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Ray Urbahn is 88-years-old and he will be running his 84th marathon

Ray Urbahn is 88-years-old and staring down his 84th marathon. He's fitter, healthier more active than many people half his age, and says it is all due to the running. Ray runs on average two marathons a year and is planning on running two more this year in Rotorua and New Plymouth. Ray turns 89 in three months and only started running at 46. He was the only 85-89 half marathon competitor at last year's World Masters Games in Auckland and beat people in the 35-39 age bracket, running it in just 2 hours 28 minutes. He estimates he has run almost 100,000km to date, but "it didn't seem that long"."It doesn't seem that far. I'm not worn out, so 97,000km is no big deal, really." (Tue 3) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Meghann Stewart reconnected with the joy of competing and training after a 30 year break

RUN THE WORLD: "I use to run at school," says 53-year-old Meghann Stewart, "but it faded from my life."  Then some 30 years later she decided to get fit with a friend and joined a morning Bootcamp.  "12 months later I entered a local Masters Athletics meet in the 200m and 800m and reconnected with the joy of competing, training and running with a bunch of like minded people," she says. Running is a part of her lifestyle in New Zealad and she enjoy all the benefits that come with it. The biggest highlight was entering her first International event in Italy in 2013. "I came second in the 800m and won the 1500m."  She has taken some years off from competing but is hoping to make a come back 2019. "That’s the best thing about the running community, there’s always another event/race to look forward to."  Asked about the Run The World Challenge she wrote. "As soon as I saw the Run The World Global Run Challenge and what it represented I signed up immediately."  She is a Personal Trainer in New Zealand to help, support and encourage everyone to see the benefits of running and include it in their life some way. Meghann is a wife and mother of three children, one dog and a cat. "I do private PT sessions and do commission artwork (oil painting, stencils and fabric art). I enjoy all kinds of functional mobility and did a Yoga teacher training course in 2017."  One of her goals is to achieve a top age-group time for 800m while experiencing as many running opportunities as possible. (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Dakota Wagner two years ago was terrified of the marathon, on June 23 he ran the Black Hills 50 Miler

Dakota Wagner hasn't allowed his asthma to stop him from running a ultra marathon. "Two years ago I was sitting on a bus riding to my first marathon and I was terrified," says Dakota. "Today I’m on my way to the start of my first ultra marathon." The former Jamestown (North Dakota) High School and current UJ runner competed in the Black Hills 50 mile race in Sturgis, South Dakota, on June 23. Wagner placed 27th out of 57 finishers with a time of 12 hours, 51 minutes and 39 seconds. "I was pretty battered by the end," Wagner said, a computer science major. "The climbs tired me out but the descending also destroyed my legs. The day after, on Sunday (June 24), I was having difficulties walking, which is typical."Overall, I think it went really well and I trained pretty hard for that race." Coming into the race, Wagner said his strategy was to consume GU energy gels every 30 minutes to intake 200 calories an hour.  About every seven miles there was an aid station to allow Wagner to eat and drink. "Every time I would get to an aid station I would eat real foods like peanut butter and jelly, chips and Coca-Cola," he said. "You're taking in enough fuel to sustain a run." The course featured six major climbs and a couple of smaller ones. Overall, there was an 8,656-foot elevation gain and a 9,990-foot loss. Despite muddy conditions that caused 41 competitors to drop out early in the race, Wagner cruised through the first 20 miles of the race. But at Mile 32, Wagner's legs hit a wall.Wagner managed to rally and finish the remainder of the race, even though his legs were telling him otherwise. Once he crossed the finish line he celebrated with his "crew" of best friend Alphonse Schoeneberger and brother Dustin.  "I learned more about myself and what I was capable of than all my years of running before this moment. For the first time I felt like I completed exactly what I set out to do, and met all of my expectations and more," Dakota posted on Facebook.  (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Grace Padilla believes running is her fountain of youth

RUN THE WORLD: Growing up being the middle child out of seven kids was challenging for Grace Padilla Leong.   "I didn’t feel notice. I discovered running when I was 12 years old," Grace says.  Her younger brother started running and racing back in 1984.  "I was jealous of him because our parents spoiled him with running gear, eating out, and money when he won races. I wanted to feel special too." She tried the 3,000m steeplechase back in 1995.  "I wasn’t much of a hurdler, but I learned to step over barriers and run fast between them. I got better every time I jumped. I really enjoyed the extra challenge the barriers gave me."   She took pride in almost completely clearing the water barriers.  In 1996, she broke the America record and actually held the World Record before it was recognized.  "I was blessed to compete in the 1996 Olympic Trials in Atlanta, Georgia. Unfortunately, I had the flu and really struggled in the 114 heat during our race," Grace says.   She took time off after this to have a family. Then 16 years later, she decided to try the 2,000m steeplechase as a master runner in the World Masters Championships.  "I was nervous and went out too fast (75 for 400m) this came back to haunt me on the last 300m. I was running world record pace and missed winning by a few seconds. I wasn’t the same brave kid, now I was afraid of the barriers and landed in the middle of the water pit with two feet."  After getting hurt from all the impact from jumping the barriers, she decided to give steeplechasing a break."Running is my life so I make it one of my priorities. I get up early to feed my children, take them to school, feed all our pets. Then I teach part time, followed by coaching at our local high school my children attend. I usually run with my kids, except on the Track interval days. I do my speed work with my husband’s running club, SoCal RoadRunners." Although, she has never played soccer, she is a huge soccer fan.  "My uncle used to have a team when I was a kid and we would cheer for them every weekend."   Asked why she thinks she is such a good runner."When I was a kid I ran to get my parents attention and to make them proud. Then I ran for the awards. Later, ran because I enjoyed winning and the spotlight. Now I run because I love pushing myself and the way running makes me feel. I feel strong, beautiful, and brave! I think what makes me a good runner is the fact that I’m a hard worker! I don’t take any shortcuts. I’ve always been a front runner and I’m not afraid to take chances."  What does this think of this challenge?"This Run The World challenge sounds interesting and I want to be part of something great! Running bring people together world wide, language stops being a barrier."  Grace sums it up well. "Running has been my life and passion for over 35 years.  I believe running is my fountain of youth." (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Ethiopia's Teshome Mekonen set to defend title at 2018 Crazy 8s 8K

The 28th annual Ballad Health and Niswonger Children’s Hospital Crazy 8s 8K road race is slated to begin on the evening of July 14th as part of the Kingsport Fun Fest. The race is continually one of the fastest in not only the Southeast, but the entire world, boasting some of the leading times for 8K all-time. The race will also feature the top three finishers in last year’s race making a return trip to the Model City to chase the world record and the $10,008 world record bonus. A high bar was set earlier this year at the UAE Healthy Kidney 10K in New York, where a certified 8K split of 21 minutes, 45 seconds set the world standard. Last year’s champion Teshome Mekonen has run well this year with a third-place finish at the United Airlines NYC Half Marathon. He will be on the starting line along with Silas Kipruto, Wilson Kibogo and Simion Chirchir. (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Abbey had planned to run just one marathon to cross that off her bucket list

RUN THE WORLD: Abbey Cannon started running when she was 28 because she wanted to cross off "run a marathon" off her bucket list.  "While I succeeded, finishing in 4:24 with only 12 weeks of training, it was a painful experience but I was hooked on running," says Abbey.  She now runs because she enjoys it.   "Running keeps me healthy, happy, and sane, and I also like to run for charities."  She is currently training for the Chicago Marathon to raise money for a dog rescue.  After running her first marathon in almost four and half hours the Boston Marathon was not even a consideration. "I never thought that I could qualify for the Boston Marathon, but I did at age 36 and ran it in 2017. I am also proud to say that, even though it was a small crowd, I placed first female in my first ultra marathon at The San Francisco Marathon last year."  38-year-old Abbey is married, a mom of two and has five dogs.  Plus foster dogs.  She is a pediatric nurse living in the San Francisco Bay area.  Asked about this challenge she wrote,  "I think the Run The World Global Run Challenge is great because it shows that even though we are all at different levels and may run for different reasons, we in the running community from all over the globe can all come together to work for the same goal."  (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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What happend to Yuki Kawauchi? He did run his 80th sub 2:20 marathon at the Gold Coast!

