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Running News Daily is edited by Bob Anderson and team.  Send your news items to jaime@mybestruns.com

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Running on sand can improve your performance

Regular running on sand can change your performance for the better. 1.- Sand running improves balance and coordination, "Sand moves when you land on it, and this tests your balance and coordination skills. Your body has to make lots of last-minute adjustments to the position of your feet, angle of ankles, legs and hips to keep you moving forwards effectively." 2.- It tests your proprioception, "Running on surfaces that constantly undulate really tests your awareness of your body in space and hones your skills in exactly where to place your feet for every step." 3.- Sand challenges your body in new ways. "Sand absorbs the energy from your stride, so you have to put more effort into your running. On a harder surface, lots of different structures in your legs act like elastic bands, absorbing energy as you land, then springing you forwards." 4.- It’s good for your legs "Sand is soft underfoot, meaning lower-impact forces are travelling up your legs when you land each foot on the ground. Instead of pushing your landing weight straight back up your legs, the sand dissipates this energy. This puts lower loads on your joints and bones and can be a great way of mixing up your training with sessions that are lower-impact." Running on lots of different surfaces, including sand, will make you a stronger and more resilient runner.   (Tue 12) ⚡AMP
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Doctor from Haiti set to run Grandma's Half Marathon for his 400 diabetic patients

Grandma's Marathon hosts runners from all over the world. This year, one doctor from Haiti will go the distance for the sake of his patients who mean the world to him. Dr. Emmanuel "Manno" Mareus cares for 400 diabetic patients in Limbe, Haiti. One hundred of them are insulin dependent. Dr. Manno said, "in Haiti if you live in the country side area, being a diabetic is a death sentence." He says insulin treatments costs 50 dollars a month. For most of his patients who only make a dollar a day, that means staying alive is not affordable. Dr. Manno, though, doesn't put a price tag on life. "It's a big family," he said. "They're the reason why I wake up every morning. They give my life a sense." He's taking his practice outside of the clinic and running 13.1 miles in his patients' shoes.  "Last year when I was here, I heard about this race and I said I'd like to do it to raise money for the diabetic patients that cannot afford insulin." Dr. Manno has been training for Grandma's Half Marathon for over a year. "All I want is to be able to get more insulin and not be able to say to patients we don't have insulin," he said. "That's the worst experience for me when we run out and don't have money to buy it." Dr. Manno will not turn patients away even if they cannot afford his care. It's what he calls 'agape care.' (Tue 12) ⚡AMP
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NY Marathon Director Peter Ciaccia to Receive Leadership Award

Peter Ciaccia, President, Events for New York Road Runners and Race Director of the TCS New York City Marathon will be presented with the Distinguished Leadership in Safety and Security Award during the 2018 National Sports Safety and Security Conference & Exhibition on July 9-12 in Louisville, KY. The Distinguished Leadership Award recognizes a professional in the field whose career includes multiple achievements and contributions with respect to sport safety and security. To warrant this prestigious honor, the recipient’s service, commitment, ingenuity and integrity must have elevated the profession to new levels. For 18 years, Ciaccia has worked for New York Road Runners (NYRR), which manages and produces the TCS New York City Marathon, the largest marathon in the world. Ciaccia’s vision was to develop a best-in-class event management system incorporating the best principles of Incident Command System (ICS), crisis management, crisis communications and business continuity. Using technology to create “air-traffic control” to track all runners on and off the course was an integral part of event planning. Over the past decade, he has committed significant resources to this effort and has created a nimble reactive system that has allowed NYRR to respond quickly to significant events affecting their races including adverse weather, bird flu, 5-alarm fires on the marathon course, multiple simultaneous system failures, race cancellations, suspicious packages, etc. (Tue 12) ⚡AMP
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47-year-old Chris Lundy wins the Dipsea Race for the second time in a row

For the second year in a row, Chris Lundy, a 47-year-old San Francisco veterinarian from Sausalito, outlasted 32-year-old Alex Varner of San Rafael and his record-tieing performance to win the 108th Dipsea race in Stinson Beach, California June 10.  “But this one was more enjoyable,” said a smiling Lundy, who suffered a torn left knee ligament near the finish last year. “At least I saw her this time,” said Varner, who finished 15 seconds behind Lundy in Stinson Beach after starting 10 minutes behind her at the start in Mill Valley. “I ran 1:40 faster this year and I still couldn’t beat her.” Lundy, with an 11-minute head start, posted an actual time of 58:37 – the fastest time of the day by a female in the 7.4 mile trail race -- to become the fourth woman to win back-to-back Dipseas. She also claimed her seventh “Female Best Time Award,” extending her Dipsea record. “I ran exactly what I wanted to run. It was dead-on,” said Lundy, who is completely recovered from left ACL surgery last June 30. “I was slow last year (1:01:09). I trained harder this year. I thought he (Varner) was going to win, but you never know how everyone is going to race.” Varner, a Research Director for Main Management in San Francisco, had a one-minute head start in the time-handicapped race where the 1,500 entrants receive head starts based on age and gender. Varner’s actual clock time of 48:52 earned him the Best Time Trophy for the eighth time in the race, tieing Mike McManus’ 18-year-old Dipsea record. “That’s been in my sights for a while,” Varner said.  For Varner, arguably the best runner to never have won the Dipsea, it was his 15th attempt at winning the historic trail race, the second oldest footrace in the country behind the Boston Marathon.  (Mon 11) ⚡AMP
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Xolani Luvuno finishes the Comrades Marathon and says running has turned his life around after losing one leg

Xolani Luvuno, was five hours into the race when the rest of the field started at 5:30 a.m. He had been granted additional time because after an injury his right leg was amputated, according to News 24, an African news outlet. Race organizers granted him the additional time on the course, but said he would not be an official participant of the race because it would take longer than the 12-hour cutoff time. He says that the marathon required a lot of training.  “It helped me to turn my life around because I used to be an alcoholic, going to parties.  Instead of partying anymore, I focus on my running.” He had this to say at the finish line: “I wanted to make sure that I finish before cut-off time and my coach said to me don’t rush because the Comrades Marathon is not 42km, it’s a big race. I want to say thank you to the supporters who cheered for me on the route, as well as the director of the Comrades Marathon for giving me this chance.” But just like he had overcome a lot in his life just to make it to this race, Luvuno was there to overcome the course. He did just that when he crossed the line in 15 hours, 50 minutes.  (Mon 11) ⚡AMP
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Grandma's Marathon has surpassed one million dollars in charity contributions

As of June 1st, the year-round charity organization of Grandma’s Marathon, the Young Athletes Foundation (YAF), has surpassed one million dollars in contributions to area nonprofit organizations that are focused on youth fitness. The main focus of the organization is to promote the growth of young athletes in the region. Through this arm of Grandma’s Marathon, the foundation helps community members and businesses that inspire kids to be healthy and provide access to athletic opportunities for those who may not be able to participate otherwise. The Young Athletes Foundation does this in a few different ways. The first community initiative of the YAF is the ? Grant Program?. It started in 1990 with the goal of providing money to nonprofit organizations in Lake, Cook, Carlton, Douglas, and St. Louis Counties that strive to provide children with opportunities to participate in recreational activities. In addition, the Young Athletes Foundation awards a $1,200 scholarship annually to one male and one female UMD cross-country runner with roots in the YAF geographic boundaries. Altogether, the YAF has granted over $700,000 to area youth organizations.  (Mon 11) ⚡AMP
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Eliud Kipchoge seeking again to challenge the world record at Berlin Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge will race the Berlin Marathon for the fourth time on Sept. 16, seeking again to challenge the world record on the world’s fastest record-eligible course, according to event organizers. Kipchoge, a 33-year-old Kenyan Olympic champion, won Berlin in 2015 and 2017 and was second in 2013, his only defeat in 10 career marathons. Kipchoge’s personal best of 2:03:05, set at the 2016 London Marathon, is eight seconds shy of Dennis Kimetto‘s world record from the 2014 Berlin Marathon. Kipchoge’s two Berlin wins came in 2:04:00 in 2015 (with his soles flapping out from the back of his shoes) and 2:03:32 last year in rain and humidity. Fellow Kenyan Wilson Kipsang, who lowered the world record at the 2013 Berlin Marathon and has run four sub-2:04s, is also in the Berlin field. As is Eritrean Zersenay Tadese, the half-marathon world-record holder whose marathon personal best is 2:10:41, though he ran 2:06:51 in Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon attempt not run under record-eligible conditions where Kipchoge famously clocked 2:00:25 last year. (Mon 11) ⚡AMP
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Frenchman Michel Jazy set the World Record for the Mile 53 years ago clocking 3:53.6

