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The weather most likely will be a factory on Marathon Monday, Here is what you need to know

There are going to be showers the entire day, and, at times, there could be some heavy downpours for the Boston Marathon. However this could change. The good news is that cold and wet is better than hot weather. David Epstein, a 30 year meteorologist just posted this today. "On April 15, 1881, the temperature in Boston only reached 40 degrees. Until today, that marked the coldest April 15 in the record books. While the cold is certainly notable, it’s the rain that will really affect Patriots Day and impact the most number of folks outside. As of late Sunday morning, Boston was just a couple of degrees above freezing, and it won’t be much better early Monday. Sunday night will be raw and chilly, and there could be some very light freezing rain or sleet showers before everything trends over toward just a drizzle by morning. It will remain breezy from the east all night. Monday will be a raw and cold day to start, but it will turn a bit milder as the rain pushes into the region, especially in the afternoon. Hopkinton will be about 37 or 38 degrees when the wheelchair racers begin and only a degree or two higher for the first couple of waves. This will be the coldest running of the marathon in many years. There are going to be showers the entire day, and, at times, there could be some heavy downpours. There’s even the risk of thunderstorms in the afternoon as a frontal system pushes through the region. Wind is going to be another factor. A headwind in the morning will turn to a crosswind during the day. At times, especially during some of the heavy downpours, the winds could gust over 25 mph, and that’s enough to create a little bit of instability for the runners. (04/15/2018) ⚡AMP
by David Epstein
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Don Cuddy qualified for his first of nine Boston Marathons running on a certified course in a Prison

"My first Boston marathon was in 1992." says Don Cuddy. "I’d sailed my boat to New England from San Diego, arriving in the fall of 1990 and running Boston ranked very high on the list of things I wished to accomplish. I was 39 and to obtain a number, the BAA required me to run a sub-3:15 qualifier. So 1991 became all about running. I targeted the Marine Corps marathon in D.C. that November for my qualifying race. Alas, my inexperience proved costly. I ran too fast, too early and finished in 3:19. On my return I discovered there was to be another marathon just two weeks later on a .44-mile running track at Bridgewater State Prison. Apparently the warden was an enthusiast. So I went inside the walls for the Chain Gang marathon. It wasn’t even an oval track. There was a dogleg on the back stretch around a guard tower. It was a certified course however and a prisoner with a clipboard was assigned to tally the required 58 3/4 laps. I can only marvel now at the fact that I managed to run a 3:12. The warden also had a sense of humor. The race shirt pictured a runner with a ball and chain on one leg. Unlike the chap with the clipboard, they let me out after the race and I was on my way to Hopkinton." (04/15/2018) ⚡AMP
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Update on Callum Hawkins who callasped with just over a mile to go at the Commonwealth Games Marathon Sunday Morning

From Team Scotland posted at 7pm (PST) Saturday: CALLUM HAWKINS UPDATE: We are very pleased to report that Callum is sitting up and speaking with his Dad and Team Scotland medical staff. He is undergoing further tests as a precaution and we all wish him a speedy recovery. (The temperature at the time when he callasped was 82 degrees. See our story with more details below.) His brother Derek posted this an hour earlier: “Thanks everyone for your messages of support. As reported Callum's in hospital, is conscious/talking and getting appropriate medical attention. Can't describe how upsetting and distressing it was to watch but just glad he's alright.” (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Former NFL offensive Lineman is ready to run Boston Monday

The job of an NFL offensive lineman is to protect his quarterback, so there wasn’t a lot of running involved for Ryan Wendell throughout his eight-year career. Sure, there were sprints in training camp and he would occasionally have to jog up to five yards, but running was never really his forte. He would much rather block a fellow 300-pounder than run. But all of that has changed now that the 32-year-old is done keeping Tom Brady on his feet. The former New England Patriot and Super Bowl champ is getting ready for a 26.2 mile run from Hopkinton to Boston on Marathon Monday. Once a 6-foot-2, 305-pound behemoth, you may not recognize Wendell when he races (or trots) by on Monday. He’s dropped 45 pounds while training for this year’s race, which included a 20-mile run last weekend. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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With just a little over a mile to go and leading by two minutes Callum Hawkins collapsed at Commonwealth Games Marathon

Callum Hawkins has been taken to the hospital for medical review following his collapse in the Commonwealth Games Marathon as is standard procedure. He is being supported by Team Scotland medical staff and there are no major concerns at this stage. Here is what happened Sunday morning in Australia. Scotland's Callum Hawkins collapsed just over one mile from the end of the marathon at the Commonwealth Games when leading by almost two minutes. In hot conditions (83 degrees) in the Gold Coast, Hawkins looked set for gold but he began weaving across the road before falling over the curb. He continued for another couple of hundred meters before collapsing again, hitting his head on a roadside barrier this time. Hawkins was conscious, sitting up and talking when helped into an ambulance. Peter Jardine of Scottish Athletics told BBC Scotland that Callum Hawkins "initially refused medical treatment after collapsing" because he "feared he would be disqualified.” It had taken a couple of minutes for any medical staff to attend to the Scotsman, who was lying on the road in clear distress with spectators looking on. BBC Sport commentator Steve Cram said it was "a disgrace" that it took so long for any paramedics to attend to Hawkins. When asked to explain why it took so long for paramedics to attend to Hawkins, Gold Coast 2018 chief executive Mark Peters said: "We need to check the facts out. You can't have medical people on every kilometer of the road. Australia's Mike Shelley won the race(2:16:46), defending the title he won in Glasgow in 2014. He ran past the stricken Hawkins just as help arrived and the Gold Coast-born athlete went on to claim the victory with Uganda's Munyo Solomon Mutai in second (2:19:02) , with Robbie Simpson of Scotland claiming the bronze. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Moroccan Rachid claimed his sixth victory in the Marathon Des Sables

El Morabity won the marathon with a time of 19:35:49, ahead of his brother Mohamed El Morabity with 20:01:28 and France's Robert Merile by 20:41:00. In the women's category, American athlete Magdalena Boulet won with a time of 25:11:19 followed by Danish Bouchra Eriksen 26:36:00 and British Gemma Game 27:00:23. Marathon Des Sables is an annual ultra-marathon that brings together more than 1,000 runners, who run six regular marathons over six days, with only one rest day. The combined distance over the six races is a massive 254km with the longest stage 91km. Each participant must carry his/her own backpack containing food, sleeping gear and other materials. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Rob de Castella set an Australia's marathon record for men hasn't been broken since 1986

