/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Joel Maina Mwangi wants to be the best of the best

Joel maina Mwangi was born in a small village of Thika town, about one hour outside of Nairobi, Kenya.  Joel says, "I was raised up in a difficult situation.  Eating was 50-50 but by the grace of God i was sponsored for secondary education."  Today the 33-year-old Joel is married and has two boys.  "I always work hard to raise my boys in a good and better environment than i got," he says.  "My school was 6km from home and I used to run to school for eight years (6-14) to avoid being late...otherwise I would be punished."  In 1998 he took part in a 10000m and won it.  "My sport teacher noticed I could run," Joel remembers.  "He encourage me to start training and from there I started training every morning before school."  He did not stop there. "I was the king of athletics."  Joel is now a professional runner. "Racing sustain me and my family.  It has enabled me to build a house and travel."  Running has given him the opportunity to travel to different countries. "My first trip abroad was to Belgium.  i stayed there for one and half month.  I had a difficult time because i was not in good condition.  I came back home with 10€ ($15). That day I will never forget. I lost money but I learned a lesson."  Asked what is his secret to success Joel says, "I believe even if you are in good shape but mentally weak, I will defeat you.  So I always tell my running mates to be strong mentally to conquer."  He has been training in Austria, Hungary and now Italy.  He says this about Italy. "Despite its low altitude I like it.  The advantage for me is because I complete in many races and train with Italian runners here."  He runs for the Dinamo Running Club. Asked why he joined the Run The World Challenge for a second time.  "I like it...it motivates me.  It brings runners from different corners of the world together.  It helped me a lot this season as I worked more to try to be the leader.  But Korir managed to be the leader for Challenge 1.  Due to that...I will sponsor Willie Korir for his start number and transport from wherever he will be within Kenya for the 2018 Nairobi marathon," he says.   Joel's personal records are: Marathon 2:14, 30kms 1:31, Half Marathon 1:01:16, 10km-28:26 (track), 5km 13:46, 3km 8:07 1-mile 4:06, 1km 2:28.  "I am looking forward to be the best of the best.  Don't tell me I am getting old..."old is Gold."  In the first Run The World Challenge Joel logged 511.36 miles placing him third. So far on Challenge 2 he has logged 224.9 miles and he is in fourth place. Most recently (September 9) he placed third at the Minski Half Marathon clocking 1:02:55. Photo: Joel (white jersey) running along side Charles Cheruiiyot Toroitich at the 2014 (Half) Marathon Solidarności in Poland.  Joel clocked 1:01:16 (09/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dean Karnazes is once again running the 246K Spartathlon which follows in the footsteps of Pheidippides

The 36th Spartathlon will once again welcome American Dean Karnazes. This year’s Spartathlon race will take place on September 28-29. Some 400 runners from 50 countries around the world, including 60 Greeks, will follow Pheidippides’ steps in the 36-hour long run to reach the statue of ancient King Leonidas in Sparta. In 490 BC, Pheidippides ran for 36 hours straight from Athens to Sparta to seek help in defending Athens from a Persian invasion in the Battle of Marathon. In doing so, he saved the development of Western civilization and inspired the birth of the marathon as we know it. This year’s Spartathlon race will welcome champions of previous events such as Czech athlete Radek Brunner (second in 2017), Greek Nikos Sideridis (third in 2017), Japanese Ishikawa Yoshihiko (fourth last year), Italian Marco Bonfiglio (second in 2016), Protuguese Joao Oliveira (winner in 2013), German Florian Reus (winner in 2015) and Zsuzsanna Maraz (second last year in females) from Hungary. Greek and foreign ultra marathoners will once again gather at the Acropolis in Athens to to begin the 246K (152 miles) marathon journey to Sparta.  That run in 490 BC stands enduringly as one of greatest physical accomplishments in the history of mankind. Dean Karnazes personally honors Pheidippides and his own Greek heritage by recreating this ancient journey in modern times. Dean even abstains from contemporary endurance nutrition like sports drinks and energy gels and only eats what was available in 490 BC, such as figs, olives, and cured meats. (09/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ultra marathon mom, stopped to breast feed her baby during the 106-mile Mont-Blanc Trail Race

A British mom has made headlines all over the world after being photographed taking a break to breast feed her baby son during a 43-hour ultra marathon. Sophie Power, who recently competed in the 106-mile, high-elevation Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc trail run through France, Italy, and Switzerland, has been applauded for showing “motherhood endurance” and “the strength of the human body” in the snap, which was taken by photographer Alexis Berg. The 36-year-old mother of two and avid runner took time to nurse her 3-month-old infant, Cormac, during the challenging race. “Cormac usually feeds every three hours, “This isn’t a story about me,” she wrote. “It’s a story about the daily struggle of being a new Mum. A story about the need to nurture our babies the best we can. And the importance to priorities our physical and mental health — to be ourselves as well as be a mother. “I have been overwhelmed by the positivity and supportive messages. They are for all mothers for we are all in this together.” Despite having to stop to feed her son, Power managed to complete the marathon in 43 hours and 33 minutes.  She believes that keeping active and maintaining a healthy lifestyle during pregnancy is really important.  She has logged 273 miles on Strava so far this year, 27 races.  "In a typical race I would get in and out of the aid stations as quickly as possible," she says.  "But here I had to focus on keeping down enough food for me and for Cormac, and resting." (09/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Linda Sereno says she finds her inner peace when running out in the mountains