It was hot and humid at the Gold Coast Marathon (Australia) July 1.  It was 65 degrees with 100% humidity.  Not the best conditions for running a marathon.  Yuki Kawauchi said,  "I could not run well."  He finished 9th clocking 2:14:50.  (Kenneth Mungara won clocking 2:09:49, Kenta Murayama second 2:09:50 and Jo Fukuda third 2:09:52.)  Yuki posted on Facebook, "But, I achieved my 80th time of sub 2:20 at this race."    "The Australian people were kind to me," Yuki says. (Photo: Yuki with fan/marathoner Dion Finocchiaro.  Dion ran 2:24:36 a PR for him.  Maybe meeting Yuki gave him that extra push?) Yuki's next marathon is going to be the New Caledonia International Marathon August 26.  Their site says, "This is an Olympic-level world-class marathon as runners battle for victory along a spectacularly scenic route winding around Noumea's bays."  Yuki posted on Facebook, "This race is my important memorial marathon.Because this race was my first oversea race. If I didn't run this race 10 years ago, I might not run oversea races like now.   I want to build a course record."  Where is this marathon?  Their site says, "Surrounded by the vast expanse of the South Pacific, New Caledonia, with a surface area of 18,564 km², lies to the east of Australia and south of the thousands of islands and archipelagos making up Melanesia and Micronesia."        (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
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America's Lopez Lomong 10,000m track champion says it would be amazing to win Peachtree 10K too

Fresh off his national title in the 10,000m on the track one week ago, Lopez Lomong (Portland, OR) will compete for a 10 km title on the road for the first time as the AJC Peachtree Road Race will be Lomong’s 10K road debut. At the USATF Outdoor Track and Field Championships last month, Lomong unleashed a furious kick on the final lap to become the only man in history to win U.S. titles in the 1,500m and the 10,000m on the track. “The Peachtree is one of America’s most amazing events,” said Lomong. “It is my honor to come and run the streets of Atlanta. It’s a U.S. championship so it would be amazing to win it, but even to be a participant is massive.” Lomong, the torch-bearer for the United States at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, will join previously announced contenders like U.S. Half Marathon Champion Chris Derrick (Portland, OR), his teammate in the Portland-based Bowerman Track Club and Bernard Lagat (Tucson, AZ), a five-time Olympian who smashed the AJC Peachtree Road Race masters course record (28:42) in 2017. Also in the men’s field are the top two American men from the rain-soaked and raw 2018 Boston Marathon: Shadrack Biwott (Folsom, CA), and Tyler Pennel (Blowing Rock, NC). Reigning USATF 25 km champion Sam Chelanga (Colorado Springs, CO) and 2016 Olympic marathoner Jared Ward (Kaysville, UT) will also compete. Last year’s Peachtree runner-up Shadrack Kipchirchir has withdrawn from the race, as has Abdi Abdirahman. “We are excited to welcome athletes who have won American titles, set American records and represented the United States around the world to Atlanta’s celebration of running and country on July 4,” said Rich Kenah, Executive Director of Atlanta Track Club and Race Director of the AJC Peachtree Road Race. “The AJC Peachtree Road Race has a rich history of crowning the legends of road racing and that history will continue in the race’s 49th running.” (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
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Boilermaker winners plan to return, Mary Wacera going after a fifth win

“This is my race.” That’s what Mary Wacera was saying here last July, after winning the women’s open title at the Boilermaker Road Race for the third time in four years. Now, according to the 2018 Elite Runner Field released by the Boilermaker, the 29-year-old Kenyan is planning to return to Utica for this year’s July 8 race. And if Wacera wins yet again, she will join Catherine Ndereba as the only four-time Women’s Open champion. The Elite Runner Field is subject to change, but both of last year’s Boilermaker winners — Wacera and Silas Kipruto of Kenya — are expected to return with hopes of defending their 15K titles. Wacera, the Boilermaker women’s champion in 2014 and 2015 and the third-place finisher in 2016, won last year’s race in 49 minutes, 18 seconds. Ruti Aga Sora was the runner-up, just two seconds back, and the 24-year-old from Ethiopia is also coming back this year. (Mon 2) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Mike Fanelli (62) has been running nearly every day since he was 14

RUN THE WORLD: Mike Fanelli caught the running bug after watching the 1968 Olympic Games on TV.  "I began competing as a high school cross country runner at age 14. I have run/trained practically every single day since and have a lifetime tally of 109,339 miles," Mike says.  Over his nearly five decade career there have been many highlights.  A 2:25 marathon PR, a 16:40 100 miler (on the track) and one mile in 4:57 at age 50.  He is originally from Philadelphia and currently lives in the Sonoma Country Wine Country.  The 62-year-old is a real estate broker representing luxury residential and vineyard properties.  As far as his running these days?  "These days my running tallies 35 to 40 miles a week...at least one of which is done on the track." he says.  He plans on logging in an average of 37 miles per week for the challenge.   "I found out about the Run The World Global Run Challenge from my pal and 'streak mate' Geoff Smith and figured it'd be fun to be part of a mileage counting team effort," Mike says. If you follow Mike on FB you know he has an amazing collection of running related material.  "My running archives began with one meet program which I got on March 1st, 1969 at the AAU Indoor National Track & Field Championships...as a 12 year old track nerd at that time, I chased down every single name athlete at that meet and got them to autograph my program...including George Young who only minutes before had set a new world indoors record that night for 3 miles," says Mike proudly.  The library is now over 4000 pieces in all.  "I hope to donate my collection to an entity that will use it to educate people on the history of running and track & field."   (Sun 1) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Australian’s Jack Rayner Took six minutes off his PR to win the Gold Coast Half Marathon

In the Gold Coast Half Marathon men’s race, Jack Rayner added his name to an illustrious list of Australian winners of the ASICS Half Marathon. In another breakthrough performance for the Victorian 22-year-old, Rayner took more than six minutes off his personal best to stop the clock at 1:03:12. Last month Rayner won the Launceston 10km breaking an 11-year race record. In an exciting duel on the Gold Coast, Rayner broke away from Kenyan William Chebor, the 2009 Gold Coast Marathon winner, with about one kilometre to go and kept increasing the margin. Chebor crossed the line 16 seconds behind in second in 1:03:28 with Victorian 20-year-old Edward Goddard putting in a huge performance to land third place in a massive 5-minute PB of 1:04:07. Collis Birmingham (AUS/VIC) finished fourth in 1:04:28. (Sat 30) ⚡AMP
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Sara Hall wins the Gold Coast Half Marathon in Australia today and then will be racing Peachtree on July 4th

Sara Hall (USA) made it back-to-back wins at this morning’s ASICS Half Marathon on the Gold Coast. In an enthralling women’s race, Hall achieved a 10-second personal best (PB) to win a consecutive ASICS Half Marathon in 1:09:27 after also finishing runner-up in 2015. It was also the second fastest performance ever recorded in the ASICS Half Marathon, only behind the race record of Lisa Jane Weightman (1:09:00). Hall, 35, pulled away in the second half of the race from Australia’s Sinead Diver (VIC) who finished second in 1:09:53, a close to two-minute improvement on her previous best. Today’s result was the 40-year-old runner’s third podium finish in the ASICS Half Marathon, having also placed second in 2014 and third in 2016. The Lee Troop-coached Laura Thweatt (USA) filled this year’s podium in third in a PB of 1:10:17.   Sara Hall is running Peachtree 10k on Wednesday.   (Sat 30) ⚡AMP
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Philemon Mbaaru wins the Safaricom Lewa Marathon for the sixth time once Rhinos were cleared off the course

Lewa master Mbaaru does it again! Winning sixth Safaricom marathon, Pre-race favorite Philemon Mbaaru lived up to his expectations as he battled tough conditions to clinch the title at the Safaricom Marathon as the 19th edition graced by the First Lady Margaret Kenyatta went down at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy on Saturday. The women’s category saw Jane Ngima take the title in 2:51:36 after flooring Esther Macharia who clocked second in a time of 2:53:41.  Being one of the toughest marathons in the world since its being run in the wilderness, the race delayed for almost five minutes to allow the organisers to clear the Rhinos and elephants on the course. However, that did not affect experienced Mbaaru who cruised to his sixth Safaricom Lewa Marathon men’s title, recording 2:22:21, dropping three seconds from the time he won with last year. The 36-year old beat his close contender Peter Wahome who was second in 2:22:33 while Silas Gichovi settled for third in 2:23:23. Running under scorching sun in the event where wild animals are privileged to be among the spectators, Mbaaru had dismissed claims that he won the race because he clearly knows the course well but attributed stiff competition imposed by Wahome. “The competition was very tough because you never know what to expect from every athlete. The first loop was not bad because I was leading with a big gap but in the second loop the second placed kept me in check, running behind my shoulder but I put more effort to beat him,” Mbaaru, who trains in Nyeri, Nanyuki Highway said. (Sat 30) ⚡AMP
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ASICS have unveiled the world’s first running track to train the mind, the blackout Track in London

The blackout track was developed in collaboration with sports scientists and top coaches to remove all distractions and encourage runners to focus on synchronising the mind and body, and runners have been trialling the first race track.  It is a custom-built course in London and the circuit – one lap is 150m – is dark apart from one spotlight trailing the athlete. The track’s absence of sound, technology, scenery and even a finish line means runners can focus their mind on each step. The “ASICS Blackout Track” was developed in collaboration with sports scientists and top coaches.  Researchers included Professor Samuele Marcora, the director of research at the University of Kent’s School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, and Dr Jo Corbett, leader of the Human Performance and Health Research Group at the University of Portsmouth. In addition, ASICS ambassadors Chevy Rough, a mind coach who works with leading athletes, and Jan Erik Kruse, a lead ASICS frontrunner, also helped to shape the various experiences on the track. Three runners, with a range of athletic abilities, completed 66 laps in near darkness as part of a 10km “mental marathon” – pacing the track without any of their usual running comforts. Olympic medallist and marathon record holder Deena Kastor (USA) ran the fastest time in just 37 minutes and 16 seconds. (Sat 30) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Phil Camp is a lifetime runner with plenty of cool stories to tell