For years Australian elite marathoners were getting faster and faster. In 1950, the fastest marathon time was two hours, 40 minutes and 49 seconds. By 1986, more than half-an-hour had been knocked off the time. That was the year Rob de Castella, also known as Deek, ran the marathon in two hours, seven minutes and 51 seconds. It was an Australian national record — that is, the fastest marathon time anywhere in the world, run by an Australian. But that was the last time the record was broken in Australia and to this day de Castella holds it. Despite all the advances in technology, sport science, nutrition, materials and understanding of human physiology, not a single male Australian runner has been able to beat it. (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
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Your training for Boston is done and now the only thing left to do is run the 26.2 miles on Monday

The Boston Marathon is just two days from now. Your training is done. Now you just need to run the 26.2 miles on Monday. That’s all. There are many decisions that need to be made for race day and each can make the difference between running a good race or a bad one. Decisions like what do you eat, wear, how fast do you start and how should you deal with the weather? “You have done the training. For race day don’t do anything new,” says Bob Anderson who ran the 2013 Boston Marathon. “However, Boston does start later than most marathons and there is a lot of waiting at the starting area. So I had to do two things a little different. I did bring some warm clothes (it was cold) to the start to stay warm which I left on the bus and one shirt I tossed away right before the start. Secondly, I normally don’t eat much before a race (except for half a banana and a GU pack). For Boston (because of the later start I wanted to make sure I had enough fuel) I ate a light breakfast (pancake with honey and a banana) at around 6am. I ran 3:32:17 (age 65) that day and everything worked. I drank water or Gatorade at each water station and I carried five GU’s that I started eating at mile five. I knew I had gotten in most of the training miles I wanted. The main thing left, was dealing with the mental side of things. Ty Velde a Boston Globe writer wrapped up his training for this year’s race on Wednesday with a ten mile run. Ty wrote, “ While my physical training may be done, I wish I could say that same about my mind. The interesting thing about marathon training is that when it comes to running, it’s easy to set parameters in terms of mileage, time, routes and frequency. But the parameters associated with mental training are not so defined. That’s something that does not end until I cross the finish line.” (04/14/2018) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Jake Robertson talks about the 10000m last night at the Commonwealth Games

New Zealand’s Jake Robertson posted this on Instagram today, “what a race last night in the 10000m. I broke the CG games record & NZ national record 27.30.90 though these four track stars showed me up, congratulations guys I loved competing with you'll”. Six runners finished in under the Commonwealth Games Record which was set in 2002. It was good to see these guys push it. “At 7000m Jake took the lead and held it for four laps,” says Bob Anderson. “This type of aggressive running is going to bring us faster times. It is not only about winning. It is about winning in the fastest time possible.” (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tyler Andrews sets new 50k World Record on a Track, that’s 125 laps

Tyler Andrews, 27, ran a world all-time best for 125 laps (50k) on the track at the HOKA ONE ONE Santa Barbara Elite 50K in California, clocking 2 hours, 46 minutes, 6.8 seconds at Santa Barbara City College’s La Playa Stadium on Friday. His performance eclipsed the 1980 global track standard for 31.1 miles of 2:48:06 produced by Great Britain’s Jeff Norman and fell just short of the overall 50K world record of 2:43:38 established in a road race in 1988 by South Africa’s Thompson Magawana. “We’re not done. We’ll come back for it, for sure,” said Andrews, who remained under overall world-record pace through 35K with a split of 1:54:19.9. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Just six days after Boston is the London Marathon and all eyes will be on Mo Farah

All eyes will be on Sir Mo Farah on Sunday April 22 as he strives to end Britain’s 25-year drought in the London Marathon men’s race and break Steve Jones’s 33-year-old British record. Four years ago Farah made his marathon debut in London amid high expectations and, despite finishing ‘only’ eighth, came home with an English record of 2:08:21 and the second fastest time in British marathon history. Now with his glittering track career behind him, the quadruple Olympic champion will be looking to make his mark on the roads in the company of some of the greatest marathon runners of all time. It remains to be seen whether Farah can live with the speed of the world record-chasing east Africans and become the first British men’s winner since Eamonn Martin in 1993, but the 35-year-old will certainly have Jones’s 1985 UK mark of 2:07:13 in his sights and possibly even the new European all-time best of 2:05:48. “I am thrilled to be starting this new chapter in my career with the London Marathon,” said Farah. “The London Marathon is my home race and it is so special to me. “When I decided to concentrate solely on the roads from 2018 I knew that I wanted this to be my first marathon.” (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Many of the top runners in the world come from Kenya and here is a good answer why

Kenya is known around the world as the home of champions and we wanted to know why. One tribe in Kenya that stands out more than others is the Kalenjins. At the 1968 Olympics Kalenjin runner Kipchoge Keino defeated world-record holder Jim Ryun. That day Keino not only won gold, but he also ushered in an era of Kenyan dominance. Since then a considerable number of the races are won by Kenyans and many world records are held by Kenyans. Many of these runners are of the Kalenjin tribe. The feats have just bafflled the world. David Epstein a renown sports editor who authored a book called “The Sports Gene'” noted that many world-class runners in Kenya come from the tribe of Kalenjins. In his book, he explores possible genetic factors that might be the reason behind this. He notes that Kalenjins have thin ankles and calves which makes their legs resemble a pendulum and eases their movement. According to his explanation, the more weight you have farther away from your center of gravity, the more difficult it is to swing. The vice versa applies to Kalenjins. Some studies have also discovered that Kenyans, in general, have less mass for their height, longer legs, shorter torsos and more slender limbs. These physical traits can be viewed as relatively “streamlined” and improve efficiency while running. Lastly, there is a controversial cultural argument that Kalenjins become great runners because they ran several miles to and from school barefoot on a daily basis. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Field set for 2018 USATF One Mile Road Championships with $30,000 in prize money