Linda Sereno grew up with two older and two younger brothers.  "I copied them, playing football, baseball and basketball.  Later my oldest brother helped me take on running.  I loved it," Linda says.  "In high school, we had a fund raising event for our band to go to Ireland to compete in the Saint Patrick's Day parade in Dublin.  We were sponsored for each lap we could run/walk in two hours," Linda remembers.  She never stopped running for 2 hours and did 52 laps around the quarter mile track.  "I love running, especially on trails, up and down mountains. I love the wind, the animals, and the scenery.  I think, I space out, and I dream on those runs. I find my inner peace out in the mountains," she says.  Asked about what is her secret to her success.   "I think it's important to keep your core strong, stretch daily, and do strength exercises.  I use my body weight to improve muscle tone rather than using weights.  I do push ups, sit ups, planks, burpees, squats lunges, and stretches," 58-year-old Linda Sereno says.  She tries to run three times per week, two days of track workouts and one long run."  Last year she finished a 50 miler.  "I was the second woman overall on a challenging hilly race with 9,500 feet of elevation change.  Another challenge I accomplished was Boston to Big Sur.  I wondered if I would have the endurance to complete both marathons without any injuries, and I did in 2011.  The times were not exceptional, but I was pleased to have accomplished my goal," she says.  Her husband, Kirk, is a surfer.  He was a competitive swimmer and diver in high school and community college.  Her daughter, Amy, is a successful runner and is an assistant coach at a local community college.  Linda is currently a 1st/2nd grade Dual Immersion teacher, teaching English and Spanish.  Why did she enter the Challenge for a second time. "Run the World Challenge can help motivate many people become more active in order to fulfill a global goal," Linda says.  Linda has already posted 51 miles for this challenge. She also has run a lot of Double Racing Events.  One of her best performances at age 55 was clocking 1:04:04 for the Pacific Grove Double Road Race 15k in 2015.  She clocked 43:40 for the 10K leg and 20:23 for the 5k leg.  This was age-graded at 87.07%.   Photo: Linda with a dear friend and running buddy Lidia Santos (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Cross-Country is making its debut at the Buenos Aires 2018 Youth Olympic Games

The IAAF World Cross Country Championships Aarhus 2019 will take place in 200 days’ time, but Tuesday 11 September marks another important milestone for cross country. In one month from today (October 6-18), the athletics program will get under way at the Buenos Aires 2018 Youth Olympic Games, where cross-country running will make its debut. Cross-country running last appeared in the Olympic arena back in 1924 at the summer Games in Paris, but it will feature in the Argentinean capital next month in a new and innovative format. As is the case with all individual athletics disciplines at the Youth Olympic Games, there will be two stages to the distances events, in which 48 boys and 48 girls will be entered. In stage one of the 1500m, 3000m and 2000m steeplechase, all athletes will compete in a heat of their individual event. In the second stage of the competition, all athletes from those three events will compete in a cross-country race – one race for boys and one race for girls.  The placings of athletes in each individual event and in the cross-country race will be added to determine the overall final placings with the athlete having the lowest total score being the overall winner. The results of the cross-country race will be adjusted to reflect separate rankings for the 1500m, 3000m and 2000m steeplechase respectively with medals being allocated accordingly in the three individual track disciplines. For example, an athlete placing second in the 3000m and fourth of the 3000m runners in the cross-country race will receive a final score of six points. “It has long been our desire to see cross country running back in the Olympic Games,” said IAAF President Sebastian Coe. “We see the inclusion of cross country in the program for the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires as the first step towards its return to the main program of the Olympic Games." "Cross country is the endurance bedrock on which all middle and long distance running is based and we believe it deserves this recognition,” Coe added. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Commonwealth champion Joshua Cheptegei will be the runner to beat at the Dam tot Damloop 10 Miler

Joshua Cheptegei from Ugandan won silver last year at the 10,000 meters at the World Championships in London and this year was the fastest in the 5000 and 10,000 meters at the Commonwealth Games in Australia.  He will be going for gold at the up coming Dam tot Damloop ten mile race. Belgian's Bashir Abdi (silver 10,000 meters EK Berlin) and Ethiopian's Ayele Abshero are also candidates for the victory for the race that runs from Amsterdam to Zaandam.  The Dutch toppers Khalid Choukoud and Michel Butter are also running. In total, 46,000 runners will participate at the Dam tot Damloop race. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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South Africa´s Mapaseka Makhanya has set her sights on winning the Cape Town Marathon

Mapaseka Makhanya would like to add a Cape Town Marathon winners’ gold medal to her impressive collection of running accolades. “Of course I would like to win it,” the Soweto-born athlete said of the race she has never competed in “It is the only one (marathon) in Africa with that status of IAAF Gold Label.   It is a big race in South Africa and I cannot miss it.” And so Makhanya will line up alongside the likes of Mother City favorite Nolene Conrad eager to reclaim the female’s title for the country. Back in 2016, Tish Jones reigned supreme in an impressive time of 2:36:13. Her time though was pretty slow in comparison to the winning times of Kenya’s Isabella Ochichi and Ethiopian Betelhem Moges Cherenet.  The east Africans ran 2:30:20 and 2:30:23. This year’s race promises to be a little faster particularly given the quality of the men’s elite field.   Makhanya is determined to see her name in stars, the fact she has only recently recovered from injury notwithstanding. “I think I will be ready to compete in that race. I’ve recovered from the calf injury that kept me out of action for two months.  I will be there to compete to win just like in any other race.” But with the east Africans coming through in their numbers once again, Makhanya and all her other compatriots will need to be at their best to keep the title on home soil. She, in particular, will have to run close to, if not better than, her PB of 2:31:02. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Will an extra does of Vitamin D boost your running performance?