RUN THE WORLD: Phil Camp (70) was a former aviator at the United States Navy.  He now lives in Chula Vista, CA with his wife Judy who is a top master tennis player.  This photo of Phil running a mile in a track meet on the ship the Coral Sea was taken in 1974.  During his running career he has qualified for Olympic Marathon Trials three times starting in 1972.  He has won five marathons including Nike OTC (73) and Marine (79).  He says, "I didn’t get into masters running Stateside until age 45 because I was living in Sicily, then the Philippines my last two tours in the Navy."  As a master runner in 1993 Phil was second overall at the Carlsbad Marathon.  At the Carlsbad 5k he placed first 45-49 in 1993 and 1st 50-55 in 2000.  Phil continued to push as the years went by.  However, just after he turned 60 his ankle started hurting.  "It turned out to be a fallen arch," he says.  "A foot surgeon told me I was done running, but my podiatrist said he could keep me going at fewer miles with newer orthotics."  Another "age challenge" was dealing with his heart health.  "I had experienced coronary artery disease at 58 and got two stents," he says.  "The heart rhythm issue was a complete mystery to me."  He started taking long bike rides and he started wearing a heart rate monitor.  "A cycling friend told me that everyone he knew with similar symptoms had a pacemaker. That night I wore my HR monitor to bed and watched my HR drop to 33-35 bpm.  I drove myself to the ER around midnight and they told me I wouldn’t be leaving without a pacemaker."  It was February 2016, he was 68-years-old, and he got a PM.  "Running has never quite been the same since just before and after the PM. I get very fatigued if I run faster than 8:30 per mile," Phil says.  But he is still gets in his runs but just slower these days.  "I’m excited to be in the Run the World Challenge! I will slow down to whatever pace I have to to contribute my 15-20 mi each week, I’m just so happy to be included with such a large diverse group of runners."  Phil has many running stories to tell and this one is about Bill Rodgers.   "I knew Bill Rodgers was going to be at the Azalea Trail Run and being a local runner at the time I was too.  I took the race out fast for me, 9:36 at the 2 mi. Somewhere before 3 mi, Bill finally caught up. He said he left the line with the pack and wondered who was in the lead. One of the guys said, “that’s Phil Camp!” He said he had read an article in Runner's World several years before and figured he’d better not let me get too far ahead.  We shared the pace for awhile and then he slowly pulled away! Three years later when I was stationed in the Philippines I got a free military flight to Korea and managed to talk my way into the Seoul Marathon. They doubted that I had run a 2:13 but allowed me to enter. The next morning I showed up among maybe 10,000 runners with no idea how to stash my warm ups. Then a bus pulled up near the start line and all the elite runners including Bill stepped out to mingle with the crowd.  I waved at Bill and he told me to jump on the bus. They took us to a locker room with a track nearby for warm up and then back to the start ahead of the masses. Bill said he wasn’t running fast.  He was just there to run with his fiancée and attend the after party. I ended up 10th in a 2:19, my 3rd marathon in two months! Never forgot Bill’s kindness, one of the nicest guys I’ve ever met!" Phil has a lot of good running stories. (Sat 30) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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New Belfast City Marathon route in 2019 will touch every part of the city

Next year will see a new look Belfast City Marathon after councillors agreed to changes to the iconic race’s route and usual race day at City Hall on Wednesday. The council’s City Growth and Regeneration Committee approved the plans with broad, cross-party support for the new look event, which for decades has seen thousands descend upon Northern Ireland’s capital city each May. Typically costing around £600k annually, the Belfast City Marathon normally takes place on a Bank Holiday Monday, however next year the starter’s pistol will go off on a Sunday morning. Chair of the City Growth committee, SDLP representative Donal Lyons, said the marathon is a great family day out and the 2019 routes should benefit local traders. "The change of day will go down well, because it will allow Sunday marathon runners the day to recovery on Monday and hopefully give Belfast a potential boost for the our tourism trade," he added. Sinn Fein's new council group leader Ciaran Beattie spoke following the meeting and said his party hope "route number one" of the two proposed routes will now go through a successful public consultation with few, if any, speed bumps. "We're really happy, this will be the most balanced marathon yet in terms of geography and it will touch every part of our city," he said. (Sat 30) ⚡AMP
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Running 31 Marathons in 31 days while working full time? impossible? Not for Harold Allen

When most people decide to run seven marathons in seven days or 30 marathons in a month, they usually take time off from work. Not 36-year-old Harold Allen, a Georgia man who works a minimum wage job as a surgical orderly. The hardworking father of four daughters skimped on sleep in order to run 31 marathons (26.2 miles, not actual races) in 31 days to raise money and awareness for mental health. He came up with the month-long challenge because he wanted to raise money for Samaritan Counseling Center of Southwest Georgia, which provides extensive therapy options for adults, teens, children and families. He set up a GoFundMe page, with a goal of raising $2,000. In the end, he raised nearly $3,800 for the organization. So, why run 812.2 miles in 31 days and sleep for just three hours a night on top of working full-time and raising a family (his youngest daughter was born two weeks into this challenge, by the way)? For him, the answer was easy: May was Mental Health Awareness month, and his struggle with depression in the past made him realize how important good mental health care is. (Fri 29) ⚡AMP
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Lamar Perlis, 93 is not the fastest but will be the oldest male running the Peachtree 10K July 4th

Some runners are motivated by a desire to record personal-best times in every race they complete. Others are inspired by the idea that their favorite snacks are waiting just beyond the finish line. Lamar Perlis is unfazed by either of these things. He keeps moving to avoid an imaginary street sweeper. “I picture this enormous street sweeper at the end of the race,” he said. “I just keep thinking to myself, ‘Lamar, just stay well ahead of that street sweeper.’ That’s going to be constantly on my mind. I don’t care how fast I run as long as it’s faster than that street sweeper.” At 93, Perlis may not be the fastest participant, but he is the oldest male competitor running  in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race July 4.  He won the 90 plus division in 2016, finished second last year and will try to reclaim his title this Fourth of July. (Fri 29) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Becca Pizzi has run 7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents twice and never gets injured

RUN THE WORLD: Becca Pizzi ran her first race when she was six years old.  Now 38 she has run over 70 marathons in 33 states.  "I love running, sharing my passion, and inspiring others," Becca says. She has run seven marathons on seven continents in seven days, twice.  “I ran the World Marathon Challenge in 2016, to make history," she says. She was the  first US woman to complete this challenge.  She went back in 2018 to hopefully lower her time.  "I love to run and I love to travel; this is my favorite race."  She beat her 2016 time setting a new world best performance clocking 6 Days 7 Hours and 58 minutes this year.  "My daughter was at the finish line and ran the last 100 yards with me. She was my biggest inspiration to get me to the finish as fast as I could. I will never forget that moment."  Becca has many things going and she loves every minute of it.  "My life is like a puzzle. I own a Day Care, I manager an ice cream shop, my daughter is 10-years-old, I am a motivational speaker,  I coach my daughters soccer team, a kids Tri team,  I started the Belmont Track Club and a kids track club."  What she is most proud of is the Becca Pizzi 5k (now in the third year) in her hometown.  The proceeds go to graduating seniors.  "It is my chance to give back to the community. I love all that I do and don't ever feel overwhelmed."  Asked about this challenge.  "I am excited to log my miles with RUN THE WORLD. I whole heartedly believe in Bob's mission."  She runs a lot of miles and has never been injured.  What is your secret?  "I listen to my body. When I feel good I go for it, when something is tweaking I back off."  We know you love deserts? "I have my own ice cream flavor named after me, Becca7. I try to eat healthy and hydrate especially leading up to a marathon. I have a weak spot for Swedish Fish." she says.  Becca lives in Belmont, Mass with her husband Joe and her daughter Taylor.  "Lets circle the world," Becca says. (Fri 29) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Yuki Kawauchi may face rain at the Gold Coast Marathon but nothing like Boston

This Sunday, Yuki Kawauchi is likely to face the rain again as he competes in the 40th edition of Australian’s Gold Coast marathon, an IAAF Gold Label event. But nothing like what runners experienced in Boston with the biting winds and slippery roads. Mild and relatively still weather is forecast for race morning. It will be warm – with the temperature tipped to rise to just over 68F (20C) but nothing like as hot as the Commonwealth marathoners experienced. Kawauchi will be competing in his seventh straight Gold Coast marathon and chasing his second victory. His only win came in 2013, but he has three more podium finishes and has never finished outside the top eight. Kawauchi will need to be on his A-game, however, as two other recent winners are in this year’s line-up – last year’s victor, Takuya Noguchi and race record holder and two-time winner Kenneth Mungara. Actually, there are at least five former winners starting in this 40th edition of the race – Eric Sigmont, winner of the inaugural race in 1979, and 1990 Commonwealth Games 5000 metres champion Andrew Lloyd, who won in 1980, are also in the field. (Fri 29) ⚡AMP
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New Zealand's Mike Stewart has run 565 marathons and isn't planning on quitting any time soon