Grand Blue Mile race officials announced the fields for the 2018 USA Track & Field 1 Mile Road Championships set for Tuesday, April 24, in Des Moines, Iowa. A world-class group of elite runners will headline the event along with approximately 3,000 participants from across the nation who will compete among the recreational and amateur competitive divisions. This year's race features a top prize of $5,000 each for the men's and women's champions with the potential to earn an additional $2,500 for setting a new course record — currently 4.00.0 (2017) and 4:32.7 (2014), respectively. Overall, $30,000 in prize money will be contested across the men's and women's championship divisions. Leo Manzano leads the men's field with a PB of 3:50.64. Brenda Martinez leads the women's field with a PB of 4:18.4. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Master Runner Kenyan´s Mungara knows the course well and hopes to win the Commonwealth Games Marathon

Kenneth Mungara will be one of the oldest competitors in the Commonwealth Games Marathon but irrespective of his 44 years, Kenya’s Mungara will be the one to beat on the streets Sunday in Australia. The current Gold Coast Marathon race record holder (2:08:42), Mungara made a late start to marathon taking up the sport 11 years ago. A former barber, the veteran runner swapped the scissors with joggers after cutting the hair of other athletes. “I believed I could run well,” Mungara says. “I watched other runners coming to my barber shop, I observed them, and I thought I can beat them in running. “That is how it all started.” However the modest Kenyan doesn't believe that experience will give him a significant advantage saying: “Everyone running is a winner and this is the game in which one needs to play well all the time, otherwise winning is not possible. It is about the training for the race and then racing well. He has run 20 marathons since his debut in 2006. Three of the races have been on the stretch of road between Runaway Bay and Burleigh with his first win coming in 2015. The world masters record holder (40-45), also claimed first place on the Gold Coast upon his return in 2016 before settling for second place last year. The Commonwealth Games marathon course runs on the same roads he knows well. Everything will have to go right for Mungara since there is a very strong elite field. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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The first American to win Boston since 1983, Meb Keflezighi is running Monday for Team MR8

The first American man to win the Boston Marathon since 1983 crossed the finish line April 21 in 2:08:37, triumphant in a storied race that has become a national symbol of resiliency and determination. A year after the bombings, Meb Keflezighi (Eritean-born Meb became an American citizen in 1998) wrote the names of the victims -- Martin, Krystle, Lingzi and Sean — on his race bib. He crossed the finish line wearing it as he won the 2014 Boston Marathon. Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lingzi Lu were killed when the bombs exploded on Boylston Street on April 15, 2013. Sean Collier, an MIT police officer, was murdered a few days later by the marathon bombers. Keflezighi's emotional marathon victory was the first win by an American man since 1983. It also came two weeks before his 39th birthday, making him the oldest winner in decades. The elite runner retired from competitive marathoning last year after running Boston and New York, the 25th and 26th marathons of his storied career. But, on April 16, Keflezighi is coming back to Boston to run the marathon once again. This time he'll be running as part of Team MR8 -- so named for the 8-year-old boy from Dorchester's initials and sports number — alongside the other men and women running to raise money for the Martin Richard Foundation. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Uganda's Cheptegei pulls off double, sets Games Record and Robertson sets New Zealand National Record

The much talked about 10000m at the Commonwealth Games today was one of the best events of the Games so far. Joshua Kiprui Cheptegei (UGA) fresh off his 5000m win not only won the 10000m too but set a Games Record breaking Wilberforce Talel (KEN) record of 27:45 set in 2002. Cheptegeie clocked 27:19 running his last 5000m in 13:25, 25 seconds faster than his 5000m winning time. The 10000m was a fast race as six runners got under the Games Record. Jake Robertson (NZ) finished fifth in a new national record for New Zealand clocking 27:30. He took the lead at the 7K mark coming up from eight and lead for four laps but he could not hold it but he still ran 13:36 for his last 5000m. Canada's Mohammed Ahmed and Cheptegei battled back and forth for the lead the last two kilometers. In the end the Canadian was out sprinted placing second in 27:20. Third was Rodgers Kwemoi (KEN) in 27:28. Eight runners finished under 28 minutes. It does not get much better than this. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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85-year-old Bob Emmerson has run 96 marathons and have logged in more than 110,000 miles

Bob Emmerson might have had both hips replaced, but that hasn't stopped him from finishing nearly 200 marathons and ultra-marathons in the last 35 years. Now, Bob has set another personal best and has joined in at the weekly Parkrun and has run the community run 300 times since it kicked off five years ago. Last Saturday (April 7), he crossed the line together with 83-year-old Diana Mary Green as she completed her 250th Park Run. “I insist that 300 is nothing special, it's just to prove my determination to keep going,” says Bob. "The Parkrun has kept me going. I've met so many friends there.” Since he took up running at 49, Bob has run 96 marathons and 96 ultra Marathons from 30 to 60 miles each. He has had both hips replaced since he was 70 and has run the London Marathon 17 times. Through careful log-keeping, he estimates he has run 110,000 miles so far. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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Mo Farah will race the Vitality London 10000 five weeks after the London Marathon

Following the London Marathon, Mo Farah will race in the 2018 Vitality London 10000 on Monday May 28. The multiple Olympic and world champion last ran in the Vitality London 10000 in 2013 and has competed in the event on five occasions, winning in 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013, finishing runner-up in the first edition of the race in 2008. “It has been a while since I last raced the Vitality London 10000 and I’m looking forward to returning again this year,” said Farah. “I have got many happy memories of the race and of the course which is a spectacular one and one that I’ve been able to run fast on in the past. “The race has always been a preparation for the track season in the past while this year I will have run the Virgin Money London Marathon just five weeks before so it will be a bit different but I am looking forward to it. As I always say, running in my home town is always special.” The 35-year-old set the 10km course record of 27:44, which is also his road personal best, in 2010 when he beat the Kenyan Micah Kogo by five seconds. (04/13/2018) ⚡AMP
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New Zealand’s Jake Robertson could win the Commonweath Games 10000m Friday

Jake and his twin brother Zane Robertson were not going to run in the Commonwealth Games in Australia. But they changed their minds and said they would be there representing New Zealand. Most recently Jake travelled to New Orelans and won the Crescent City 10K classic clocking 27:28 March 31. Zane however was injured while getting a deep tissue massage by a massage therapist. The details are not very clear but Zane had to withdraw from the Games. Tonight Jake posted on Instagram: “Track, it's been awhile,10000m final tonight, 25 laps on the grill. It's time to burn.” “Jake has been running well,” says Bob Anderson. “There is some strong competition and it has been awhile since Jake has raced on the track but I think he can win it. He and his brother has been training in Kenya the last ten years and have been doing some impressive workouts.” The race starts Friday at 9:10pm in Australia which is 4:10am in California or 7:10am in New York. (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Inspired by the Boston Marathon bombing survivors, incredible medical advances were achieved