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient that regulates some 1,000 processes in the body, and doctors have long known its importance to bone density and preventing the related illnesses like rickets and osteoporosis. Now researchers are beginning to study its role in athletic performance. While an extra dose of vitamin D might increase muscle strength and endurance, the science is far from settled. Still, many athletes are eyeing the vitamin for possible performance gains. Given that the science is still young, is it worth hitting the drugstore?  The main sources of vitamin D are sunshine and certain foods, including salmon, cod liver oil, and fortified cereal and dairy products. The USDA suggests an intake of 600 International Units per day, or 800 IU for adults over 70. You can easily meet that recommendation by spending 15 minutes outside on a sunny day. In athletes, a vitamin D deficiency increases your risk of stress fractures, anemia, and a weakened immune system—all of which can hurt performance. In a study of 214 NFL players, scientists observed more muscle injuries in athletes with lower vitamin D levels. There’s no clear consensus about how widespread the deficiency is. In 2015 review, scientists found that about 56 percent of athletes had inadequate levels of the vitamin. Still, in a large-scale review, researchers at the National Academy of Medicine (then the U.S. Institute of Medicine) observed that, on average, Americans’ vitamin D levels appeared fine. One cause of this discrepancy is that scientists don’t agree on the definition of “adequate” when it comes to vitamin D levels. The most common test for the nutrient measures a precursor version of its hormone form—the form of the vitamin that is actually used by the body. Sometimes this precursor doesn’t predict how much vitamin D exists in hormone form. Certain researchers, like those with the Endocrine Society, argue for higher concentration thresholds than than those of the National Academy of Medicine.  The effects of vitamin D supplementation on health are uncertain.  A 2013 review did not find any effect from supplementation on the rates of disease, other than a tentative decrease in mortality in the elderly. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei says she will be ready for a full marathon debut

World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei says she will be ready for a full marathon debut, probably in December. Jepkosgei, who has had injury trouble since her world half-marathon record of 64:51 in Valencia last October, believes she still has more to do to return to her top performance and believes venturing into full marathon is her next target. "My coach is preparing me for a marathon. He told me that I will go for training and then he will see how my body is. It might be end of this year or next year," said the 25-year-old on Tuesday. "China marathons are good, though I have no particular race I have lined up now. But I know it will be good to test myself there." Shanghai Marathon in November might be too soon for the Kenyan star. However, there is a possibility of her running at the Xiamen Marathon in January if her management gets an invite from the organizers. Jepkosgei was third in 68:10 at last week's Great North Run in Newcastle, England, her third race this year. Injury concerns have limited the Kenyan participation in international competition, but she believes she is getting better. In May, Jepkosgei was second at the Manchester 10km run behind Ethiopia's Tirunesh Dibaba. Meanwhile, London Marathon silver medalist Brigit Kosgei is intensifying her training ahead of her race in Chicago in October. However, the Kenyan has injury concerns after she pulled a hamstring problem in Newcastle in the last stages of the 21km Great North Run. (09/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge is focused on only one thing as he gets ready for the Berlin Marathon Sunday

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya says he has a crazy dream to be the fastest man in history. He hopes will inspire his quest to shutter the world marathon record in Berlin on Sunday. Kipchoge, 33, will be racing in his 10th marathon since he graduated from the track back in 2012. The London champion has only one loss in his career back in 2013 against compatriot Wilson Kipsang. He has won in Hamburg, Chicago, London, Rio (Olympics) and Berlin. "It's only a crazy dream until you do it. Don't be the fastest runner in the world, but strive to be the fastest runner in history," said Kipchoge on Monday in Nairobi. Kipchoge will be running his fourth Berlin marathon on Sunday and has sounded out world marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto (2:02.57) saying he will be focused on lowering his personal best time, which is only eight seconds off the mark. "Don't ask if your dreams are crazy. Ask if they are crazy enough," he added. "In Berlin the focus will be to improve on my personal best time of 2:03.05. Last year the weather was not good but I managed strongly to finish the race," he said. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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The world record will be under attack at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon on September 16

Kenya’s Jorum Okombo and Alex Korio will be hoping to improve on their respective second and third finishes at the 2018 Copenhagen Half Marathon on September 16. Organizers have assembled one of the deepest half marathon fields in history of the road race. “An elite field boasting 17 sub-60-minute men, including three of the four fastest half marathon runners over the past six years, is proof of an extremely high level,” says Jakob Larsen, director of the Danish Athletics Federation. Abraham Cheroben will be back to defend his title, having won last year in a world-leading 58:40. His main opposition looks set to come from Berlin Half Marathon champion Erick Kiptanui, Okombo and Korio. Kiptanui has announced that he will be attacking the world record in Copenhagen. The women’s race also boasts superb depth as it contains seven runners with PBs faster than 68:00. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Karla del Grande of Toronto set new world records in both the 100m and 200m for women aged 65-69 at the World Masters Athletics Championships

Karla del Grande breaks world records in both 100m and 200m at World Masters Athletics Championships in Malaga, Spain.  The Toronto runner has been racking up accolades since she began competing on the track in 2002 at age 49, Del Grande trains with Variety Village in Toronto. Del Grande ran 28.83 in the 200m and 14.04 in the 100m in Malaga. The previous records for both were held by Nadine O’Connor of the U.S. Del Grande also lowered the Canadian records in both distances earlier this summer in Surrey, B.C. Del Grande has a long history of success on the track at the masters level and has held numerous Canadian records in the sprints in various age categories. She has been named the Ontario Masters Athletics’ Female Masters Athlete of the Year six times. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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The first woman to break five minutes for the mile almost went unnoticed