DID YOU KNOW: 53 years ago, on Jun 9, 1965 – Frenchman Michael Jazy runs World Record mile in 3:53.6.  He won the 1,500 meters silver medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics, as well as two golds (in 1962 and 1966) and one silver (in 1966) at the European Championships. He set nine world records: in the mile (once), 2,000 meters (twice), 3,000 meters (twice), the two miles (twice) and the 4×1500 metres relay (twice).  Jazy was born into a poor coal-mining family from Poland. His grandfather, together with his wife and their daughter, emigrated from Poland to France after World War I. Michel's father was a coal miner, Michel's mother worked in a brewery in Lille. Michel was raised by his grandmother during much of his childhood. He was 12 years old when his father died.  When Michel was 14 years old, he, his mother and his older sister settled in Paris.  Michel was passionate about soccer when he was a schoolboy.  He would spend hours daily playing soccer.  He left school at the age of 14 and became a uniformed doorman and elevator operator at a bridge club near the Arc de Triomphe. At 16 he became an apprenticein a neighborhood printshop. Jazy won his first French national championship title in 1953 – the 1000 m race at the youth level.  Just 12 years later he sets his world record in the mile.  (Sun 10) ⚡AMP
by Gary Cohen
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South African Runners take Top spots at the Comrades Ultra Marathon

South Africa completed a clean sweep at the Comrades Marathon on Sunday as Bongmusa Mthembu and Ann Ashworth ensured that the coveted titles remained in South Africa. It was a South Africa 1-2 in the two categories with Joseph Mphuthi and Gerda Steyn‚ clinching the runners-up spots. In achieving his feat‚ Mthembu completed a hat-trick of victories (after he won in 2014 and 2017) and in the process became only the second man to do it since Bruce Fordyce won the popular ultra-marathon back to back in 1988. The Arthur Ford runner waded off a strong challenge from Marko Mambo of Zimbabwe‚ who had set the pace for the better part in the second half of the 90km down run. Mthembu made his breakthrough at Cowies Hill‚ some 18km from the finish at the Moses Mabhida Stadium. At this point‚ it was left for the rest of the pack that also had a significant South African presence to jostle for the remaining top ten slots. (Sun 10) ⚡AMP
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Risper wins for the sixth time at Bellin Run, Brendan Gregg wins men’s race while Meb finishes second

The last of the 12,050 Bellin Run, in Green Bay Wisconsin, entrants had barely crossed the South Webster Avenue starting line Saturday morning when Brendan Gregg arrived at the finish.  Gregg finished the 42nd annual 10-kilometer race through Green Bay and Allouez in an impressive 29 minutes, 52 seconds. Meb Keflezighi, the 2016 Bellin winner, finished second with a time of 31:06. Jared Ward, at 31:19, was third for the second straight year.  Meb who is officially retired from Marathon running showed everyone today that he is still in good form.  Kenya’s Risper Gesabwa won a record sixth women's elite division title, finishing in 33:24; 2017 champ Kaitlin Goodman — Gregg's sister — was second at 33:30. Dawn Grunnagle was third at 35:29. (Sun 10) ⚡AMP
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Last year's Comrades winner will defend his title on sunday at Comrades Marathon

Bongmusa Mthembu wants to prove he is South Africa’s current best ultra-distance runner.  He has finished among the top three on five occasions at Comrades, with four of those performances achieved on the ‘down’ run. The only South African since 1990 to secure victory more than once.  He was also a silver medallist at the 2016 100km World Championships, and he will be eager to stand up and deliver once again. Other contenders include powerful front-runner Rufus and in-form Zimbabwean athlete Hatiwande Nyamande. While Mthembu and Gatebe are considered the pre-race favorites, a number of other athletes could pull through to win this wide-open race. Title contenders include former winners Ludwick Mamabolo and Gift Kelehe, as well as Zimbabwean athlete Hatiwande Nyamande, who finished third in last year’s ‘up’ run.  On the women's side, last year’s American winner Camille Herron is not running.  (Sat 9) ⚡AMP
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Ethiopian Defending champion Kelkile Gezahegn aims to retain his title at Lanzhou Marathon

Kelkile Gezahegn will return to the IAAF Gold Label road race on Sunday. The Ethiopian won in Lanzhou last year in 2:11:54 and went on to make it on to the podium in Frankfurt and Rotterdam, reducing his PB each time. He clocked 2:06:56 to finish second in Frankfurt and 2:05:56 to place third in Rotterdam two months ago, making him the fastest in the field for this year’s race. Gezahegn has a good record in China. Of the 13 marathons he has contested to date, seven have been in China, and he has won all but two of those. Little separates the top contenders, though, and Gezahegn will have to be at his best to win again. (Sat 9) ⚡AMP
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Mary Keitany win the NYRR New York Mini 10K by over one minute

More than 8,300 women took on 6.2 miles in Central Park this morning at the 47th running of the NYRR New York Mini 10K, bringing the event’s total finishers to more than 200,000 since its inception in 1972. Each year, the Mini celebrates women of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds coming together to advance their sport while having a great time running alongside their friends, teammates, mothers, daughters, sisters, and role models. Kenya's Mary Keitany, a three-time TCS New York City Marathon winner, took the top spot in the open division in 30:59, the fifth-fastest time in event history. Americans Aliphine Tuliamuk and Molly Huddle were second and third, in 32:08 and 32:25, respectively.  Star-studded professional athlete fields were followed by thousands of women, each with their own reason for running.  Stephanie Bruce finished 7th in 32:55.  Charlotte Arter finished 8th in 33:01.  Boston Marathon winner Desiree Linden was 14th in 35:12 while Sarah Sellers finished with 35:29 in 17th place.  40-year-old Roberta Groner from New Jersey ran 34:10 for 11th place and 50-year-old Fiona Bayly from New York finished 31st place with 37:50.  (Sat 9) ⚡AMP
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How to manage and get rid of Chronic pain

Chronic pain is frustrating to live with, especially for athletes and runners. Unlike the healing process of an acute injury, chronic pain last long after your body has restored itself. It’s kind of like a car alarm that goes off for no reason; but fortunately you can learn how to properly manage it and start running again. You feel pain when the accumulation of stress exceeds your brain’s perceived ability to cope.  Situations that cause chronic pain include: Lifestyle factors such as job stress, relationship stress, lack of sleep, poor diet, lack of exercise. Coping strategies like avoiding running out of fear, which drives you deeper into despair and further sensitization. Emotions: catastrophizing, fear, anxiety, anger, rumination. Tissue stress: This can definitely contribute to pain, but damage is typically a minor contributor to sensitization. There are two ways to tackle pain: one way is to decrease the stress that contributes to it, the other is to increase your resilience and get stronger. You may not know it, but your bones, connective tissue, joints and muscles are very strong and respond well to loading. If you’ve been guarding and resting part of your body, then it gets weaker. Structures like the Achilles and patellar tendons need strength, not more rest. Physiotherapist, chiropractor and pain expert Greg Lehman considers gradual strengthening as one of the best ways to reduce chronic pain. (Fri 8) ⚡AMP
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Stricter regulations on Airbnb in Japan before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will cost visitors more