Five years ago, 17 people lost limbs in the Boston Marathon bombing, fueling efforts to improve amputations and artificial limbs. On April 15, 2013, two homemade bombs exploded near the marathon finish line in Boston, Massachusetts, firing shrapnel into the crowds that killed three and injured 260. Following the attack hundreds of thousands of dollars were donated to research for technology that would help get the 17 amputees back on their feet. The lessons learned by working with those survivors have been integral to developing better prosthetics for them and all other amputees. Each of these survivors have undergone multiple surgeries and many of them continue to experience severe pain even five years later. However, the doctors and researchers who helped them get back on their feet say the advances in prosthetic technology that resulted from working with the survivors is a silver lining of the bombing. (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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American marathon record holder Deena Kastor has been writing and decided in December to run Boston

At 45, Deena Kastor has been writing and training at her high-altitude home in Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Her newly-released book, "Let Your Mind Run, A Memoir of Thinking My Way To Victory" (Crown Archetype), is a gem. She's also in the final stages of her training for the Boston Marathon on Monday, a race she has only run once before. At her last Boston Marathon in 2007, she battled the rain and wind which was so strong that organizers nearly canceled the race. Kastor sloshed her way to fifth place and won the USA marathon title, a prelude to her victory one year later at the USA Olympic Trials Marathon which were also held in Boston, but on a different course. "It wasn't my intention to be part of this phenomenal American field that is being put together," said Kastor, who admitted that she only got the idea to run Boston at the end of December after finishing up the bulk of her writing on the book. "It was my intention, when I finished with this book, I couldn't wait to get in shape again because I had spent so much time in front of that computer." She added: "I needed to put something on the calendar again. Why not go big and choose the most historic marathon in our country?" (She was speaking with David Monti from Race Results Weekly) (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Could be wet and windy for Boston Monday, how to prepare

The current weather forecast for Boston Monday is not looking very good. But New England weather can change in an instant. Conditions for the 122nd Boston Marathon on April 16 may be wet, windy and cold. The temperature should be okay once you get going but how should you prepare yourself for Monday? Toni Reavis has covered races all over the world and writes about running regularly. Here are some tips for Monday. "It’s important to stay with your fueling and hydration plan. Just because it’s wet and chilly outside, doesn’t mean your fueling and hydration needs change on the inside. Also, bring old clothes you don’t mind losing, and maybe a trash bag to the start to keep yourself warm and dry before the race – especially if you find yourself stuck outside for several hours. Then, wear arm warmers, a light pair of gloves and a skullcap during the race. The energy needed to keep you warm is energy that’s taken away from muscles working for performance. Tights are also an option, although those you can’t easily remove." (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
by Toni Reavis
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Stuart Kolb, prepares for his 100th marathon in boston this monday

Stuart Kolb will turn 56 on Monday. He is celebrating by running the Boston Marathon for the eighth time, which also will mark his 100th career marathon. Stuart Kolb says he just feels blessed. “Running allows you to relieve stresses in your day, and from a work-life balance, this is the best thing to do for yourself, to take care of yourself, take care of your health, and running has been my outlet for that,” said Kolb. After over 30 years and six destinations, including Ireland, not to mention some ultra-events with 100-mile runs, Kolb said he is feeling humbled to celebrate his 100th venture as a marathon runner. “Distance runners will tell you it's as much the nutrition and execution. Pacing of course is huge. You can run a great half marathon and really struggle. For me it's always thinking about how your body feels,” said Kolb. Kolb Is hoping to get it done in under three hours. (04/12/2018) ⚡AMP
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Shalane Flanagan’s Mother once held the World Record in the Marathon

DID YOU KNOW: Cheryl Bridges, now Cheryl Treworgy, once held the American and world record in the marathon. Cheryl Bridges was born December 25, 1947 in Indiana. She began her running career as a sophomore at North Central High School in Indianapolis. In her senior year in high school, she competed in the national cross-country championships. In 1966, she became the first female athlete in the U.S. to receive an athletic scholarship to a public university — Indiana State University. She graduated in three years with a degree in physical education. In 1969, she finished fourth in the World Cross Country Championships in Scotland. She set the American records in the 3 mile and 5,000 meter distances. On December 7, 1971, Bridges ran her first marathon, finishing the Culver City Marathon in a world record time of 2:49:40. She had a lot of ideas and ambitions. She was the holder of a patent on utility sports bras and was the former buyer and part-owner of Frank Shorter Sports stores. Cheryl, now 70, is a professional photographer for her own company, Pretty Sporty, and was recognized in 2010 as Track and Field Writers of America Photographer of the year. Cheryl is the mother of Shalane Flanagan, who among other achievements set an American record in the 2008 Summer Olympics Beijing in the 10,000m and won the New York City marathon on November 5, 2017. Shalane is going after a dream on Monday. This dream is to win the Boston Marathon. Her mom would be proud. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Commonwealth Games 5000m Champion has decided to also run the 10000m

Uganda's Joshua Cheptegei, fresh from winning the 5,000m gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in Australia, has changed his mind and will compete in the 10,000m final as well. He won his first-ever Commonwealth Games gold on Sunday April 8 in a time of 13:50.83, ahead of Canada's Mohammed Ahmed at the Carrara Stadium Track. The other two Ugandans in the race, Thomas Ayeko and Phillip Kipyeko, finished fourth and sixth respectively. Cheptegei had, according to the country's athletics federation, initially ruled himself out of the longer distance as he didn't want to overload himself, but will now contest the 10km final on 13 April. "We have managed to convince Cheptegei," said Dominic Otuchet, chairman of the Uganda Athletics Federation. "This is very good for Uganda as a country and for the athlete himself because he is now better motivated to even perform well after winning gold on Sunday." Otuchet explained that Cheptegei initially did not want to overextend himself with two races, even though he had qualified for both, adding: "But we left him entered for the two events and only kept hoping that he changes his mind. "We are glad he has now allowed to stay back and compete in the 10,000m final." (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Jon Hendershott spent nearly 50 years writing about Track and Field has died