Diane Leather ensured her place in athletics history when she became the first woman to break five minutes for the mile in 1954. She achieved the feat three weeks after Roger Bannister ran the first sub-four-minute mile.  She died September 6 peacefully, aged 85, following a short illness just six months after the sport lost Bannister. There were other parallels between the two athletes.  While Bannister was a medical student in Oxford, Leather was an analytical chemist at the University of Birmingham and a member of Birchfield Harriers. One thing they did not share, though, was the fame that came with their miling achievements. As Bannister became a global icon, Leather’s sub-five mile did not receive anywhere near the same publicity. This was an era when the longest event for women at the 1952 Olympics was just 200m and the mile was not recognised by the IAAF as a world record and was described as a world best instead. Leather first set a women’s world record, or ‘best’ as it was called, in September 1953 when she clocked 5:02.6. She improved to 5:00.2 on May 26, 1954, followed by her historic 4:59.6 three days later on May 29. Her sub-five time came despite erratic splits too – 68.8, 2:27.00 and 3:48.6. But further records came with 4:50.8 and 4:45.0 in 1955 and she held the world mark for eight years in total. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Marnie Margolis says that running gives her a great outlet where she can have control, make goals and accomplish something

Running is very important to 48-year-old Marnie Margolis from Winnipeg, Canada. The mother of two (17 and 16), works at Bayer Healthcare and says, "I used to consistently power walk and do treadmill workouts.  The workouts started getting easier and I was going longer.  I then started adding inclines."  Then one day a friend invited her to join her on a 5 mile run outside.  "I said I would try," she remembers. "It went very well and there has not been any looking back. Before I turned 40 I decided it would be my goal to do a half marathon." That hooked her into the marathon world and participating in running events.  How important is running to her?   "It's just a given. It's part of my routine. It's the time where I can think and enjoy some quiet time. It also gives me a great outlet where I can have control, make goals and feel some accomplishment. It keeps me healthy and happy," she says.  In the 2017 Manitoba Marathon Marnie was the 20th female to finish the full marathon and first in her age group.  "In 2018 I ran in the infamous Boston Marathon- torrential downpour, 35 mph winds and 33 degrees. It was the first time I had traveled to participate in a marathon and it was an amazing experience," Marnie says. What does she think is the secret to her success?   "I think consistency.  It's just something I schedule in. I balance it with with circuit workouts and that has helped me be stronger and eliminate soreness post long runs. I don't always love running during, but once I cross the finish line or complete my run I can't wait to go again."  This is Marnie's second Run The World Challenge.   "I think the RTW challenge offers another fun way to enjoy the sport with other like minded runners.  It's been great to focus on helping the team achieve the goal and it's really motivating to check the feed and see all the runners posting photos across the world in amazing spots and sharing their stories," Marnie Margolis says.  She does try to get her kids to run with her but at least for now they are more into hockey, football and basketball.  On September 9th she ran a 30K race on a tough day (wind and rainy) and finished in 2:28:21 which by the way is 7:59/mile pace.  Marnie has logged in 76 miles for the Run The World Challenge 2 since August 29 which is good enough for fourth female.         (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Michael Johnson Expected to make a full recovery, from a mini-stroke

American sprinter 50-year-old Michael Johnson, who once billed himself the “world’s fastest man” revealed that he was recovering at home this week after suffering a transient ischemic attack (TIA), or mini-stroke. Heart issues have apparently been ruled out, and Johnson is expected to make a full recovery. And he referred to himself, once again, as a former “world’s fastest man” in his announcement, as reported by Britain’s Daily Telegraph: “It seems these things can affect anyone, even the once fastest man in the world!” A TIA is a temporary blockage of blood flow to the brain. It does not cause permanent damage, but it may be an indication that a stroke is imminent. Johnson won 12 world and Olympic gold medals for the U.S. over his career, and was the first to win both the 200m and the 400m at the same Olympics. He was the world 200m record-holder when, in 1997, a 150m race was arranged between him and Canada’s Donovan Bailey in Toronto’s SkyDome to settle the matter of the “world’s fastest man.” Bailey had run the fastest-ever 100m at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996, and had become a world champion in 1995. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Kenya's Rosaline Nyawira says she avoids anything that can lead her to fail

Rosaline Nyawira started running at an early age of eight in primary school.  She started out as a sprinter running the 80m and100m.  "Later my talent was polished by my games teacher and I also ran 200m and 400m," Rosaline says.  "After finishing my secondary education, I improved my personal bests to 12sec in 100 and 24sec in 200m," she says.  Later in 2016 she moved from the track to the road.  Rosaline says, "To me, running is my full time career that keeps me motivated, focused, refreshed and healthy. Apart from running, I have an idea of starting my own business once I have enough capital."  But right now she's focused on racing.  She says, "I always train hard and smart to win easy. I am always focused and I avoid anything that can lead me to fail."  Asked why she joined the Run The World Challenge.  She says, "I think It's the best group to join because it encourage and motivate my career.  Actually it's the best global group to join and learn as I socialize with my fellow athlete's around the globe."  Rosaline is a Kenya athlete living and training in Durban, South Africa currently.  She has run a 34:30 10K and a 1:10:45 half marathon.  On September 2 she ran her first full marathon clocking 2:49 on a tough course.  (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Estonian Roman Fosti won Sunday's Tallinn Marathon