He brings color to every event he attends, but the man they call "Mad Mike" has a black and white outlook for his running future. Joining 300 participants from as far afield as Hawaii, 66-year-old Mike Stewart completed his 565th marathon at the Monaco Mid-Winter event on Sunday. His first marathon was as an 18-year-old in Wellington's Olympic Handicap event on January 28, 1970, back when distances were still measured in miles and women were still limited to spectator roles. In 1988, he clocked his best time, 2:59:07.   In 2012, he completed his 500th marathon.  On Sunday, he entered the finishing chute in 5h 50m 48s. "Most are just marathons but I remember the first one and the 100th and when I broke the three hour – the others you have to look at the certificate to see if you'd done it." All but two of his marathons since that day have been run in New Zealand. Stewart said he only attended two events on the Gold Coast in Australia because his brother lived there. Over the last 48 years, the Naenae, New Zealand resident has run a total of 23,843km. That's equivalent to running the length of New Zealand 15 times, more than the total length of the Great Wall of China or, in Forrest Gump terms, five and a half times across the width of the United States. Stewart is believed to hold the Southern Hemisphere record for most marathons completed, not that such achievements drove him to pound the pavement. (Thu 28) ⚡AMP
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Harvey Lewis On Track To Set Record For the 2,189 mile Appalachian Trail

Harvey Sweetland Lewis has covered over 1,370 miles and 60% of the iconic Appalachian Trail since May 30th, and is nearing record setting pace to arrive in Mount Katahdin, Maine on July 14th. This Fastest Known Time (FKT) has become one of the most contested, coveted accolades in ultra running and has been broken in recent years by Scott Jurek and Carl Metzler. Joe “Stringbean” McConaughy set the current record last summer in 45 days, 12 hours and 15 minutes. Harvey’s support team has been led by his 78-year-old dad and includes countless friends, family, fellow ultra runners and strangers who have been encouraging him along the trail and on social media. Road iD has joined Harvey to document his journey. “The man who has no imagination has no wings,” are the words that drive high school teacher Harvey Lewis as he searches within himself to complete the most challenging test of his life. His accomplishments include winning Badwater, the 135-mile ultra marathon in Death Valley, considering by many as The World’s Toughest Race. His latest pilgrimage began in the early morning on May 30th, 2018, with his dad and a small film crew, set out from Springer Mountain in Georgia on waterlogged trails through torrential downpour while navigating several mudslides. For Harvey Lewis these obstacles are opportunities, as he speaks prior to the start, “Pushing yourself to extreme limits, this is when the greatest growth happens.” “When I was dealing my injuries last week, the Achilles pain, the tendinitis, the foot soreness. I was beginning to think these injuries would sideline me,” shared Harvey Lewis as he had just completed one of the most grueling sections of the Appalachian Trail on June 24th. “This has been my toughest ultra and I didn’t quit because I knew there were people counting on me, these amazing friends and strangers have made all the difference. Now, I’m feeling 90% and ready for whatever’s in store.”  Harvey posted on FB before the start.  "The opportunity to have the experience of a lifetime with my father on a journey we never would have imagined. The love of the wilderness and need to push myself to new places has inspired the seed."  Photo: Assistance on the trail comes in many forms.  Here 30 days in with Alann Lopes. (Thu 28) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Rosaura Tennant says running is like a vitamin or medicine done daily

RUN THE WORLD: Rasaura Tennant was born in Costa Rica in a little town she calls the jungle.  "It was a very remote town without electricity, potable (piped) water, hospital, or roads," she says.  "That meant no cars or even bicycles.  We had to walk a lot, and if we were going far with heavy things, then we had to ride a horse or go the distance by boat."  She is number thirteen of fifteen kids and even though the conditions were hard it was a very happy family.  "My mother didn’t have help, so we all had to do chores at home, she was also a tailor and a midwife," Rosaura says.  "My father was a farmer and a carpenter. He built our house and many other houses in our little town."  When she was 20 they finally got electricity followed by potable water.  More recently the town caught up with the rest of the world.   "Now in my ‘little jungle’ almost everybody has a cellphone and some of the finer things of life."  She did start running while still living in Costa Rica but nothing longer than the half marathon.  "I was very intimidated by the marathon. It wasn’t until I was living in the USA when I ran my first marathon at the age of 47. I ran the Portland marathon with a time of 3:37," she says.  She has run a lot of races.  "I have lost track of the number of half marathons, 10Ks and 5Ks I have run during my running career… but I know it’s a pretty big number.  I have run a total of 24 marathons including five Bostons and one 50K."   She decided to join the Forward Motion Race Club (FMRC) in Danville.  "This is where I had the opportunity to run with more experienced runners and was able to learn from these athletes.  My times definitely improved, a lot."  She has a very supportive husband and a flexible work schedule that allows her to do what she loves.  "Running is part of my daily life. Running is like a vitamin or medicine.  If I don’t take it (run)… I start feeling not myself. Running makes me feel free and fulfilled."  She thinks our Run The World is a great idea.  "The fact that people around the world can join and commit to log their runs just to accomplish our goal means a lot throughout the running community; this tells us how supportive we can be without knowing each other," says 58-year-old Rosaura.  The Run The World Challenge starts July 4th and the goal is to reach 24,901 miles in 30 days.  Rosaura is looking at logging an average of 37 miles weekly. (Thu 28) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Olympic Triathon gold medalist, Gwen Jorgensen is set to race the AJC Peachtree Road Race

2016 Olympic triathlon gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen will chase a national title at the AJC Peachtree Road Race on July 4 in Atlanta, which for the second consecutive year will serve as the USATF 10 km Championship for men and women. Jorgensen, the reigning Olympic triathlon champion as well as the 2014 and 2015 World Champion has retired from triathlon to pursue professional running. “I am thrilled to be racing in the AJC Peachtree Road Race,” said Jorgensen. “I am really excited to race the 10K on a hot and hilly course.”  The 49th AJC Peachtree Road Race is one of the nation's most recognizable Independence Day traditions. Jorgensen, whose 10K road personal best is 32:12, will face defending AJC Peachtree Road Race champion Aliphine Tuliamuk (Flagstaff, AZ), who has won U.S. titles this year in the 25K and the half marathon. They will compete against previously announced athletes such as Sarah Pagano (Boston, MA), last year’s runner up; Stephanie Bruce (Flagstaff, AZ), who placed third in the 10,000m in Des Moines and Sara Hall (Flagstaff, AZ) whose 2:26:20 at the 2018 Ottawa Marathon made her the 10th fastest American woman of all time in the marathon. (Thu 28) ⚡AMP
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A cancer survivor is running 380 miles, from the Boston Harbor to Lake Ontario

Cancer survivor is running 380 miles, from the Boston Harbor to Lake Ontario and Wednesday was day six of 12. When she reached the steps of the state capitol in Albany Wednesday afternoon, she officially hit her halfway mark. Davina McNaney has been running long distance for years. In 2012 she ran her first ever ultra-marathon, 40 miles to celebrate her 40th birthday. One month later she had her first ever mammogram and that came with a cancer diagnosis. "It was very, very frustrating and this is what I can do to overcome all of that,” Davina said. Without a second thought, she had a double mastectomy and within four months she was officially cancer free. Since then she's been determined to take action and fight against breast cancer. "Running is my strength and so I want to use it to highlight the research that the foundation funds is really key. So if I can come out here and sacrifice myself and encourage people to donate, I'm helping people and that's how I can give back,” Davina said. "One morning, I woke up and I said I want to run home." So she did exactly that, traveling 480 miles across four states from Michigan to her hometown of Sodus Point, New York. After their move to Medway, Massachusetts, she was up for another challenge. This journey is 380 miles, but much steeper with some 18,000 feet of elevation. (Thu 28) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Bertrand Newson aka Coach B gets immense pleasure encouraging others to get active