We are saddened by the news that Jon Hendershott, one of the most respected track and field journalists in America, died Monday April 9 at his home in Salem, Oregon due to complications from a stroke he suffered on Sunday. Hendershott, who spent nearly 50 years working for Track & Field News, was 71. Born July 20, 1946 in Bend, Oregon, Hendershott spent much of youth surrounded by track and field. His father was a high school and college track coach, a passion that was picked up by Jon. Hendershott learned of Track & Field News for the first time in 1962 at age 16 when his high school track coach shared the magazine with members of his team. He subscribed immediately, beginning a relationship that would last the rest of his life. He started working for Track & Field News in 1967 while studying at the University of Washington. Over the course of the next five decades, Hendershott covered hundreds of regional, national and international competitions, including nine Olympic Games and 15 world championships. Hendershott retired from Track & Field News in 2016 but continued to report on the sport on a freelance basis for several outlets, literally until his final days. On Saturday, the day before he suffered his fatal stroke, he traveled to Eugene to cover the Oregon Team Invitational. Respected by his colleagues, Hendershott was twice elected president of the Track and Field Writers of America. He also authored several books on the sport. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Brad Caswell is running Boston again after losing 90 pounds and feeling better than ever

Running has given me a new love. I volunteered at the Boston Marathon finish line three years ago and was blown away by the energy. The runners had done something amazing, their friends and family all supported them in it, and it was truly touching. At the time, I weighed about 275 pounds. I couldn’t run more than a mile at a time, but I went home and signed up for a half marathon that day just to feel a small part of that. I ran the Old Port half and fell in love. Since then I have run another 13 half marathons, the Boston Marathon for the first time last year, and, most importantly, gotten my weight under control. Through my new love of running, I’ve lost about 90 pounds, and feel better than I ever have before. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Switzer named Female Masters Runner of the Year 2017 by RRCA

Kathrine Switzer on Facebook said, "How surprised and honored I was last weekend to be named by the Road Runners Club of America as the Female Masters Runner of the Year 2017! I protested that there were many performances so much better than mine, but they said the award was for inspiring people of all ages by running the Boston Marathon again 50 years after I first did it. Wow, thank you RRCA for all you do for the sport and thank you for this amazing recognition!" Switzer founded 261 Fearless Inc. in 2015 after her first Boston Marathon in 1967, when race officials attempted to stop her run by ripping off her bib, No. 261. She was the first woman to officially enter and run the Boston Marathon after registering under her initials. She is going to be running the London Marathon the week after Boston and we are sure she will be wearing number 261. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian Dino Sefir faces WR Holder Dennis Kimetto at Vienna Marathon

World record holder Dennis Kimetto will face some strong challengers at the 35th Vienna City Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on April 22. Dino Sefir is the next fastest man in the field after the the world record holder dennis Kimetto. The 29-year-old smashed his PB at the 2012 Dubai Marathon where he clocked 2:04:50, finishing second. A year earlier he had improved significantly in the half marathon when he clocked 59:42. While he hasn't matched those time in recent years, he has been consistent in the 2:08-2:09 range, collecting victories in Barcelona and Ottawa two years ago. More recently he was eighth in the 2017 Boston Marathon. One year ago, Bushendich was involved in the closest race ever in the history of the Vienna City Marathon, crossing just behind fellow Kenyan Albert Korir in 2:08:42. While he knows the course well, he'll return with added confidence after taking the Lisbon Marathon last autumn with 2:10:51. The 26-year-old has already won five marathons during his career: Enschede and La Rochelle in 2012, Ljubljana in 2014, Toronto in 2015 and Lisbon last October. Another contender with a marathon victory under his belt is Abrah Milaw. The 30year-old Ethiopian, who has a 2:07:46 from the 2014 Dubai Marathon, won the Stockholm Marathon last year in 2:11:36. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Carson Swartz running marathon for people who have lost limbs raising money for 50 Legs

Carson Swartz was inspired by young Katie Eddington to run the Boston (UK) Marathon to raise money for 50 Legs, an organization that provides amputees with prosthetic limbs. While handling anything from headaches to motor cycle accidents, Carson Swartz understands the importance of having a healthy way to relieve stress. “Running is my outlet,” Swartz said. Swartz is a graduate of the UK College of Nursing and now works in the UK Emergency Department in the level one trauma center. She is an accomplished distance runner. Swartz, along with a team of 20 other runners from across the country, is running to raise money for 50 Legs. 50 Legs is a non-profit organization that provides necessary care and prosthetic devices to people who lost limbs with the goal of adding positivity to the lives of amputees and removing hopelessness to allow children, adults and service members to lead active and productive lives. (04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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Galen Rupp's preparation for Boston is the best ever says his coach Alberto Salazar

Galen Rupp finished second in his Boston Marathon debut last year despite not knowing if he would start the race two weeks prior.

This year is a different story says his coach Alberto Salazar, "This is as good as he's ever been prepared for a marathon. Anything can happen. You can have bad luck. But by far this is the best preparation he's ever had in terms of being really prepared," says Salazar.

Rupp, a two-time Olympic medalist, contests his fifth career marathon Monday. "Galen's been able to train much harder, run more miles and do more speedwork. It's gone really well, knock on wood. There have been no setbacks whatsoever," says Salazar.

Rupp can bolster his argument as the best U.S. distance runners of all time. He already has Olympic 10,000m and marathon medals. In his last marathon, Rupp became the first American-born male runner to win the Chicago Marathon in 35 years.

On Monday, he can become the first American-born male runner to win the Boston Marathon in 35 years. (Meb Keflezighi an Eritrean-born American runner won the 2014 Boston Marathon at the age of 38, the oldest winner in decades.)