For millions, Airbnb has opened up an entire planet of brilliant and affordable accommodation options - from treehouses to chateaux, penthouses to private islands.   For governments and local residents, however, Airbnb and other short-term rental companies are being blamed for pricing out long-term renters and side-stepping the regulations and taxes imposed on hotels and registered apartments.   The latest country to have introduced stricter regulations on Airbnb is Japan. This week the holiday rental website was forced to withdraw tens of thousands of listings from its site and cancel reservations ahead of a new law clamping down on private residences.  “This announcement came as a surprise to us. It was contrary to the guidance our team had previously been given by the Japanese Tourism Agency and put the travel experiences of thousands of visitors to Japan at risk,” Airbnb said in a statement reported by Reuters.   Under the new legislation, due to come into effect on June 15, anyone wanting to list their property on Airbnb will need to register their accommodation with the local government, who will conduct fire and safety checks.   The new regulations will also limit rentals to 180 days per year - with fines of up to ¥1 million ($9,133) for anyone who breaches the rules.  The measures have been introduced to build more transparency into the home-sharing industry. The Japanese government aims to increase lodging options for tourists ahead of the  2020 Tokyo Olympics.  Olympic ticket prices will be expensive and now it appears there will be less housing bargains with these changes directed toward Airbnb and other similar companies.  (Fri 8) ⚡AMP
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Boilermaker Road Race has announced a new president, Mark Donovan

The announcement comes nearly a year after longtime race president Tim Reed’s retirement last summer, and only a month before this year’s Boilermaker Sunday. Race founder Earle Reed announced Donovan’s appointment Wednesday morning, assuring the community he and his organization had “got the guy.” “We got a man who’s got corporate ability,” Reed explained, “he’s eager to learn and wants to work in the race.” Reed added that Donovan shares his passion for continuing the legacy of the Boilermaker as a staple of local tradition. Donovan began his remarks by thanking Reed for “setting a high bar” for the race going forward, as well as Boilermaker staff for their help and support in the transition. Originally from Albany, Donovan has worked in the commercial insurance and medical device industries, in addition to providing marketing strategies. This experience complements the role, says Donovan. “We don’t need another race director. We need someone else to help with expanding and engagement,” he explained. “The last thing that team needs,” Donovan said, referring to the race organizers, “is for me to start questioning things. “Going into this year’s race, my goal is to experience it from the inside,” he added. Echoing Reed’s words, Donovan asserted that the Boilermaker is “more than just a race.” He cited the impact on local morale the event had when he first arrived to Utica in the mid 1990s, which saw the closure of several major area employers.   (Fri 8) ⚡AMP
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Fung Kam-hung is running a multi-day ultra marathon across Antarctica despite only having one leg

Hong Kong's Fung Kam-hung spiralled into depression following a gruesome accident that robbed him of a leg, but little did he know what fate had in store for him as the seemingly dark day opened him up to love and running. In 1979, Fung became trapped between a motor bike and a tram. He was dragged towards the tram platform and watched as his leg was ripped off. “I knew it was a disaster as soon as I saw it,” said Fung, 65. “I was terrified but it was painless. I was in shock. I couldn’t think of anything but I was cold as I’d lost a lot of blood.” Sport was a central part of Fung’s life – he played anything involving a ball – and he could not imagine giving up his passion. “I had one thought in mind – as long as I can stand and walk, that will be fine,” he said.  Fung rediscovered his positive outlook for life when he fell in love with the nurse who treated him in the hospital, Chong Bing-ying. They are still married to this day. When they started a family they wanted to encourage their children to get into sports – Fung would take his daughter to a local track and they would train by chasing each other. That is how his running habit started, and then he entered a 10K race despite never having run long distances even before his accident. Chong soon followed suit and entered a 30km race. At the age of 65, Fung has now completed two of the 250km multi-day 4 Deserts Race Series in the Gobi and the Atacama with Chong, and this year they will run their third in Antarctica in November. (Fri 8) ⚡AMP
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British 10,000m champion is looking forward to running the NYRR Mini 10K

Charlotte Arter  has already secured her 10,000m spot for the European Championships in Berlin. The 26-year-old added yet another PB to her 2018 list by clocking 32:15.71 when finishing third at last month’s Highgate Night of the 10,000m PBs – claiming European Cup bronze, the British title and her European Championships place in the process. With no standard to chase, Arter is looking forward to seeing what else she might be capable of over the next two months before she pulls on the GB vest once again. “Motivation is at an all-time high at the moment,” says the Cardiff athlete, reflecting on her run at Highgate which followed other recent PB performances over 5km, 10km and the half-marathon. “It makes all the hard work that you put in, not only over the last year but throughout the whole of your running career, worth it when you get an outcome like that. “It also gives you a bit of trust that you’re in great shape. It’s now more just a case of enjoying the rest of the summer. There’s no pressure now, it’s just taking each race as it comes and enjoying it all. “I know I’m in the best shape I’ve ever been in.” “I absolutely loved my time in America so going back to race will be really cool,” says Arter, who now works full-time as a performance sport officer at Cardiff University. “I did a lot through the NCAA collegiate system but didn’t do much external racing so I’m looking forward to what will be my first pro race out there against a really high-quality field. It’s pretty amazing to be part of.” Kenya’s defending champion Mary Keitany and US runners Molly Huddle and Desiree Linden are also among the entries and Arter is keen to test herself at the NYRR Mini 10K.        (Fri 8) ⚡AMP
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This group that became 80 runners accepted my 500 mile June 6 Challenge

Yesterday, June 6, was Global Running Day.  A day celebrating running.  It is exciting to have our own day, celebrating what many of us do daily or at least regularly.  Among other things the day is about inspiring people.  At noon the day before I had just finished doing my daily run-to-lunch few miles.  I was enjoying an avocado toast and the best ice tea in town before heading back to the office.  Knowing that Global Running Day was the next day, I was thinking that My Best Runs needed to do something.  I knew there were already a lot of well thought out programs taking place June 6.  I decided, on the spot, that we would do something just for the fun of running.  We would run our challenge like a road race back in the 1970's.  Since we needed to get the word out quickly, we would use my Facebook account to reach people.  I would record everything by hand.  Making things more interesting,  I was flying down to our MBR/Ujena office in Mexico in the middle of the day Wednesday.  (I would be out of touch for nearly five hours.)  There would be no entry fee and no prizes.  There would be no official results.  It was all about running.  We would not be raising money for a cause.  Each of us would run on June 6 and log in miles on my FB account.  Just to see if we could do it, my goal was for our group to run at least 500 miles June 6 and hopefully have 100 participants   Everyone had to post their miles by midnight.  In the end, 80 people posted 560.12 miles for our My Best Runs Global Running Day 500 Mile Challenge.  We did it.  We showed the world that a group of people can come together (with no notice) from all over the world and run the equivalent distance from San Francisco to San Diego.  All types of runners from slow to fast joined our challenge.  I am very proud of each and every participant but I would like to mention some of our gang here.  We had two time Boston Marathon winner (Geoff Smith) post 10.5 miles, Co-owner of Worlds Marathons Malin Andersson from Sweden posted 6.2 miles, Bertrand Newson who heads up a popular bay area running group (2L2Q) posted 8.45 miles and Willie Korir from Kenya posted the most miles with 22.5.  Verity Breen posted the most miles for a female hitting 19 miles and Boston Marathon historian Tom Derderian ran 5 miles.  The youngest female to win Bay To Breakers (age 11) who ran her first marathon at age 5 Mary Etta Britano now 55  posted 10 miles, Julie who we met at the front desk of our hotel in Paris ran 5 miles, Ram VenKatraman who heads up a major running group in Mumbai, India ran 4.69 miles and super ultra-marathon star Michael Wardian ran 12.5 miles.  Phil Camp who among other things won the 4th annual Marine marathon (1979) posted 8.3 miles, Roger Wright used to weigh 278 pounds a few years back before he started running marathons logged 13.5 miles and ultra runner since the early 1970's superstar Frank Bozanich ran 9 miles. Joshua Holmes Ultra runner and Run It Fast founder posted 2 miles, Brent Weigner who has run more marathons in more countries than anyone posted 1.5 miles, and the list goes on and on.  One common thing about our group of 80 runners is that everyone loves running.  Until our next challenge! Run on...  I ran 6.6 miles which I thought was only fitting.  This was our first Global Run Challenge.  (Thu 7) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Mo Farah and Usain Bolt will go head-to-head in the charity football match this weekend