RUN THE WORLD:  Bertrand Newson (Coach B) has always enjoyed sports and outdoor activities.  "After turning 40," he says, "I found myself looking to expand my fitness interest. There were several close friends that enjoyed running, but I had always been reluctant to join them due to lack of confidence in my running ability.  It wasn’t until the beginning of 2011 that I decided to give running a try. I recall attempting to run a mile without stopping before my birthday in March and I was very disappointed with my effort." Bretrand says.  It was clear to him in order to become a better runner he would need to commit to a regular training schedule.  "March of 2011 was my first "timed" running event as a member of a four person marathon relay team.  From that point on running became a passion for me."  It was later that year the idea to start a team came to mind.  Team Too Legit To Quit (2L2Q) was founded with fellow original members: Jim Cordoba, Chis Smith, Bernardo Newson, Demetrius Coats and Jabari Sims.  "Our team has grown immensely over the last six years as we have over 700 members," he says.  Becky Hernandez joined 2LTQ in 2011.  "Becky played a vital role in the overall growth, leadership and being a true visionary inspiring so many along the way," Bertrand says.  Asked why he joined the Run The World team.  "I love the spirit behind the “Run the World Challenge” as the running community is incredible supportive.  The teamwork aspect of this challenge is very compelling and I cannot wait to share the journey with my fellow RTWC teammates."  Bertrand loves the Bay Area and works in San Francisco as a General Manager of two hotels in the Union Square area.  Promoting his passion is what is very important to him.  "I will continue to encourage others to embrace a healthier active lifestyle and having a social impact on the local community for those less fortunate.  I’ve experienced many satisfying moments and accomplishments involving sports, however, there’s nothing like completing a race/event when family and friends are participating. One of my biggest sources of inspiration and motivation is my younger brother Bernardo who underwent a successful kidney transplant in 2007. We’ve shared some of our proudest moments as siblings participating side by side in fitness events and crossing finish lines in 5K’s, 10K’s, half marathons and challenging obstacle courses.  "I get an immense amount of joy and satisfaction by organizing group fitness events and encouraging people to get active and see them appreciate the health benefits by doing so (weight loss, reduced stress, improved level of confidence and more energy)." (Wed 27) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Good hard training is more important than diet says Ultra legend Frank Bozanich

RUN THE WORLD: "I discovered running as a very young child as play and way to get places. I ran track in HS and College," says 74-year-old Frank Bozanich who currently lives in Reno, Nevada.  His last overall ultra marathon win was when he was 69.  In 1976 he won the AAU National 50 Mile Championship clocking 5 hours 36 minutes.  In all he won three National 50 mile titles, two at 100k.  In 1979 he set the American 100K record clocking six hours 51 minutes.  I asked him about injuries.  "I have been injury free all these years other than a couple hamstring situations when I was sprinting.," Frank says.  "I attribute this to having a strong physical body.  When I was a young lad I was working on crab fishing and salmon fishing boats.  I helped my dad pull in crab pots (traps) by hand. I continue with physical work in wrestling and has a Marine. I have always maintained a strong overall body."  I knew we had found another good Run The World team member.  "I love the idea of the Run The World Challenge. It is fantastic way to join the world together in a different way. It is something we can all do..." Frank enjoys running as much as he did when he was young.  "I understand that age takes a toll on speed and endurance. but I still love running.  I have enjoyed working with and helping new runners and think we should impart what knowledge we have to help others improve and enjoy the sport so they can have a better quality of life in their elder years." How about diet?  "I love eating good fresh Dungeness Crab when I can get it and also fresh wild caught salmon (no farm raised). I also eat whatever I want, no special diet. I eat good and well balanced foods, my wife of 51 years is a great cook."  What is your secret for success?  "The good hard training is more important than the diet," he says.           (Wed 27) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Boston Marathon Champ Des Linden will Run 2018 TCS New York City Marathon

The New York Road Runners announced 2018 Boston Marathon champion and two-time U.S. Olympian Des Linden will run the 2018 New York City Marathon on Sunday, Nov. 4. In April, Linden, 34, became the first American woman in 33 years to win the Boston Marathon despite battling rainy and cold conditions. Last year's New York City Marathon was won by Shalane Flanagan, who became the first female American champion in the race in 40 years. Flanagan, 36, contemplated retirement after her win but decided to run the 2018 Boston Marathon, where she finished sixth. Flanagan has yet to commit to a fall marathon. Linden is looking to become the first woman to win the Boston Marathon and New York City Marathon in the same year since Norway's Ingrid Kristainsen in 1989. (Wed 27) ⚡AMP
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Volunteer of the Year Joe Wilczynski has also run all 40 Boilermaker 15k's

This year’s Boilermaker Volunteer of the Year is Joe Wilczynski, who has been the coach of WKTV’s Go The Distance for all 22 years of the training program. “He’s very deserving of this and we were honored to give it to him,” said Boilermaker Race Director Jim Stasaitis. Joe has run every single Boilermaker 15K since the race’s inception, making him one of the ten Perennials who have run all 40 Boilermakers, for a total of 372 official Boilermaker miles logged. “If you added up all the mileage with the running he does, with the Go the Distance group starting out with the 10-week, 12-week course, he's probably run it more than a hundred times,” Stasaitis said. Joe is the heart of the Go The Distance program, inspiring a new generation of runners each year. Many of them go on to join the Mohawk Valley Hill Striders running club, which was created by Joe and other former Go The Distance runners. Joe serves as president of the club. “He gives the proper instructions to all these beginners, and actually, there are some veteran runners who could probably learn from him," Stasaitis said. “Joe was there every step of the way with me,” said Rose Butler, a Go The Distance volunteer who was a member of the 2006 GTD class. “He helped me complete the Boilermaker. I couldn't have done it without him.” More than 200 people have crossed the Boilermaker finish line thanks to Joe’s guidance. But he would never take the credit, because that’s the kind of guy he is. “He is a huge supporter of the running community, huge supporter of all the runners. All the people with Go The Distance and the Mohawk Valley Hill Striders,” Stasaitis said. (Wed 27) ⚡AMP
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93-year-old Betty Lindberg is running her 28th Peachtree 10K and she just keeps on going

Betty Lindberg likens herself to the Energizer Bunny because she just keeps going and going. Born Sept. 7, 1924, she is the oldest participant set to run in the 49th annual Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race this Fourth of July. Though there is another competitor who also is 93, Lindberg is exactly one week older than the most senior male runner, Lamar Perlis. This year’s race will be her 28th since completing her first at age 64. The Parkers Prairie, Minn., native was not aware of the Peachtree Road Race until her daughter and son-in-law asked her to drive them to the start line in 1987. At the time, she was not overly enthusiastic about getting up at sunrise on the Fourth of July, but once she witnessed the celebrations at the finish line, she decided to give the 10K a try. Lindberg began training by walking around her neighborhood and hasn’t stopped since. She now works with a personal trainer three days a week, completes races of various lengths throughout the year and follows the Atlanta Track Club’s 12-week program to prepare for the race. (Wed 27) ⚡AMP
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Aliphine Tuliamuk will return to defend her title at Peachtree Road Race July 4

The AJC Peachtree Road Race  will again serve as the USATF 10 km Championship, Aliphine Tuliamuk (Flagstaff, AZ) tops a star-studded women’s elite field that will blaze the trail for 60,000 runners and walkers in the world’s largest 10K. Tuliamuk won last year’s race in convincing fashion and has dominated the U.S. road circuit in 2018, winning national titles in the half marathon and 15K. Most recently, she was the top American and finished second place overall in the NYRR New York Mini 10K in New York City. Despite all her success in the past year, she still considers the Peachtree a career-defining moment. “It’s one of the most memorable races I have ever run,” said Tuliamuk. “I would love to smile until my cheeks hurt and hold my flag until my arms can’t support it like last year.” A win for Tuliamuk will not come easy. 2017’s runner-up Sarah Pagano (Boston, MA) will return. Pagano recently unleashed a punishing kick to win the Freihofer’s Run for Women 5K in Albany, NY. Also in the women’s field is Sara Hall (Flagstaff, AZ), who last month recorded the ninth-fastest marathon time ever by an American woman at the Ottawa Marathon (2:26:20). Emma Bates (Boise, ID) who was second American at Bolder Boulder 10K (behind Tuliamuk) last month, London Marathon 10th place finisher Stephanie Bruce (Flagstaff, AZ) and Allie Kieffer (Buffalo, NY) who was the second American in the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon will all be making their debuts on Peachtree. (Wed 27) ⚡AMP
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Running is the perfect sport for couples and here are reasons why!