(04/11/2018) ⚡AMP
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We have the greatest marathon team on the planet says Boston Marathon Director

“We held our final BAA Organizing Committee tonight,” says Boston Marathon director Dave McGillivray. “We are READY TO GO! I’ve always said our greatest asset is our team, our people, our leaders. Here is a photo of the greatest marathon team on the planet. Many have 10 years, 20 years, 30 years, 40 years and some even 50 years of experience working this race. It’s an honor and a privilege to work with each and every one of them. The 30,000 runners in this race are really fortunate to have this group of 110 of the most dedicated and passionate professionals producing the best and most prestigious marathon in the world for them! Good luck to this amazing group and to all the participants in the race on Monday.” (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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I just think if you could pick a day and place to win, it would be Patriot’s Day in Boston says Molly Huddle

Molly Huddle is a two-time Olympian, owns the U.S. women’s record in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meter races, and recorded a third-place finish in the 2016 New York City Marathon. Yet in 2018, at the age of 33, she will be making her Boston Marathon debut. It won’t be her first race in Boston, as Huddle has run (and won) multiple versions of the Boston Athletic Association 5K. Yet as she enters a new period in her career oriented more around marathons, Huddle is eyeing Boston as a challenge and opportunity. Asked about the Elite women's field Molly said, "I feel like that’s one of the main storylines of the race is just having such great head-to-head match-ups on the women’s side. Shalane has just won a major in New York, and Desiree [Linden] has always run so well in Boston. Jordan is running really fast in the marathon right now. I think between the four of us it’s just going to be a story within a story on race day. I like that... Competition I think brings out the best in people, so all four of us in the same race on the same day will kind of be like a preview of the Olympic trials in a few years. I’m sure it’ll be exciting and kind of dramatic. I personally was thrilled to see that field." (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Kenya’s Michael Kunyuga was nearing the finish line of the Hannover Marathon when the unexpected happened

Kenya’s Michael Kunyuga was nearing the finish line of the Hannover (Germany) Marathon on Sunday April 8 when the unexpected happened. The Kenyan had been keeping a steady pace throughout the entire Marathon and was in the lead pack with the finish line in sight. Kunyuga was heading towards victory when he began to wobble and stagger. Soon, he collapsed, but miraculously continued to the finish line on his hands and knees. Crowds began to cheer and watched in amazement as he crossed the line to finish second in 2:10:16. Kunyuga managed to barely hold off his compatriot Duncan Koech who clocked 2:10:19 and his determination was rewarded with a personal best as well as the runner-up spot. The race characterized by sunny conditions and rising temperatures was won by Ethiopia’s Seboka Negusse clocking 2:09:44. An eight-strong group reached halfway in 1:04:12. The pacemakers had fulfilled their task to the letter, putting the field at this point on target to attack the course record of 2:08:32. As temperatures rose the lead group slackened their pace and the prospect of attacking the course record slipped out of reach. (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Don’t make plans just yet to attend the USATF 2020 Olympic Trials at Mt Sac

The USATF awarded the 2020 Olympic Trials in June of last year to Mt. SAC, located in suburban Los Angeles. The decision, made by USATF's board of directors in an 11-2 vote, came after Eugene had staged the trials successfully at Hayward Field in 2008, 2012 and 2016. Eugene and Sacramento both submitted bids for 2020. In theory, the trials could go to one site or the other if the Mt. SAC renovation gets tied up in court and falls too far behind schedule. The University of Oregon is expected to begin a complete razing and reconstruction of Hayward Field this summer to transform it into something UO Foundation president and CEO Paul Weinhold terms "spectacular." The new Hayward Field is expected to cost more than $200 million, Money for the project has been privately raised, much of it reportedly contributed by Nike co-founder Phil Knight. If the Hayward project begins this summer it is expected to be completed by April of 2020. That might be just in time. (This photo was taken during the women's Steeplechase at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Eugene.) (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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Boston here I come...I thought I would just run one marathon but it's kind of addicting

“It’s been a dream of mine for the last 10 years," says JaneKae Wall. "I competed in the St. George Marathon about 10 year’s ago. I wanted to run at least one marathon and cross it off my bucket list. But, it’s kind of addicting. I ran the St. George race with my sister. She’s always been there with me, pushing me along. “Last year I ran the Denver marathon and I was able to qualify for the Boston Marathon. I had to run three hours and 40 minutes to qualify for my age group. I made the cut with my qualifying time of 3 hours and 36 minutes. I’ve been training for the last 10 years. I’ve done several half marathons too. I’ve also added strength and weight training to my workout and I think that’s reduced my time as well. I’ve been training two days a week with a personal trainer. I run four times a week. I have kind of backed off on the weight training now. I can’t wait to run Boston on Monday April 16.” (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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America's Ben True and Ethiopia's Buze Diriba are back to Defend Their Titles at BAA 5K Saturday

The Boston Athletic Association (BAA) announced Monday the elite field for the BAA 5K and Invitational Mile, to be held on Saturday, April 14 two days before the Boston Marathon. New Hampshire’s Ben True will return to Boston looking to earn his fifth BAA. 5K title, while Ethiopia’s Buze Diriba will defend her 2017 crown. Canada’s Nicole Sifuentes and American Drew Hunter will lead world-class fields at the tenth annual BAA Invitational Mile. A $39,900 prize purse will be distributed to the top finishers of the BAA 5K, while a $14,500 prize purse will be available in the BAA Invitational Mile. True is a veteran and New England favorite on the roads of Boston, having broken the American record twice at the BAA 5K in both 2015 and 2017. A year ago, True timed 13:20 en route to his fifth win in seven years. Coming off a win at the NYC Half in March, True will drop down in distance and face a tough field that includes fellow Americans Eric Jenkins, Tommy Curtin, and Scott Fauble. Jenkins, a native of New Hampshire, is a two-time NCAA champion and was runner-up at last year’s USA Championships 5000m on the track. (04/10/2018) ⚡AMP
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The forecasters are thinking there will be at least some rain during the Boston Marathon

The weather during the Boston Marathon has been all over the place. This year it’s been chilly the past six weeks, and finally spring-like conditions are predicted for Thursday and Friday. The 10-day temperature forecast shows a possible summer-like day Saturday, followed by a return to chilly air on Sunday. “The possible problem for the weekend and early next week is that colder air from the north will once again move south, and when that meets this warm air it’s going to create a fairly significant storm system,” says Dave Epstein of the Boston Globe. “Obviously this can all change, but multiple computer models are indicating the way the atmosphere will unfold over the next five days is conducive to a significant rain event sometime within 24 hours of the Marathon.” Runners should be ready just in case. The challenge for forecasters is exactly when this heavy rain moves in — during the Marathon or before or even after it. “We won’t know for several days just when the rain might begin and when the heaviest will move into Boston, but I think it’s a high enough probability there will be at least some rain during Monday that runners and spectators should be thinking about it,” says Dave. “The worst-case scenario is a strong gusty wind with heavy rain during part of the Marathon. The best case is that it’s just cloudy with a few light showers; I think it’s highly unlikely we are going to have a sunny, pleasant day,” says Dave. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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The Boston Marathon is just one week out and Tyler Pennel is pumped