Mo Farah, who broke the British marathon record in April at the London Marathon, will be part of the England team this Sunday (June 10) at Old Trafford in Manchester, UK.  The Soccer Aid for Unicef football match will face eight-time Olympic gold medallist Usain Bolt and his World XI team. “When I got the call from Robbie to play for the England team, I immediately said yes,” said 10-time major track gold medalist Farah. “Everyone knows that I’m absolutely mad about football and to top it off, this event is for such a good cause. Helping children around the world make it something I definitely want to support. “My instant ‘yes’ was even easier in the knowledge that I would finally be going head-to-head with my friend Usain Bolt. People have long suggested we should compete against each other, so on Sunday at Old Trafford, you will see us trade our spikes for boots. “Usain has the speed but I have the stamina so we’ll see who comes out on top at the end of 90 mins.” Soccer Aid for Unicef is the original England V Soccer Aid World XI charity match. It was launched and co-founded in 2006 by Unicef UK Ambassador Robbie Williams and Jonathan Wilkes. 100% of all public donations to Soccer Aid for Unicef will go towards supporting the vital work protecting children in the UK and globally. (Thu 7) ⚡AMP
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Record number to race NYRR New York Mini 10K will Surpass 200,000th woman finisher

More than 8,000 runners will race through Central Park at the NYRR New York Mini 10K, the world’s first road race exclusively for women, on Saturday, June 9. The 47th edition of the race will be historic, featuring the event’s 200,000th finisher, a star-studded professional athlete field that includes a wheelchair division for the first time, and the third annual Rising New York Road Runners race at the NYRR New York Mini 10K, which will draw a record number of youth participants. “This event paved the way for women’s running 47 years ago as the original women’s only road race, opening new opportunities for runners, and has now grown into an all-inclusive event that features professional runners and wheelchair racers, youth runners and youth wheelchair racers, and thousands of women each year,” said Michael Capiraso, president and CEO of New York Road Runners. “We’ve seen tremendous growth in the reach of Rising New York Road Runners since its launch last year and spectators will be in for a treat on Saturday, seeing a record number kids participating in our free race to the finish line in Central Park just before the professional athletes take to the streets.”  (Thu 7) ⚡AMP
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Richard Body only took up running in August 2016 and already is running a 53 mile Ultra

Richard Body has passed the half way point in his challenge to run 12 marathons in 12 months is set to face his toughest test yet.  Richard who went from fat to fit after realising he needed to shed the pounds, will take part in the Pennine Barrier 53 mile ultra-marathon on June 23 as part of his multi-marathon charity challenge. The 52-year-old only took up running in August 2016 but his two most recent marathons – his fifth and sixth of the year – took him to the picturesque surroundings of Strafford-Upon-Avon in the UK. He admitted the Dorchester hills proved a tough task, adding: “This was my hilliest endurance race to date. There must have been 10 or more. Each giving stunning views of the Dorset countryside. I walked most of them including the mile long beauty just after mile 23. “But just two miles in I came along a chap running in bare feet. He was raising money for a children's charity and turns out he once worked at Dudley Zoo as a monkey keeper for two years, before moving down south. “Runners of all genders, ages, sizes and abilities all took part.” Despite undergoing surgery for a knee injury - and medics telling him he would never run again - Richard continues his challenge with marathon number seven in Yeovil on Sunday, June 10. After that, on June 23, comes his biggest and scariest challenge - the Pennine Barrier ultra-marathon. (Thu 7) ⚡AMP
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Yonni Kepes ran day and night for 29 hours to achieve his dream of becoming the youngest Kiwi to race a 100-miler

Most of us wouldn't even consider running a full marathon but for Kiwi teenager Yonni Kepes, 42km stopped being long enough a while ago.The 18-year-old from North Canterbury has become the youngest known New Zealander to complete a 100-mile ultramarathon.  He achieved his big feat at the Hanmer Old Forest Ultramarathon last May where he spent 29 hours running to cross the finish line and receive his long-awaited buckle. That was the culmination of a years-long dream for Kepes, who first took up running when he was about 9 or 10 years old, just as an excuse to spend more time with his dad, Ben Kepes, who also runs ultramarathons. "It was special to finish my first marathon, but I was convinced I could go further and eventually set my mind on ultramarathons." (Thu 7) ⚡AMP
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Running Legends Celebrate NYRR’s 60th Anniversary on Global Running Day

The 2009 New York City Marathon champion, Meb Keflezighi, and five-time New York City Marathon champion Tatyana McFadden – both NYRR Team for Kids Ambassadors – joined 1974 New York City Marathon champion Kathrine Switzer in an out-and-back one-mile virtual race in Central Park on Wednesday starting and ending at the same location as the TCS New York City Marathon finish line to celebrate Global Running Day and New York Road Runners’ 60th anniversary. It is one of 60 finish lines NYRR has set up to celebrate its 60 years on Global Running Day, with finish lines popping up throughout the day in parks, schools, and iconic locations around New York City and others being remote finish lines tied to people around the world who have played a role in NYRR’s history. These “break the tape” moments from notable runners, including 2018 Boston Marathon champion Des Linden and chef and global restaurateur Daniel Humm. Since being founded on June 4, 1958, NYRR has grown from a local running club to the world’s premier community running organization, serving nearly 600,000 people of all ages and abilities—including 267,000 youth—annually through hundreds of races, community runs and walks, training sessions, and more across New York City’s five boroughs. In Global Running Day’s third year, the goal once again is to celebrate the sport of running and allow people everywhere to declare their passion for running.   (Wed 6) ⚡AMP
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Ashley Moffet loves running up the stairs and through the redwoods at the oldest trail race in America, the Dipsea

Petaluma’s Ashley Moffet has run on tracks, on roads, up mountains and through valleys, but she has never run anywhere she enjoys more than up the stairs and through the redwoods in Mill Valley’s Dipsea Race. The 7.4-mile run is the oldest trail race in America, originating in 1905. The course is considered one of the most beautiful and most difficult in the world for its length. Three flights of stairs, combined as tall as a 50-story building, come near the very beginning of the race, and offer an immediate challenge. Some runners never fully recover from the initial ordeal. Sunday’s running will be the 108th running of the race. Moffet, one of the best Casa Grande High School distance runners ever during her time as a Gaucho, can hardly wait. “I love it,” she said. “There is something special about the Dipsea. Starting in waves is really cool. Everyone is cheering, and it isn’t just at the start. They cheer all along the way. There is a lot of energy from the runners and the spectators. You can feel the excitement.” Moffet comes from a family of runners. One year, the entire family — Ashley; father, Brian; mother, Sylvia; and younger brother, Kevin — all ran in the race. “That was fantastic,” Ashley said. Her father is signed up to run again this year. After high school, she continued to run at the University of San Francisco in both cross country and track. After graduating from USF in 2017, she traveled through Europe running in, among other events, the Zugspitz Ultra Race, a 25K run up the tallest mountain in Germany. “That was fantastic,” she said.     (Wed 6) ⚡AMP
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Veteran athlete Barry Holland will be running his 46th Comrades Marathon