Estonian Roman Fosti won Sunday's Tallinn Marathon in 2:24:08. Whereas previous marathon victors have generally hailed from abroad, Sunday was local heroes' time to shine. Second-placed man Ülari Kais (2:31.06) and Aleksandr Kuleshov (4th, 2:35.11) are Estonian; Sandwiched between them was Kenyan (and first women's runner) Daisy Langat (3rd, 2:33:50). Started at 09.00 EEST by President Kersti Kaljulaid, the marathon is one of four races over the weekend. The 10km Sügisjooks ('Autumn run') on Saturday followed Friday evening's 5km youth run. The 21 km half-marathon started at 10.45 on Sunday. Estonian Tiidrek Nurme won the half-marathon (1:03:27), a mere two seconds ahead of Kenyan star Peter Kiprotich. With up to 25,000 runners taking part (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jenny Simpson becomes the first woman to win the iconic season-ending race seven times at New Balance 5th Avenue Mile

It was chilly and rainy in Manhattan Sunday as world and Olympic medallist Jenny Simpson won her seventh and consecutive New Balance Fifth Avenue Mile, running 4:19. This was the 38th running of the iconic season-ending race. Colleen Quigley of the U.S. was second, in 4:20, and the U.K.’s Melissa Courtney was third, in 4:21. The men’s race was swept by runners from the Commonwealth, including Jake Wightman of Nottingham, U.K. in first place, with a time of 3:54, defending champion New Zealander Nick Willis in second (3:55) and Neil Gourley of the U.K. in third (3:56). Wightman is the 2018 European Championships bronze medalist in the 1,500m, and it was his first win at this event. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia’s Abebe Negewo broke the course record at the Minsk Half Marathon

Ethiopia’s Abebe Negewo broke the course record at the Minsk Half Marathon, while Kenya’s Sheila Jerotich became the first non-Belarusian winner of the women’s race, Negewo ended Hillary Maiyo’s winning streak in the Belarusian capital, but the Kenyan put up a good fight and finished close behind Negewo as both men were given the same finishing time of 1:02:39. Negewo was first across the line, though, and became the first Ethiopian winner of the race. Negewo, Maiyo and the four other top contenders – Kenya’s Joel Maina Mwangi, Benard Korir, Ethiopia’s Feyera Gemeda and authorised neutral athlete Rinas Akhmadeyev – soon detached themselves from the rest of the field and covered the first five kilometres in 14:43. The pace dropped slightly, but the six men remained together through 10 kilometres, reached in 29:50, and were almost a minute ahead of their nearest chaser. Akhmadeyev and Gemeda were unable to maintain that pace for much longer and lost contact with the leaders. Korir soon followed, leaving Negewo and Maiyo at the front with Mwangi a few paces behind as they reached 15 kilometres in 44:48. Mwangi continued to drift away from Negewo and Maiyo as the leading duo ran side by side for the final quarter of the race. Negewo proved to have the better finish, though, as he kicked ahead of his Kenyan opponent to win in 1:02:39, taking 21 seconds off the course record Maiyo set during his first victory in 2016. Maiyo finished a close second while third-placed Mwangi crossed the line in 1:02:53, also inside the previous course record. (09/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Run The World Challenge 2 Profile: Gloria Nasr has run the toughest race on earth already five times

Gloria Nasr was always active as a kid growing up in Lebanon.  She did Kung Fu, worked out at the gym and did bodybuilding.  "Upon arriving in Paris in 1995, I started riding my bike about 50k (31 miles) per day," Gloria remembers.  "Then one day in 2002, a friend who wanted to lose weight asked me to accompany her for a jog. It was love at first sight and since then I have not stopped," she says.  "Running is an integral part of my life. It's my moment of relaxation where I find myself within myself."   As soon as she started running, she had a dream of running from her adopted country France to her homeland in Lebanon.  A Transcontinental race of 4150km. "I realized this dream in 2013," Gloria says. She ran 50km a day across nine countries for three months and 10 days. "Those were the three most beautiful months of my life."  She has also participated five times in the Marathon des Sables of Morocco.  This is a six-day 156 mile ultra marathon which has been called the toughest foot race on earth.  Gloria says, "I am currently preparing a new challenge, a transcontinental race from Paris to Beijing a distance of 10000km (6,214 miles).”  Asked what is her secret to success, she says, “I always say that the most important thing is envy. with envy, courage, perseverance we can succeed many things.  I also do not put pressure on training and despite my love for running, I keep a certain distance. I do not have an addiction to running."   So why did she join our Run The World Challenge?  "It's great to bring runners together from around the world."   Gloria is a doctor, PMR, physical medicine and rehabilitation.  She is French Lebanese, living in Paris.  The 48-year-old has run 40:27 for 10K,  1:24 for 20k, 1:34 half marathon and 3:14 for the marathon. (09/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Mo Farah wins the Great North Run half marathon beating Jake Robertson by 31 seconds

Mo Farah won for the fifth time the Great North Run Half marathon in a course record of 59 minutes and 26 seconds on Sunday in Newcastle, UK.   New Zealand's Jake Robertson was 31 seconds back in second. London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot from Kenya won the women's race for a second time in three years.  Farah narrowly missed out on his half marathon personal best, finishing four seconds outside it after fading inside the final 200m, having pulled clear of Robertson with about two miles to go. Robertson, who finished a close second to Farah last year, clocked 59:57, with Belgium's Bashir Abdi third in 60:43. "Training's different now as I'm not in the track season, I've been doing a lot more long runs and in terms of endurance I'm definitely fitter," said four-time Olympic champion Farah. "Just coming into that headwind it was so tough, I wasn't going smooth, I was going up and down. I honestly thought I could beat my personal best today, but those last two miles really hurt." Olympic and world champion Cheruiyot posted a personal best of 67:43 to win the women's race ahead of compatriots Brigid Kosgei (67:52) and Joyciline Jepkosgei (68.10).   (09/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Teen runs the second fastest road 10K ever, Phonex Kipruto clocked 26:46 at the Birell Prague Grand Prix