"In a week’s time I’ll be racing from Hopkinton to Boylston Street," says Tyler Pennel. "Over the last few months I have been holed up in the mountains, both of Colorado and North Carolina, with the goal of having a great race on Patriot’s Day. And there is no better place for that to happen than one of the most storied races in the world. Since I witnessed Meb win Boston in 2014, I have wanted to run from town to town in the Massachusetts countryside, and I will get to this year! With only a week to go, all the hard work is done and there is only the last 26.2 miles to go!" (Tyler has some impressive PR's Half Marathon 1:01:44, 13:32 5k and a 3:58 mile.) (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Someone said a flat and fast 100 Miler doesn’t really count? Camille Herron doesn't agree!

Someone tried to tell my friend her first 100 miler at Tunnel Hill “doesn’t count” because it was “flat and easy.” Is this really what people think? Anyone who can go 100 miles on any terrain has my respect! And if anyone wants to attempt to run 100 miles at 7:38 pace you’re welcome to try! Flat and fast and trying to hold the pace hurts way worse than any mountain trail race I’ve done. Hardest event in my opinion is a flat road 100K! Having crossed surfaces I respect the challenges they all present. (Camille holds many ultra records including the World Record for 100 miles running 7:38 pace for nearly 13 hours.) (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Camille Herron
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I would not like to see the mile returned to the Commonwealth Games says Walter Sargent

"Offering both the 1500m and mile in the Commonwealth Games would dilute the fields and encourage some of the game-playing that was rampant in the 1980s, when top competitors were using the proliferation of both mile and 1500 events," says Walter Sargent. "This was done often at the same meet, to avoid head-to-head races against their most difficult challengers. As for the choice between the 1500 and the mile, I much prefer the ease of viewing the race as four quarters and calculating splits in a mile, but I wouldn't want to see the mile returned to the Commonwealth Games as a way of extending the sentiment and mythology of the Bannister and Landy races of 1954 or the dominance of Commonwealth milers in earlier eras. The history of the 1500 at the Commonwealth Games is every bit as impressive as the ealier mile competitions; in fact, probably the single greatest middle-distance race at the Commonwealth Games was Filbert Bayi's 1500 world record (photo) at the 1974 Games." (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
by Walter H. Sargent
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The doctors told 40-year-old Melonie that she would never walk again...now 71 she is running the Pear Blossom 5k this Saturday

Melonie Jorgensen was told by Doctors she would never walk again. At the age of 40, doctors were at a loss for a diagnosis until she found out she had fibromyalgia, and she would be living with chronic pain for the rest of her life. “I truly prayed that I would die, and I truly believe that if there was a pill I would have taken and not woken up, I would have taken it,” Melonie Jorgensen said. But Melonie started to see an end to her pain when her son convinced her to alter her lifestyle by making small changes to her diet, and her sleep. During her forties, Melonie was convinced that she would never be active again. And yet decades later, she’s now preparing to run in the Pear Blossom 5k. “I never could’ve pictured that I would have been doing this. Ever. So I feel like at 70, I’m younger at 70 than I was at 40, 50, 60,” she said. While Melonie would love to be able to place in her age group, her biggest hope is that can inspire others with her story. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
Inspirational Stories
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Ethiopians Yimer And Diriba Cherry Blossom Ten Mile winners but the wind slowed down everyone

On his first trip to America, 21-year-old Jemal Yimer broke away from a dwindling lead group in the last mile of Sunday's Credit Union Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Run to win the race in a time of 46:17. His compatriot Buze Diriba won the women's race in 53:45 after finishing second here the past two years. In a race full of stories, another highlight was 60-year-old Joan Benoit Samuelson's single-age and 60-64 age group record for women of 1:07:56. Given the dire weather forecast of snow on Saturday night earlier in the week, runners and race organizers were delighted to awake to clear blue skies and peak cherry blossoms this morning. While it was a cold 35 degrees at the start, conditions were ideal for racing, though it was a bit too windy for really fast times up front. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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19-year-old Walelegn sets a Turkish all-comers record at the Vodafone Istanbul Half Marathon

Ethiopian's Amdework Walelegn, clocked a personal best of 59:50 in his second half marathon at the Vodafone Istanbul Half Marathon Sunday. Walelegn, who turned 19 last month, arrived in Istanbul with a modest 1:02:00 lifetime best, a time he ran in his half marathon debut in Riyadh in February. However, he had proved that more was coming when he finished in a world-leading time of 27:36 at the Laredo 10km three weeks ago. The Ethiopian was in the leading pack going hard from the gun. The fast opening 2:43 kilometre led to a 14:10 split at five kilometres with an 11-man pack at the front. Along with Walelegn, Asefa Tefera of Ethiopia, Kenyans Leonard Langat and Evans Cheruiyot, and the Turkish duo Kaan Kigen Özbilen and Polat Kemboi Arıkan were still in contention when the group passed the 10-kilometre mark in 28:09. Arikan was the first to start losing ground after the 12th kilometre, but the rest held together at 15-k, reached in 42:15 and still well in line with the targeted pace of sub-60. (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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Tura running his third marathon in five months wins Milano Marathon in 2:09:04

Seyefu Tura of Ethiopia and Kenyan Lucy Kabuu took the honours at the 18th edition of the EA7 Emporio Armani Milano Marathon,In his third marathon of the past five months, Tura, 21, crossed the finish line in 2:09:04. He was second in Seoul in his debut over the distance in 2:09:26 and seventh in Dubai with an impressive 2:04:44 last January. Kabuu, 34, came from behind to take a close win in the women’s race in 2:27:02 holding off her compatriot Vivian Jerono Kiplagat by six seconds in the final two kilometres. “I am happy with the win, but I struggled with a cramp problem," Tura said. "The final time was not good, but the conditions were not ideal because of the wind." (04/09/2018) ⚡AMP
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My feet have pretty much taken me all over the world says Zach Miller