Comrades veteran Holland aims to extend unique record, Barry Holland will bid to complete his 46th Comrades Marathon this Sunday and extend the record for most finishes in the race. “I’m very proud about the record; it has been a very long journey. I’ve been running since I was 20 years old and I’ve run every race since then,” he said from his home in Durban yesterday. Holland jointly holds the record for the most completed Comrades finishes with Louis Massyn and Dave Rogers, who has stopped running. “I’m hoping to run about 10 hours and 50 minutes on Sunday. I’m running with my daughter and it’s her first run, so I’m expecting it to be a very special and emotional day with her,” he said. The 66-year old said the most interesting thing over the years was the difficulty to achieve certain goals. He said it took a great deal of hard work and dedication to get certain goals and milestones that were normally time-based, like the Comrades. “I originally wanted to get less than seven hours and I battled to do that for a very long time. Overcoming that obstacle by thinking, strategising and unpacking my training has been the most interesting thing over the years,” he said. When speaking about the difficulties faced during the race, Holland said a runner needed great discipline and a “good head” to get through certain questions, such as “why am I doing this?”, halfway through the marathon. “Your mental side is bigger than the physical side. (Wed 6) ⚡AMP
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We are running this challenge like an old fashion road race when a line was drawn on the road and someone yelled out set, go!

Global Running Day (June 6) has already started eight hours ago in Sydney Australia and it just started in Paris.  It will start in nine hours in San Francisco.  Bob Anderson, founder of My Best Runs always is looking at ways to help inspire people. Just today he came up with the idea of the MBR Global Running Day 500 Challenge.  It is just a fun event and it is being run like an old fashion road race when the organizer drew a line on the ground and said set, go.  There are no prizes, no money is being raised and any costs is being covered by My Best Runs.  The whole deal is simply to get more people out running within a 36 hour period of time.  The goal is that at least 100 people will run or run/walk at least 500 miles during the period.  If we get more, all the better.  To be part of this you need to post your mileage on my Facebook page.  (Just click on the title above and it should take you to my FB page.)   You can tell us about your run, post your time or anything else OR just post your mileage.  The main thing is to get out and get in at least one mile.  Tell your friends...This will be our first My Best Runs Global Run Challenge.  (Tue 5) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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10-Year-Old Arielle Avina, Becomes Youngest Female To Win A Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series 5K Event

10-year-old Arielle Avina (Murrieta, Cali.) shocked the finish line crowd today (Sunday June 3) as she won the female division at the Synchrony Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego 5K presented by Brooks. With this year’s Boston Marathon Champion, Desiree Linden on hand to support and inspire runners, Avina found an extra gear past other competitors finishing the race in a time of 19:20 as she became the youngest female to ever win a Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series 5K event. Baxter Arguinchona from Cardiff, California took home the men’s 5K race with a time of 16:59.  (Tue 5) ⚡AMP
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Two time Canadian Olympian Reid Coolsaet will run the Waterfront Marathon and is eyeing the $43,000 bonus for a national record

Two time Canadian Olympian Reid Coolsaet wants it known that rumours of his retirement are greatly exaggerated, even as marathon enthusiasts are busy penciling in their choices as to who will be the ‘next generation’ of Canadian marathon runners. As if to underscore his sudden status as ‘not nearly retired but simply maturing’, the 38 year old Hamilton, Ontario resident, and New Balance sponsored athlete, has confirmed he will race the 2018 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon on October 21st.   And in a test of fitness following his surprising 9th place finish in Boston earlier this spring, Coolsaet will also tackle the upcoming Toronto Waterfront 10k on June 16th.   Coolsaet has the closest time to Jerome Drayton’s highly coveted national marathon record (2:10:09) than any other Canadian, running 2:10:28 at the 2015 Berlin marathon, and he appears eager to finally achieve this goal. With the Scotiabank prize for beating the record in Toronto now at $43,000 – a thousand dollars for each year the record has stood - Coolsaet would easily find use for such a princely sum. He and his wife, Marie, recently welcomed their second child, Elodie Virginia, into the world and renovations to their Hamilton home lie ahead.   "Of course the record is a big deal," Coolsaet declares. "My goal has always been to break 2:10 so whether or not another Canadian runs 2:07 or 2:08 I would still want to break 2:10.   "It has been a while, about a year and half, since I ran 2:10:55 (2016 Fukuoka). Even if it’s not possible I still think of (sub 2:10) when I am training and I use it to push me along and keep me motivated. It’s something that has been motivating me for about eight years now."   Injuries tend to take longer to heal as one matures and Coolsaet has been through some debilitating ones. Most recently and most seriously was the bout of osteonecrosis in his metatarsals that restricted his training and threatened to completely derail him. But Boston was a significant response, as he bravely trudged home through the cold rain and windy conditions to snatch 9th place.   "I was hoping to get a good feel for my marathon fitness in Boston but because of the conditions I wasn’t able to do that," he reflects. "The last 12k I wasn’t trying to maximize the training I had put in; I was just trying to keep the cold away and just move my stiff legs. I am happy with toughing it out there and happy I kept pushing and got 9th. But, I really don’t know what I could have done in nice conditions on a normal course." (Tue 5) ⚡AMP
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Experts confirm that running, especially in a group, can do wonders for mental health

“Physical exercise improves a person’s well-being by releasing endorphins, the body’s ‘feel good’ hormones. Studies show that in mild to moderate depression patients who exercise regularly do as well as those prescribed antidepressant medications or talking therapies.” Dr Averil McClelland, GP and elite Masters Athlete. GP and author of Sorted: The Active Woman's Guide to Health, Juliet McGrattan added “Energy levels and motivation are low when you are struggling with depression.  Exercising and committing to a group can help give you the extra boost to get you going and keep you going.” The results of this research reinforce the huge success of England Athletics’ RunTogether programme, which breaks down barriers for individuals new to running, and helps them to build confidence, establish relationships and cope with the daily stresses of life. Over 40,000 people have registered to join RunTogether, seeking opportunities to run with others, since the programme launched in January 2017.  Running in groups brings other benefits. The poll showed that group runners were more likely to be regular runners (62%) when compared to solo runners (51%). The rapid growth in running groups across the country (UK) is significant for England Athletics as it works towards its goal of getting one million people into athletics and running by 2021.  There’s also been a big increase in the number of people becoming Run Leaders, with over 3,000 people a year taking England Athletics’ Leadership in Running Fitness (LiRF) qualification. Priory consultant, Dr Laurence Church, who is based at the Priory’s Hospital in Woking, Surrey said: “I treat an increasing number of people suffering from stress, depression and anxiety.  Exercise, often running, can be an important component of recovery from mental health problems, and in maintaining well-being.  The power of the social aspect of the RunTogether programme appears to be an important ingredient for many - boosting self-confidence, reducing social isolation and ensuring people keep coming back.” (Tue 5) ⚡AMP
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The 1907 Boston Marathon Winner Tom Longboat earlier hated life at a state-run school and ran away

DID YOU KNOW: Tom Longboat was born 131 years ago (June 4, 1887).  In 1907 he won the Boston Marathon in a record time of 2:24:24 over the old 24-1/2 mile course, four minutes and 59 seconds faster than any of the previous ten winners of the event.  The next year he collapsed in the 1908 Olympic Games marathon, along with several other leading runners.  A rematch was organized the same year at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Longboat won this race, turned professional, and in 1909 at the same venue won the title of Professional Champion of the World by defeating Dorando Pietri and Alfred Shrubb in front of sell-out crowds.  The Onondaga athlete was one of thousands indigenous children in Canada to be separated from their families and forced into a state-run education in the country's residential school system. Longboat, rebelled against being forced to speak English and to abandon his indigenous beliefs in favour of Christianity.  He hated life at the school.  After one unsuccessful escape attempt, he tried again and reached the home of his uncle, who agreed to hide him from authorities. After his athletic successes, he was invited to speak at the institute but refused, stating that "I wouldn't even send my dog to that place."  Longboat, from Ontario's Six Nations reserve, also served as a dispatch carrier in France during World War One. He was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1955.After the war, Longboat settled in Toronto where he worked until 1944. He retired to the Six Nations Reserve and died of pneumonia on January 9, 1949. (Tue 5) ⚡AMP
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Japan hopes to have self-driving car service on the road for the 2020 Olympics