18-year-old Rhonex Kipruto from Kenya runs 26:46 Saturday evening at the Birell Praque Grand Prix.  This is the second fastest-ever road 10k, while his compatriot Caroline Kipkirui moved to third on the women’s world all-time list.  Phonex Kipruto – who was third in Prague last year in 27:13 and then ran 27:08 in New York before claiming the world under-20 10,000m title in Tampere – clocked 26:46 for a dominant win. It was a Kenyan top three as Geoffrey Koech ran 27:18 in second and Mathew Kimeli 27:26 in third. A total of 11 athletes dipped inside 28 minutes. The women’s race was much closer and Kipkirui won in 30:19 ahead of Fancy Chemutai (30:22) and Diana Chemtai Kipyokei (30:23) to complete another Kenyan clean sweep. Running alone with his opponents rapidly dropping back, Kipruto went through 5km in 13:31 before clocking a negative split of 13:15 to take 22 seconds off his PB. Only his compatriot Leonard Komon has run a faster time with his world record 26:44 set in 2010. (09/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Marshall Ulrich, 67, had to drop out of “world’s toughest foot race” he’s previously won four times

Marshall Ulrich has run 129 ultra marathons and adventure races averaging 125 miles apiece. He started running in 1978, when he was 27, and tackled ultra marathons in his mid-30s. He once ran across the United States, from San Francisco to New York City, averaging almost 60 miles a day. He completed the Badwater 135-miler from Death Valley to the foot of California’s Mount Whitney a record 20 times, winning it four times, also a record. Each time, he continued another 11 miles with an ascent of 6,000 feet to the summit of Whitney, the highest peak in the contiguous United States, at 14,500 feet. But this year, Badwater went badly for Ulrich, three weeks after his 67th birthday in July. On a day when the temperature reached 127 degrees in what is widely considered “the world’s toughest foot race,” the man Outside magazine once dubbed the “Endurance King” missed the mandatory cutoff time at a checkpoint 50 miles into the race and had to drop out. Now, he’s having a hard time facing the realization that his career as one of America’s most iconic endurance athletes may be over because he’s not as fast as he used to be. (09/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Shabir Hussain of the Ladakh Scouts once again managed to secure first position in the Khardongla Challenge- a 72 km-ultra marathon

Covering a distance of 72 Km from Khardong village to Leh city in 6 hrs 50 minutes and 38 seconds, Shabir got the first position while Tsering Norboo, again from the Ladakh Scouts Regimental Centre, with 6 hrs 51 minutes and 15 seconds secured second position. Karma Zopa of the Vikas was on the third position with timing of 7 hrs 6 minutes and 42 seconds. The fresh snowfall on higher reaches of Khardongla reportedly made it difficult for the runners while crossing Khardongla pass. However the runners in spite of such hostile condition covered the distance in good timing. Earlier in the morning Khardong Nambardar and HQ Dy SP Suraj Singh formally flagged off the runners from Khardong village at 3:00 AM. As many as 162 participants from different parts of world took part in the Khardongla Challenge of the Seventh edition 0f Ladakh Marathon. Ladakh annual mega sports event was organised by a local Rimo Expedition with the support of J&K Tourism, LAHDC Leh and Bisleri. The Marathon has been recognised by Association of International Marathon and Distant Races (AIMS). The main Ladakh Marathon will be held on Sunday and roughly seven thousand people from different countries are expected to take part in the event. (09/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Martina Strähl wins the Jungfrau Marathon with almost a quarter of an hour advantage securing her victory for the second time

At the 26th Jungfrau Marathon from Interlaken to the Kleine Scheidegg, Martina Strähl celebrated her 2nd victory after the success of 2016. The Marathon European Championship seventh in Berlin missed the course record in just 3:14:36 ​​hours by just 100 seconds. The second-placed German Michelle Maier lost almost 15 minutes on Strähl. Third was with Michela Segalada another Swiss. Among the men, the Scot Robbie Simpson prevailed. The Swiss Volley-Nati of the women gambled their first victory in an annoying manner at the end of the Masters in Montreux. After a 2: 1 sentence lead and match balls in the 4th set, they were forced by the Cameroon women in the decision set. There the local girls went down with 1:15. Thus the Swiss selection ends the tournament on the 7th final rank. (09/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dennis Kimetto says Kenyan athletes have the strength and skills to run the fast Berlin Marathon course in under 2 hours and 50 seconds

Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03.05) and New York marathon silver medalist Wilson Kipsang (2:03.13) will be the top Runners at the Berlin marathon on Sept 16 and Kimetto believes either athlete can run away with the world record. Kimetto's world record stands at 2:02:57. "First there is a race to be won and then the record. Kipchoge is the best so far but Kipsang has the ability to sprint and win if he has his tactics right. Both athletes are under pressure since they will all want to prove a point," said Makau on Thursday in Nairobi. Kipsang was forced to pull out of Berlin marathon last year under rainy and windy conditions after just 31km, citing stomach cramps. He recovered and a month later, and proved his critics wrong to secure silver in New York. "My training has gone on very well and I'm looking forward to a good run in Berlin. It has been an injury-free period for me since running in Tokyo although there has been lots of rain but that didn't stop me from achieving my dream," said Kipsang. Like Kipchoge, Kipsang will be running his fourth marathon in Berlin, having made his debut in 2013 running a world record time of 2:03:23 and has since followed it up with 2:03:13 for a second-place behind Kenenisa Bekele (2:03.03) in 2016. (09/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Abera Kuma of Ethiopia wants to break the world record at BMW berlin marathon