Common sport activities improve your bond and set you up for a long-lasting relationship, recent studies say. Some activities, however, are not fun to do together or just too difficult to perform. Others seem to be made for two! Here are some reasons why running is a perfect sport for couples. Three magic words that really make us happy are endorphin, serotonin, oxytocin. These hormones keep up your mood and improve the quality of your sleep. One way to release them is running. Running clears your mind and reduces stress. Running together, practically, becomes some sort of a couple therapy where both partners are working on their psychological stability. Just lace up your running shoes and you’re good to start. Go together to a nearest park or explore your neighbourhood by running. Regular running requires devotion and it’s easier to stay focused when you’re not alone. You can take care of each other and do some pep talk when one of you is ready to give up (Come On!). The support of your partner will be a good reason not to quit and impress them by conquering a new distance. The simplest and most obvious reason – staying in shape together or helping each other lose weight. Even low-impact jogging involves many muscle groups and burns calories. Run together to become the fittest couple on the beach and be proud of the great work you’ve done together (Tue 26) ⚡AMP
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Yolander Holder is all smiles but dealing with blisters 10 days into the world's longest race

Yolander is on the 10th day of the world's longest race. "I'll be walking for 18 hours a day, seven days a week, for over seven weeks to reach 3100 Miles as a participant in the 2018 Srichinmoy Race," she posted on her website.  Her goal is to break her record she set in 2017 where she completed the race in 51 days, 17 hours and 13 seconds.  She posts a video daily on her Facebook page.  This morning she filled us in on how she is doing. "The warmup is the hardest part of a race like this because I am walking on open blisters.  It is very painful and I just need to tolerate the pain.  I need to go to a happy place in my head.  My feet will heal. My feet were perfect before this race started.  These blisters came around mile 40.  The less I talk about these blisters, the better."  The race goes around a half mile city block on the sidewalks in Queens, New York.  The runners have 52 days in which to complete the distance, an average of 59.62 miles everyday.  Before the race started she said, "I’m the only American in the 3100 Mile Race (again).  I am the only African American male or female that has ever run or walk this race (again).  I’m the oldest woman (again).  I’m the only walker (again).  I am going to attempt to break my own World Record...No crying this year... Walk Baby Walk."    In 2012, Yolander Holder broke her own world record by completng 120 marathons or beyond in one year.  She has run over 540 marathons or beyond, over twenty of these were 100 milers. (Tue 26) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Shalane Flanagan and Michelob Ultra have teamed up to offer coaching to 95 runners running New York

If you’re already signed up for the TCS New York City Marathon this year, there’s one coach who may be your best bet at snagging a personal best: Shalane Flanagan. The 2017 champion is teaming up with Michelob Ultra to offer 95 runners the chance to train with her this fall. To enter, runners (21+) are invited to tell their story via JoinTeamUltra.com about how their love for beer and running motivates them to the finish line. Open to entries starting today until July 2, Michelob Ultra will “evaluate the stories and select 95 individuals that best embody the ethos of living fit and fun.” Because this is a nationwide contest, members of Team Ultra will be using a dedicated online social hub and training platform to interact with each other and Coach Shalane until race day. Shortly before the marathon, Flanagan and Michelob Ultra will meet the team in-person for a training run and happy hour drinks post-race. Flanagan syas, "I will be helping 95 beer-loving runners as part of Team Ultra and getting them a chance to run The TCS New York City Marathon. I will be helping by giving advice and training motivation and training tips so that they can have the race of their lives and a really memorable experience."  (Tue 26) ⚡AMP
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Boston winner Des Linden is looking for a new coach as she parts ways with the Hansons

Des Linden is looking for a new coach. The 2018 Boston Marathon champion tweeted Saturday, "After doing some soul searching, I’ve made the decision to part ways with the Hansons team. I’m appreciative of Keith and Kevin’s guidance as well as the support of my former teammates. My journey forward is not yet charted, but every step is part of the process."    Most people agree on two things: change is good, and a Boston win brings with it the luxury of choice. Before her Boston win, Linden placed seveth in the marathon at the Rio Olympics in 2016 and second in the U.S. Olympic Marathon trials during her relationship with the Hansons, who are based in Michigan. At the time when Canadian Running posted this, Linden was still listed as a Hansons athlete on the group’s website.    (Tue 26) ⚡AMP
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Moses Kibet and Katsiaryna Shaban Karneyenka were victorious at the Vidovdan Road Race

Moses Kibet and Katsiaryna Shaban Karneyenka were victorious at the Vidovdan Road Race, winning the men’s and women’s titles in 28:34 and 33:40 respectively at the IAAF Bronze Label road race in Brcko on Saturday June 23.  Kibet looked controlled throughout and led a breakaway pack in the early stages. The Kenyan was followed closely by compatriot Ezra Kering, Romania’s Nicolae Soare, Morocco’s Jaouad Chemlal and Derara Hurisa of Ethiopia. Hurisa, who had set PBs for 10km and 5000m in the week leading up to the race, had to withdraw in the second half after feeling pain in his back. It left just three men at the front with the lead changing frequently before Kibet forged ahead at the eighth kilometre. With a strong finish, Kibet crossed the line in 28:34 to win by 35 seconds from Kering. Soare placed third in 29:17.  For a while it looked as though Lilian Jelagat would make it a Kenyan double in Brcko as she led the women’s race up until the seventh kilometre. Karneyenka, however, had other plans and she attacked in the final few kilometres to take the lead. Jelagat stayed in relatively close contact, but the Belarusian eventually won by four seconds in 33:40. Ethiopia’s Gadise Mulu Demissie was third in 33:53. (Mon 25) ⚡AMP
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Solid Advice for runners over 50 who want to run their first marathon

Even if you’ve been fairly fit your whole life, your 50-year-old self will likely run your first marathon slower than you would have at 30. That’s OK. While it’s all highly individualized, aging can change hormones, metabolism, and other aspects of the body’s physiology that seriously hinder its ability to perform and recover, Jay Bawcom says. All that means is you have to adjust expectations. Another thing you can do to help your case: Pick the right race. Bawcom recommends “a fast course with simple logistics,” such as the California International Marathon. The race has a smaller field, making organization easier, and a fast, net downhill course. Then there’s temperature. “Heat also seems to impact runners more as they get older, and this can make training for early fall races a challenge since it means doing big miles during the peak of summer,” Bawcom says. If you live in a place with harsh summer temps, try a winter race like the Houston Marathon or Surf City Marathon, which would allow you to clock your 20-milers in milder weather.  For an older runner, setting aside 18 to 20 weeks to add more recovery time in between your longer runs and harder workouts.  As an older first-time marathoner, it’s important that your training runs focus on quality miles. To survive the marathon training cycle, work from either end of the spectrum—focus on shorter runs significantly faster than marathon pace and longer runs significantly slower than marathon pace. “Trying to do too many long runs at or close to marathon pace or chasing an arbitrary weekly mileage goal can really beat a person up.” Finally, supplemental workouts like yoga, Pilates, and cycling can really help older athletes.  (Editor's Note: Jay Bawcom has 17 years of coaching experience and was a credentialed coach for the 2012 Olympics.  He has coached dozens of senior runners in the Run SMART Project, an online program that pairs you with a running coach.)  (Mon 25) ⚡AMP
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Netsanet Gudeta of Ethiopia and Stephen Kiprop of Kenya took decisive victories at the 9th Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon

Gudeta, the world half marathon champion, dominated from the outset en route to her 1:07:30 triumph. In her first appearance over the distance since breaking the world record for a women's only race with her 1:06:11 run at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships Valencia 2018, Netsanet Gudeta, was on her own soon after the gun sounded, reaching five kilometers in 15:55, 18 seconds clear of her nearest challenger, compatriot Aselefech Mergia. From there she only added to her lead, passing 10 kilometers in 31:57 and 15 kilometers in 47:53, by then 1:43 clear of Mergia. "I feel really great about today’s race," said the 27-year-old Gudeta, whose winning time was the third fastest of her career. "I launched my attack early on to ensure I secured first place and I’m delighted that I managed to keep it up right until the finish line." Conversely, the men's race was one of patience, with eight men still in contention at the 15-kilometer point, reached in 43:21. Kiprop proved the strongest, pulling away late in the race to build a insurmountable lead en route to his 1:00:15 course record."I had my sights set on breaking the event record and I’m delighted that my plan worked out," said Kiprop, who at 19 is beginning to make waves over the distance. He won the Venloop in Venlo, Netherlands, on March 25, clocking 59:44. "The wind wasn’t half as bad as it seemed at the start, though if it hadn’t been there at all, I could easily have run 30 seconds faster. Even so, I really enjoyed the race." (Mon 25) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Two Time Boston Marathon Winner Geoff Smith is excited to be running again