A self-driving car service could be on Tokyo's public roads in time for the 2020 Olympics as Japan looks to drive investment in new technology to drive economic growth, according to a government strategic review announced on Monday. The strategy, presented at a meeting chaired by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, also includes plans to allow the development of virtual power plants by the fiscal year ending March 2022. The proposals are part of a larger package of fiscal and economic policies the government aims to compile by the end of the month. The review said the government plans to begin testing a driverless car system on public roads sometime this fiscal year with the goal of launching a self-driving car service for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The government will then try to commercialize this system as early as 2022. Economists see enormous potential in the development of autonomous vehicle and artificial intelligence technologies, which could help businesses cope with an aging and declining workforce. However, Japanese companies have struggled to keep up with their Chinese, European and U.S. counterparts in implementing such innovations into their work practices. (Mon 4) ⚡AMP
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What is the point of runing junk miles? Mixing in some walking is a better solution

I can remember a time when I would never walk during a run.  I would never count any walking mileage in my weekly numbers.  That changed a few years ago and I am thinking maybe I should have changed my thinking on this years before.  However, the best way to run well is to get in running mileage.  Walking miles is not going to get you through your 10K, half marathon or certainly not a marathon or beyond.  However, there are times when walking is a better option than running.  I run at least 20 miles per week and currently about 15-25% of that is walking.  Over this past weekend I got in 12 miles.  Today my legs were tired.  For me just to run slowly for a mile (i cover at least one mile everyday) would not have proved anything other than it would not have been fun.  Running needs to be fun.  My legs needed rest.  So today I started off walking, then I decided to run 25 steps, then I walked, then I ran 50 steps, I walked and then ran 100 steps and so on.  Even for as long as I have been running I still from time to time need to do something like this.  I finished the mile just under 14 minutes.  I broke a sweat and I got in my "run."  My legs will be ready to run tomorrow but if not I will do something like what I did today.  Lots of times our body says no (like mine today) but we run anyway and wonder why we get injured.  I have done it many times over the years.  Running junk miles is not going to make you a better runner.  Next time mix in some walking and see what you think.  It works for me.  I have been running since 1962 and  I am still racing.  (photo - 70-year-old Bob Anderson after finishing the Paris 20K May 27, 2018, placing second (1:56:24) in his division on a tough course.)       (Mon 4) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Underberg local Nkosinathi Duma is dreaming big for this year's Comrades Marathon

Nkosinathi Duma is still a relative novice in the Comrades Marathon but that doesn’t stop him from dreaming big. Born and bred in Underberg in KwaZulu-Natal, Duma has experienced a mixed and emotional start to his Comrades career. He made his debut in the world’s biggest ultra-marathon back in 2013. The 31-year-old has competed in three Comrades but has only managed to finish two. After making his debut in the famous race, Duma opted for a two-year break and returned in 2016. Things didn’t go as planned. though, as he failed to finish. Last year he came back strong as he finished 16th overall. Now Duma is backing himself for a top 10 place and the gold medal that this brings. He has been training with last year’s champion Bongmusa Mthembu under coach Arthur Ford. “Nothing has disrupted my preparations. I have no injuries and I’m looking forward to the race,” Duma enthused. “I started my preparations in December. My training programme is different from the one I used in 2016 and 2017. For the past two years, we used to run 150km per week and this time around we are running more than 250km per week. “It hasn’t been easy but it is worth it. I want to emulate my performance of last year. My target this year is to be in the top 10,” he added with confidence. (Mon 4) ⚡AMP
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Chris Patterson is running a marathon each week for a year to raise money for Hope For Children

Ultramarathon runner Chris Patterson is nearly half way through is 52 marathons in 52 weeks challenge - and has already finished a gruelling Great Wall of China event in six hours. The 35-year-old is raising money for the international charity Hope for Children. During the Great Wall Marathon – which has been described as one of the world’s most challenging long-distance races – Chris climbed more than 5,000 steps and had to contend with steep ascents and descents amid stunning scenery. The challenges also include battling with injury and he admits he is currently ‘carrying quite a few injury issues’ but attempting to ‘work through it as best I can.’ After the Great Wall Marathon he added: I am officially broken... I’ve done a fair bit of damage. The jetsetting challenge has seen Patterson – a senior estimator with Stepnell – compete in various countries since starting the challenge in January in Anglesey. He has since run in Gran Canaria, Malta, Rome, Edinburgh and Barcelona. This is not his first eyebrow-raising fundraiser for Hope for Children: two years ago, he ran the Marathon des Sables, a 264km race across the Sahara Desert. He said, "I found myself needing another big challenge to motivate myself, so 2018 became the 52 in 52 challenge."  This weekend he competed in his 20th marathon of the year in Stockholm. (Mon 4) ⚡AMP
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Bhat and Merchant are the first Indians to finish the world's highest 60Km Everest Marathon

Deepa Bhat and Taher Merchant’s completed the 60km Extreme Ultra – Everest Marathon, the world’s highest running event, and with that, became the first Indians to do so since this competition opened in 2013. Everest Marathon is held to mark the historical ascent on the Mount Everest by Late Tenzing Norgay Sherpa and Sir Edmund Hillary on May 29, 1953, and also includes half and full marathons.  Bhat clocked the circuit in 19 hours, 50 minutes, and 40 seconds – beginning at 6am on May 29 and finishing by 1am on May 30. “I took two coffee breaks, without which, I would have fallen asleep,” the vice president of an e-learning firm shared on a quick call from Nepal. While Merchant took 19 hours, 15 minutes and 10 minutes, he didn’t run in one go. “Mountains are unpredictable. That evening, temperatures went sub-zero. It started to snow, so I decided to stay back at a lodging and resume the next day. For this, I was penalised for four hours. Otherwise, I would have timed 15 hours,” says the businessman. “No guesses but the Nepalis won the first eight slots,” Merchant said, laughing. “I saw them at the start and then at the finish, nowhere in between. They are so fast.” Rightly so, Thirtha Tamang ran it all within seven hours to win the day. Nonetheless, they are proud that it took “two crazy Bengalureans” to bring this honor to India.  (Mon 4) ⚡AMP
by Barkha Kumari
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Ethiopian Meseret Defar won the women's Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Half Marathon

Two-time Olympic gold medalist Meseret Defar of Ethiopia won the women's Synchrony Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Half Marathon on Sunday while Titus Ekiru of Kenya upset Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa of Ethiopia in the men's race.  The elite runners in the half and full marathon had finished long before the race was halted for about 10 minutes and rerouted after a police officer accidentally shot himself in the leg while pursuing a hit-and-run suspect who pointed a weapon at police and was eventually arrested on the roof of a parking structure near the finish line in downtown.  Defar, a two-time Olympic champion in the 5,000 meters, finished in 1 hour, 8 minutes, 26 seconds, well ahead of Jane Kibii of Kenya, who clocked 1:12:00. Kaitlyn James of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, was third in 1:13:54.  Ekiru won the men's race in 1:01:02, 16 seconds ahead of Lilesa, who won the silver medal in the marathon at the Rio Olympics. Josphat Kipchirchir of Kenya was third in 1:02:21. (Mon 4) ⚡AMP
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Perfect day for the World Masters Mountain Running Championships