Abera Kuma (27) of Ethiopia, the Rotterdam marathon silver medalist has a personal best of 2:05:50.  Former World marathon record holder Patrick Makau has warned that it will require more than skill, strength and pacesetters to break the world record. "Breaking a world record in my experience requires more hard work, experience, mental and physical strength as well as a favorable course and weather conditions," he warned. But that has not dampened Kipsang's resolution to go for the top mark and win the 50,000 U.S. dollar prize. "My target is to be on the podium as the winner. I will not be looking at who's in the race, but I will be able to use my training skills to be on the podium". (09/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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World marathon record holder Dennis Kimetto says he has overcome his injury worries and hopes to make another comeback, this time running at the Shanghai Marathon in China in November

Kimetto wants to set a new all-time best mark in China as he seeks his first win in marathon since 2016. Speaking in Iten, Kimetto, 35, warned his rivals that it will take more than their skills to improve on his world mark. "I am in right frame and shape to return to marathon running. Shanghai in my next stop in Nov," Kimetto told Xinhua on Thursday in Iten. Compatriots Wilson Kipsang (2:03:13) and Olympic marathon champion Eliud Kipchoge (2:03:05) like patient vultures have been circling the carcass that has been his world record for the last three years. The two will be in Berlin next week eyeing shutter the record but Kimetto is sitting pretty saying the record is safe. "It depends on their strategy. They are the fastest in the last two years and it depends on their pace makers. If they go past the 30km mark in under one hour and 27 minutes, then they will be able to break the record. But it is fast running and needs a lot of endurance," he warned. Kimetto, who has not finished a marathon since London in 2016, suffered another unhappy day in Vienna, Austria in April when he aggravated his calf muscle injury. He has been in and out of hospital in Germany and hopes when he returns to Hamburg next week for review, he will be given the all clear signal. "I am going for a review in Germany next week. I have just cleared my long run now and am resting. There has not been any pain my leg and I believe it is clear sign I am getting back to my best form," he said. "I will be running in Shanghai in November and I want to check with the doctors to be certain I am ready for the race. If Kipchoge and Kipsang fail to break the record, I want to tell them I will be back next year and will run even faster. But for now, winning Shanghai Marathon is my main concern," said Kimetto. (09/07/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mare Dibaba leads strong women´s field at Mainova Frankfurt Marathon

A strong Ethiopian women's quartet could cause a sensation at the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon on October 28th. All four Ethiopians, who have given their commitment to start this year's Frankfurt Marathon, have high-quality best times of less than 2:22 hours. The course record of 2:21:01, which Meselech Melkamu set up an Ethiopian six years ago, should at least be in danger in good weather conditions. The Women's Field will be led by 2015 Marathon World Champion Mare Dibaba, who will be the first starter in Frankfurt with a best time of less than 2:20 hours. Mare Dibaba did the trick twice to run exactly 2:19:52 hours. First, she was third in Dubai in 2012, three years later she set her best time in the victory in Xiamen (China). 2015 was followed by the World Cup triumph in Beijing (China). A year later, the Ethiopian won bronze at the Olympic Games in Rio (Brazil). Incidentally, it's not the first marathon start in Frankfurt for the 28-year-old. In 2010, she already finished fifth here in 2:25:27. "This may be the best women's field in the history of events in the breadth of the top. In this respect, we look forward to an exciting as well as high-class race. With four such fast athletes it can go in the direction of 2:20 hours or even faster, "said race director Jo Schindler. Among the strongest competitors of Mare Dibaba are three compatriots, who set high-caliber personal bests in 2018. 24-year-old Haftamnesh Tesfay made the fourth-fastest marathon debut ever in Dubai in January, finishing fifth in 2:20:13. Two places behind her was another debutant who will now run her second marathon in Frankfurt: The only 21-year-old Dera Dida reached in January in the desert emirate 2:21:45 hours. (09/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Canadian Ted Rowan, smashed the M85 decathlon world record at the World Masters Athletics Championships in Malaga, Spain

Ted Rowan of Martensville, Saskatchewan smashed the M85 decathlon world record at the World Masters Athletics Championships in Malaga, Spain. Rowan beat the previous record by a shocking 500 points, scoring 7,110 to set the new record. Rowan was roughly 2,500 points ahead of the second place finisher. The decathlete reportedly didn’t begin participating in track and field until his 70s once he retired from his job as an accountant. Rowan is a former boxer. The decathlon is arguably the most grueling event in track and field. Rowan competed in 10 events over the course of two days of competition. The first day consists of (in order): 100m, long jump, shot put, high jump and 400m. The second day’s events are 80m hurdles, discus throw, pole vault, javelin throw and 1,500m. Yes, that’s right, the event includes pole vault. Other Canadians who have preformed well in the first two days of competition are Kris Koznell who grabbed gold in the 5,000m race walk and Jean Horne who also also received gold in women’s event. (09/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Dave McGillivray who has heart issues says just because you are fit doesn't mean you are healthy

Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray was at home resting last night after undergoing his third angiogram in the past five years earlier in the day at Mass. General Hospital.