RUN THE WORLD: 64-year-old Geoff Smith was born in Liverpool, England and now lives and works in Mattapoisett, Mass.  He ran a 2:09:08 marathon when he finished second to Rod Dixon at the 1983 New York City Marathon.  He has won the Boston Marathon twice and he has run a 3:55 mle.  I asked him about our challenge.  "The Run The World challenge is a great idea. I think it was designed for me. It provides a goal that is tailored to commitment and for me that feels better than actually training for a race. There is on pressure on how fast or slow I go," Geoff wrote. One of the most exciting marathon finishes happened in New York.  "The 1983 NYC Marathon was my first marathon. It was a new experience. 26.2 miles of racing. I was confident that my training had gone well and I knew what I could do. My plan was to follow the seasoned marathon-runners at the start and learn on the run. At around 10 miles my own running instinct took over and I began chasing the leader, Gidimus Shahanga. I liked to lead and once I took the lead at around 13 miles I just started to run without fear. The noise of the crowd was pushing me forward. And the next 10 miles it was just me running and feeling like there was no one else. Once I entered Central Park, i was alone but I knew I was slowing down." he worte.  He had no idea what was happening behind him.  "I was leading and following the blue line through the park. The noise was incredible and I didn’t know Rod (Dixon) was there. It wasn’t till he passed me at 26 miles. So my battle was not with Rod but with the Marathon and I came up 385 yards short."  How did this all start?  "I played soccer in Liverpool.  I never ran at school but I did run about two miles to school and home again almost every day." After school he became a firefigther working 56 hours a week.  "I got my first taste of running working as a firefigher.  I joined the fire brigade running team and ran races around the country against other fire departments. I was pretty good amd it became a full time passion. I just wanted to see how far and fast I could go.  Winning races motivated me to train harder."  Tell us about Boston.  "Boston 1984 was my redemption race. It was also my Olympic trial. I had to win with a fast time to make the team.  As is always the case the Boston weather is unpredictable. It was a cold wet day with a head wind. I pushed the pace from the gun and won going away in 2:10:34. My time and victory proved enough for my British Olympic Selection."  How did this win change your life?  "A difficult question as running has changed drastically over the years. I was the last of the Amateurs. There was no prize money. The victory was more about pride, love, recognition and glory. The win did mean I got recognized at every race I attended and it gave me a celebrity status that I never had. It didn’t change the way I trained and ran. If anything it made me train harder." How about your running now?  "Running today is a gift. My last competitive race was Boston 1991 not long after the race I fell and hurt my hip. The injury resulted in me having both hips replaced. Today after 20 years of no running I find myself drawn back to the sport I love. There is no better feeling than the sun on your face and the wind at your back. Starting from zero I have got to experience the joy of running again. It’s not about winning anymore it’s all about the love and the feelings of joy I experience on every run."  Geoff (photo) in his Liverpool yellow jersey crossing the finish line of the Narragansett Bay Half Marathon/5K. (Sun 24) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Willie Korir says of this challenge, It builds a strong bond and love for running around the Global

RUN THE WORLD:  Willie Korir's father and mother lives in Eldoret, Kenya.  He is the seventh born in a family of nine, five boys and four girls.  All of his family lives in Eldoret.  Willie lives near Nairobi. Willie joined the first Global Run Challenge on Global Running Day and posted the most miles, 22.5 miles and he plans on averaging 131 miles weekly for this challenge.  That is almost 22 miles daily since he takes off one day each week.  I asked him...  "I got into running through my friend William Waweru and my cousin Reuben Maiyo who used to always encourage me to run coz they saw a lot of potential in me," he said.  We had met in 2013 when we travelled to Kenya to stage a Double Racing event.  More recently we connected on Facebook.  I asked him how important running is to him. "Running makes me fit physical and healthier. I love running a lot coz its something flowing in me," he wrote.  How about life in Kenya?  "My life in Kenya is blessed with good weather and nice terrain for training. Life here is so hard for upcoming athletes like me coz you need to look for money to buy food, pay rent, buy training gear and look for races to run locally. Athletic career is so competitive coz every person is in good shape because of hard training.  Sometimes i go training without a meal but coz of love for sport I crush 18+ km, 30km long run or speedwork then drink water, sleep a little and wait for next session with determination of being the best athlete," he wrote.   Any secrets? He is a good runner with goals of running a sub 61 minute half marthon and sub 2:10 marthon.  "My secret is running smart.  This involves planning well my workout and later reflect my weekly training so as to know where to improve and maintain. Lastly, I always think and dream about running." he says.  And being part of Run The world?  "The Run The World Global Run Challenge is a nice platform that bring athletes together and share a goal of self management in sports.  It builds a strong bond and love for running around the globe hence making the whole world a running planet."  Willie has big goals and we are glad to have him on our team.   (Sun 24) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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More and more runners are joining the 50 States Marathon Club, that's finishing an official marathon in 50 states

The 50 states Marathon club has 4,454 members.  Not all have completed the task of completing a marathon in every state in the US but they are working on it.  You have to have finished a marathon in at least ten states to join.  You don’t have to join their club but they offer a lot of good informaton, inspiration and advice.  It is a good challenge.  When Kari Hamilton crossed the finish line at last Saturday’s Nevada Marathon, the 44-year-old Bradenton, Florida social worker achieved a distinction that far surpassed finishing 28th in a starting field of 68 runners. She has now run a marathon in each of America’s 50 states. “It hasn’t hit me yet,” Kari said after returning home. “When I was finished I hugged my husband, Michael, and there were tears of joy. But it’s still so surreal.” Her first was the 2004 Chicago Marathon and, encouraged by parents Mark and Claudia Quehl, she figured she’d run one every year. “Then I joined the Bradenton Runners Club, met some folks who were running one in every state and thought, well, maybe I’ll go along for the ride,” Kari said. What a ride it’s been, too. She has run 84 marathons and ultra-marathons — 23 in Florida and as many as 15 in one year. “I’m not an athlete, but I like a challenge and each race is different,” said the Green Bay, Wisconsin, native. Her toughest race? The Leadville Trail Marathon in the Colorado Rockies. “It started at 10,000 feet elevation and went up to 13,000 feet,” Kari said. “I’m not used to those altitudes and it took me eight hours to finish.” (Sun 24) ⚡AMP
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Jim Walmsley breaks the Western States 100 record by over 15 minutes on a baking hot day

We posted on Tuesday that even with the forecasted hot weather, Jim Walmsley was going to break the course record set in 2012 by Timothy Olsen who clocked 14:46:44.  For two years now, Walmsley’s public declaration that he will not only try and break the famous 100-mile course record but trim more than 45 minutes off it has bought him massive attention.  Fast forward to this year's race.  Jim hit the 85.2 mile mark in 12 hours 16 minutes.  Could he hold on for 15 more miles? The temperature in Auburn, California where the race finishes at 6pm was 96 degrees.  That was still a lot of miles in that kind of heat.  At Pointed Rocks (94.3 miles) he was still trying to hold it together.  He ran 10:50 pace for that 3.7 mile split.  It was hot.  Meanwhile Courtney Dauwalter continued to lead the women hitting 79.8 miles in 13 hours 48 minutes. Course records were still possible.  Jim passed the 96.8 mile check point at No Hands Bridge and ran right on through without stopping.  He was 14 minutes ahead of the course record still.  Courtney was 33 minutes ahead of course record at mile 80 with Lucy Bartholomew in second place some miles back. Frenchman Francois Dhaene was in second place at 90.7 miles about an hour behind the leader.  Reliable reports told I Run Far that Jim was delayed for about ten minutes by a bear with cubs along the trail at around 95 miles.  He passed the Robie Point check point (98.9 miles) running 8:11 pace now knowing he was going to finally win the Western States 100 and maybe still set the course record. He kept it together and went on to win clocking 14:30:04 on a baking hot day, taking over 15 minutes off the course record.   (Sat 23) ⚡AMP
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The Pre Classic will never be the same as they rip down the stadium in Eugene Oregon

This is not right. We can thank Phil Knight for putting up millions of dollars to make this happen.  Peter Thompson posted this photo on Facebook about an hour ago.  He said," Is this the required careful deconstruction of an historic structure, carefully cataloguing everything as you go and ensuring that timbers and metalwork can be re-purposed elsewhere?" Or, is it, "The wilful destruction of an iconic building?" Lots of history had been torn away. Phil Knight made millions by using Pre in NIKE advertising.  In his memory he could have built "his" new Track someplace else, as Joe Henderson pointed out months ago, in Eugene and left this stadium standing or at least the track and the east grandstands.  I know that Phil Knight has donated millions to the University and probably to the city and how could anyone stand in his way. I also know that Phil Knight and NIKE have done a lot of positive things for running but this is not one of them.  Peter continued, "Bill Bowerman's favorite seat in the upper row of the East Grandstand has been ripped out, undocumented as it was piled with all the other bleachers - and this is the true respect that Phil Knight has granted to Bill Bowerman."  I know the new track is going to look amazing but it will no longer be Pre's track.  The Pre Classic will never be the same.  This was a mistake that we let happen.  Hayward Field will never be the same.             (Sat 23) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Sara Hall is set to defend her title at the Asics Half Marathon on the Gold Coast July 1

Defending champion Sara Hall and 2:25 marathon runner Laura Thweatt will lead a two-pronged United States attack in the ASICS Half Marathon on the Gold Coast of Australia next Sunday 1 July.  Hall, who won the race last year in 1:10:30, is the top seed and will arrive on the Gold Coast in cracking form following a marathon personal best (PB) of 2:26:20 in Ottawa, Canada last month.  The 35-year-old, who also placed second in the race in 2015, will be striving to better her half marathon PB of 1:09:37 as well as claim the winner’s spoils of AUD $6,000 plus time bonuses. Her compatriot Thweatt, coached by Australian distance running legend Lee Troop (a previous winner of the ASICS Half Marathon), is also in good form having run a 10K PB of 32:20 in Ottawa.  Thweatt is a highly accomplished marathon runner having run 2:28:23 on debut in the New York City Marathon in 2015 and clocking a PB of 2:25:38 in last year’s London Marathon.  With the likely strong competition at the front of the field in good Gold Coast conditions, the 29-year-old may leave next Sunday with a new PB under 1:11:02.  The US duo won’t have it their own way with a Japanese runner out to add to her country’s 22 winners (6 men, 16 women) in the history of the ASICS Half Marathon.  Hanae Tanaka has the fastest half marathon PB in the race (1:09:18 set in 2013) as well as solid form this year highlighted by a sixth placing in the Nagoya Women’s Marathon in March in 2:27:40.  (Sat 23) ⚡AMP
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The maximalist running shoe company Hoka Tackles the Track with an innovative new design.