A picture-perfect day awaited the nearly 400 competitors at the 18th WMRA/WMA World Masters Mountain Running Championships in Zelezniki, Slovenia today.  After several days of afternoon or evening rain storms, the weather held from the first race start at 10:00 a.m. to the awards ceremony later in the day. Even with clouds threatening at the summit of Ratitovec at 1678 meters, which served ast the finish line, the rains never came delighting both spectators and runners.   There were two challenging courses, the long route of 10.8 kilometers with 1184 meters of height difference for men up to 54, and the shorter route of 7.2 kilometers with 869 meters of height difference for the men ages 55-79, and all women (ages 35-79). The terrain included a short stretch on pavement at the start of each race, and then a combination of wide forested path, single track trail, rocky steps, a section to the finish line in a meadow filled with wildflowers and an amazing view. The fastest time of the day on the long course was posted by 50-year-old Miran CVET (SLO) who raced 1:02:22.  The short course top times were from 36-year-old Monica KOLLIGAR (SLO) in 52:04, and Franco TORRESANI (ITA) timed in 47:31. On site were nine members of the local organizing committe for the 2019 event which will be held in Gagliano del Capo, Italy, September 27-29.  (Sun 3) ⚡AMP
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Sarah Pagano wins the 40th Annual Freihofer’s Run for Women 5K

Sarah Pagano of Brighton, Mass., surged to the lead in the final 400 meters and won the 40th annual Freihofer’s Run for Women with a time of 15 minutes, 48 seconds on Saturday June 2 in Albany New York.     The 26 -year-old was the first of 3,567 participants to complete the 5K course. She earned a $10,000 prize and matched her personal 5K record. “I’m really happy,” said Pagano, who runs for the Boston Athletic Association. “I came in and just wanted to compete and not worry about anything else, just do the best I could. I’m really happy to be able to come away with the win.” Pagano, who ran track at Syracuse University and was the 2012 Big East outdoor 10,000m champion, was five seconds ahead of runner-up Steph Bruce (Flagstaff, Ariz.). Diane Nukuri (Flagstaff, Ariz.), a three-time Olympian representing her native Burundi before becoming a U.S. citizen last year, led for most of the race and placed third. (Sun 3) ⚡AMP
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80-year-old Russ Kiernan Running the Dipsea for the 49th time

Mill Valley's Russ Kiernan is a three-time Dipsea champion, a member of the Hall of Fame and now perhaps the race's most recognized and beloved figure.  Kiernan's résumé remains unparalleled. His records of 27 top-ten, 19 top-five and 15 top-three finishes will stand for eons. Safe, forever, is his record of 11 Double Dipsea wins. His fastest Dipsea time was a sensational 51:23, at age 42, in 1980. Ten consecutive years (1999-2008), he recorded an actual running time (in minutes) below his age (in years), a feat only a handful of other runners have ever achieved even once. A unique aspect of Kiernan's Dipsea career is that, unlike other of the race's all-time greats, he was never a nationally top-ranked runner - although he was in the mixed horse riding/trail running discipline of Ride and Tie. "I did well in the Dipsea because I have always been a good and fearless downhiller, rarely got injured, and I trained long and hard on the course," Kiernan says. "And I knew the legal shortcuts!" Kiernan taught in San Francisco public elementary and middle schools for decades. It was at San Miguel Elementary School in the City that he met wife Marilyn, a kindergarten teacher, and they just celebrated their 50th anniversary. They had one child together, Kari, 47, and also raised Heywood Bowser, 46, through foster care. Bowser now has two children at Tamalpais High, with Russ and Marilyn living right across the street. At 80, Kiernan, not unexpectedly, has his share of medical woes. He is losing some vision to glaucoma and making a few wrong turns. He's had bouts with skin cancer. He is having a surgical procedure on his leg just nine days before the Dipsea. But on June 10, Russ will be at the Dipsea start line for a 49th time. You'll recognize him by the loudest cheers.      (Sat 2) ⚡AMP
by Barry Spitz
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Ethiopia's Defar queen of the 5,000 has sights in the Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego Half Marathon

Meseret Defar donated her 2004 Olympic 5,000-meter gold medal to a church museum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. She was 20 years old when that one was draped around her neck in Athens. Eight years later at the London Games, Defar became the only woman to win two gold medals in the 5,000. That medal is on display in the hallway of her Addis Ababa home. Since 2016, when knee pain prevented her from competing at the Rio de Janeiro Games — “That was the most difficult time for me.” — Defar has focused on marathon training. It has been a difficult transition for one of Ethiopia’s most revered runners. Because of recurring knee injuries, she still has not debuted at 26.2 miles. Come Sunday, when nearly 20,000 runners, walkers and wheelchair athletes take to the streets for the 21st Synchrony Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego Marathon & Half Marathon, Defar will be among them. She’s running the half. If her body cooperates, she hopes to make her marathon debut come fall, likely in Chicago, New York or Berlin.    (Sat 2) ⚡AMP
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Sweden's Larsson wins the Stockholm marathon while Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi finished 4th

“Today I felt the spectators helped me pull out something extra over and over again. It was absolutely fantastic,” Mikaela Larsson told Sweden’s SVT broadcaster. “I’m tired but terribly happy. I hadn’t expected this beforehand.” At the 30km mark, Larsson spurted ahead of her Ethiopian rival Beju Bekelu, building a lead of three minutes and 27 seconds by the finishing line. In the run-up to the start, many had feared that the 27C temperatures would mean runner collapsing from heat exhaustion, but the arrival of clouds just before the start made the contest slightly cooler than expected. Kenyan Lawi Kiptui won the men’s competition with a dramatic finish which saw him overtake and power ahead of his Ethiopian rival Bazu Worku. “It was an extremely hot race,” Kiptui told SVT. “I focused on nothing but winning.” Boston Marathon winner Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi finished fourth nearly 10 minutes behind the winner.  (Sat 2) ⚡AMP
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Race organizer has been found that meets the requirements to produce the Portland Marathon

Portland has turned to a local race organizer in its search for an operator for the city's 2018 marathon. Mayor Wheeler and the Portland Bureau of Transportation say the October 7 marathon will be overseen by the Run With Paula events firm. The firm's leaders, Paula and Dave Harkin, also own the Portland Running Co. The married couple has operated the Hippie Chick and Helvetia half marathons in Washington County.  “I believe our great city deserves an equally great race,” Paula Harkin said. “Fall just would not be the same without a marathon in Portland.” The Portlandathon will include the showcase 26.2-mile event, as well as a half-marathon, the Mayor’s 5-mile race, and a 4-mile river walk. The former Portland Marathon group informed the city in April that it would be canceling the fall race. Earlier that month, the Oregon Department of Justice reached an $865,000 settlement with Les Smith, the Portland Marathon's former race director. The agency's investigation found that Smith had illegally received hundreds of thousands of dollars in loans from the race organization. The race was canceled but the Portland Bureau of Transportation put together an expedited, 7-question application process that attracted several interested event organizers. In the end, only Run With Paula was qualified based on the city's criteria.  Paula and Dave Harmin operates two running retail locations (800 SE Grand Ave. in Portland and 10029 SW Nimbus Ave. in Beaverton).  Dave is a dynamic speaker and coach who inspires hundreds of athletes every year through seminars for a broad range of groups and his work with Portland Fit.  His wife (and co-owner), Paula, is also the race director of Run with Paula Events. They put on four award winning races around the state each year.  Now it will be five races.   (Sat 2) ⚡AMP
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Why did Emil Zatopek gift one of his Olympic Gold Medals to Ron Clarke?