The tests showed that McGillivray, who turned 64 on Aug. 22, has one heart artery 80 percent blocked and another 40-to-50 percent impaired. McGillivray plans to meet with a heart surgeon in the next week or so to decide the best avenue of treatment. 

”Right now, my mind is spinning out of control. I never thought during my lifetime and in my craziest dreams that I would need bypass surgery. This just wasn’t on my radar,” McGillivray said in an email sent out to friends and colleagues last night. 

”But, I’ve also finally learned and accepted the fact that I am not invincible. No one is.” McGillivray, who maintains a whirlwind schedule, recently served as race director/organizer of the MR8 5K event, which finished inside TD Garden last week.

Just weeks before this past April’s 122nd edition of the Boston Marathon, McGillivray completed an arduous trek of running seven marathons in seven days on seven continents. Each year, to celebrate his birthday, McGillivray runs an equal amount in miles. 

Dave wrote in his email, "On the one hand, I wanted to keep this private.  At a certain level it is almost embarrassing to me that I am in this position.  However, I also want to expose the fact that this can happen to ANYONE and sometimes I am led to believe that the fittest athletes could actually be the most vulnerable ones because they are in such denial of their illness and don't act on it like others do. 

I'm hopeful that this message can actually save others going through a similar experience and make everyone think a little deeper about their own health and act on it before it is too late." 

(09/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Commonwealth marathon champion Mike Shelley will make his debut at the Great north Run

Commonwealth marathon champion Mike Shelley will make his debut at the world’s biggest half marathon on Sunday, while British interest will come in the shape of Great Britain’s Olympian Andy Vernon and Jonny Mellor. Daniel Wanjiru, who won the London Marathon in 2017, will take on Farah and Robertson on Tyneside, while 2012 New York Marathon winner Stanley Biwott has also been added to the field. Just as Farah aims to strengthen his hold over the competition, Vivian Cheruiyot is pursuing her second victory at the race in three years. Joyciline Jepkosgei, the world record holder over the half marathon distance, is, on paper, her main rival, although Betsy Saina, fifth in last year’s race, could pose a challenge. Lily Partridge, Gemma Steel, Charlotte Purdue and Aly Dixon are also in the line-up. (09/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Little Rock Marathon Race directors announced today they will be hosting Black Marathoners Hall of Fame honorees

Little Rock Marathon Race directors announced today they will be hosting the National Black Marathoners Association (NBMA) in recognizing their 2019 National Black Distance Running Hall of Fame honorees. The Hall of Fame induction ceremony will occur at the 2019 NBMA Annual Summit banquet at the 17thannual Little Rock Marathon on Sat., March 2, 2019. The honorees include: Herman Atkins, Alisa Harvey, Oscar Moore, and the Honorable Mayor Catherine Pugh of Baltimore, MD. An estimated 700 NBMA members from across the country will take part in the marathon and ceremony. These individuals are recognized for their running abilities from 800 meters to the marathon and for their service and leadership in the African-American and running communities. This is the organization’s fifteen-year anniversary. “We’re very excited about returning to Little Rock to honor standouts in the African-American distance running,” said Tony Reed, NBMA’s Executive Director. “We feel that it’s important that we acknowledge the things our runners have done, even if others haven’t.” (09/06/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopia's Guyer Adola ran 2:03:46 for his first marathon is running his second marathon Oct 28 in Frankfurt

Guye Adola of Ethiopia, last year’s surprise newcomer on the marathon scene, will run his next marathon in Frankfurt on October 28. He set an unofficial world record as a first time marathoner with 2:03:46 to finish second at the 2017 Berlin Marathon, coming within a hair’s breadth of beating the Kenyan superstar Eliud Kipchoge. The Mainova Frankfurt Marathon will feature a contest between a trio of runner-ups, setting Guye Adola against his fellow Ethiopian Kelkile Gezahegn and the Kenyan Martin Kosgey. The latter two each finished second in Frankfurt in the previous two years. The German record holder Arne Gabius will make his fourth appearance in Frankfurt while Japan’s Hiroyuki Yamamoto will also be on the start line. The organizers expect up to 15,000 entrants for the 37th edition of the Mainova Frankfurt Marathon which is an IAAF Gold Label race, the highest category in international road running. Guye Adola is the marathon runner who almost broke the lengthy dominance of the Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge a year ago. Just before 40 kilometers in Berlin the 27-year-old was in the lead but Kipchoge, unbeaten in the marathon since 2013, was able to reel him in. (09/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ben Flanagan has signed with Rebook, and becomes the second Canadian to join coach Chris Fox and the Reebook Boston Track Club

The newly formed team will be based out of Charlottesville, Virginia and will use the University of Virginia track for their workouts. Earlier this summer, fellow Canadian track runner Justyn Knight became the club’s first major signee. After Ben Flanagan won the NCAA 10,000m this June, things changed for him. “Since NCAA’s the opportunities that became available to me changed enormously. After singing with Dan Lilot, we decided that the best approach for choosing a company was to be as open minded as possible. I didn’t want to make any impulsive or emotional decisions.” Flanagan continued, “Dan and I contacted every major company. As the process went on, I started to discover what my best fit would be.” Flanagan is excited about joining Reebok, “I’m excited to work with Reebok as a company as well and the athletes and staff in the Boston group. The coaching staff is phenomenal, I know what they’ve done in the past and I know I’ll fit in pretty seamlessly.” Fox is the former Syracuse coach, and has worked with Knight throughout his NCAA career. (09/05/2018) ⚡AMP
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