The last place you’d expect to see the bold logo of Hoka One One, a brand known for its max-cushioned midsoles, is on a pair of track spikes.  But the company put in two years of research and development to create a distance spike called the Hoka Speed EVO R that debuted at the U.S. Trials last July and went on sale for the rest of us this month. The Hoka Speed EVO R spike is different from other spikes on the market. To start, the left shoe doesn’t match the right. Both soles are tuned to provide the strongest support when you’re turning left—which, on the track, you do about 60 percent of the time. The spike location is different for each foot, and the semirigid torsion plate, covered with sharp teeth, angles from the left side of the arch to the right side of the heel on both shoes, providing stability as you torque your way around the track. The Speed EVO R also provides more cushioning than you’re used to seeing in a spike, but not quite as much as it would seem from just looking at the shoe. Your foot doesn’t sit on top of the full midsole height: some of that thickness is a sculpted sidewall that provides what Diard calls a “bucket seat,” centering the foot and creating arch support. The midsole foam is typical Hoka light but more responsive than the stuff found in the company’s training shoes. “We put twice as much cushioning as in most spikes,” Diard says.  As with the Hokas, it’s unclear whether these shoes will find a solid audience. Runners who have tested them report they don’t have the pop one expects from a track spike, but they are significantly more comfortable and seem applicable for cross-country and the longest track events. If you’re interested in testing the shoes for yourself, the Hoka Speed EVO R sells for $130. (Sat 23) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Swetha Amit says that when the endorphins kicked in after her first half she was hooked

RUN THE WORLD: 36-year-old Swetha Amit started running December of 2010 in her hometown of Mumbai, India.  She was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and as a result lost a lot of blood, strength and self confidence.  "Since I couldn’t lift weights in the gym as I used too, I took up running to build back my strength and restore my sense of worth," she says.  Six months later she ran her first half marathon in Mumbai.  "The sheer feeling of crossing the finish line and with the endorphins kicking in got me hooked. Running has been a part of my life ever since and will continue to be as long as I am alive." So far she has run one full marathon, 26 half marathons, three Double Races, two 15k's and several 10K's.  She has had eight podium finishes.  "I have gained a wonderful community called the Mumbai Road Runners which is the largest running group in India.   I have met a lot of inspiring people and learnt a lot from them. I have also run some incredible events in California in the last year which has changed my perception about running."  She came to California about a year ago with her husband and daughter.  "We met up a year ago on the Stanford campus," says Bob Anderson.  Her husband would be studyng at Stanford over the next year. Swetha would enroll in some creative writing classes.  "A Facebook friend Ram, founder of Mumbai Road Runner. told me she was coming. I was impressed by her right from the start. Obviously running was a major part of her life along with her family.  We connected right away as us runners do," says Bob.  Swetha says of her stay,  "We landed here in Stanford, California in June 2017. Coming away from my comfort zone and home in India was initially intimidating. However, I decided to embrace the opportunities."   And she did.  She has run 27 races and is doing a couple more before leaving in August.  "My stay in the Bay area has been a memorable experience."  Asked about our Run The World Challenge, "I think it’s a fantastic idea. I have always marveled at the fact that running somehow manages to connect people from across the globe. We run in different parts of the world yet there is this common thread that ultimately brings us together.  We inspire, get inspired from people of varied backgrounds, age groups and their ability to battle against the odds. I feel elated to be a part of this phenomenal challenge."  (Fri 22) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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Future Missoula Marathons will be held in June because of the threat of summer wildfires

This year's Missoula Marathon is still on for July 15. However race dates starting 2019 are going to be move prompted by the threat posed by summer wildfires.  A June marathon date allows for better air quality for participants. Race Director Tony Banovich said in a press release, "We're concerned about the trend we've seen with earlier and earlier starts to the fire season in the northwest United States.  As we've seen over the last several years, the air quality can degrade to the point of causing outdoor events to be cancelled," says Tony Banovich.   The 2019 Missoula Marathon will be held June 0, 2019; and the 2020 marathon is scheduled for June 28, 2020. The marathon is held in conjunction with a half marathon, a 5K, and a Kids Marathon.  (Fri 22) ⚡AMP
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Women's Half Marathon World Record Holder is Racing June 23

Three months after her world record run at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships Valencia 2018, Ethiopian Netsanet Gudeta Kebede will be making her eagerly anticipated follow-up over the distance at the Mattoni Olomouc Half Marathon, an IAAF Gold Label road race, on Saturday June 23. Gudeta stormed to a 1:06:11 women’s-only race half marathon world record in the Spanish city on March 24, winning by 43 seconds. She's competed only once since, a fourth place finish at the TCS World 10km in Bengaluru, India, on May 27, where she clocked 31:53. She is going to have strong competition. Among the opposition assembled in this eastern Czech city of 100,000 is compatriot Aselefech Mergia, the world silver medallist over the distance in 2007 and world gold medallist in the marathon in 2009. She has a 1:07:21 best from 2011, and clocked 1:08:46 last year. Her best race this season came in New York in April where she finished second in the Healthy Kidney 10km in 32:06. Kenya comes armed with Antonina Kwambai, perhaps her fiercest challenger this weekend, who notched an impressive victory at the Paris Half Marathon on  March 4 in 1:08:07. That was the 26-year-old's second consecutive personal best this year, following her 1:09:07 run in Naples in February where she was second. The men's race features four men with personal bests under one hour.  The fastest is Jemal Yimer, the 21-year-old Ethiopian who clocked his 59:00 lifetime best at this year's Ras Al Khaimah Half in February where he finished second. His performance remains the third fastest of 2018. (Fri 22) ⚡AMP
by IAAF
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A London Man is facing jail for only running 1000 feet of the London Marathon and taking a finishers medal

A London marathon impostor who picked up a lost race number to see “a dream come true” has been jailed for 16 weeks. The homeless 38-year-old Stanislaw Skupian crossed the finish line with legitimate runner Jake Halliday’s number after spotting it 300 meters from the end of the London Marathon.  He picked it up, ran the remaining 1,000 feet of the course and strode across the line, victorious. Now, a month after being pictured kissing his finisher's medal Skupian is being jailed for fraud.  Halliday, who was running for the charity Bloodwise, dropped his number after stopping short of the finish line to take off his T-shirt during the hottest London Marathon on record. Friends later told him someone had been pictured celebrating with his number, with Halliday saying he was “shocked”, the court heard. The London marathon chief executive, Nick Bitel, said the episode could be seen to damage the reputation and integrity of the race, regarded as one of the best organized in the world, the court heard. The homeless father of one had been training for a race ahead of the London Marathon his lawyer said.  He wanted to watch the race and in his excitement picked up the number and crossed the line.  The reaction in England has not been good.  Many are criticizing the organizers for what they see as a lack of compassion for Skupian's circumstances.  But he only ran 1000 feet of a 26.2 mile race! Once the press published the photo and showed the world what had happen, how could this event be overlooked?  Medals are only met for finishers, period. (Fri 22) ⚡AMP
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Global Run Challenge Profile: Boston Marathon Director Dave McGillivray has run over 150,000 Miles

RUN THE WORLD: "You can count on 35 miles a week from me," wrote Dave McGillivray, director of the Boston Marathon since 1988. Dave is much more than a first class race director.  He was and still is an accomplished runner.  He has done some amazing things with more to come.  On his birthdate he runs his age in miles.  (Photo: finishing 60 miles on his 60th birthdate.)  In 1978 he ran across America, a distance of 3,452 miles in 80 days.  That is a daily average of 43 miles or 302 miles weekly.  Most recently in 2018 he ran seven marathons in seven days on seven continents at age 63.  He has run the Boston Marathon 46 times and he does this after completing his duties directing the marathon. In May 2004, McGillivray ran across the country again, this time with nine other veteran marathoners, in relay style, from San Francisco to Boston as part of TREK USA, an event which he founded and raised over $300,000 for five children’s charities.  In his lifetime so far he has run more than 150,000 miles.  "Dave and I first met back in the 70's during one of his cross country adventures,” says Bob Anderson.  "Dave stopped by our Runner's World offices and we had time to meet and chat before he headed back out to run more miles."  There is one thing he would like to figure out.  He needs more hours in a day.   "There just is not enough time in a day.  I wish there would be a way to add a couple more hours each day," Dave told me.  “If we could take a pill to add another couple of hours daily I know I would do that too.  I am very excited to have Dave on our team and I know we can count on his miles," says Bob.   (Thu 21) ⚡AMP
by Bob Anderson
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