Exactly 64 years ago today on Jun 1, 1954 – Emil Zatopek runs World Record 10,000 meters 28:54.2. This was the first sub-29 minute clocking and his 4th 10k World Record.  The amazing Czech Rocket won the 5,000 meters, 10,000 meters and marathon at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Finland - an unparalleled achievement!  One of the most beautiful things he did was to secretly give a small box to Australian Ron Clarke with one of his Olympic Gold medals as he thought Ron would have earned a Gold medal if the 1968 Olympics weren't at altitude. (Photo - Ron Clarke with the gold medal Emil gifted to him.)  (Fri 1) ⚡AMP
by Gary Cohen
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2019 Austin Marathon Registration is Officially Open

Registration for the 2019 Austin Marathon® presented by Under Armour officially opens today, Friday, June 1st. The 28th Austin Marathon will take place on Sunday, February 17, 2019, in Austin, Texas. The initial pricing structure follows: marathon ($100), half marathon ($80), 5K ($35). Austin’s premier running event featured a new marathon course in 2018 and witnessed Allison Macsas qualify for the 2020 Olympic Marathon Trials (2:43:11) while defending her 2017 title. The 2018 Austin Marathon saw continued growth with the Elite Athlete Program, streamed race day live through their continued partnership with FloTrack, raised $670,800 for Central Texas nonprofits through Austin Gives Miles, and featured an enhanced finish line festival, complete with beer garden. Joey Whelan (2:21:37) and Allison Macsas were the male and female marathon champions. Patrick Smyth (1:04:16) and Hillary Montgomery (1:16:15) were the male and female half marathon champions. More than 15,000 registrants enjoyed a fully supported course, complete with 22 stocked aid stations, two CLIF Bar CLIF Zones, live music throughout the course and at the finish line festival, and tens of thousands of cheering spectators with hilarious signs, countless noisemakers, and endless energy. The Austin Marathon will celebrate its 28th year running in the capital of Texas on February 17, 2019. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 30+ countries around the world. Having start and finish locations just a few blocks apart, being within walking distance of many downtown hotels and restaurants, and finishing in front of the picturesque Texas State Capitol makes the Austin Marathon the perfect running weekend destination.  Participants can register for the Austin Marathon, Austin Half Marathon, Austin Marathon 5K, or the Austin Marathon VIP Experience.  (Fri 1) ⚡AMP
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Three-time Olympian Diane Nukuri is the favorite at Freihofer's Run for Women

Three-time Olympian, Diane Nukuri, is the favorite in Saturday's race after getting U.S. citizenship. Her American citizenship gives Nukuri, 33, a reason to return to the Freihofer’s Run for Women in Albany, which will celebrate its 40th anniversary on Saturday. She last participated in 2015, the year before Freihofer’s reverted back to an all-American field. Freihofer’s made the change to support U.S. distance running and in response to international doping scandals that rocked the sport. Nukuri appeared at Acadia Middle School in Clifton Park to talk to students on Wednesday, one of the school visitations by elite athletes for which the Freihofer’s has become known. I’m so excited,’’ Nukuri said. “It was sad that I couldn’t do it the last two years. I’m definitely excited because it’s one of the first races I ran after college at Iowa and I have really good memories of coming and talking to kids and stuff. I’m definitely looking forward to racing and it’s different when you don’t have an international field. I’m just glad I’m part of it.”  The winner gets $10,000.  She came in seventh in her most recent appearance three years ago. This race is short by Nukuri’s standards. She said her best distance is the half-marathon. (Fri 1) ⚡AMP
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Anna Hackenberg will race in Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego Marathon after paralyzing accident

Anna Hackenberg suffered punctured lungs, fractured ribs, a broken collarbone and broken leg. She developed pneumonia in the hospital. Her spinal cord was severed, leaving her paralyzed from the chest down. Lying in the hospital bed, Hackenberg couldn’t feel her legs when she awoke. She was surrounded by her mother, father, brother and sister. But they didn’t want to deliver the devastating news. A doctor friend, Erin King, was also in the room. “Am I ever going to walk again?” Hackenberg asked King. King summarized the freak accident, then said, “No, you’ll never walk again.” “Well then,” Hackenberg said, “I will be a great swimmer.” Hackenberg, 31, was training for the Synchrony Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego Marathon when the accident occurred on April 13, 2017. Since then, she has swum, tried surfing, snow skied, practiced yoga, and hit golf balls. On Sunday, her arms cranking a hand-cycle wheelchair, Hackenberg will attend to unfinished business, racing in the 21st Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego Marathon. At first, she planned to tackle the event’s half marathon. Asked why she would double the challenge, Hackenberg, sitting in her Little Italy apartment, her 13-pound rescue dog Max perched on her lap, smiled and said, “Why not?” (Fri 1) ⚡AMP
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Barbro and Jan will celebrate their wedding anniversary running the stockholm marathon

Barbro and Jan Paraniak are not like everyone else. They got married at the Stadium after finishing the 1999 Stockholm Marathon.  On saturday they will celebrate their 19th wedding anniversary. Then they are again on the starting line in Stockholm. Together they have run 784 marathons in 123 places in 32 countries. Although the Stockholm Marathon is very special to them, the couple continues to run marathons all over the world.  The last five weekends they have been on the starting line in Säter, Copenhagen, Helsinki and Darmstadt, Germany (24 yards in a prison yard). On Saturday they are on the starting line again. It's 21st time for Barbro and 36th for Jan. "It's one of the world's ten most beautiful races. And when it's nice weather, it's a very good public support, "says Barbro. "As a citymember, Stockholm is one of the most beautiful. It will be especially with a lot of water and many islands,” says Jan. (Fri 1) ⚡AMP
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Things have really changed. In 1969 I was out running in the snow and a person just could not understand why I did not need a ride

A friend of mine, Brent Weigner who has run a marathon or beyond in more countries than anybody, posted a list of the 25 worse questions to ask a runner on FB today.  Some of the questions included, "How far is your marathon," "Why would you need so many running shoes," "Is running safe at your age," and "Do you need a ride?"  That last one reminded me of a story that happened to me in the winter of 1969 when I lived in Manhattan, Kansas (before I moved to California).  It was snowing and there was about four inches already on the ground.  It was about 25 degrees and I wanted to get in five miles.  I put on a few layers and hit the road.  Outside of town, after about two miles, a woman with a baby in the back pulled alongside in her car and asked if she could give me a ride.  I told her I was just running and did not need a ride. "Thanks for asking," I said.  Then she asked where was I going.  "It is cold out and I can get you there much faster," she said.  I told her again that I was running and did not need a ride.  As she pulled away she said, "Are you sure you don't need a ride? It is cold out."  She drove about a quarter of a mile down the road and pulled over again.  At this point I was thinking of turning around because now she was really messing up my run but I kept going.  As I approached the car she yelled out, "Are you sure you don't want a ride?"  This time I just ran by like I was running away from a dog.  She met well but she just could not understand that I was just running.  Things have changed.  That was 1969. (Fri 1) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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I want to win the Olympic Marathon says London winner Kenya’s Vivian Cheruiyot

London marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya will only think of retirement after competing at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. Speaking from Eldoret, Kenya on Thursday, Cheruiyot believes good planning and performance will be enough to secure her a slot in the Kenyan team and at the Olympics. The 34-year-old remains confident. "I still view myself as novice in marathon. I have only run three races and the target is always to run in big cities and in the Olympics. I want to win the Olympic marathon," said Cheruiyot. Competitors at the Tokyo 2020 marathon will face a tough uphill finish as organizers said Thursday when they outlined the route, an additional challenge to heat that has already sparked concern. Kenya has over 40 women who have run under two hours and 30 minutes, the cut off mark for qualification to the Olympics and Cheruiyot will be among the many athletes who will have their names in the pot for the coaches to draw from. Cheruiyot's victory in London confirmed her pedigree as one of the top female marathon runners, ready to take over from veteran Edna Kiplagat and Mary Keitany. Cheruiyot, with a personal best of 2:18:31, now becomes the fourth fastest woman in marathon history after Radcliffe (2:15:25), Keitany (2:17:01) and Tirunesh Dibaba (2:17:56). But she has to toughen up if she is to win in Tokyo in 2020 as organizers believe the change in course, especially the final climb would likely be decisive factor in deciding the winner of the race. (Thu 31) ⚡AMP
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