Zach Miller likes to look down from a mountain, see a distant peak or valley that looks inviting and know he can just run there. The 29-year-old Miller has surprised himself and the racing world by becoming one of the top mountain runners and ultra racers, running for up to 105 miles at a time. But, at its core, it’s a will to use the gift of his legs that propels him. “My feet have pretty much taken me all over the world,” he says while cooling down after one of his daily 20-mile training runs on Colorado’s Pikes Peak, where he lives in a one-room cabin above 10,000 feet. “They’ve taken me physically up and down mountains. They’ve enabled me to do enough in races to send me anywhere in the world.” In just a few years’ time, Miller has exploded on the scene as an extreme-racing legend and fan favorite by the way he starts each race like a spooked horse in a sport in which measured is considered the only way to win. “I just like to be at the front if I can be,” the 2007 Hempfield High School grad says. “I don’t like being at the back. It makes me nervous.” Not trailing the pack is one thing. Being able to run like your pants are on fire over hill and dale for 50 miles or more at a time is another. But Miller does it. Sometimes he hits the wall like any human testing the limits of physical and mental endurance. But sometimes the go-get-’em mindset makes for great performance. Zach is in France in preparation for the grueling 103-mile Ultra-Trail Du Mont-Blanc race through three countries. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Should the mile be added back into the Commonwealth Games? How about the 1500m?

A mile race could be added to the programme for future editions of the Commonwealth Games as part of a broader attempt to embrace the heritage of athletics. International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) President Sebastian Coe spoke enthusiastically about such a plan here today when asked about possible innovations. The mile featured on the programme at all editions of the event until Kingston 1966, when it was replaced by the 1,500 metres. It is not yet clear if a restored mile would sit alongside, or instead of, the 1,500m, although the latter scenario seems more likely due to the similarities between the events. "We have had the thought of introducing the mile back into the Commonwealth Games and I have an ambition to create and celebrate our own heritage, because often we have events that are the bedrock of our history," Coe said. "Some of the great moments in track and field have been established in a Commonwealth Games. "We still talk about the Miracle Mile, 1954 in Vancouver, these are indelible moments." The Miracle Mile saw England's Sir Roger Bannister beat Australian rival John Landy at Vancouver 1954 in the first race in which two men broke the four minute barrier. "The mile is something that we have been talking with the IAAF about recently, particularly with the passing of Roger Bannister," added Commonwealth Games Federation chief executive David Grevemberg today in Australia. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Erick Kiptanui was just 19 seconds off the world record at Berlin Half Marathon

Kenya’s newcomer Erick Kiptanui clocked a sensational course record of 58:42 in the Berlin Half Marathon, equalling the fastest time in the world this year. Running only his third race in Europe and winning for the third time, Kiptanui moved to equal fifth in the all-time performances for the distance. His impressive running on Berlin’s fast course left him just 19 seconds short of the world record. Kenyans dominated the event and took the first seven places. Emmanuel Kiprono and Richard Mengich finished second and third with 60:29 and 60:36 respectively. The best non-Kenyan runner was Germany’s Homiyu Tesfaye who took eighth place in 62:13. Ethiopia’s Melat Kejeta won the women’s race in sunny but windy conditions with 69:04. Switzerland’s Martina Strähl was second and set a Swiss record of 69:29, improving her personal best by more than two minutes. Anne-Mari Hyryläinen of Finland took third with 71:04, also setting a personal best. At her second attempt the European steeplechase champion Gesa Felicitas Krause of Germany finished the distance for the first time and placed fifth. Her time of 72:16 was the fastest time by a German woman this year. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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For six miles there were 20 Runners in the Lead Pack at the Cherry Blossom Ten Miler

As the elite men’s racers took off in the Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Run, the large pack that typically separates into smaller groups of runners at different paces didn’t budge. Instead, for the first half of the 46th annual race, which has a course that features views of the city’s monuments amid the newly bloomed cherry blossom trees, the men stayed together. Until about the sixth mile, there were about 20 runners in the lead group, proving the deep talent pool this year’s competition offered. But in the last stretches of the course, a few pulled ahead and as Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer, 21, reached the nine-mile marker, he made his move to the front of the lead group. Yimer, who had never been to the United States before entering this race and is excited to go sightseeing, used the burst to win the elite men’s division in 46 minutes and 17 seconds. Aweke Ayalew Yimer finished five seconds behind as runner-up in 46:22, while Philip Langat (46:25), James Kibet (46:36) and Chris Derrick (46:53) rounded out the top five. In the women’s race Buze Diriba, 24, representing Ethiopia, won in 53 minutes and 45 seconds. Diriba had been second in the previous two Cherry Blossom Ten Mile Runs and avenged last year’s runner-up finish by 15 seconds to Hiwot Gebrekidan. Gebrekidan, last year’s winner, crossed the line three seconds after Diriba at 53:48. Hiwott Yemer (53:51), Alemitu Hawi (53:53), Diane Nukuri (53:56) and Vicoty Chepngeno (53:59) completed the top six. (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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Four runners go under 2:06 at the Rotterdam Marathon this morning

It was a good day for Kenyans in Rotterdam as Kenneth Kipkemoi and Visiline Jepkesho dominated to win their respective races during the 38th edition of the Rotterdam Marathon in the Netherlands on Sunday April 8. Kipkemoi clocked 2 hours, 05 minutes and 44 seconds to win and locked out Ethiopians Abera Kuma and Kelkile Gezahegn from the top podium place. Kuma, the 2015 winner was forced to settle second in 2:05:50, beating Gezahegn to third place by sevens second in 2:05:57. Kenya’s Laban Korir came in fourth in 2:05:58 followed by the 2016 champion Marius Kipserem in 2:07:22. Under sunny circumstances, the 33-year-old Kipkemoi finished solo on the Coolsingel Street in his European marathon debut. After the start at the Erasmus Bridge, a group of 14 athletes distanced themselves from the rest and halfway, there were 10 leaders left. In the final kilometers, Kipkemoi proved to be the best to edge out Kuma and Kelkile. Jepkesho, the 2016 Paris Marathon champion, ended Kenyan women’s long drought at the championship, winning her race in 2:23:47, missing the course record of 2:23:27 held by disgraced doper Jemima Sumgong by 20 second (04/08/2018) ⚡AMP
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